37 Burst results for "Katrina"

Fresh update on "katrina" discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

01:40 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "katrina" discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"We talked to vanessa kosta from wasi clothing about starting a business during the pandemic using tiktok by the way. Thank you so much to everyone. Who wrote us those tiktok tips. All vanessa. no credit over here. So while vanessa's businesses thriving during the pandemic after getting furloughed. Many of us had to learn how to survive. I feel like everybody's been asking each other. Are you dealing with it strategies. Tell me what strategy is we're all just grasping any tip. Is it to rick lots. I wish we wanted to find someone that has gone through the wringer we've found isabel kosar. She's an immigrant. Who started one of the oldest tourism companies in new orleans. She's also a farmer and owns an orchard as we were digging into her story. We were just like whoa. She has gone through. Hurricane katrina nine eleven being a breast cancer survivor. Really shitty divorce spoiler her still lives behind her property by the way and we wanted to know how does someone go through all of this pain and still have the energy optimism and passion to keep moving forward. She has had to make so many changes in order to survive throughout everything. She's just remained resilient and flexible like the cyprus trees that are on our property. You'll be hearing a lot of cyprus tree sounds in the background. This episode is packed with surprises from having a baby during katrina to some connie chung t. n.'s brooks. Let's just get into it..

New Orleans Isabel Kosar ONE Vanessa Kosta Vanessa Hurricane Katrina Nine Wasi Lots Cyprus Eleven Each Katrina
Fresh update on "katrina" discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

01:08 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "katrina" discussed on Bad Science

"And i was like what was going on in the world at this point in time. So this is two thousand. Five's i was working at a grocery store in san francisco in two thousand and five trying to figure out what i was going to do with my life and then i remembered like two thousand five of ban like right on the precipice of when conservation kind of climate change really came into the public domain because hurricane katrina hit right after that and then we had an inconvenient truth from al gore coming out which was launched climate change into household conversations. And so really. And i think it was like maybe that same year. After was the very first episode of the bbc at bro planet earth series which was or groundbreaking at that time. And so i that so much has happened since the first one came out that has now made i think conservation invite diversity and the crisis that's unfolding for us. Just a part of the conversation. I was interested to to think about. How if keep going with this. You.

San Francisco Five First One First Episode Two Thousand BBC Bro Planet Earth Katrina
Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

WazaMedia Podcast

02:16 min | Last week

Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

"Welcome back to another episode of the wasn media podcast. My name is jr. I am the ceo of this awesome company. And i'm here today. excited to talk with jean laborde. Gina thank you for being on the show today. Jr thank you and we have a former guest of the show. Daisy daisy shoe To thank for connecting us together. So thank you dr xu thank you daisy For bringing us together. Thank you days so gina for our audience. That doesn't know you We want to with all of our guests. We like to ask our audience To tell a little bit of the story. Because i was immediately we believe in the power of storytelling. Everyone has a great story to tell. And i'm sure you have a great story to tell and also about your organization which will get back We'll get to a little bit later. But i can. We hear a little bit about your story. Sure i'm jean laborde. And i'm originally from louisiana where i happened to be right now and i have a background in design. Did some teaching of design and also worked for lsu medical school where did all the graphics for the whole university in Done some different marketing. Things did a. I worked for a marketing company. That promoted coca cola music festivals things like that grassroots marketing And then lsu moved to the department of biochemistry and former where. I helped develop in photoshop for scientists empowered winter side powerpoint scientists class. Then we had a little hurricane katrina than i was the director in baton rouge Exile baton rouge for low law for two publications two to five magazine which is a lifestyle magazine in the batteries business report so i was in new orleans. I did some work for spotify doing being campus ambassador and influence and also for a restaurant group. That susan spikes earned. We did some social media for food. And she's actually been character. Those based on the hbo series tra may she's the main shaft was based on

Jean Laborde Daisy Daisy Dr Xu Lsu Medical School Gina Baton Rouge Louisiana Department Of Biochemistry Coca LSU Hurricane Katrina Lifestyle Magazine Susan Spikes New Orleans HBO
Wet Notes - 3-28-21

Scuba Shack Radio

06:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Wet Notes - 3-28-21

"This is wet notes here on scuba shock radio for sunday march twenty eighth two thousand and twenty one first up today. I want to give you an update from reef or the reef environmental educational foundation. They have released their two thousand and twenty two field survey trips and it's pretty neat. They have eleven trips. Planned in two thousand and twenty two starting with saint vincent in february and that is being led by amy lee. For those of you who listen to the show. I had amy on the show last july. They also have a cuba trip in march followed by raja arm pot in april. May june will feature saint lucia and roett tan. july is. the red sea and hawaii is in august. The september two thousand and twenty two baht trip is already sold out grand. Cayman is october bon. Air's in november and the year closes out in december. In 'cause you might wanna take a look at the reef website for all the details availability and pricing. These trips. look pretty awesome last week ned. who's a dive master at. The shop passed on a new york times article about looking for climate solutions and this article was written by catrine einhorn. Essentially she reported that ocean bottom trawling for shrimp whiting. Cod and other fish emits as much carbon dioxide into the air as the entire globalization industry. Now this was based on a study published in the journal. Nature and it was pretty enlightening. About how trawling releases. Immense amounts of carbon from the ocean floor and that leads to more acidification of the water and that reduces the oceans capacity to absorb atmospheric carbon dioxide. You can check out the entire article on the new york times website look for climate solutions by katrina einhorn. There's another piece of good news. Out of molly s this month. The honolulu star advertiser reported that a trained response team was able to free young. Humpback whale from gear entangling. It's left pictorial flipper. They were able to free about fifty to one hundred feet of line from the flipper but not we're able to get the Entangled line out of its mouth. They are hoping that that will ultimately free itself. They haven't seen the whale since it was freed. Apparently it wasn't in great shape but at least now it has a chance. They recovered gears being analyzed to see if they can determine the origin now. The efforts were led by the hawaiian humpback whale national marine sanctuary in partnership with cardinal point captains k key koala project and ultimate whale-watch. Now i've had the opportunity to go out with ultimate whale-watch from lana. A couple of times was very happy to hear of their support. We carry a lot of aqualung equipment in our shop and like most businesses twenty twenty taught many of us a lot of lessons. Well i recently sent out a message that they are introducing. A new aqualung is a bit of a rebranding. They're using a new tagline beyond the expected in the message. They said the twenty twenty taught them to expect the unexpected time to seek out the unexpected. If you check out the aqua lung website they further state that they are for the ocean exploration for ocean understanding and for ocean conservation. The aqua lung site also has a really inspiring short two minute video to get you inspired. Stay tuned for more from akwa. Long as they go beyond the expected earlier in the week. I got an email from nicole. Russell dima vice president of operations and i e mail had a lot of different information but one of the items that stood out said las vegas is open for business that means they are in fact planning to hold the demon. Show two thousand twenty one in las vegas in person and not some very exciting news. There was a learn more link in the email that took you to the dive equipment and marketing association's website where they gave you a list of all the trade shows conventions and meetings scheduled in las vegas of over five thousand or more attendees in the next twelve months. Now that was an interesting list. F why the marijuana business daily or m j biz con two thousand twenty. One is expected to draw thirty thousand people. And it's just one month before dima for all you dive pros out there. Mark your calendar for demon show two thousand twenty one november sixteenth to nineteenth in las vegas. Nevada can't wait to get back to dima and finally earth day two thousand twenty one is less than a month away earth day is actually april twenty second however it looks like this year. They are promoting three days of climate action. It starts on april twentieth. There are three lead organizations working on this educational international or education international the hip hop caucus and earth uprising will will be organizing three separate parallel climate action summits on april twentieth and twenty first ahead of president biden's global leaders climate summit on april twenty. Second what a difference a year makes. What a different political climate additionally earth day dot org will be producing the second earth day live digital event on april twenty second. Check out the website on earth day dot. Org for more information. Well that wraps up wet notes for sunday march twenty eighth two thousand and twenty one here on scuba shack

Reef Environmental Educational Raja Arm Roett Tan Catrine Einhorn Katrina Einhorn The Honolulu Star Advertiser The New York Times Amy Lee Hawaiian Humpback Whale Nation Saint Vincent Saint Lucia The Red Sea Cayman Ocean Exploration For Ocean Un Las Vegas NED Akwa Cuba
Interview With Joy Bonaguro, CDO Of California

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:32 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Joy Bonaguro, CDO Of California

"So we're so excited to have with us today. Joy bond guerrero. Who's the chief data officer of california. Hi joy and thanks so much for joining us. Thank you for having me excited to be here today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role is chief data officer for the state of california. Sure so. I always like to describe myself as a four legged stool also known as the chair ends so my background actually got started in data design and technology so the first three legs of the stool and not was on designing and developing data and information systems in the city in parish of new orleans. Both pre and post katrina and what i learned along the way. There was that the way. We're developing those systems if we grounded them in user needs made the music music center. They could have high impact on in They could reshape public policy choices. And so really i. I sort of came into data world through the data democratization lens and After working in that space. For a long time i found myself serve disappointed by the publicly available tools out there and in the public policy setting world and so became interested in public policy. Eventually after many years. Got my degree in public policy Where i sort of learned about the sort of social economic political and legal frameworks um for use of data and technology. I brought that to the national laboratory system where i worked across the national labs Developing technology information security and privacy policy. And then i took that serve complex bureaucratic experience in brought it to on the city and county of san francisco as the first states first chief data officer and really married my early work in data democratization with What had would emerge to be the open data movement and sort of took not sort of took over the city's on data program overhauled that And then also developed a strategy in executed on it to improve use of data and decision making which eventually led to rolling out a program called data science sf which was on data science as a service using advanced statistical modeling in machine learning to answer questions that departments cared about.

Joy Bond Guerrero California National Labs Developing Techn Katrina New Orleans San Francisco
Republican Lawmakers Across The Country Push For Abortion Restrictions

All Things Considered

01:02 min | Last month

Republican Lawmakers Across The Country Push For Abortion Restrictions

"Up seats in state houses across the country in November, and now they're using those gains to push new abortion restrictions, some of which resemble laws previously blocked by the courts. NPR's Sarah McCammon reports. In the last couple of years, A federal courts have repeatedly struck down early abortion bans in Ohio, Georgia, Alabama and elsewhere. But this year, Republican lawmakers in South Carolina were undeterred. This field protects the life of the unborn with the heartbeat. This is a sensitive issue. This is a controversial issue, but it shouldn't be. But it is. Those voices were South Carolina Republican Senators Katrina Sheeley and Larry Grooms during debate over a bill prohibiting most abortions after cardiac activity can be detected. That's often about six weeks into a pregnancy. Republicans were able to pass the bill after picking up several seats in the November election almost as soon as Republican governor Henry McMaster signed the law. Ah federal judge blocked it. Ah court hearing is scheduled for Monday.

Sarah Mccammon South Carolina Katrina Sheeley NPR Larry Grooms Alabama Georgia Ohio Henry Mcmaster
Republican Lawmakers Across The Country Push For Abortion Restrictions

The World

01:02 min | Last month

Republican Lawmakers Across The Country Push For Abortion Restrictions

"Picked up seats in state houses across the country in November, and now they're using those gains to push new abortion restrictions. Some of which resemble laws previously blocked by the courts. NPR's Sarah McCammon reports. In the last couple of years, federal courts have repeatedly struck down early abortion bans in Ohio, Georgia, Alabama and elsewhere. But this year, Republican lawmakers in South Carolina were undeterred. This bill protects the life of the unborn with the heartbeat. This is a sensitive issue. This is a controversial issue, but it shouldn't be. But it is. Those voices were South Carolina Republican senators Katrina Sheeley and Larry Grooms. During debate over a bill prohibiting most abortions after cardiac activity can be detected. That's often about six weeks into a pregnancy. Republicans were able to pass the bill after picking up several seats in the November election. Almost as soon as Republican governor Henry McMaster signed the law. Ah federal judge blocked it. Ah Court hearing is scheduled for Monday.

Sarah Mccammon South Carolina Katrina Sheeley Larry Grooms NPR Alabama Georgia Ohio Henry Mcmaster Ah Court
Republican Lawmakers Across The Country Push For Abortion Restrictions

All Things Considered

01:02 min | Last month

Republican Lawmakers Across The Country Push For Abortion Restrictions

"Picked up seats in state houses across the country in November, and now they're using those gains to push new abortion restrictions, some of which resemble laws previously blocked by the courts. NPR's Sarah McCammon reports. In the last couple of years, A federal courts have repeatedly struck down early abortion bans in Ohio, Georgia, Alabama and elsewhere. But this year, Republican lawmakers in South Carolina were undeterred. This bill protects the life of the unborn with the heartbeat. This is a sensitive issue. This is a controversial issue, but it shouldn't be. But it is Those voices were South Carolina Republican Senators Katrina Sheeley and Larry Grooms during debate over a bill prohibiting most abortions after cardiac activity can be detected. That's often about six weeks into a pregnancy. Republicans were able to pass the bill after picking up several seats in the November election. Almost as soon as Republican governor Henry McMaster signed the law. Ah federal judge blocked it. A court hearing is scheduled for Monday.

Sarah Mccammon South Carolina Katrina Sheeley NPR Larry Grooms Alabama Georgia Ohio Henry Mcmaster
Will Oysters Ever Make a Comeback in the Bay?

Bay Curious

07:56 min | Last month

Will Oysters Ever Make a Comeback in the Bay?

"The ocean that's reporter khloe veldman even with a couple of friends so tough khloe. Sorry tough katrina. What's a tough assignment. I eat always does all the time. But i had actually never tried this type. It's called an olympia oyster or ali for short. Oh i've never heard of that kind. Are they like well. They're much smaller than the oysters. Most of us in the bay area a familiar with they taste kind of coppery and pungent and this special because they are native to the san francisco bay. But the oysters you just heard me and my friend guzzling actually harvested from our bay scientists. Say it's still too polluted from agricultural runoff and other chemicals like mercury instead. These came from a farm in washington state. However for thousands of years the olympia grew locally in vast numbers three generations back would be a safe to say that our family last word gathering oysters from the bayshore east bay alone chef and food activist vincent medina says the only was a dietary staple for many local tribes including his own ancestors in raw they would also be cooked in earth ovens underneath the ground and with of sea lettuces and different types of seaweed acorn sue vicious meals matthew buca is an environmental historian and has written a book all about the bays voice to full past. He says olympia oysters. All along the west coast stretching from alaska all the way down into central mexico all these perfectly adapted to survive the cold waters of san francisco bay but they need rocky surfaces to grow on matthew says by the mid eighteen hundreds thousands of years of slow sea level rise and melting sierra. Glaciers made the bay muddier. And that's bad for all these. They were struggling. Basically then the gold rush hit and brought thousands of golden protein hungry settlers. It didn't take long for them to destroy the local population forcing oystermen to look further afield. All the estuaries of the west coast are essentially mind for there to satisfy this endless demand from san francisco. Matthew says soon even those far-flung habitats had been plundered. There were relatively few all east left on the entire west coast but there was still a demand for them. So entrepreneurs took to importing non native varieties from the east coast. You can capture baby. Easter's barrel them up. Put them on. Board schooners later on board unrefrigerated train cars ship them across the entire united states and then they would be placed into san francisco. Bay on privately owned tied lands and harvested as crop demand for always was so high pirates frequently raided the beds bay area native. Jack london tells us about it in his autobiographical novel. John barley corn the winds of adventure blew the oyster pirates. Loops up and down san francisco bay. Before london became famous writer. he was among other things. An infamous oyster pirate every raid on. An- bed was a felony. The ofa glamorized his experience stealing oysters from the bay by night and selling them in the oakland markets the next morning in several literary works and behind it all behind all of me with you. A bubble whispered romance adventure but even the imported oysters didn't survive in the san francisco. Bay for long the already muddy waters were made worse by mining in the sierra during the gold rushes. This turned up more modern sanders sweat downriver. So the san francisco bay historian matthew book says grow moved their atlantic choices to the south bay when mantras less of a problem but heavy industry and human sewage polluted. The bay waters a rash of deaths connected to eating contaminated puts an end to the san francisco bay oyster industry so by the early twentieth century. There are plenty of oyster bay but the people eating them are no longer so sure if this is the right. Food in the nineteen thirties bombing resumed in the clean waters of drake's in somalia's base north of san francisco but the focus especially after world. War two was on pacific oyster varieties from japan. Interesting cultivating the native olympia oyster as a food source dwindled. It still hasn't really come back. So will we ever be able to eat the native only ounce of the bay again even though no always does a grown in san francisco bay food there are efforts to bring them back to help restore the based delicate ecosystem and ecologists have focused on the native. Only that once thrived here sickle spot. Oh you been question. Scott joseph fletcher at the bay natives. Plant nursery in the bayview to interview linda hunter. She's the founder and director of the wild oyster project. Oysters have so many wonderful benefits. Linda tells us does have superpowers. So one grown oyster can filter fifty gallons of water a day. Oysters helped maintain the balance of marine ecosystem but reducing algae and sediment that can contribute to low oxygen levels causing other marine life to die. There's also the fact that oysters provide have attacked for other critters we as cluster on discarded shells rocks peers and heart submerged surfaces. They fuse together. As they grow forming these rock like reefs that make ideal homes for other marine animals. Implants into says the protect coastal lands by reducing the impacts of storm wife's. It's been proven that voice to rapes attenuate. The effects of rising tides caused by the wild oyster projects is trying to rebuild these reefs. That works starts with collecting discarded oyster shells from local restaurants and piling them. Up part sites like bay natives shows in. Linda says eventually these shells will be built into reefs unplaced in the bay. The idea is for these manmade reefs to attract native voices and as a result other wildlife like ill gross salmon crabs egrets says. They've already installed reefs near alameda. Point pinot the first to reflect the at point panel in richmond. I got a phone call from a fisherman who is complaining that his fishing line had been snagged on one of our reef balls. And i said Have you noticed more fish. And he said yes. I have thank you very much. But before they can be turned into reefs. The oyster shells needs to be clete. And that's where the chickens come in. They natives is home to about two dozen chickens. This is the chicken launch. There's not chickens. you have to clean the shell. Otherwise they get stinky and they attract kinds of critters. Should we feed the ins- off the shelves at cleaned laid out in the sun and several years later gobi ready to use annoy staff. This curing process helps kill any harmful bacteria and houghton's the shells. We have plenty of show. We have over ten thousand times here. Linda tells joseph. The projects has been relying more heavily on individual choice to eaters recently since covid nineteen shelter in place. orders have shut down many local restaurants. We are encouraging people to save their own trucks. Bring by one insights. Now you know what to do just dump them in the lounge

San Francisco Bay Olympia Khloe Veldman West Coast Bayshore East Bay Vincent Medina Matthew Buca San Francisco John Barley Khloe Matthew Book Katrina Acorn Scott Joseph Fletcher Jack London Linda Hunter Wild Oyster Project OFA Alaska
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

06:50 min | Last month

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Appropriate with katrina julia. This is all about helping you. Create a life and business. You hands on with tips tools and technology. It's about the freedom freedom of expression of time of location of an ultimate financial freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to lock it. Walking from fear to fate devaluing to love. Calling and bondage. So it's been a journey as you can see walking dead right there with you on your own green a life and business learn all the themes about wellness about how about lifestyle and travel. You will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So who am i. I'm katrina julia. Lifestyle entrepreneur a creator at a traveling. Welcome back to create with katrina julia show and in this episode. I am sharing all about costa rica adventure with men. Well the national park imagine visiting the most abundant park filled with wildlife at every turn on each path. Just when you think it cannot get even more incredible you discover limitless ocean views and experiences with three taking beaches established in nineteen. Seventy two and welland tonio. National park was established to protect the rainforest animals from commercial development. While manuel antonio national park may be one of the smallest national parks in costa rica with forty nine hundred acres. It's one of the best parks for animal. Wildlife observations enter costa rica. my visit our visits now definitely proved to be filled with wild life and wonder no matter how much time you are planning to spend. Inman will antonio itself if costa rica's on your list should definitely be on. Your top. Manuel antonio national park is a must see and experience for a half to a full day of your visit. This is one. Costa rica adventure. You definitely do not want to miss. And i stand so much behind this you guys. That not only. Did i visit once but twice during my time in and near the manuel antonio area in on the blog which i linked is in the show notes. Are you gonna find at fit life. Chretien dot com slash blog and then search for costa rica venture middle. Antonio national park are look under my travel teams. You'll also see numerous pictures and video on my youtube. That's linked in it's located. The park itself is located in manuel antonio and visiting the national park is absolutely a top. Ten experience in costa rica. Four shore. It's minimal antonio is located about three hours from san jose about three hours from month the along the west coast of costa rica the inner west coast. And so what do i mean by that. Because you have central costa rica. And then you have the eastern side or the caribbean side with puto von leeman. Then you have the portion or the west side of costa rica with hakko manuel antonio further down retha but then on the other side which is closer to liberia. Further west you have by hermosa play though coco which is also the area co streak. I visited back in two thousand sixteen when i hosted our first fit like chretien retreat. So if you didn't know if you haven't tuned into my series yet I spent about a month and right at a month in lawford tuna costa rica. Then right at about three weeks so almost a month in month the very there. I knew i absolutely wanted to spend a minimum of two weeks near the beach as a result of the pandemic and decrease tourism the shuttle. That did run. Daily from monteverdi to tonio did not reach the minimums for the morning. Within the week. I plan on leaving so explored the possibility of taking a bus but with cova de having a suitcase a backpack and a purse and needing to change buses way. I opted not to take the bus due to safety. And he's i reached out to carlos uber driver. I connected with in san. Jose ended up having him drive me at a reasonable rate lower than uber. We drove about three to four hours stopping along the way at last carcass river where we sit high to some bello crocodile friends and you can see the pictures of them on my blog as well. This stop in los last article is literally halfway between month of that will in tokyo as a great way. Stop coming from san jose. Costa rica the crocodile bridge gives you easy and safe use of the friends below. Quepos is the nearest town to mental and Antonio park the you reach. I coming from either san jose or month the very there once you reach does you. Drive through town ended up on a long winding road to reach tonio. Manuel antonio national park is located. Basically in the center of Tokyo one day. I went to explore the manager My airbnb dropped me off at the bus station for about six hundred colonists about a dollar. I took a bus for about twenty minutes to play at the beach for surfing lesson. If you haven't read about that are tuned in on the show. It's on an earlier episode before this this stop. It play is great for both access to the public beach as well as walking distance from the entrance of manuel antonio national park whether you decide to serve for not the walked minimal. Antonio national park is about ten minutes from that stop. Or if you're going straight to the park you can take the stop. It's literally about five minutes walking from the part when you arrive at the park entrance. You must put on your mask currently if you forget your mass..

san jose liberia Tokyo Costa rica monteverdi manuel antonio costa rica Quepos youtube retha tonio lawford katrina julia two weeks antonio first cova de twice Antonio park about six hundred colonists
Could more women-led tech companies make the internet less awful?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:09 min | Last month

Could more women-led tech companies make the internet less awful?

"The dating app. Fumbles wiped right on. Its ipo last week. Making it ceo whitney wolfe heard the youngest female ceo take a public. Not only that. But eight of the company's eleven board members also identify as women and that has more than just symbolic power bumble has styled itself as a women first dating app. The platform encourages them to send the first message. It also moderates the photos that are on profiles and the ones sent through direct messages so users won't get any revealing content. They didn't ask for sarah. Kunst is the managing director of cleo capital and she advised about on its venture capital arm. I asked her if all that translates into more women on the app then men. No you know it's funny. They're more men. Because it turns out that when you empower women and when you give people dignity and equity in the relationships that it helps everybody. It's not just women. And how much of that do you think is because of the type of content moderation. It does not allowing photos of shirtless men are worse. I think that's a huge part of it right when you think. Oh maybe maybe. I'll go meet the love of my life today on a dating app and instead you see something that you really did not want to see. It's disappointing and and it makes you less excited to do it and so bumble hs done a ton of work in making sure that you know people are who they say. They are with things like photo verification to that. They're not doing creepy mean rude things and if they do than than the the companies taking a really firm stance that it's really kind of one strike and you're out with everything from people who want to body shame to people who are sending lewd images that's not okay and certainly the legislation that they've been able to work on and push through in the state of texas to make sending a picture that exposes yourself illegal. It makes so much sense. Those are the kinds of things that are so obvious. In retrospect but but nobody in the dating app world and the online dating world had taken that stand yet. And i think it's pretty clear from the market debut. There's a lot of success in helping people. Just treat each other better given that success. Do you think you'll see more companies kind of taking that same path of moderation. I mean i think this is happening right. I really kinda everywhere right now in our world online when you look at everything from twitter's tussles with the last president to the facebook review board. They're starting to be this understanding that you can't be the wild west right you build roads in the real world but then you put up speed limit. I think we're seeing that happen. A lot. Right now in the digital world and i think companies like bumble. That had the vision that had the real kind of character to stand up and say. This isn't okay. we're not doing it. I think that really really matters. And so that. I think is something that we're going to see more of less of and it certainly hasn't escaped my notice that it seems like women led companies in particular are really leaning that way. Now this good news for bumble comes on the heels of what looks like bad news. For other women lead tech companies with so many facets of life the pandemic seems to have exacerbated inequities including with venture funding the share venture capital dollars for companies founded by women declined last year to point three percent according to crunch base. So what happened. And what do you think needs to happen at change. That i mean the good news is it is a frustrating problem with very simple solution. The solution is now fund more women and fund more more women. Because you either fundamentally believe that somehow men are just so much naturally better at running companies and raising money that they take ninety percent plus of all venture funding. Or you think that there is some inequity and there's a problem to be solved there and you know the reason to solve. It isn't the the social mission. It's because if you are leaving that much money on the table by not funding women. Then you're not gonna make as much money as you should and you know it is your job as a investor as a venture capital investor to make money and so by only looking at a sliver of the population. You know that's a lot of money you're not making and that's not good. So that's the solution. Why is it a problem. I mean the reason for this problem is always the same. The reasons never change. it's always. it's always sexism. It's always biased. It's always you know the concept of hama awfully of sane. Every human is generally drawn to people who remind them of themselves. And when you don't have enough diversity on the investing side of the table. You're very unlikely to see that diversity take place on the founder side you know. Bumble obviously had a really successful. Ipo do you think that will make a difference. You know in all of the stuff that you're talking about you know the success of stumbles ipo. And and being the youngest woman take a company. Public reminds me of this excessive katrina lake in such fix a few years back. And it's it is certainly helping to move that needle right if if you can't be what you can't see shortly after fumbles. Ipo came to marquette allison from from the ceo of our modern help. You know a company. That recently became a a unicorn. You have said openly that that she looks at that is is a real inspiration to think about you. Know how do we. How do we get an even younger woman to show her company next now. They're looking at that. I think that that deeply matter is built on the founder side and on the investor side. Because when you start to see that it becomes a lot easier of the next time a woman walks in your office building a company that you might not one hundred percent understand because it's not fixing a personal pain point for you and say well i mean if there's been all this success in the market and this person seems interesting incredible. Why wouldn't they be next. And so i think it's incredibly incredibly important.

Whitney Wolfe Cleo Capital Kunst Sarah Texas Twitter Facebook Katrina Lake Marquette Allison Bumble
Historical Costuming with Dr. Christine Millar of Sewstine

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:08 min | 2 months ago

Historical Costuming with Dr. Christine Millar of Sewstine

"Climb christine. I go on the internet as so steam. And i am a lot of things really. I am historical costumer who focuses on digital embroidery and extremely detailed trim. But i'm also a physician by trade. So i do work in a hospitals as anesthesiologist through this pandemic and i also do a god. I also have a youtube channel. Where i talk about how to create these things and really. I also focused on instagram. And so i just wanna take a moment and again. Thank you for being here. Because i do not know how you do all these things. You're also a mother of an adorable. I think he's too now toddler so i just want to thank you for taking the time to be here especially with everything you have going on. Oh my god. I can't believe. I forgot to mention the family. Yes mother and game. So i just want to kind of learn a little bit more about you. Do you have an earliest memory of clothing. That might have stuck with you over the years. Did you first realize the transformative power of clothing. I love to ask people this question. Oh my okay. So i was born in korea and i came to the united states when i was three and a half so i have a lot of memories of sitting in korea watching american disney movies like the little mermaid as well as There's an anime cult candy candy. I don't know if you've ever heard of it. But it's basically a yellow haired american girl who wears fluffy roughly dresses all over the place. And i was so obsessed with pink ruffled gowns especially after areas pink dress in little mermaid that my aunt actually got me a nine petty bridesmaid dress for like a little four year old girl and i was so big on me and i remember wearing it for the first time and it was the most happy moment of my childhood and from there on i think i just became obsessed with drawing in trying to capture addresses and the older i got i the more i realized what i really wanted to do was not just draw these dresses but actually had to wear these dresses. Yeah and i'd love to hear a little bit more about that. Because i think everyone probably has their own unique origin story about how they came to historical costuming. How did it all start for you. I believe you kind of started in caused play to if i'm not incorrect. That's exactly it. I initially started in. 'cause play. I noticed i was doing a lot of costuming for some of my favorite power. Females like the tana princess leia. you know Firefly characters and that's where i started end but the real one that i really want to make was katrina from sleepy hollow particularly that black and white striped dress that she works for about fifteen seconds in the end. I initially made it in college end to turn out right but you know i loved it enough that it. I just realized that my favorite movie costumes were all historically based and once. I realized that it was really easy to just kind of focus on that i kind of went. The steam punk route and did a lot of eighties bustle dresses. One of which. I got into the new york times style section when i was in college and that gave me the like the positive energy boost i needed to religious focus all my energies into historical. And that's not to say. I still don't do 'cause play in fact i'm working on a cost play right now for another power female a sister of battle for more than forty k which seems like a completely turnaround but to me. It's just you know more of the same like you know detailed female power stuff and i'm not cost player or historical costumer of but i come from a career as a costume supervisor in a costume designer i started in theater and then i got into film and tv but i have this just incredible appreciation and fascination with these communities both the 'cause play community and historical costuming community. They're not necessarily mutually exclusive as you attest to you. Know they are really quite intermingled. A lot of the times. Even though. I don't participate in these communities. I really really anxious. I just think it's so cool do so for those who may not know. Can you please tell us a little bit more about this worldwide historical costume community and cause play community and maybe just kind of start by defining those things. 'cause i don't think everyone may know the difference. That's a really good point. So i say cost play his costumer like everybody knows but so cost player. Is someone who makes costumes for movies. Tv shows games sort of like established Ip already out there. So you know someone who's a cost player making a princess leia costume versus on historical customer may take a museum piece or a picture from say like an old fashioned panel and try to recreate those so it's different goals so the cost player tends to try to make things as screen accurate as possible or take their own spin on a two degree while the historical customer is all about trying to get things to look historically accurate or correct the historical time period. But these are vague goals. You know everybody has their own specific goals when it comes to costuming which is really one of the most delicious parts of it. Yeah and i think just seeing how many all these people all around the world who have been introduced to through instagram. That's how i became familiar with you and a lot of your peers was just through instagram. And the para social media but admits so many wonderful people and so many people who have incredibly different approaches to as you mentioned these same historical or cause play approaches so just so cool so you yourself have built this incredible online presence for yourself you instagram and youtube as you mentioned at so steen is your handle. And you're really just showing all of these various historical dress projects that you've created at your in home studio which is just incredible. I love you can tell us a little bit about your selection process. What is your inspiration between starting these different projects so omen inspiration from everywhere and think. There's always about fifteen different projects night years going through my head at any point in time so a lot of times. What'll happen is i will learn something about or i will be able to actually procure a certain fabric. So for instance right now. I'm working on the dressed. That marie antoinette whereas in the two thousand and six the couple of film marie-antoinette in the chapel or the church which has the strawberries on it. This particular fabric is woven in italy. It's based off of seventeen eighties. Waistcoat in a museum collection. Somewhere in this particular fabric was actually used in about three different films including the original dangerous liaisons movie and it is so hard to get if you can even buy it. It usually runs about three hundred euros a meter so for me. That is like you know. I might be a doctor but i can't. I can't spend that much right on top of it. It wasn't even like procurable. Until very recently i was able to actually buy it because Not the original. But some other company on oetzi started making a knockoff of it. And i don't know how legal his is but on the other hand. It's based off of original waistcoat. And the you know the trademark on run out like two hundred fifty years ago so the fact is you know this. Other companies started offering. It was very similar. The colors are almost identical slightly. Different here and there but it was so close and the fact that they were able to offer it at a significant discount from the original price meant that it went from being pipedream in the back of my head to something. I could actually do now so a lot of times. It'll be that i finally find. The fabric actually comes available or in the case of the strawberry dress which i turn into which is strawberry regency dress. I always want to make address. But i really didn't like the roses on the original inventory. Not because i dislike roses. Or i think it's ugly. I've just digitized so many roses but then suddenly the strawberry gus went. I like i can just turn those roses and strawberries. And no one's gonna care or mind. So i was able to do that as well. So it's all about what becomes available to.

Tana Princess Leia Korea Instagram Youtube Christine Disney Katrina The New York Times United States Oetzi Marie Antoinette Antoinette Italy
The changing research landscape for academics

Future Tense

01:15 min | 2 months ago

The changing research landscape for academics

"This widespread unease within the global academic community over the dominance of journal articles and conference papers as the premier way the setting a researches status and performance katrina manful in the uk has been busy serving scientists about just that very issue and about their hopes and fears for the future. Dr manville is research leader with rand europe. We conducted the study with academics. From across england it was funded by reset kingdom. Which is the equivalent of the australian research council and they were interested in understanding. How research is going to change over the next ten years. I think the important thing to remember here is the research that will be published in ten years. Time is what's being undertaken. Now the average length of time it takes to produce an academic articles about four years and so to ensure that we are right at the cutting edge of that. This sort of research needs to be that forward looking so what we did was. We conducted a survey with over three thousand academics to get a broad opinion across all disciplines and all different career stages and understand what they think they will be doing in ten years time

Katrina Manful Dr Manville Rand Europe Australian Research Council UK England
In Historic Move, Biden To Pick Native American Rep. Haaland As Interior Secretary

Environment: NPR

03:23 min | 4 months ago

In Historic Move, Biden To Pick Native American Rep. Haaland As Interior Secretary

"President-elect biden sandy. Wanted his administration to reflect america and two of his nominees to lead his environmental agenda. Appear to support that promise. Michael regan would be the first black man to lead the environmental protection agency. If confirmed by the senate and new mexico congresswoman deb holland is biden's pick for the interior department. She would be the first native american to serve as a cabinet secretary. Npr's nathan rod reports hamas nomination is especially symbolic. The department of the interior is a massive agency responsible for about one fifth of all the land in the united states deals with natural resources and wildlife recreation and national parks. But it's also responsible for the relationship between the federal government and the people. Those lands were taken from or a number of scholars who have done really great work to show how the creation of national parks was predicated on the removal of native peoples katrina phillips as a history professor at macalester college in minnesota. And she's a member of the red cliff band of lake superior ojibway and she says it's fair to say that for most of its history. The interior department has been used as a tool to oppress indigenous people in the us which is why she says she still in shock that deb holland a member of the laguna pueblo. In new mexico has been nominated to lead it to harm someone who understands this history and indigenous sovereignty and land rights and treaty rights is. Just i mean. I'm just i'm so happy right now. It's just hard to believe that this nomination cam through a large coalition of native american tribes along with environmental groups progressive leaders pushed for holland to get the post now just because of the symbolism but because of her experience she's a two-term congresswoman who served on a committee with oversight of interior and she comes from new mexico a fossil fuel dependence state that is trying to transition to renewable energies in an interview with npr before her nomination holland made clear. She'd want the country as a whole to try to do the same. Climate changes the challenge of our lifetime and it's imperative that we invested an equitable renewable energy economy. President elect joe biden has said he wants the country to be carbon neutral by the year twenty fifty and his interior secretary holland would have a big role in shaping that future roughly one quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions in the us come from public lands. She also said she'd restore trust with the interior. Seventy thousand some employees prioritize conserving thirty percent of all us land and water and undo some of the damage that the trump administration has done to our environment. Native americans and other minorities are disproportionately affected by climate change and pollution in dallas goal to founder of the indigenous environmental network says it would be invaluable to have someone in charge of interior. Who understands that but he says the fight is not over. We're not stopping here. Like we celebrate this victory but we as a climate justice movement as an indigenous rights movement are going to continue to push the biden administration to to its promises and to do so in an equitable way nathan. Rot npr news.

Deb Holland Department Of The Interior Elect Biden Sandy Michael Regan Nathan Rod New Mexico Katrina Phillips Lake Superior Ojibway Laguna Pueblo United States Holland Macalester College Environmental Protection Agenc Biden NPR Hamas Cabinet Senate President Elect Joe Biden Federal Government
Agency homing in on social media companies' data collection

BTV Simulcast

08:33 min | 4 months ago

Agency homing in on social media companies' data collection

"U. S Federal Trade Commission has issued orders to Amazon, YouTube and Facebook and six other social media companies to hand over information. But how they collect and use information from users, the country's top privacy regular, saying the firms use of consumer data is quote shrouded in secrecy. The sweeping demand comes after the agency sued Facebook for alleged violations of antitrust laws just last week. Discuss We're joined by Mark Mahoney, managing director at RBC Capital Markets. So Mark obviously the pressure from the U. S government on Big Tech in general has been ratcheting up. How much does this latest salvo from the U. S government changed the equation. Just write it just like your expression. Emily. It just cracks. It's up the pressure on these these companies, and it's become a clearly a bipartisan issue. You notice that, in the congressional hearings in the middle of the summer is what I called up opening of a congressional bipartisan can of whup ass on on Big Tak. It's Republicans and Democrats. So yeah, these these companies have planned to become very large, very powerful, and there are legitimate questions. So it's the weather. They become too large, too powerful both in terms of their acquisitions and then their internal practices. Privacy issues are a little bit separate. But you know the scrutiny is a super high and at that leased it very much limited ability of these companies to do any large scale acquisitions. This statement from the FTC today, the decisions that prominent online platforms make regarding consumer and customer data remains shrouded in secrecy. Critical questions about business models, algorithms data collection and use have gone on answered. Policymakers and the public are in the dark about what social media and video streaming services due to capture and sell user's data and attention. It is alarming that we still know so little. About companies that know so much about us. You know, as somebody who has covered these companies for so many years, you know, I'm sure this is probably the height of scrutiny that you have seen on these companies from the U. S government. How big a risk should investors take this into their calculations when they're thinking about whether to invest in these companies that already high Valuations. Well, let's see, I you know, we regulatory issues aren't necessarily new Google is paid. I think about $10 billion now and find space book is a those air European finds Facebook has paid about 5 to 6 billion to us to the FTC for violating a consent decree or acknowledging that may have violated a consent decree so investors were used to find Investors. They're used to this kind of scrutiny. So I don't think it changes the investment thesis on this name. You'd have to really have a required break up or required changing business practices. But Emily, you've tracked decision industry for a long time. A lot of these models. It's kind of a trade off for consumers. You you know, if you want a free service, you have to give up some of your privacy. You have to give information and by the way, in many ways, I think it actually makes the service a lot better. You get targeted ads rather than junk mail on. I think most consumers prefer the targeted ads, how, In fact, they get the information to target the ads. I mean, that's kind of a secret sauce for a lot of these businesses, and they probably not tell regulators or anybody that for competitive reasons, but they may be forced to now because of regulators, and so anyway, that's that's the new issue, but I don't think it changes the investment thesis on this name for good for for investors. What about the risk in particular of Facebook being broken up? Given that the FTC certainly it's not required, but the FCC has suggested that could be a remedy spinning off instagram spinning off. What's up? Well, it could be one of the smoking guns Emily that came out of this congressional hearings this summer and, by the way, was already brought up in a couple of really great books that have been published in the last year or two about Facebook and Instagram quickly. Several fires book is that there's no question that Facebook bought Instagram, in part to take on what they perceived as a potential future competitors. And so the those air those are the things that antitrust laws they're sort of meant to stop or to at least address why there was The dress. The first time the FTC looked at that acquisition is a little bit of a mystery. But anyway that Z it does. It does raise the issue that these will be forced breakup. I think break up of what's happens a little harder to see what the rationale for that would be. It's not clearly in the same industry as Facebook. That was kind of the more about our thought. Colonel acquisition, but the person's gonna be there. I think it's unlikely they'll be required spin offs, but it is possible. Now you just put out a note on uber and you are pretty bullish on how they come out of the pandemic. Why? Tuck. I'm sorry, Emily. Let's see the uber. This remains our topic in the group. We have snow dust this multi year rise in the interest of ride sharing what I found. Most interesting. This from this report in the survey was the finding that consumers are finding new use cases for ride sharing. Dark Custer shot. He talked about this on the last earnings call that New Yorkers you specifically pointing to. We're starting to use ridesharing during the middle of the date or non peak commute times. Our surveys show that people Start to use ride sharing to run errands. If that use case continues, post Cove it and then you have your general use cases rising for social events. First for airport runs. What it means is that the use cases for ridesharing for uber for lift all then they're gonna be greater post cold Whenever postponed. It is. I thought that was an unusually bullish take away, So we continue to like Cooper. It's our topic in large cap. Now interesting. Uber's Obviously one of the companies that has struggled in the midst of the pandemic. Stitch fix is another company that your look looking at that struggled early on as well made big job cuts but seems to be taking off like a rocket ship. What do you seeing in terms of the path ahead there? So that's gonna be a covert recovery. Play on that retail is a category Emily just accelerate like a rocket ship throughout Cove it except for fashion apparel because we didn't want to buy clothes to go out because we weren't going out. But now we starting to think about going out. There's been a lot of pent up dollars. Uh, I think people will be looking to refresh their wardrobes. And in the meantime, I think Stitch fix Katrina like that, that company, I think they've done a lot of product improvements. And to me, that's what innovation product groups really tried that you do these for these companies over time, and I think investors kind of made miss Mr Underappreciated. Some of the changes that they've made the side is more personalized. They figured out new features that kind of game ified to service a little bit on. I think that you come out of covert. You'll see a really nice sharp recovery in both new users and in revenue it stitch fix. This has been one of our topics and small cap. We've had a dramatic surge in the shares, so it's become a pretty small by force now, but fundamentally, it's a much stronger acid. It will be coming out of orbit and it was coming in. That's why investors are excited. Now even covering take a long time Mark, and I'm sure you follow the Airbnb and Gord Ash I pose last week, doubling their valuations. Even Brian Chesky. The CEO, seemed stunned when I told him live on air, where the shares were about to open at As we head into 2021. Are you concerned about froth in the market? We're already looking at a couple of companies affirm and road blocks that are postponing their I pose till next year. As as we they try to get a sense of what is happening in this market. Well, yeah, This is unusual What we're seeing, and I don't have been a formal opinion, either Airbnb and or door dash. I wanna look at names this year, which have risen a lot because their estimates have gone up. So I look at a good classic case like a Facebook or an Amazon. It's not so much the re rating. We haven't seen these multiples. Five the moon. What we've seen this. The numbers have gone up Amazons. Everybody's estimates on the street for Amazon of Ghana materially since the beginning of the year because their revenue growth accelerated. There were big winners off of advertising on the cloud computing business, even though all three of their agents of growth have actually benefited from Cove it so I think there's less risk in a good, solid name like that, and my guess is that you'll see kind of a recovery back or returned by investors back to kind of the standard Bears of tech. Especially those that benefited but also came up with new investment initiatives. During the course of the year again, M sounds the poster child here. They're increasing their distribution capacity by 50%. This year, they really leaned in the cove it and I think what's gonna come out of that for them accelerated market share gains, So I think investors can still stick with that name and continued output for perform for them despite already out performing this year.

Facebook FTC Emily Mark Mahoney U. S Government On Big Tech U. S Government Rbc Capital Markets Instagram Federal Trade Commission Dark Custer Amazon Youtube Mark U. FCC Google Colonel Airbnb Gord Ash
Big Freedia "Queen of Bounce"

Q

12:19 min | 4 months ago

Big Freedia "Queen of Bounce"

"On stage in front of a sweaty crowd of people pushed together dress their best remember? Beginning crowds of people with other sweaty people and being dressed your best and not just wearing pajamas all the time. Bounce music is party music and big Frida will she's the Queen abounds. It's a sub genre hip hop that originated in New Orleans, where big Frieda is from people lose their minds when they see big freedom perform. She wraps torques and she Wants you to both rap and torque. Big Frieda has had a busy year despite the pandemic. Last time we spoke on cue, she had just released new music. She was hosting Friday night shakedown parties and a cooking show. And now she's got a new holiday deep and her 2015 memoir, God, Save the Queen Diva. Is out in paperback. I got up with Big Frieda over Zoom, and she started off by explaining what it is that she loves that she adores about bounce music. I mean, I love my crowd. First and foremost, I love the culture of bounce music. I love the origin way comes from my love The people that love the music. The sound the base the boom, they're not, You know, I love everything about it. It's You know is what I know. It's what I grew up listening to is what I enjoy. It is my type of music. What do you think it is that the audience gets out of it. Like when? What do you think that when people watch you and your dancers go like what do you think they get out of it? Well, A lot of people have told me over and over that it's like a bounce revival. You know, like they some type of spirit comes within them. And they, you know, they let their self loose and they lay their hair down and they party and they have a good time. I'm so happy you said about survival. I want to play this. Take a listen. Please don't harm being faces. Either room killers all read in about a minute Walk, Walk, walk, walk up in the room maker maker becoming a man's globules. No one's reading you. That is my guest. Big freedom. Performing the title track offer latest Keep Louder, which came out earlier this year featuring I kind of pop. So Bounce revival you in this in the video for that there's bounce and there's gospel music, So let's just let's just get their facts straight here. You started out in the church right in church choir. Did. I started out Very young in church. Um, I later became a choir director and my church home at my high school. I had my own choir somewhere Many quiet around New Orleans traveled the world with a choir. So yes, started in gospel music, and then you had to make a decision right between bounce and gospel. Well, at some point, I'd be it. You know, One sound. I started to get heavier. And so the bounce music and things kind of started to take off for me. I kind of have to make a decision. Yeah, but that was that a hard call. Itwas. It was very hard. Um, you know, I talk to a few people. First. I talked to my mom and then I talked to a few people at the church. I talked to my godmother, Georgia who's in the book. Um, you know about the situation and about what was going on in my life in these transitions, and yeah, it was a hard call. And, you know, my mom always said no matter what, long as you keep God first and everything that you do, I think you'll be okay and that stuck with me and I made my decision right? You're right, because it's not just a matter of like, I don't have a lot of time. Like I have. I have to get me That's part of it. But it's also sort of a spiritual decision, you know? Yeah, it is. You know, I was tossing and turning, you know, while making the decision off, you know, going into over crossing over to bounce music, but I never lost my faith. And I never lost my hope. And I never lost my love for gospel music. Still listen to it all the time. I still you know, Go back and saying what the quiet when we have unions, so I'm still you know, I'm still connected. And And you know, the building is the is just the place and I still have church in. They must love to see you when you come in to sing with the choir again. Oh, yeah, it be like old times. You know, we'd be all happy to see each other, You know, And then I go back into a whole nother person. I'm not freedom. When I go to church, you know, it's like I go back to when I was growing up and where my roots come from, so It brings me back in the aisle. I love to be reminded of where I come from. Well, let's let's bring it back to what you said earlier about about survival. What similarities? You see between bounce and gospel? Well, um, I see a lot of singularities first. I see that, you know, is a gathering of people and then You know, there's something that come over them. You know when they're at abound. Show that something that comes over them when they're at church. I'm also still directing. I'm directing. When I was directing in church. I will open my hands and people will, you know, saying now one pointing my finger and people shaking ass is so it has a lot of similarities. Still, you know, I feel still like, feel kind of feel like the director when I'm on stage. Yeah, The The intention in the process is the same. The result is a tiny bit different. I get it. Yeah. Most most of the time for church, people falling on pews. And, uh, you know, when I'm at abound, shield they're they're falling out with their ass is My guest is my guest is big Frieda. Another thing that struck me in your book, and you mentioned this. Just that actually was how strong your relationship was with your mom. Um, I know I know your mom since past I'm really sorry for your loss, and I I could only imagine what it would have lost. That must be because you get the feeling that your mom just gave you unwavering support. And you tell this story. I was hoping you might tell about the principle. Call in home on you and your mom having to stick up for you know what he well, you know, I always had issues when they came to my hair. And what do you mean? I always wanted to wear my hair all type of ways and exotic and you know hi to the feeling and there's one particular time I had went to school with a foul. That was kind of high like Marge Simpson, You know that high of a style. And the principal was just not happy. When I walked in school. He was just very much not happy. He called my mom right away. He was fun family, and he, you know, cousin. And my mom went to the school and put him right in his place and said that the Children should be worried about their education and not worried about my child's here. So she told him just the two bit where to get off at, But she always defended me. No matter what. She was my queen. She was my rock. She was my biggest cheerleader. And when I told my mom at an early age that I knew that I was gay, she said that she already knew and that she loved me for who I am. So once I had the support of my mom Um, I didn't need approval from anybody else in the world. So my life really begin at that point off, starting to make my own decisions and feeling really finding out who I was and finding my truth. There. I don't need to tell you. There are parents who would not be a supportive right? Oh, yeah, Most definitely. I had friends who Mom was not supported. That wasn't having it that you know, they couldn't do the things that idea or they couldn't go to places I went or, you know they couldn't be themselves. You know, I don't with that growing up as well. A lot of my friends around me had issues at home that they were fighting. And they will come from me and my mom as the outlet. She was the cool, mama. She must be still with you, You know? She's my guarding an angel. She walks inside of me every day. She's in. She's still within me, and she helps to protect and make things happen for me. If you're just tuning in, my guess is Big Frieda. She's known as Queen of Bounce. Her memoir is out now in paperback. It's called God Save the Queen Diva. You've been talking a lot about bounce you've been talking about, you know, keeping going during some of these dark moments, and in the book, you talk about it particularly dark moment You get pretty candid about Hurricane Katrina. You were with your siblings when it struck. Your niece was with you. Who was just a little baby. Can you tell me a little bit about that story? You know, Katrina was really rough in life changing for all of us. You know, we had to be evacuated by boat. Um, you know, we have to cut a hole in the roof to try to get your rescues to even see us who kept flying over us and picking up neighbors, right? Um, next door to us. So we had some really trying times We slept on the bridge. We slept at the convention center for a few days. We went on a cargo plane and got dropped off at an army camp base. What? Then we slept. Yeah, there we slept at a warming campgrounds. Then we went to ST or then we went to the class Louisiana. Then we went. I went to Houston. Then I moved back to New Orleans. So my life was in a really Um, it was a roller coaster, and it was, um Roller coaster of emotions and moving and restructure in my life and finding out where I was going to live, you know, along with my family and I think often Katrina, though, because it gave people a chance to start their lives over, especially if your life was in shambles, or you needed a new start. But for me it also let me know that material. Things don't mean anything long as you could survive and have your life you can get through anything and all that other stuff can be brought again. But you can't buy your life again. And that was the most important for me with survival moments for me and my family to survive during those times, and a lot of times we take tragedies for for granted when we see things on on TV and on the news and on, you know, on the radio. But After experiencing country Noah. I took everything that I saw into account and I felt the pain of those people and what they went through and whatever catastrophic disaster death he had, But Katrina was definitely life changing for New Orleans. On. We're still recovering each day. I don't want to, in any way imply that it was good. I don't want to, in any way imply that it was Ah, anyway. Good thing. It was absolutely devastating thing that happened her Katrina, But like do you think That you'd be Where you are today if you hadn't survive something like that. Not at all. You know, even surviving it. You know, it also put The sound of bounce music even further because we were displaced all over the world, and people started to want to know what's that music? What type of music is that? Can you teach me the dances? You know we were. We were all over the world. They had a little New Orleans all over the world, And when those New Orleans people were displaced, they wanted to listen to their type of music. And it was New Orleans bounce so people in Houston and Atlanta and you know, everywhere we were man. What is that music, you know? Teach me that. Show me that. And I thought if the travel all over people started requesting me And when I got to the different clubs and in venues, it was like Michael Jackson or Prince had a ride because the people were screaming and holiday and like running up to me, like, Oh, my God, I can't believe you here, you know, but it was felt. Like a sense of home and I wanted to bring some joy into those people like that was going through some stuff and I was still trying to bring joy in my own life, so it felt good to go around and see people of New Orleans. And how they missed the culture and how they missed the music. So the music really started to spray it and got me even further. Are you cool with that? Are you cool? When when? When

Big Frieda New Orleans Frieda Frida Katrina Marge Simpson Georgia Hurricane Katrina Houston Louisiana ST Noah Atlanta Michael Jackson Prince
Christmas Do's, Bonuses and F-Bombs with Dr. Gia Wiggins

Cheers To Business

04:58 min | 4 months ago

Christmas Do's, Bonuses and F-Bombs with Dr. Gia Wiggins

"And in the best hr person. I've ever met in my life. That is the sweetest thing i've ever heard this week. Get with a bad reputation. Be sincerely thank you for coming on the show. Today is my absolute pleasure as always so we were going to plan on talking about holiday. Do's and don'ts and so. I went back and listened to episode fifteen of cheers to business and it was katie. And i and we did holiday. Do's and don'ts and we pretty much took an article off the internet and just tore to pieces. Basically about do's and don'ts what are some good holiday dues. Well i've got a lot of holiday. Dues for businesses. And you know. I think that are good. You know in general you know right now. My focus is gratitude. It's all that. I've spent a lot of time Just being really thankful and reflecting over two thousand and twenty and all of the fun things that have happened and not so fun things that have happened. And what was the most important thing to me so right now you know when i focus on gratitude of course grateful for clients. I'm grateful for great friendships and alliances. I'm grateful for you. Of course you know that. Tell you that all the time just to call me sweet. I very grateful for you. But i'm also grateful for the lessons that we've learned in two thousand and twenty. I'm grateful that businesses have learned how the pivot in two thousand and twenty and how to deal with things that they've ignored for meany save learn how to pandemic proof their businesses and i can't help but to truly believe that the ability to work through some of those things to bring innovation in their preparing them for what's to come twenty twenty one twenty twenty two and i think the businesses are going to be stronger as a result as we lead thousand and twenty whatever the heck is banned by by no see. I don't wanna do that because my name's karen and my sister's name is katrina and we've had so much fun with our names all over the internet so yeah thank you very much to all you people. So by no person no-name person You actually did the first covid show with me when the pandemic hit you did and you know what we talked about on that show. I bring up. All the time is found a way to reinvent found a different need. Sorry and i am grateful that it forced as painful as it was short term pain long-term game but people have either that or they went out of business they either were forced into doing things differently and it was at the time but is probably a good thing in the long term. Yeah i think so too. I think so too. You have to sometimes win. There's a disruption in the market and they're always disruptions in the marco actions correct and. You have to make a decision. You're either gonna pay attention to it or not. You know i liken it to you know. Let's say for example a bakery. That doesn't you know have gluten free options if you're a bakery that decides not to have one gluten free option. You're literally putting your hands. Your eyes and your blindfold in yourself to the changes in the market understanding that if you focus on that one thing and to publicize it you're going to increase business exponentially. Everybody's like a for gluten free or sugar free or kito desserts and so by taking a look at what the market is doing and making a decision that you're going to run your business a little bit differently. Our offer something net previously. Nobody cared about but now everybody cares about it. I mean you could really changed the path and the longevity of your business if your business does not evolve and change it will die and it should it should nobody wanted anymore is changed to change with it and that is so hard because i think people talk the talk but don't walk the walk the need to do this. I need to do that and then don't do it. Yeah it's out of your comfort zone you know. Life's about choices. Did somebody do this to us. Well it doesn't really matter. It happened so do something. You got to choose what you want to do. That's exactly what's happened. So i'm i'm excited for those businesses. That have discovered you know a new way of doing things and they are doing fun stuff that they've never done before and you can see the spark i shared with you before. I'm a part of a businessman mentor group and a mentor. Couple of companies and even long established companies. That are doing something new and fresh. I mean the spark in their eye. I'm like a bit. That was the spark. When you first open a business. I mean and to cheer and to listen to you. Know them you know sharing things and need to have fee. But it is so exciting. I mean it just energizes me. So that's what. I've been surrounded myself with this year. Yeah it's different because now we're looking

DON Meany Katie Katrina Karen Marco
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

02:16 min | 4 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Rachel hollis disney nike today view regardless of the outcome and as i always share you guys create transform and inspire legu- are born to last but not least love limitless. -ly this year has taught me to love. Limitless lead myself and others to forgive mislead my life verses one john for eighteen perfect love drives out off year in moment by moment. This has shown up for me all year and continues to i hope and pray it does for you all reminded to love ourselves and others limitless. -ly sometimes it's up closed. Sometimes it's from a distance. The choice to forgive and lovely is always there ten things to be grateful for in twenty twenty from the start of your story to loving limits the countless ways to have gratitude in twenty twenty. Imagine you being with gratitude. Imagine choosing gratitude. I would love to see and hear your gratitude lists twenty twenty. If you love this. Please leave a review for the show. And i will shot you out on an episode and please take a peek at our freebies like the summit that i shared tags on stories on social media at katrina julia bit Live chretien for a reshare and so much more. Thank you so much for tuning in and let's create transform and inspire because we are born to all tabs on stay well man's money marketing business and travel to create a life head on over to the blog with the podcast and the threes to jump. Start your transformation. You're ready to dive into online courses. The live event or the retreat. And if you want to create with our community on an even deeper level definitely check out. Our internships are influence or collaborations managed and brand engagements let's create..

Rachel hollis nike disney julia bit Live chretien john
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

02:45 min | 4 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to lock it walking. Fear to fate devaluing to love calling and bondage three dollars. So it's been a journey as you can see walking dead right there with you on your own. Green a life and business learn all the themes about wellness about how about lifestyle and travel. You will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So who am i. I'm katrina julia. Lifestyle entrepreneur a creator at a ten things to be grateful for in twenty twenty so many people reflect on occasions like thanksgiving and christmas. And one thing. I've learned in two thousand twenty greater than any other year is to focus on gratitude and presents moment by moment day by day. I don't know about you friend but this year has tried my face my vision my calling my my focus more than any other year and this one mindset shift to choose gratitude even win and especially when it's the hardest times has impacted everything from what i focused on to how i react to who i create with and more last year when i shared ten things to be grateful for in two thousand nineteen which you can go to the show notes and click on the league or go back to the prior episode. I never would have imagined a year like this one. None of us would have. I know i'm not alone. A global pandemic racial unrest extreme economic instability was not on anyone's vision board to say the least yet at the same time. There are still miracles moment by moment and billions of things to be grateful for. And i know it's not easy to choose that in those moments that are especially difficult this week. This past week has been really really challenging for me. In a number of.

katrina julia Green
How different hospitals battle the pandemic to save lives

Morning Edition

06:28 min | 4 months ago

How different hospitals battle the pandemic to save lives

"Thanksgiving holiday arrives during an escalating calamity. More than one million people are testing positive for Corona virus every week. Now that is a high enough number that there is a good chance that some of your family friends or co workers. Among them. It's certainly been true for me these last several weeks if you want to identify and especially hard hit state, just throw a dart at a map because the odds are that any state you hit will qualify. This morning we visit three. Sebastian Martinez Valdivia is a K B A. And Missouri Blake farmer is with WPL and in Nashville, Tennessee, and Bram Sable Smith. Is with Wisconsin public radio. Welcome to all of you. Good morning. Thank you. Morning, and Bram. How widespread is this surge in Wisconsin, where you are? It's quite widespread, you know, by September, public health experts were really sounding the alarm about the rise. In cases we're seeing in the state initially were seen surges and cities where the university started located, but very quickly. The virus is rampant in communities. All over Wisconsin. As you know, Steve cases they're just the beginning of a covert search. So our hospital started filling up quickly. And maybe most concerned involves our death. Worried. We reported the record 104 deaths yesterday. We're losing about 52 people every day, on average and over 3000 people. Wisconsin have died of covered 19 so far, and I should also note we are seeing a slight downturn. Our cases are slightly our cases are dropping ever so slightly, But we're still very much at the top of the mountain and Steve the death rates very similar here in Tennessee. But cases are still climbing often more than 4000 Day. And As we found throughout this pandemic destined to lag those big spikes in new cases by a couple of weeks, So Tennessee's bracing for what could be to come because so far they're just has no sign existing of cases, letting up. Blake, over here in neighboring Missouri were in a similar ballpark in terms of new cases on deaths. But the really troubling trend has been in hospitalizations, which are high and continuing to rise on. Hospitals are really struggling with capacity and a lot of parts of the state. Well, let's talk a little bit more about hospitals or doing in Missouri, then Yeah, well, one of the big problems is a lot of the smaller rural hospitals that traditionally transfer patients toe urban and metro areas for intensive care are really struggling to find beds because those larger hospitals are already full. S O. For example, Cocks Health, which is in Springfield, the third biggest city here in Missouri, has expanded its hospital capacity multiple times over the past nine months, but it's still had to turn people away. Steve Edwards is the CEO there. So we will have added 147 bed capacity, which is probably bigger than the Average hospital state, Missouri, he says the hospital keeps hitting what it would have considered a worst case scenario every couple of weeks. But adding rooms isn't really the half of it the biggest challenge, according to Edward to staffing, so training staff to care for covert patients, and then the draining work of actually caring for them. So that's the crisis in Missouri, Bram Sable Smith, Let's go back to Wisconsin Howard doctors trying to keep up where you are. You know, October the state we converted our state fairgrounds into what's called an alternative care facility to handle the excess capacity. We have so about 89% of the hospital beds available in the entire state for being occupied right now, in some regions, that's higher. At the alternative care facility. There's only nine patients right now, though. That's in part because it's voluntary to go there. It's also because it's where patients will go to recover kind of after they've cleared a hurdle in their covert treatment. The idea behind that is To free up resource is inside the hospitals to treat on influx of patients. Researchers like ICU beds that are in very short supply here and brand that the corps of Engineers build alternative care sites here in Tennessee is well, but increasingly, there's a concern about having the staff to open them. And a big reason for that is that so many nurses and doctors air out themselves with Kovar 19 or because they have to quarantine Well, Blake. What are hospitals in Tennessee, saying about that? Well, they're really starting to sound the alarm. In a way we haven't heard for a long time. Hospital administrators have wanted to make sure people knew that they would be able to handle the usual patients along with covert, and that's just less. So now. Dr Katrina Green works in an HCIA emergency room here in Nashville. We're worried about what the delays and care will mean for our patients, and I am personally terrified in my hospital. Being full could result in someone dying in the waiting room. The situation has become particularly severe in parts of Texas as well like El Paso and love IQ. For now that they're able to transport covert patients to other parts of the state. But there's going to be a time likely when those hospitals air capacity to You know, I spent some time last week and one of the five covert units at the University Hospital here in Madison, Wisconsin, where I live. I spoke to Mary Lowe. She's a nursing assistant in the unit. She's been there since the pandemic began. This has been going on for a long time. And right now it doesn't feel like there's an end in sight. Even though there will be a time it doesn't necessarily feel like that right now. You know that unit as 28 beds and they've been consistently full and she says, it's it's exhausting and remember, the whole reason for shutdowns early on, was to prevent hospitals from being overrun will now in a lot of these states like ours, Those restrictions are long gone, and hospitals are now nearing the edge of that cliff. But political leaders are really finding it hard to go backward after lifting restrictions, months, Okay, granted, that's granted. That's true. But suggestion haven't some political leaders at least faced pressure to approve more safety measures. Yeah, There's definitely been pressure here in Missouri. The State Hospital Association actually sent a letter last week to a Republican governor Mike Parson, urging him to kind of issue one of those statewide mass mandate, saying the Wolf is at the door. But like a lot of Republican governors, he's rejected that call just to the north of us, though. In Iowa, the story's a little different. So Governor Kim Reynolds, there, also a Republican, was initially against the mask mandate, and she even said that city's couldn't issue their own mandates back in the summer, But she recently reversed course. I would have seen one of the biggest surges in cases and hospitalizations in the country per capita. I will has roughly half the population of misery, but it's almost in the same ballpark in terms of new cases. S O earlier this month, Reynolds did end up issuing a statewide mass mandate as well as some restrictions on public and private gatherings, with exceptions for some businesses and religious services.

Missouri Bram Sable Smith Wisconsin Tennessee Sebastian Martinez Valdivia Blake Farmer Cocks Health Wisconsin Public Radio Steve Nashville Bram Blake Steve Edwards Kovar Dr Katrina Green Springfield Mary Lowe
Dr. Umair Shah Reflects On Time As Houston's Harris County Health Authority, Ahead Of New Washington State Role

Houston Matters

07:37 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Umair Shah Reflects On Time As Houston's Harris County Health Authority, Ahead Of New Washington State Role

"Harris county public health executive director. Dr shawn ounce tuesday. He's leaving the department. He's led since twenty thirteen to become washington state's new secretary of health. He joins us now. Dr shock congrats on the new gig. Welcome back to the show. Crag it's as you can imagine but Thanks for having me and thanks for the congratulations. Why have you decided to take on this new challenge in the state of washington. Well it's You know let me. Let me just say Again with mentioned about the sweet piece is that there's just so much that we have accomplished here and and so many incredible incredible staff members Department leadership and and just across the community cross county government but across the community. That have just done. Just such an amazing job It is really hard to leave. But i will tell you that what you know it. Opportunities are when they come before you and i was asked by governor ins lease Administration to join as the secretary of health. And it's an incredible privilege and honor to be asked for that And certainly i'm hopeful to be able to take that experience from here and what i've learned and been able to do here in harris county to state level and some excited about that. Would you characterize the challenges that washington state is facing as roughly the same as what we're facing here when it comes to the pandemic. Oh craig here's the thing so it it. We're all facing the same way. So i in fact i got this question yesterday from a reporter in in seattle and it was a very Very much a question. That i thought was interesting and it was about well. You know the state is big and it's diverse and you know it's got red and blue areas and it's got urban areas and it's got suburban areas and scott rural areas and not. Everybody has agreed on how we should fight the pandemic So what what are your thoughts about coming into that. And i thought that kind of sounds like harris county So you know it's it's seven point six million people it's it's larger than obviously harris county and in population and certainly size. But i will tell you that it. It is also true that throughout this pandemic what we are facing here in our community is similar to what we're facing across texas across the country and across the globe now everything is manifesting differently. So fortunately we although we've been seeing increases and yes. These are concerning trends here within our region. We're not seeing that same level that you've seen in el paso or other parts of texas other parts of the country now again we can't let our our eyes off the the the ball here because very quickly as you talked over the month things can change and when they change. They changed quickly. And so we've got to do everything we can to prevent it from happening in the first place. And that's why we've got a strategic opportunity right before the holidays to get things Right and for community to heed the call to to really change the behaviors that were having over the holidays. And that's going to really drive. You know what's going to happen for us in the next chapter for you know for our community. What's next for harris county health leadership. Well you know. Obviously county government is going to make a decision and You know. I'm leaving an incredibly strong Leadership team behind In fact you can see it on twitter. I tweeted it out recently and it's strong. It's experienced its diverse Dedicated passionate and that's what community wants from its public health leadership and so. I'm just incredibly proud of that team. Now it's never about the me. It's always about the we when when we do activities or we take on activities and so craig what i would say is that while i may be not here and cheering this community on from a distance that work continues and that team continues and they are here and they're ready but ultimately it's going to be county government and commissioner's court. Who's going to decide what they're going to do after i leave my last day. Here's december eighteenth What they're going to do after that in the interim period and certainly beyond that But i will tell you that we've got a great team and i'm hopeful that the community remembers the incredible work that we've done you know local health department of the year National accreditation Microsoft research Picking us as the only community in the country. The only health department the country for its project premonition We've you know we were ranked number two recently and peer rankings by seven hundred and forty local health departments across the country for who. They look to initiatives. There's a lot of incredible work that we've done and craig one that i know you're I've talked about this before. Related to animals When i started at the at the department as the director are leave alive rate animals. That left our shelter. Alive was was about fifteen percent. This is twenty twelve twenty thirteen. It is now ninety eight percent. We have actually changed the narrative. These are things that we have to be proud of as a community and as a as the government. I just really want to just say that. We can't do it alone. In this pandemic has shown this you know obviously harvey and katrina rita i e carvey all these hurricanes and tropical storms but also you know h one n one ebola zico now covid nineteen. We have a lot of work that continues. There's never a good time to leave. But i'm very proud of our department and our team and i'm excited about the fact that they're going to continue that that work into the future. What parting advice. Can you offer to huston. Ian the department and its initiatives not just about cove in the current surge in cases about the region's health and general. Well a two things. One is that look cova. Nineteen is a. It's a crisis it's pandemic it is. Let's not let's not let our focus off of that so What i've been calling twenty twentieth the first half of football game. It's the first half the holidays coming up here. We're going to be at halftime. Usually people take a charge Recharge during halftime they changed strategy. They think about what's up ahead. We know twenty twenty one's gonna be vaccines vaccines vaccines and certainly We've got to be readying ourselves for the second half so halftime so critical. So if you don't have to have thanksgiving holidays with a lot of people don't and fact Make him very small holidays. a few people your social bubble your immediate people in your family Don't travel do those kinds of things if you're gonna do those things. Please look at our website for safety precautions. That's the one thing koba. Nineteen craig the second thing. Let's remember the value proposition of of true health. Not just health care delivery about prevention about the investment in public health systems. The reason that we have got into some of this mess across the country is we have not appreciated the value of public health and prevention. And so we wait for people to get sick and then we try to do things. We wait for people to get injured and we try to do things. Let's invest upfront. And if we do that in county and city and and even state and federal governments we invest truly unhealth then we can have a healthier community. Dr rumor shaw's the soon to be departing executive director of harris county public health. Doctor shaw thanks very much. Thank you craig. It's been an honor to be with the all. These

Harris County Dr Shawn Ounce Washington Craig Texas El Paso Carvey Seattle Twitter Ebola Rita Microsoft Huston Katrina Harvey Koba IAN Government
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

01:36 min | 5 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Super focused on one to two to three things daily set up weekly goals. Kpi's in track them. So this helps you level up in many many ways by taking action in any of these steps you will transform your life from the inside out. I can't wait to see how you transform an guys as always take screenshot share tag us on the show tag on your channels At limitless global girl. Right now at katrina. Julia and both channels and At fit life creation. We will reshare. And if you leave a review on the show. I will also shot out on the show because helps us it helps you et cetera. And as always remember create transform and inspire. You are born to all tabs on. Stay well money. Marketing business travel to create a life visit already head on over to the blog. The podcast and the threes to jumpstart your transformation. You're ready to dive into the online courses. The live of that or the retreat. And if you wanted to create with our community on an even deeper level definitely check out. Our ships are influenced her collaborations management and engaging. Let's create it..

katrina Julia
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

01:32 min | 5 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Appropriate with katrina julia. This is all about helping you. Create a life and business. You hands on with tips tools and technology. It's about the freedom freedom of expression of time of location of an ultimate financial freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to lock it walking from fear to fate devaluing sell pre to love calling and bondage dollars. So it's been a journey as you can see walking dead right there with you on your own. Green a life and business learn all the themes about wellness about how about lifestyle and travel. You will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So who am i. I'm katrina julia. Lifestyle entrepreneur a creator. Traveling let's talk about.

katrina julia
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

01:32 min | 6 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Appropriate. With Katrina Julia. This is all about helping you create a life. And business you. Hands on with tips. Tools and technology. It's about the freedom. Freedom of expression. Of Time. Of Location. Of. An ultimate. Financial Freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to walk it. Walking, fear to fate. Devaluing. Sell Pre to love. Calling and bondage dollars. So it's been. A journey as you can see. Walking dead right there with you on your own. Green a life. And business you. Learn all the themes about wellness. About how about lifestyle and travel? You will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So. Who am I I'm Katrina Julia Lifestyle Entrepreneur. A creator at a traveling. Welcome to hitch. Your Business Like.

Katrina Julia
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

07:39 min | 6 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Because it's just getting good literally so with protein Donuts, so I don't know about you friend, but I love all things breakfast. I mean all things breakfast doughnuts and pancakes have become my new healthy Obsession in 2020. So for protein Donuts, it's super easy. I could use two scoops of Formula One. Whatever flavor you want with Herbalife nutrition, I typically use pralines and cream and your banana caramel and or Herbalife 24 chocolate which legit taste like the Yoo-hoo chocolate drink you guys and that's the image I have in the blog where I used herbalife24, then you can also add an additional two scoops of protein drink mix your choice to increase your protein intake. I also add in 2 tablespoons of peanut butter five egg whites and 1/2 tablespoons of Ginger. I love love love Ginger and the added kick it gives to everything mix everything and pour it into donut containers. I got eco-friendly and super colorful donut containers from Amazon in my favorite color is pink blue and green bake for about 20 minutes at 375° and dead. Keep an eye out you guys because everyone's you know stove Etc is different and the other thing is is my containers are easy like peel off but either way you want to make sure and put in like some coconut oil or olive oil so that the batter doesn't stick as it cooks and then let cool once it's done and add toppings. And what I typically do is I will turn off the oven about seven minutes before it's gone. And again, you know pay attention to what's happening as you're cooking and then once everything has cooled I add in toppings of almond and or peanut butter cinnamon. I love love cinnamon and coconut milk Flakes and then of course serve and enjoy caution flash warning, you may drool over your own protein donut Creations. So definitely stay tuned for the episode coming up on banana protein pancakes. And then after that pumpkin pumpkin spice protein bars no-bake protein and veggie pizza and egg white bites and I was always friends remember create transform and inspire because you're born to leave a review and I'll shot you out on the show and you're a screenshot and tag me outfit like creation at Katrina Julia fit chew, and we will reach share your screen shot and or your creations and or your review Thanks again, you guys so so much and chat soon. So what is the creation Club because you just got a preview and one out of twelve themes. So you might be wondering what it's all about. You guys explore off the show notes in the link to see the visual that I'm going to give you the overview and there's even more in that link. It is for the Transformers for the creators for the dreamers month for those that truly want to create a life and business. They love with Hands-On Guidance with the tips tools and Technology with health money and business all in one package. Yes. I said all in one this is a true labor of love and if you don't know my story, let me give you a preview. I did not arrived at Planet Fitch Planet Faith Planet stability or Planet creating what I love new to know. I years ago ten years ago as of this recording I felt like I was in the wrong. Despite doing all the things people told me right. I was nowhere near the health. I wanted always tired in over fifty five pounds heavier than I am today. Disclaimer those in our programs and that use our tools end up losing an average of about a half a pound to a pound a week weather is Tools in meal plans healthy habits life nutrition and even more recipes so much more along with wealth and business tools. I was always pursuing my other dreams and helping them make 7.829 figures per year over and over yet feeling despite all my certifications and external results. I was missing something or someone i e me deep down inside having tones of experience in over 7 Industries yet unclear if I had wasted my time and in my life and about what it all meant continuing in the rat race wage. On the hamster wheel wondering how on Earth was I going to pursue my passion and purpose and help people on the planet and transform my life deep breath home. I get it the joy you hear my voice and you see on my face or on social media had been missing for quite some time. I was not aligned in all areas of my life. I was determined not find it again. I walked from Fear to Faith corporate to calling self hate to Love Bondage to freedom and continue to friend. That's why I'm so passionate about you creating a life in business you love and that's why I'm so passionate about all my programs but especially creation club and so much so that I give you guys not only the previews on the show, but also for free in the membership itself, so you can look feel smell what it tastes like all the things and so what is what is involved in what's included dead? You get all the things to get healthy and make money and build Brands getting clear on your inner self from mindset and health too crazy confidence and momentum being and becoming a money-maker. You've always wanted to be from my six pack of wealth, which yes is included in the free part to creating value and money to cash flow. You will be in awe of your progress and potential building Brands being the boss. You know, you are weather in your personal brand your business. Brand building a Boston too smart social to scaling smart, you will love how simple it is to create jobs and all the Hands-On and the behind-the-scenes that I give. So the first fourteen days are free friends. Yes free free free. I give you a sneak peek into the monthly Mastermind wage you register twelve modules on health wealth and business things like passion and purpose smart. Social moneymaker health wealth biztools. Get to know me one-on-one face-to-face on your screen on video game. My voice all the things and I use kajabi an amazing tool that you enter in your info and you can cancel anytime before the trial ends. It's simple and easy couple things that you want to know before you cancel in case you're even thinking about it. If you stick around after the 14 a challenge you get access to twelfth Eames on going on health wealth and bears to create a life and business you love a brand new course.

Herbalife creation Club Katrina Julia Amazon Boston Eames
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

02:45 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Appropriate With. Katrina Julia. This is all about helping you create a life. And business you. Hands on with tips. Tools and technology. It's about the freedom. Freedom of expression. Of Time. Of Location. Of. An ultimate. Financial Freedom I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to walk it. Walking fear to. Fate. Devaluing. Pre to love. Calling and bondage three dollars. So it's been. A journey as you can see. Walking. Dead Right there with you on your own. Green a life. And Business. Learn all the themes about wellness. About how about lifestyle and travel? You will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So who am I I'm Katrina Julia Lifestyle Entrepreneur. A CREATOR AT A. Welcome back to the wellness wonder series, and in this episode on diving deeper on the transformation tools or your health, the best tools to transform your health from the inside out. So you may have heard of lifestyle transformation or a lifestyle brand are maybe you clicked because you want to transform your health to get ready for the transformation rules for your health consider that transforming your health maybe easier than you see. Over five years ago, if you haven't heard my story, I was fifty five pounds heavier and typically consumed alcohol one to two times weekly. For. Years I struggled with Hell. Yoyoing I made it about the external versus the eternal the internal I focused on solely myself vs on also helping others once I right sized my approach everything changed. Might transformation from the inside how became possible starting with transformation tools for health I understand the struggle if I did it. So can you friend? Let's talk about the transformation tools for your hell the first let me give you a bit.

Katrina Julia
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

03:08 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Know, who being Long. Mass. Salt worse. Look. Fire. ME. Ranch. report. With. Katrina Julia. This is all about helping you create a life. And business you. Hands on with tips. Tools and technology. It's about the freedom. Freedom of expression. Of Time. Of Location. Of. An ultimate. Financial Freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to walked. Walking from. Devaluing. To love. Calling and bondage three dollars. So it's been. A journey as you can see. Walking dry. On Your own. To Green a life. And Business. Learn, all the themes about wellness. About. About lifestyle and travel, you will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So. Who Am I? I'm Katrina Julia I'm a lifestyle entrepreneur. A creator. All. Tabs on stain. Money Marketing Business and travels to create a life. Already. Head on over to the blog, the podcast and the threes to jumpstart your transfer make. You're ready to dive into online courses. The live event. Or the retreat and he wanted to create with our community on an even deeper level. Definitely check out our internships are influence her collaborations, management and rand. Let's..

Katrina Julia rand Ranch.
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

03:21 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Not, enough. So. I hope this. Worship. Walk you by and this wellness wonder series as well as my faith series along with the online travel and money and Biz series have been encouraging. You have been blessing you during whatever time you find yourself listening to this and I, hope you join me in the future or on another worship walk that I'd take you along and again if you are loving this and you would love to see more avenues, I will happily add this update this more often. In my content series because this is something I am trying out in the midst of my wellness series face series, etc to provide encouragement and uplifting and prayer from several different angles because we are human beings that have experiences spiritually an practically and mentally, and emotionally in a number of different levels, the impact us and financially and physically as well. So thank you so much for tuning in and as always friends remember, create, Transform, and inspire because you are born to. Your. PODCAST. With. Katrina Julia. All about helping you create a life. And business you was. He ends. With tips. Tools and technology. It's about the freedom. Freedom of expression. Of Time. Of Location. Of. An ultimate. Financial Freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to walk. Walking. Devaluing. Sell three to love. Corporate to calling and bondage three dollars. So. It's been wide a journey as you can see. Walking right there. On. Your. Own. To Green a life. And Business, you Learn all the themes about wellness. About how about lifestyle and travel you will learn how I'm creating it and how you can create it too. So who am I I'm Katrina Julia I'm a lifestyle entrepreneur. Creator. Traveling. All. Stay well. Money Marketing Business and travel. Wife and Head on over to the blog, the podcast and the threes to jumpstart your transformation. You're ready to dive into online courses. The live of is. Wanted Free with our community on an even deeper level. Definitely, check out our internships are influencers, collaboration management, and grand. Let's create it..

Katrina Julia
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

02:39 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Welcome back you guys to the creed it with Katrina Julia show. So as part of this focus on wellness and wellness wonder I was inspired to take you guys along on a walk with me on a worship. That helps you focus on elevating your thoughts to it's excellent, worthy and Praiseworthy along with music. To help you along on your journey and on your walk. So the first song that's up is psalms one hundred and thirty nine by Sarah Rees. And the second song is keep the fade by. Del Harris. And the third song is going to be with hope all things are possible by Delaware Harris as well. So whether you take this episode in this walk along in your neighborhood down the street or to a park wherever you take this show this episode an me along with you on this walk I pray this blesses you pray that you return to this over and over and over anytime that you need some uplifting. And thinking about things that you are grateful for and reframing your perspective from pain to purpose. So I hear Sarah. Oh You're. cleanly. So I read, this is not. A couple of months. owned. Says, you're setting your. Height was to use low. Whatever? Arms. The. And.

Sarah Rees Delaware Harris Katrina Julia
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

07:56 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Appropriate. With. Katrina. Julia. This is all about helping you create a life. And business you. Hands on with tips. Tools and technology. It's about the freedom. Freedom of expression. Of Time. Of Location. Of An. Ultimate. Financial Freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to walk it. Walking fear to fate. Devaluing. Pre To. Love. Calling and bondage. So it's been. A journey as you can see. Walking dead right there with you on your own. Green a life. And Business. Learn all the themes about wellness. About how about lifestyle and travel? You will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So who am I, I'm Katrina Julia. Lifestyle. Entrepreneur. A creator. A. Welcome to my wellness wonder series the second one of twenty twenty. So in this series, I'm talking all things for wellness but wellness you guys is. Starts from within what we consume, how we align, how simple we may get not only that, but it trickles into our wealth and into our business like a flood. So. In this series I'm not just talking wellness and health and workouts no no friend. We are talking all the things to create a life business you love and make moves with health with money and business and sneak peek. Into, the creation club, my money mastermind and of free or Teen Day Challenge. So let's create. Welcome to cluttered to clarity, so I love seeking clarity and every area of life. Spiritually. Emotionally relational playfully, physically financially because I believe those are the seven steps to success to truly create a life and a business you love. So here in this theme, we're going to be chatting about several different components of clarity and I'm always creating content as I transform and inspire myself I a big believer in connecting and creating and cultivating community. So in this theme, we're GONNA be talking about several different things we're gonNA. Be Talking about space creator. We're going to be talking about brain behaviors and the. Different things our brains do that were often not aware of that Miss, align, our productivity, our performance, and so many different things, and we're also going to be talking about fear factor's and different things that trigger fears or different things that we are afraid of and a typical fears so that you become more and more aware of those in the moment so that you're able to transform those in the moment and were faster and faster with time. So you don't get stuck in certain areas of your life repeatedly. And then we're going to talk about the power of presence. So the power of presence you guys is just it's amazing because if you think about it when you're really in the moment like let's say you're going like I went skydiving years ago. So what I was skydiving there was nothing else in my brain but being immersed focused on that moment of. Jumping out of a plane thirteen, thousand above the air and. Soaring seeing the guy. So I was completely immersed in the moment versus we know win. We're not in the moment we know when we've got our phones in our hands and we're distracted we know when we're focusing on something from the past and replaying a conversation or something that happened from the past or we know when we're we have anxiety and we're thinking about refrain from the future we're crystal clear. There was so many times I experienced all of that and my health in my wealth in my business. You know. In relationships in friendships in travel. So many different times. So I'm right there with you. Then we also know. We also know are we're aware of, but sometimes we feel like we're not empowered. We don't have the power to shift it when it's impacting us. In our health in our money inner business in our time management in our presence with someone else. So comet down below on what you're excited about with cluttered clarity and can't wait to help you get clarity on your path to create a life in a business you love. So. What is the creation club because you just got preview and one out of twelve feeds? So you might be wondering what all about you guys explore in the show notes in the link to see the visual I'm GonNa, give you the overview and there's even more in not link. It is for the transformers for the creators for the dreamers for those that truly want to create a life in business they love with hands on guidance with the. Tips tools and technology with hell money and business all in one. Yes. I said all in one. This is a true labor of love and if you don't know my story, let me give you a preview. I did not arrive at planet fit planet faith planet stability or planet creating what I love new I years ago ten years ago as of this recording I felt like I was in the wrong line despite doing all the things people told me. Right I was nowhere near the health I wanted always tired in over fifty five pounds heavier than I. Am today disclaimer those in our programs that user tools ended up losing an average of about a half a bound to powder a week weather is tools in meal plans, healthy habits, herbalife nutrition, and even more recipes so much more with well and business tools. I was always pursuing my dreams and helping them make seven to eight to nine figures per. Your over and over yet feeling despite all my certifications and external results, I was missing something or someone I e me deep down inside having tons of experience in over seven industries yet unclear if I had wasted my time and in my life and about what it all meant continuing in the rat race in on the hamster wheel wondering how on Earth was going to pursue my passion and purpose and help people on the planet and transform my life. depressed..

Katrina Julia
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

03:07 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Appropriate. With. Katrina Julia. This is all about helping you create a life. And business you. Hands on with. Tips. Tools and technology. It's about the freedom. Freedom of expression. Of Time. Of Location. Of. An ultimate. Financial Freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to walk it. Walking from fear to fate. Devaluing. Sell Pre to love. Calling, and bondage. So it's been. A Journey, as you can see. Walking dead right there with you on your own. Green a life. And Business. Learn all the themes about wellness. About how about lifestyle and travel? You will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So, who am I I'm Katrina Julia Lifestyle Entrepreneur. A CREATOR AT A. Welcome to my wellness wonder series the second one of twenty twenty. So in this series, I'm talking all things for wellness but wellness you guys is. Starts from within what we consume, how we align, how simple we may get not only that, but it trickles into our wealth and into our business like a flood. So, in this series, I'm not just talking wellness and health and workouts. No no friend. We are talking all the things to create a life business you love and make moves with health with money and business and sneak peek. Into, the creation club, my money mastermind, and a free or teen day challenge. So let's create it. Welcome to space creator. So you guys, I'm super excited to be here in this beautiful place in Cuba I mean look at this place and look at the lily pond behind me what better place to do this pace credo workshop than here. In this workshop, we're GONNA be talking about sanity space and stuff. So what does that mean? So think about the things that impact your sanity is it your finances? Is it your health think about your space look what are you surrounded by what relationships in your life that maybe in your boundaries and how you feel and then what about your stuff like what.

Katrina Julia lily pond Cuba
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

04:05 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Which you can explore in the show notes in fees, go to the meal plan could register for a free wellness profile learn more there. So four scoops a of pumpkin spice herbalife two scoops of herbalife rebuild twenty four, which by itself you guys taste like you who the chocolate drink. Is absolutely amazing. One of my favorite things to make chocolate Mousse with Sino. That's a whole nother thing. So that's number two, number three is egg whites but a quarter cup. Number four is about a half a cup of peanut butter number five is a cup of oats. Numbers. Six. Coconut, flakes and cinnamon for the toppings. So the first five ingredients, literally, you guys jump in a big bowl mix it all up you may be okay for you consistency. Wise. You may need to add in a little bit more water. And just mix it mix it makes it and then once it's adequately blended, it should be pretty thick. So not liquidity at all. And hard to stir and enroll basically in make little balls. Sprinkle it with the cinnamon and coconut flakes and pop it in the fridge for a couple hours and boom. It's done. Like A- boss. Thank you guys much for tuning in to my episode, and as always you guys remember crea transform and inspire because you are born to in stay tune for more on help be like a boss and my other boss like a boss series. Hundred. That's outcome. On. Cow. Clouds'll. With any Katrina Julia. All about helping you create a life. And business you. He ends on with tips. Tools and technology. It's about freedom. Freedom of expression. Of Time. Of Community. An ultimate. Financial Freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and. Walk. Walking from. Devaluing. Love. Corporate to calling and bondage. So it's been. A journey as you can see. Walking right there with you on your own. Life And business you. Learn all the themes about wellness. About legal about lifestyle and scrabble, you will learn how And how you can create it you. I'm Katrina Julia I'm a lifestyle entreprenuer. Creator. Travel. Stay. well-meant. Money. Martin. Listen travel. The life and already. Head on over to the blog, the podcast and the threes to jumpstart your transfer make. You're ready to dive into the online courses. The live event. Or the retreat, and if you wanted to three years with our community on an even deeper level. Definitely, check out our internships are influence or collaboration manage. And brand engagement. Let's create it..

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"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

02:18 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"Of. An. Ultimate. Financial Freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to walk it. Walking from fear to fate. Devaluing. Sell Pre to love. Calling and bondage dollars. So it's been. A journey as you can see. Walking dead right there with you on your own. Green, a life. And Business. Learn all the themes about wellness. About how about lifestyle and travel? You will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So, who am I I'm Katrina Julia Lifestyle Entrepreneur. A creator. A. Welcome. Back to the BAID FOCUS and self hate to love. So I thought I would share a piece that I wrote for another faith based platform and community. And this will also be coming up on the blog has been re purposed. And this feature is a product daughter passion purpose at purity restored. I John for eighteen. Perfect love drives out off year this I I came to me in two thousand, ten a year that would begin a profound transformation from the inside out of every area of my life. With God, when I I read this I I remember this deep feeling of love. I never knew a creator or God to be like that. I have walked with God through fear to fate. Devaluing to purity self hate to love corporate to calling. Lies to love pain to purpose and bondage to freedom and continue to friend. I would have thought you were crazy. If you would have told me, this was to be my journey. God has radically pursued in changed.

Katrina Julia John
"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

03:16 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"When but that's when it really matters. That's when your characters bill that is when you are chiseled like iron. When you choose to fight for faith for hope for love for joy for abundance for gratitude. No matter what. That will stay with you. And even more importantly when things start happening. In shifting because they will frame they will I promise they will keep fighting. Not only will you inspire others in ways you never ever ever imagine? Though when things start shifting in the natural in your circumstances, you will have so much more joy gratitude because you set that foundation and then also, and this is something else I always express. You have a choice. You can either sit and wallow in that pain and again I know it's hard not discounting it. But, you can choose to turn that pain to purpose I share in prior episodes high walk through domestic violence situations or how my best friend passed away from cancer. One of my best friends in two thousand thirteen. But I chose to take those situations, turn pain to purpose or to turn financial hardship and turn it from pain to purpose. So what I mean by that? I can choose to learn the lessons I can choose to share with others might journey I can choose to help others on their journey along the way relate to others. So that that pain serves a purpose for people on the planet and I promise you friends when you do that. You're prophets will mean something and then you will also allocate your profits. To the greater good 'til. Like I'm working on my books right now passionless purpose equals prophets and my book from paying to purpose, and you can see that Wa- Pad I share that in the pet episodes to, and I'm Katrina Julia Crazy on what pad. That it changes everything like my prophets. And clear that right now I'm giving over twelve percent. To Help in homelessness and cancer military vets, battered women, and help serve in ways to help people focus on the eternal. So. I hope those self love tips helped you guys in countless ways. And feel free to screen shot Lieber Review. Tag. ME Julia Fit. At Fit Chretien if you leave a review, I shout on the show and as always friends remember create, Transform, and inspire because you are born to. All Tabs on stay wellman's money marketing business and travel is to create a life. Head on over to the blog, the podcast and the threes to jump start your transformation. You're ready to. Dive into. Online courses. The live of. Or the retreat, and if you to create with our penalty on an even deeper level, definitely check out our internships are influence or collaborations, management and rand engagements. Let's..

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"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

03:55 min | 7 months ago

"katrina" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"It's about the freedom. Freedom of expression. Of Time. Of, location? Of. An ultimate. Financial. Freedom. I understand the struggle. I've been there. I've walked through and continue to walk it. Walking, from fear to fate. Devaluing. Sell Pre to love. Calling and bondage three dollars. So. It's been quite a journey as you can see. Walking dead right there with you on your own. Green a life. And Business. Learn all the themes about wellness. About how about lifestyle and travel? You will learn how creating it and how you can create it too. So who am I I'm Katrina Julia Lifestyle Entrepreneur. You're. Traveling. Welcome to I series on faith. In this faith series, we are getting into self hey, to love and a sneak peek into a my Bible study self hate to love. So leads created. Welcome back to the faith series and this episode I'm diving into playful. And the first thing I have for this one is finally brothers and sisters. Whatever is true. Whatever is noble. Whatever is right. Whatever is pure. Whatever is lovely. Whatever is admirable. If anything is excellent or praiseworthy, think about such things, which is from the book of Libyan's. Chapter Four Eight. This is playful but this is also related to your gratitude. Down all the list of the good you have in your life friend. Consider your faith, your health, your home, your family, your food memories, travels, experiences nature. Right down aw the gifts, the talents and abilities. You have what you love about yourself what About you recognize you for read over the list and reflagged in close your is and relive those miracle moments because it's so easy to take for granted every breath. And every single day we have on this planet is literally a miracle in his a gift. That's why they call it the present. Consider your day day blessings you have now and maybe take this activity outside maybe go to the park maybe invite a family member along to do this together. The love to see how this blesses you how this encourages you how this gives you faith how this gives you hope politics gives you joy the Afrita tag me fe at fit like creation leave a review on the show I'll do a shot out for you. We reach our stories and as always friends remember. Create. Transform and inspire. Because you are born to. All Tabs on stain. Money. Marketing Scissors and travels renamed life. Already..

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