24 Burst results for "Katori"

"katori" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

07:45 min | 3 months ago

"katori" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Yourself. It's a very emotional and very complex scene. And I'm wondering why that issue, the issue of abortion, is something you wanted to tackle in the show. I think it's because it is so emblematic of just the black female experience, and I just think it's so important to be honest about everything that we're going through. You know, it's not a lot of us who live at the intersection of race class and gender. And to have that intersectional identity, it's we just don't see the complexity of that often. In media. And so I always said, we're trying to put vitamins in the Kool-Aid. We want to talk about real stuff that everyone is going through through this very specific lens so that it can feel and be universal. I mean, I love when we drop an episode and you see the comments on Twitter or on Facebook or on Instagram and people are kind of rising up and saying, oh my God, that's me. Mercedes is me, tarika is me, big tikka is me. We're dealing with issues that a lot of people don't even want to talk about in their own families. It's not only abortion. We're talking about mental health. We're talking about suicide. And you know, from the outside, it could be like, oh my God, that's a lot to take on for a TV show. But I think when you, like I said, you're writing about characters that have like a, you know, they have multiple identities that they're dealing with. You know, it just, it just makes sense that what they're going through would resonate with so many different types of people. So we take on a lot. And I feel as though, as a black writer, as a black female writer, it's kind of my responsibility, right? I have this platform. Millions of people are watching this show. So I think that's one of the main reasons as to why we tell the stories that we do. We tell the kind of deep and dark stories that we do. Which, you know, some people have been a little, I would say, they're uncomfortable. They've been made to feel very uncomfortable. But, you know, it's sometimes it's really hard to look in the mirror. Sometimes it's really hard to look at your reflection, especially when you don't like what you see. But that's the power, I think, in this particular medium of TV, where we are going to just be honest, be true. We use, as I say, fiction in order to tell the truth. And you say, you just said there's a great thing about putting the vitamin C in the Kool-Aid. How do you write about these very complex and maybe contentious topics without having the stamp of issue show or without being preachy? I think it has a lot to do with the fact that it's all very character based. It could come off very easily, I think, in the wrong hands as, like you said, very preachy, heavy handed, like even political, but for us, because we've created these characters that feel so real and we've created characters that people really want to hang out with. Everybody and their mama won an uncle Clifford in their life. Everybody want a roulette as they friend, right? So by tackling these issues and these stories through these characters that, you know, just feel like your home girl or your homeboy, you know, you just, I think in a weird way, you're able to take in the vitamins a little bit more. Yeah. And I mean, two of the characters in their storylines that I find particularly interesting is the relationship between uncle Clifford and low murder, and I wonder if you could tell us about those characters. So uncle Clifford is the owner of the pink, she has been wrestling with trying to, you know, keep the pink, you know, in her hands and keep the pink fiscally healthy. She is non binary, but she goes by, she has a she and her she uses she and her pronouns. And even in season one, you know, she began to cultivate this in the closet relationship with this up and coming trap a rapper named Lamar. And initially it felt like just this kind of lusty, sexual connection, but over time, it has grown to be something deeper. I think la murta in that he is, you know, so masculine, so sexy, how it has all this swag and has not been, he's honest with himself about, I think his identity, but I think that he is well aware that as a rapper as the rapper who does, you know, gangster rap. If he came out, he knows that he wouldn't be, I would say, embrace. And so last season, Lamar, you know, in an attempt to kind of flex in front of this music executive, he basically dismisses uncle Clifford, which, you know, hurts her to her core. And kind of brings into sharp relief this thing of Ken, you know, these two human beings, one who has a more feminine gender performance and this other one who has a more masculine junior performance. Can these two kind of live loudly in the light in a relationship. And so that has been one of the major struggles over the course of these past two seasons for these two particular characters. What I have found so interesting and I joke about this all the time, I'm like, did I just create, you know, a stripper show so that I could hopefully write one of the best love stories between two black queer people of all time. 'cause it's so interesting that people are so invested in this relationship, the will they or won't they make it for? Everyone. Even people who, you know, are low key homophobic or hiking homophobic. They still has a little murder cell tendon. 'cause he's a tenderoni. He absolutely is a lover and he's also a fighter. How come you let me back inside? 'cause you needed me. Then I needed you. Coming up why people can't stop fighting about P valley on social media. Stay with us. This message comes from NPR sponsor carvana in the business of driving you happy. When you're shopping for a car, there's nothing sweeter than staying within your budget sweet spot. That's why carvana has no bogus fees. So visit carvana dot com or download the app to shop for a vehicle. Listen to planet money for all kinds of weird and interesting stories that just happen to teach you a bit about money and the economy and how the world works. Planet money from NPR. Subscribe now. Parker. Gene. Code switch. Okay, well, gene, you may have seen this, but earlier this year there was a P valley social media uproar that had me feeling some type of way. Basically, there was an episode of the show that featured two scenes that people had very different reactions to. One

Clifford la murta Lamar Twitter Facebook wrestling Ken carvana NPR Parker
"katori" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

08:03 min | 3 months ago

"katori" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR. I'm Andre guitarist, a producer on the show. And Emily Hugh. You've heard me here on it's been a minute before. Well, Andrea and I, we are your guest hosts for the next couple of weeks. And we're hard at work baking up some fresh stories for you, so while those babies are proving in the oven, we thought we'd share a conversation from our good friends over at coat switch. It takes us into the glittering neon universe of a fictional strip club called the pink. And just a heads up, this episode contains explicit language about sex and sex work. So it might not be appropriate for young ears. So with that, let's go enjoy. Hey everyone, you're listening to code switch from NPR. I'm BA Parker. And I'm gene debi. Now Jeanne. I want to talk to you today about a show that I'm absolutely obsessed with. Have you ever watched P valley? You know, Parker has been on my list for a long time, but I actually have not gotten a chance to see it yet. Oh my gosh, you've got to. You've got to. So you obviously have feelings. I want to hear all of it just lay it all on me. All right, so listen, it's steamy and saucy and introspective. It contains multitudes. Okay. So basically, P valley is this dreamy, southern gothic black woman is soap of a show that focuses on the lives of strippers in this fictitious town called chuck ELISA Mississippi. The strippers work at a club called the pink that's PY and K. First up, we got blue cinnamon. Okay. And usually the way that strippers are portrayed on TV is this one dimensional world weary, single mom, or the stripper with the heart of gold. Exactly, but that's not P valley. In fact, you can tell from the first bars of the opening theme song that this is not your mama stripper show. I don't think my mom has a tradition. One, two break them. Three, four. But as I said, the show isn't just steamy. You've got these amazing characters. There's the always glamorous uncle Clifford, who is the owner of the paint. Rule number 45.22. Leave your baby daddy drama at home. There's Mercedes, who is the headstrong veteran stripper who keeps trying to retire, but she can't. Just when she was out to keep pulling her back in. Exactly. I'm just saying, my milkshake brings all the boys to the yard. And what would all I've been doing? And then this keyshawn, who is this dreamer, struggling to become a star and dealing with her abusive husband? What did he say? He was just Holland and screaming about wearing a mask. Oh, you got another complaint before. And the second season of the show, which is wrapping up this month, follows them all as they try to save the pink from being sold. So I've seen a lot of discourse around the valley, but I haven't obviously seen the show itself. I've seen a lot of people tweeting about, you know, the way it portrays black women and sex work. I've seen people argue about whether the accents are accurate, 'cause it's set in Mississippi. I've seen people talking about how beautifully shot it is. And all the people I know in real life who really rock with this show are southern black women. I guess you are a connoisseur, right? Yeah, 'cause we love mess. Everybody loves this though. But we love mess. Okay. Fair enough. Okay, P valley first premiered in the summer of 2020 and has gained such a strong following since. The first episode of the second season had more than 4.5 million viewers across platforms. Yeah. So I wanted to talk to the mastermind behind this hit show kotori hall. And by the way, Jeanne, kotori hall is the creator of P valley, which is impressive enough on its own, but she's an award winning playwright. She won the Pulitzer Prize for drama for her 2021 play the hot wing king. Okay. And P valley started out as a play as well. And it was inspired by her childhood growing up in Memphis, Tennessee, and I actually grew up like a lot of folks, I will say. Going to strip clubs. Started probably too young, but you know, when you would go into a club. You would see just this amazing spectacle. I think southern strip club specifically, there tends to be more of a show. It's not just about stripping and taking off your clothes, taking off your top, it's a really about these athletic sets that you get to see and throw money at the women, right? And so it was just part of my upbringing in terms of southern culture and seeing that and kind of being a participatory observer of the culture. So fast forward, I have moved up to New York, you know, just attending school, living my young adult fabulous New York City live. And I actually started taking pole dancing classes at crunch gym. I remember, and in that moment I realized how'd that go? I was just about to say I almost threw up actually on my first day. Because I was on the policy. I just kept on spinning around and around and around. And then I was like, I'll be right back. I'll be right back and I'll have to run to the bathroom. So in that moment, you know, it kind of crystallized for me how hard what these women do is. And I figured out, you know, I should probably make a story out of this. I was just inspired by the kind of super shiro Ness of the women that I had grown up seeing on the pole and then trying to do it myself. So I embarked on this 6 year long journey from that point of doing research, I sat across from over 40 women over the time I went to over 40 strip clubs, respect. Oh yeah, I did that journalism thing. Like really, really did a huge deep dive. Yo. I did everything, but auditioned. I was like, man, I should have, I should have went up on that stage. I should have, you know, because I had done the class, but I should have just gone ahead and went all the way. But I kind of, you know, that's the thing. It takes a lot of bravery. I think to do that, I just wouldn't as brave. The play came out of that, all of that. And I learned very quickly in 2015, which is when the play pussy valley was produced that it should have been a TV show because there was just so much going on and so many interesting characters and the dynamics just begged for a deeper exploration that could go on for multiple seasons. And so I decided to go out to LA and pitch it. And I remember everybody was like clutching their pearls. At my pitch. Because I just think they were like, we are, this is titillating. This is interesting, but there's just no way in hell that we're gonna do a show about strip clubs, you know, black women down south, you know, stripping. Just because it was like a cultural landmine, you know, there's this history of the hypersexualization of black women. And so I just think that people are very hesitant to take that on. But when I sat down with stars and I explained to them that this was not, you know, this glamorization of strip club culture. It was actually a humanization project that I was embarking on. They really, really understood where I was coming from. And they gave me that shot. They were the only place that

kotori hall Andre guitarist Emily Hugh BA Parker gene debi NPR chuck ELISA keyshawn Jeanne Mississippi southern strip club Andrea Parker Clifford Mercedes Holland Pulitzer Prize Memphis Tennessee pussy valley
"katori" Discussed on The Divine I AM

The Divine I AM

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on The Divine I AM

"You feel focused and trust that your quick thinking is going to get you there something about thinking here. Quick thinking that you need or you will need. He's here to help. Serve you with that. So i hope that resonated with you that resonates main thank you. You're welcome thank you for joining us katrina. We appreciate it. I want to go into the fees and just welcome in hyder shida. Thank you for being here. And martha and sandra thank guys in ira- I am looking through guys if you wanna put your questions or if you blink card pop in the comments but i'm going to go up the top and it looks like the first person that passed was tori. Let me just hop your comment up. She said katori said hi. Katori would love reading. I believe i have chosen my next pat as the one. I should be pursuing. Can you please confirm okay katori. Let's say i'm doing the enchanted but fearing energies for you. Let's see what the car tapped to say about that question. Humour shuffles that night was hurtling toward the future in that other card just so she knows. Yeah.

hyder shida katori Katori katrina sandra martha tori pat
"katori" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Is it just crude careerism or did he. I don't know go on a in ayn rand binge round sanchia house one week. Yup i had the same feeding his alex it was. It was so confusing to kind of think about him having had these opinions previously and how they fit with him now. I actually don't think it's not surprising if you look at him. As a whole so. I think shown jolly key see described him as having a kind of cherry picking approach to liberties. And i think that's accurate so you know. He's someone who opposes new cia but he hates to human rights so that kind of conflicting ideologies but basically he supports individual liberty but not the ability to hold state to account so i think on refugees and migrants what he was actually saying it was in pump it for the social market foundation. Is that once people here and half status. They should be able to work and learn english which is a very low ball. It's very low but seems generous. Considering the current approach of you know it makes economic sense. Of course people who were living here permanently should have the option to skills but what he was not advocating for was a fair asylum system in general and at some point refers to legitimate refugees which is actually very in line with the government's current to new merge in the borders will so it kind of fits with this confused ideology and ultimately. I don't think he would stick his neck out and risk his cabinet position even if he did one kind of reform to the system and he famously admitted into eighteen that he hadn't quite understood the full extent of uk. Trades reliance on the david kelly crossing which any child on the ferry trip with. No of and he was nicknamed the turnip in brussels during brexit negotiations. Because i think rob sounds like the dutch word for. It is his position purely down to brexit loyalty. Do you think does he have some underappreciated qualities ninety. He's he sung charmless that like brexit loyalty has to have played a big partner. I mean i. I've been reading a lot of tories or katori. Sources saying that you know he's very analytical and he's a big fan of evidence and he's very resourceful but i mean he didn't read the good friday agreement when he was lexi secretary he wants like in an argument with the uk statistics authority for coming out like random start about migration housing that no one had ever seen before on which turned out to be an accurate so those two things don't add up. He can't be both very analytical in of pick of evidence and then not read things that are in front of him. So i think probably his dropping out of the tory leadership race and lending support johnson afterwards is a more important factor into how he's gonna go where he is over promoted. Alex alex as we know from tweets from numerous story rob has a stakhanovite work ethic but he sort of seems to make the right noises in two thousand twelve. He coached at the pamphlet. Britannia unchained with four fellow members of the factory. Free enterprise including pocos faves pretty patel. This trust four of the five cases of ended up in johnson's cabinets. What's the appeal. I mean part of it. I think is that they define themselves by position. To david cameron's socially liberal green conservatism. That was laid by Other wings in the party. And i guess one of the drivers of pace cameron leaders has been to distance themselves from that. I mean in that. That pamphlet is kind of amazing curate. The talented have nothing to fear. Which is a weird thing for someone who lost their father to cancer aged twelve to write in speaking about those hoping to coast it's classic. Right-wing shitheads stuff cook. Donka mutterings suggests this quite a lot of dark money coming from the right wing of the republican party sloshing around uk. Politics via think-tank land. But i didn't want to stray into conspiracy territories there. There are certain aspects of that who which approvable and documented like the atlantic bridge projects. And things like that so maybe there are parts of the conservative party which know the international right-wing quite likes and importantly for his current job is designed as a vision for the uk's role in the world. I mean you don't necessarily be secretary without one but it helps. Yeah no. I mean if he couldn't see the full of kabul a day after kabul fell. I don't have much faith in his vision of anything tom. Sartori privately want him to go. afghanistan johnson as we like anyone unless they've been called canoed ruling on cctv. But do you think he is vulnerable in the next reshuffle with a reshuffle. Whenever you be you bring someone in and then you have to every decision that you make has consequences. Further down the line in every train makes somebody would actually brought in to replace him other he would necessarily be considered worth just entirely booting out so i think the question is a straightforward yes I think ultimately yup ghanistan story would eventually move on. I mean i think it's dominate roads holidays to of with story for the entire afghanistan process and in a month not time What is going on in afghanistan will be too closely alloyed with whether dominate row was on a paddle. Board of sick time will so. I don't think he'll probably be okay. I think there'll be a lot of people who feel like he's been targeted for a huge global crisis in there will be no justification for him losing his job racy. Why voice johnson has no problem with the cut currently anyway this happen in the next reshuffle. But boris johnson strategy for long time as has been absolutely to not have a problem with people who use this in very high jobs because they a threat to i mean if dominate rav is gonna lose his job for for what he did or didn't do creatine beach crisis than gavin williamson. Ob jailed and missile. I mean it's reshuffling is gonna is gonna suck people for being useless than rahlves not going to be too too high up there in front. Firing squad sort of human centipede of incompetence isn't exactly so visceral description. Wanting obviously rubbed did did run for leader. His majority fell by ninety percents in two thousand. Nineteen thousand seven hundred. Forty three after massive tactical voting. Let's live dem search. We saw what happened to on the rudd. You had much much smaller. Majority not really a haram visions. Is that number small enough margin to sort of course him. 'cause many angst amara's very small majority in hastings was considered to be a problem for her in becoming toilet because the toilet. The tory party will be unlikely to make someone leader. Who has the very real prospect of not holding their seats. General-election domini rob's tiny resort ties. More majority would would would with causing manx if he was in a position to be running for the conservative party leadership See that happening at least before. Twenty twenty four..

sanchia house social market foundation katori uk Alex alex johnson rob david kelly Donka cia kabul Sartori lexi afghanistan brussels cabinet patel david cameron conservative party cameron
"katori" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"But i mean she. She went to europe and did a bunch of italian variety shows like like crazy over the top disco e or somewhere maybe a little prior discussed the whole thing starts both in like a rollercoaster goes into the studio and around the room on my god. They all sort of start dancing sequined bikinis on stage. And things like that. But there's only so much airtime but that stuff was really good. That's incredible. There's a moment when they're talking about the some of the cabaret shows she's doing and it. There's really grainy footage of a dance studio where it seems like. She's rehearsing with her dancers. But it's it's it's so blurry and grainy that i can't tell if it's a recreation or if it's for real again with having access to rhonda rhonda grams archive. Rhonda shot a millimeter footage during those early years with when they first were going on Some of the tv shows. She shot footage. When tina went to london and win tino. i went on her own. She helped record some of those practice sessions and stuff that was never. It hadn't even been developed i. Wow wow I'll have to check with ben. This is definitely the first time that stuff had did and there was things sound right. I mean what we're seeing sound all that stuff. Another element of that is the dance instructor. For her cabaret sessions when she started doing her distant medleys. Who's in that is. Hey mickey your saviours. Toni basil fazal. Basil depends on which side of the pond. You're on yeah. Wow that's that's really god. Just the fact that that i was looking at footage was like that woman is moving in a way that only tina turner can move. But maybe it's a very skilled. Yeah it's real at this point in. The movie is when she meets her new manager. Roger and we begin the transformation into what would become eighties. Tina so you know. The harris cut the harris fashioned in a new way. I detail. I love about this part of the movie. Is that her for a time. Her backup band is dressed like ninjas seventies baby people are trying stuff out so deputy time roger deities. I think was twenty six years old. When he came he came to the states and he came over and started working with the manager of john and then became her manager But he was sort of like a young gator. He just managing like a small band in australia. And he met this period of time. When i think he's twenty seven or twenty eight years old but he became her manager right so they're super close friends now. He absolutely helps her get on the path that she wanted to get on. But i you know again talking about trying to do balancing stories. This was a hard period where we were like really trying to balance and i think katori hall who wrote the play and talk a little bit. I'm not sure film or not but really trying to balance its idea of this white guy comes in and then helps her. That's the only time that she sort of gets to this place. I think it was just a matter of really trying to let people understand that they truly did rely on each other to sort of inform each other's decisions and it was just a matter of where each other's strengths were and it was something that we all kind of wanted to make sure came cross right. It was like it was a friendship more than like didn't like He's not a savior. Yeah a savior. And he's not just like a businessman looking in.

rhonda rhonda Toni basil fazal tino Rhonda harris tina europe tina turner Basil ben london Tina katori hall Roger roger australia john
"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Truth behold i could have lived like this forever days at the shop being lulled by the sounds of rusty machinery dead bolts being bolted and unbolted dad and his guys making fun of american dieting for being less effective than the kyw mayor rouge diet of boiled grass. All i needed was the occasional hookup throughout his collection so dramatizes the push pull of being first generation. His characters vacillate between a loyalty to the class and culture. They grew up in and a yearning to ditch the weight of all that horrific cambo history by moving away and maybe picking up a degree or two as of course so himself did his characters in the most memorable stories. Are one of a kind. In three women of chuck's doughnuts a story evocative of edward hopper's nighthawks two young sisters work in their mothers twenty four hour donut shop and speculate on the silent man. Who comes in every night and doesn't eat his apple. Fritter in super king's son scores again a badminton coach who works in his parents crummy super king. Grocery store is driven mad with jealousy of his star player but to my mind. It's the story with the ironically. Vague title human development that hints at sos greater reach on the topic of identity that his future work might have achieved. Human development is narrated by a character named anthony three years out of stanford and unlike his techie friends. Making chump change. Anthony is teaching at a private high school in marin on a two year contract as the frank chin endowed teaching fellow for diversity when we meet him he's rereading moby dick in preparation for teaching it. Here's a snippet of a beautiful passage where anthony reflects on moby dick. It was the first novel i've ever read. That didn't care for resolutions. It validated for me. The experience of confusion of exploring something as stupid and vast as a white whale as an ocean. I wanted my students to understand the doom nature of a halves hunt for moby dick. The profound com of shmayleh's aimless wandering the difference between having purpose like ahab and finding meaning like ishmail. I thought my students should learn the best ways to be lost. Anthony's subsequently hooks up with an older man named ben. Ben is yet another bay area techie. And he seems thrilled to be with anthony especially because the two of them are cambodian-american. Ben is working on an app that is he proudly says will allow people of color people with disabilities people identifying as lgbtq to cruise for safe spaces spaces not specifically for sex but for the whole of their lives. What's at odds. Here are the attitudes towards identity of anthony who's not particularly wrapped up in being cambodian american but thinks of himself as more of a skeptical free-floating intellectual like ishmail and ben. Who's like a hab fixating on the consummation of a clarifying goal here. So embraces uncertainty and undermined several potent markers of identity at the necessity sexual orientation and the diversity industry itself. It's heartbreaking that we won't see so's continued exploration of these teams instead like anthony reading moby. Dick we too must be satisfied to live without resolutions. Marine car again teaches literature at georgetown university. She reviewed after parties by anthony vis not so tomorrow on fresh air collaborating with stevenson. Heim on three musicals. My guest will be james lapine. He wrote the book for the show's sunday in the park. With george into the woods and passion and directed the original broadway productions. His new book as a behind the scenes look at

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Anthony visas died unexpectedly. Last december our book critic. Maureen corrigan says these nine stories mostly about first generation cambodian-americans navigating differences with their parents generation of education sexuality and possibility are a bittersweet triumph. It's impossible to talk about after parties. The much-heralded short story collection by anthony. Business so without first talking about it's back story so died this past december of a drug overdose. He was only twenty eight. Most readers who pick up this collection will already know about sows death and yet i'm guessing that like me. A fair number of those readers will be in denial as they're reading these short stories. His voice is so alive. Smart flip funny. Rude sexually explicit and compassionate. come on. it doesn't make sense. That upon its introduction to the larger literary world such a fresh voice has already been stilled. That freshness is derived not only from so's style as a writer but from the nuance perspective of his ultra intersectional identity so was a queer first-generation cambodian american who graduated from stanford and the mfa program at syracuse university. He grew up in stockton california where his working class parents along with many other cambodian refugees settled after fleeing the genocidal regime of the kamerhe. Rouge almost all of the nine stories and after parties are set in stockton a place. We're told that some. Us government official deemed worthy of a bunch of ptsd doubt refugees. That's the teenage narrator of a story called mai li mei li mei li. He's a young gay man who can't wait to escape this landscape of dollar tree stores and cheap sushi joints but toby the slightly older gay narrator of another story called the shop has a more wistful view. In fact toby has gone home to stockton after graduating college in the midwest to work at his father's auto shop there. Most of the men are like his father survivors of the killing fields. Here's toby's view of the place..

Maureen corrigan Anthony stockton anthony syracuse university mai li mei li mei li mfa stanford toby california Us midwest
"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I had There was always a dancer who was a writer and so we not only did. I have like all of that research but to have somebody in their room. Who was kind of like. are you know. Stir club culture truth. Barometer i think was always super important but on the other side of that people who have never even stepped into a strip club before they brought the experience of having struggled with domestic abuse or they they had complicated relationships with their moms or you know they grew up in abject poverty or they came from really you know whole families but you know still struggled with i would say Body image issues like all of my writers. Different experiences have been funneled through every single one of those characters you know. Oftentimes we are dealing with issues. That are very specific to the lgbtq community. And i would say ours. Interesting are less rhetoric is like. Oh my gosh over. Half of us are queer. This is so cool. How often does that happen. You know and the fact that our show really feels responsible to make sure that you know black. Queer folks get presented in a way that is loving and respectful. Why did it feel important of the directing staff be composed of women. You know. it's so interesting. I will say i was actually open to having men be. Directors is just that once. I went through my interviewing process. They were not the best ones for the job and it was because when i interviewed folks i'd be like what is your idea of the female gaze and i just think that the women who ended up getting those jobs they had a clarity. They have been dealing with it in their own work. They really understood how their choices. Whether it was framing was camera movement was going to feed into..

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I do not come from a broken home. I was taking the pole fitness class. And i was like this fun. And i love my body and I think i have my sprays. And so i want to go show them off at this. You know a audition and then that ended up getting a job. The stories are so different. The women are so different the whys of why they are doing. This is so different. And whether you know it was on the main floor or in The locker room or in a women's home. I was really given Just an entry into These private spaces and oftentimes into these women's hearts. And i think had a lot to do with the fact that i asked questions with so much respect. It was never a thing of like me being judgy or judgment. And i'm not i'm just not that way. Anyway as a human being and so all of that kind of lined up for me in order to help me for over six years interview over forty women in over forty clubs all across this nation. And i took all of the stories all of the mistakes the dreams that these women kinda poured into my ear and create it all of these different care in the world of valley and i understand you also took pole dancing lessons yourself. I did my geiger okay. So how did those go day did not go. Well that not at all. I mean atkins work. Talk a little bit i could. I could get better. Could be better than this. But this is where am and i accept but with the with the classes i was like yeah. Let me see if i can climb up on the pole. Can i hold my own weight. Can i spin and my first class. I literally ran out of the room. Because i was about to vomit. Because it's the dizziness. That occurred like i wish is really bad and it it obviously made me respect them so much more..

atkins
"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I was at columbia at the time and we were taking an acting class and our teacher gave us an assignment. She was like go. You and your partner go to the library and find the play. That has the scene for you. And you're seeing partners type so as we all know type it could be physical. Could be racial whatever but you know my my scene partner ended up being another young black woman and our members trudging to the library. We're like pulling all of these plays off the shelf and we literally cannot find a play that had a scene for two young women in it. So we're like okay okay. Maybe our teacher who's been teaching for. Twenty years has a suggestion. So i remember. We went back to class the next day and we were just like. Do you have Any any recommendations for us where we are looking for a play that has seen for two young black women. Ten seconds went by twenty seconds. Went by forty seconds went by and our professor could not think of a single play that had a scene for two young black women and in that moment i was like well. I guess i have to write those plays then. I want to ask a little bit about another award winning. Play of yours. The mountaintop what was just so many of them What was the central theme or truth. You wanted to explore in that play. Which imagines the last night of martin luther king's life set at the lorraine motel. I think the most important truth. I wanted to explore in the play. Was that even an hour. Extraordinariness were quite ordinary as human beings. You know you walked until my big mama's living room and you see you know three pictures. It would be dr king jesus. Nfl life obama. But but you know it. Was this exercise in showing how we put people up on these pedestals and yet they're so human..

columbia lorraine motel martin luther king dr king jesus Nfl obama
"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Sometimes trotted out in ways that you know. She's talked about being harmful Having struggled with it's interesting. I felt that the icon part oddly was easy because i feel like. That's the part that we see. That's the part that's been replicated for us. It's always the human part. That's the hardest part. Because it's reliant. On how truthful a subject wants you to be about their life and so i was lucky in that because she was used to being truthful you know. The there was kind of an easy access to her her humanity. Even though it's hard to articulate because you do have to lean into the imperfections of the human being. And i would say that of the entire journey figuring out which imperfections of her to highlight and making sure that you know an in interesting it was really about trying to find the things that made her human i e for example. You know the fact that i would say that. She struggled and had a lot of guilt. Like a lotta mama's do with having to leave her. Her kid does behind at certain points and and the fact that she had to kind of sacrifice that and not be as good of a mom in terms of or how other people define that right. I don't necessarily subscribe to that. But the fact that she had to choose career sometimes over family she had to choose the music over her her son's sometimes and that was that hurt. Her and i was really happy that she was able to be honest about that particular struggle and how that imperfection of her life kind of settled her soul in the way that she still dealing with some of those regrets so in addition to having tina now back on the west though you also just wanna pulitzer for the hot wayne king. Congratulations my god. It was so crazy. Because you know. I think because the world was shut down in theater will shut down right. You just kind of forgot about the award cycle..

wayne king tina
"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

"She's a superwoman. Mike i think of like the black superwoman. Myth ride that there's nothing can bring us down and it's like oh my god the amount of things that bring us down and continue to bring us down so Anytime i get an opportunity to lay my hands on a black woman story. I just wanna make sure that she is fully rendered and she feels so real and that she's not actually perfect. I always feel like you know. There's always this kind of onus on on black folks to have these images of perfection out there. But i always feel as though you have to allow me access to my mediocrity to my mistakes in order to understand my humanity right and so i was just so happy that that's exactly what she wanted. She did not wanna sanitized version. This show it was like yeah you go. You've all along. But you gotta understand the pay behind every note every wale and be complicit you know as i would say a consumer was in effect in a weird way. Many of us have been consuming. Her black pain heard her trauma. How involved with tina and the original writing process extremely and you know for her. She felt that there was a kind of cultural sensitivity and of regional specificity. That she felt was just you know. Meet it in order for it to come across as authentic portrayal of her life. I was lucky in that. I come from the same soil as her like i knew about growing up in the south. I grew up at totally different times. But you know sadly the south hasn't changed very much and so i was kind of able to use my own lived experience my own struggles being a black woman in the entertainment industry to kind of fuel. the story and so To be able to fly to switzerland and hang out with her for hours and hours on end and for her to tell me her story. And it's interesting because often times you know people who who we think we know. Their story has been told so many times. It's like oh there's nothing new to add to the story. But i really felt like She led me into some new cracks and crevices of life The fact that. I got an opportunity to really talk to her about her mother. Which i don't think has really been addressed in previous interviews or or you know the movie or the autobiography Which talking to her about her very complicated and often. I would say toxic relationship with her. Mother was really the doorway that i walked into act something new to her story. Now the musical begins with tina played by adrienne warren. Centering herself with a buddhist chant. What made you wanna start there. And what role does spirituality play throughout the production..

wale Mike tina switzerland adrienne warren
"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I'm terry gross. Our guest could hall is nominated for two tony awards. Best musical and best book of a musical as a producer and the writer of the broadway. Show tina the tina turner musical. The show just reopened in london and scheduled to return to broadway. This fall hall also received this years pulitzer prize for drama for her play. The hot wing king said in memphis where hall grew up. It's a comedy and drama about a man prepping a recipe for a spicy chicken wing contest. The play is an exploration of family ties sexuality and black masculinity hall received the olivier. Livy award for her earlier. Play the mountaintop which imagines the last night of martin luther king's life hall is also the show runner and executive producer of p valley. A breakout show on stars about the women working in fictional mississippi strip club. The series is based on her play of a similar but more explicit name. The show is currently filming. Its second season. Katori hall spoke with our guest interviewer. Hana georges hanna is a staff writer at the atlantic where she writes about culture. Let's start with the song from tina. The tina turner musical. This is a track from the original. London cast recording adrienne. Warren originated the role in london. Before moving to the broadway production. She's nominated for a tony to good evening. Ladies and gentlemen. You're on for quite a treat tonight. We haven't seen this incredible woman performing the big apple. So please put your hands together province. Tina turner offs hard to to win. Those due to our is as a name. Plays that abba do wop.

Tina turner terry gross king's life hall tony awards p valley tina mississippi strip club pulitzer prize Katori hall Hana georges hanna memphis london martin luther king atlantic adrienne Warren London apple
"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Adult. Kevin whitehead is the author of the new book. Play the way you feel. The essential guide the jazz stories on film. He reviewed solo albums by tenor saxophonists. Jd allen and. john era gone on monday. Show playwright katori hall. She won the pulitzer prize this year for play the hot wing king which explores family sexuality and black masculinity. She's also the producer and writer of the broadway. Show tina the tina turner musical her previous play. The mountaintop imagined the last night of the life of martin luther king junior. I hope you can join us. Freshers executive producer is danny miller. Our senior producer. Today is roberta shorrock. Our technical director and engineer is audrey bentham with additional engineering support. By joyce lieberman jillian hartsville charlie higher and tina calicut. Our interviews and reviews produced an edited by amy salad phyllis myers sam brigger lauren crandall hiding soman theresa madden and marie ball. Denardo fair challenor. Seth kelly and kayla lattimore our producer of digital media. Is molly seavy. Nesper for terry gross. I'm david dein. cooling this message comes from. Npr sponsor hp to help combat climate change. Hp thought about how they could build their products in a truly sustainable way taking used plastic and turning it into best in class products at hp dot com slash hp dash sustainability..

Kevin whitehead Jd allen john era katori hall roberta shorrock audrey bentham joyce lieberman jillian hartsville pulitzer prize charlie higher tina calicut tina turner danny miller amy salad phyllis myers sam brigger lauren crandall soman theresa madden marie ball tina
"katori" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on AP News

"Geico dot com slash local Nevada's governor signed a law that Could make it the first state in the nation to hold a presidential primary in 2024, But that's not the final step needed. Democrats in Nevada push to change from the in Person caucus system, which is hard to count to a primary ballot on the first Tuesday in February, and by pushing up the date, party members say they'll provide a better representation than early states, Iowa and New Hampshire do because Nevada is more racially diverse, but the national political part This would need to agree to the change in the primary calendar, and the Republican National Committee has already said it's opposed. Also, if Nevada schedules itself as the first state, it's likely Iowa and New Hampshire would move up their primaries. I'm Jackie Quinn, Justice Department investigation I'm Tim Maguire, with an AP newsman at the current Justice Department is investigating actions taken by the Trump Justice Department. Here's the AP Soccer. Madani, The department's inspector general, is investigating after revelations that the Trump era Justice Department secretly ceased phone records from at least two House Democrats in a leaks. Probe. Intelligence Committee chair Adam Schiff and panel member Eric Swalwell say Apple told them last month, the department subpoena their metadata and As the committee investigated. Trump's Russia ties The Senate's top two Democrats are demanding former Trump attorneys General Bill Barr and Jeff Sessions testify. Stories of race, racism and colonialism in the U. S. Sweep the Pulitzer Prizes for the Arts from Louise Erdrich's novel, The Night Watchman to a Malcolm X Biography co written by the late less pain to Katori Hall's played the hot wing King. I'm Tim Maguire. I might grow. CIA reporting federal regulators will seek automated braking requirements for heavy trucks. The Department of Transportation, says U. S auto safety regulators will move to require or set standards for automatic emergency braking systems on new heavy trucks. The decision is a departure from Trump Administration policies that allowed similar regulations proposed in 2015 to languish in the regulatory process. After former President Donald Trump took office, the Department of Transportation, which includes the national Highway Traffic Safety Administration will also require rigorous testing standards for autonomous vehicles and set up a national database to document automated vehicle crashes. The department made the announcements when it released its spring regulatory agenda. Mike Grossi, a Washington AP News I'm.

Mike Grossi Louise Erdrich Tim Maguire Jackie Quinn 2015 Jeff Sessions Republican National Committee CIA President Eric Swalwell Trump Administration Adam Schiff New Hampshire Katori Hall 2024 AP Democrats Madani national Highway Traffic Safet Senate
"katori" Discussed on Feliz Dia Novo

Feliz Dia Novo

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Feliz Dia Novo

"Yeah i call about. Our country is somewhere also look for. So how'd y'all eastern beauty aging saw least a region mosquito fees. You'll tumbler per kim. Shurmur also bore the so mad ceremonies local tour de so russillo. Katori is so palestinian. Decided you communica. Something with this ecuador. Save us on the mood sampling applause. Say some i store here to simply gather me follow coma zone to smith's and soul as hr tease the communica though latchkey then gain appropriate. Died your vision. Now the school is ms that all that enthused he communicated covert program mckee verizon no and over versa educate tell the into parts per la bora to pay certain though. Dr bernard thought now. Some kosovo though marquis you thought they sounded deals are deposed the alka passo makunike forth cunard. Who's got sean depends largely commuted market on the logic age. Even cut the deal. Meisels amazon's capacity that. I just want us even. See the artie yelling. That vic- nausea picard to simply look massoni. Spills won't put the obviously are artie tampa covi- sober up gallup. Espn view the homeless today. Modell move abolish. Academia body knows better. Served preseason and there there's hockey will kick on the outside year. This nassar so boys day gained a radio Stuck as soon as you did ask. You are voltage sabi academic power usage. Give them for ninety the but it's don't dominate your action deal but it seems fitness the the thing we need this increment. Saddam raise a remarks right without sash dot. Labor's batch lilly co k that will suffice with quiz winter on we'll sail into schools. The arctic sophis- years of school was liquidated value schools burn. Xanthos goods buys. We'll sit they'll be up is suck fuzzy. Little absolve county asaf allergy being equal. Meet the game for my they. Eat maxima enola gay officials agendas so many million so many being chiefs games through more me. It was ziarat. This is not i only saw arrested rob thursdays. Pretty made us you as you just on. Today's got nothing gladys got songs residency gum. Angel iriarte optimism jumping pitch dark angel food so employees would always as was those obscene that was or the booth Senior director john. Each each will indulge too. Ill so those any. I wanted go for several key. Represent allergy or if is in order so not at. The moment is easier. Pools a signaling. That is so key genetic mutation the jia you've day dow S he sou. Every giants repossessed now in thousand now so hit thaddeus. you'll be chievo commercial. I gave us a hobby. Simply mill will sit back doors you sit thighs patching for the sears us if look.

amazon Saddam bernard verizon Today john today Each each ninety palestinian massoni Katori Shurmur covi ecuador thursdays chievo thaddeus Espn zone
"katori" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"katori" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"So when you're confronted with their full humanity. I e i wanna be physically female. It's like oh no that's not. I can't that's messy. Yeah it's confronting. The second season almost feels like it's aware that the sword of damocles cancellations hanging over their heads because they really did so much they pack so much into the second season. I mean we got the mummified corpse. Plotline where erica. Mummify a person who is trying to kill her and that she manages survived but she has a dead body. We have we have somebody. Trance murder a transmitter. And i guess we don't want to spoil it but you know. Angelica ross becomes a phenomenon through the series and billy porter develops a romantic sexual relationship as his character. Pray tell with. Ricky who's like a young man young man and i think there are so many groundbreaking moments and so many like. I can't believe i'm watching this on television moments on pose that it really is a disservice to humanity to pull the plug after only a ryan murphy's projects and we have seen ryan murphy's projects you know. Start out starring devolve into into garbage like if you look at glee we had so much charm that first season and just by the end of it. You're just like oh my god. No wonder why like. It's just terrible. Yeah it's a gift. Fausto that ends before it what that would be feel like i. By the way this summer fees to fund three thousand episodes three thousand three on. I'd say at least ten of them right over the team sixteen years. Yeah at least yours. Initially known as the nine eleven lady talking about experienced during nine eleven. And then you came on to talk about Your documentary about the magnetic fields. What else there is the bump. Yes with a latigo and and so many other amazing film projects and experiences. And you've had a lot of our audience has gotten to know you outside of him teen mom and so it's it's really interesting to see you know your figure your profile change over the last decade of this kind of like reality tv star even though most of the time behind the camera. Yeah i'm no star. But but i think it's interesting for for both of us since we've known each other i don't know twenty five years something like that and we hope. We started out as goofy performance. Our kids doing you know weirdo I remember you in a you know. Tin foil dress in headdress. Strat doing drag adam. Yeah mean we we really came out of a an artistic community that was not mainstream and yet we're working as you know we're working creatives in in fairly mainstream you know worlds. It's funny because i still have that tendency in those routes and i think you do as well like we still have a kind of populism about our interests in our work. Which is why the tv that i watch. I'm often curious what young people are. Watching. and so when. I saw a bridgeton i was like what the fuck is this lake. Classic like 'cause when. I was like in my you know probably from age thirteen like age seventeen i was reading those toward bodice buster romance novels. That would like have a lot of sexual material without being like super explicit. But they were you know. They were like they were hot. Titillating in bridgeton is you know written into a a period series but of course You know what's quickly apparent flake. Oh they're using all kinds of untraditional casting. We'll that's what i thought it. I you know it's a shonda rhimes productions. Of course it's gonna be a you something. That's positive around racial diversity but it's like an episode four you realize oh this is actually an alternate history like the great About catherine the great where. It's not which is on hulu. I think where it's not strictly history and yet it let you understand that historical figures were people who you know got pregnant. I mean one of the main plotlines in bridgeton is a young woman gets pregnant and her husband is our her The father of a child is at war and it's a crisis to be ruined as a woman in the get into it in a really different way Sex and because they're they're you know they're casting you know all across races Aunt but it's like eighteen thirties. England's so regency england. So there's a lot of. It's just very interesting. I was watching it at the same time that i was watching p valley on stars which is also very you. Know centered on the female experience and you know sexism. Racism the control of bodies and sexuality But one is very supposedly prim and proper in one is very you know out in the open and aggressive like female sexuality is strong powerful athletic and aggressive and p valley valley. Feels like if you're missing the the dynamics the energy the i can't believe i'm watching this on television of pose. Yeah it's definitely you know. Because of the character of non binary character workers and performers and dancers and in a lot of ways p valley is kind of like the small town cousin of pose. Wouldn't you say i guess so. I mean small town implies that it has a smaller world but the world is as rich as pose and it's It is at the south end katori hall. Who's the creator She truly loves these ito strip clubs shoes to with her friends like in atlanta and stuff. she loves that world and she respects. You know she started interviewing some of the dancers and you know this is where Torquing came from like torquing came out of these kinds of artistic. Space fits moody balancing bodey bouncing be. What is it a. What is the big free song..

ryan murphy twenty five years Ricky sixteen years second season first season both England one nine eleven p valley valley atlanta eighteen thirties south end katori hall england nine eleven lady three thousand age seventeen p valley episode four
Rocket Roundup for June 3, 2020

Astronomy Cast

05:12 min | 2 years ago

Rocket Roundup for June 3, 2020

"Twenty twenty. Today's livestream was hosted by Anne Wilson. And our audio is reported by me Allie Pelfrey. Most Mondays through Fridays. Our team will be here putting science in your brain. Usually Wednesdays for rocket roundup, and we have some catching up to do. Let's get to it, shall we? A JAKSA H. to be rocket launched the H. T. V. Nine Mission Aka. WHO NATORI Nine on Wednesday may twentieth, twenty twenty at five thirty one PM ut see. The mission patches a gold ring around a blue and yellow graphic of the H. T. V. Capsule with a yellow image of the ISS in the distance against a black background. The text H to transfer vehicle and mission designation HDTV, nine, or in the yellow ring. The Japanese characters say Kuna Tori nine. There were to last for this flight. This was the last flight for the H. to be the first flight of the H. Three is planned for later this year. This was also the last Katori. A new Japanese cargo vessel is expected to launch and twenty when he to. A lot of cargo went to the ISS ON HDTV nine. Six thousand two hundred kilograms to be exact. That's four four thousand three hundred kilograms in the pressurized compartment and one thousand nine hundred kilograms in the unpressurised compartment. This includes a solid combustion experimental module. The module will continue research on combustion in microgravity, also on board were six new lithium ion batteries for the space station and fresh bell, peppers, Kiwi and citrus fruit for the crew. All fresh fruits and vegetables were grown in Japan. One of the other experiments was a wireless. Lan Demonstration or W. L. D. pronounced wild. Wild was an experiment that was performed during Kuna Tori nines flight. This was tested during Katori nines approach where video taken by a camera attached to the craft's propulsion module was broadcast in real time on board, the space station via a wireless data link the technology tested by wild will enable ISS cruise to monitor approaching vehicles during an autonomous docking. This was the first time to spacecraft communicated using w LAN during a rendezvous. On May twenty second at seven thirty one am ut see Russian. Armed Forces launched a Soyuz two one B rocket with the cosmos, two five four six mission. This was a military mission. So details are a little scarce. Here's what we do know. The payload was the Tundra Fourteen L. satellite that will be used for an early warning system, replacing the aging US K. and US Komo constellations. This is the fourth satellite and the newer. Tundra Constellation. The satellite was placed and ammonia orbit, which is a highly. The satellite was placed in a Molnia orbit, which is highly elliptical and highly inclined. When I say elliptical I. Don't mean a tiny bit. egg-shaped were straight into severely stretch territory with altitudes ranging from six hundred to nearly forty thousand kilometers above earth. At that long oval of an orbit and place it at sixty three degree angle relative to Earth's equator, and you get the highly inclined orbit. The what's the purpose of this orbit? Thanks to orbital mechanics. Ammonia orbit is uniquely suited to providing useful satellite coverage for earth, observation and communication services needed by ground terminals operating in high northern latitudes. Those areas are not easily serviceable from satellites in the typical geosynchronous orbits over the equator. Because any antenna you're using would be pointing at such a low angle that a small hill could easily block the path of the signal. And even though polar orbiting satellites can reach these same latitudes, they only have coverage of any given spot for several minutes at a time. The MONJA orbit is inclined in such a way that the desired areas are not only clearly visible. The satellite is pause for a time at its highest point. Thanks to orbital mechanics, which provides several hours of uninterrupted coverage that. L. E. O. AND GAO satellites simply can't

H. T. V. Nine Mission Aka Kuna Tori Nines United States Anne Wilson Twenty Twenty Kuna Tori ISS Allie Pelfrey H. T. V. Capsule Japan Armed Forces GAO W. L. D. L. E. O.
Fashion History Now

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:42 min | 3 years ago

Fashion History Now

"So this week April. I thought we were Kinda start talking about fashion wink. We're on the tail end of the month of quote Unquote Fashion Week. We are currently witnessing all the Paris runway shows and I thought this would actually be a great opportunity to suggest a instagram. Follow to our listeners. At Robin Given our OB. I N. G. I. V. H. A. N. She's a fashion critic for the Washington Post and pass dressed guest that absolutely. She came on the show and our very first season to talk to us about the battle over cy which happened in nineteen seventy three and it was basically like a fashion show face off between French. Katori as an American designers. Yes so that was an amazing episode but she is an incredible critic. She's very thoughtful and insightful about her coverage of fashion that I think a lot of our listeners will really appreciate for instance today. She's posting about the Balenciaga show. And she's saying that. The show is thoughtful but she says quote. Thoughtful just stressful. It's very ominous. I think it's kind of a commentary on climate change. I haven't read much else about it. But she also has been writing about kind of the feminist ideologies that Inspire Maria Grazia. Carey's creations for Dr. And how you know that. The fashions and the runway she presents don't really reflect those feminists beliefs. They still reflect this kind of feminine ideal of a woman which is a little counter intuitive or counter to feminism for all women representing all women. That's something that's I guess. Problematic throughout fashion she also has commenting about Virgil Oslo off-white collection. She just doesn't get it. I don't know if you've seen that yet. But he was sending like half Parkas and half tool dresses down the runway. Yes and not only that but one of those tool dresses was actually ripped off. I think it was from givenchy. I don't know if Jeevan she but she ought. There's definitely been comparisons to victor and Ross tool creations and kind of cut out creations. Like it's definitely something that's definitely probably been done before. But I thought the fashion writer Tony Glenville who you could also follow on instagram. How To really insightful? Commentary about some of the collections? That have hit the runway today and he wrote that it's time fashion. Stop treating US too. Don't care close. You know kind of these clothes that we can't really wear in real life. He says you know when you start thinking. The future and designing fashion aware in the real world think about fashion to keep and cherish and fashion to make women look strong and confident. It's not taking the fun out of fashion. It's actually thinking on the subject of fashion as Global Business. And he goes on. That fashion is a creative force. An employer of millions repository of tradition. And Crass let's think about how it can survive in the future and then I wanted to kind of talk to you about this April because he ends with costume belongs in museums. Fashion belongs in our lives and I was curious what your thoughts are on about that. Do you agree with him? Well I mean I think. That's some problematic terminology in terms of exactly how we as fashion historian. Use those words right because all fashion is costume but all costume isn't necessarily fashion. Does that make any sense? Yeah and I think. He's trying to distinguish between this idea of like fashion as as costume as kind of like this performance. Art as a something. That isn't really representative of what we would wear in every day and specifically he was talking about the mosquitoes down by Jeremy Scott. I'm recently which he literally had. It was very much a let them eat cake. Marie-antoinette moment with like tons of Pan Yeas and women in the you know those huge waves reflective of late eighteenth century fashion but they literally came down the runway dressed cakes and like references to eighteenth century panelled gown so a lot of people probably aren't going to wear those clothes. I guess the argument would be if we're just creating fashion for. I guess this like a federal shock value to send it down the runway. Is it still worth it? Should we be doing that or should we be more conscious of the environment and creating fashion? That isn't actually meant to be put on bodies. Well I that actually kind of leads me into the the follow that I want to talk about. Because you said WHO's GonNa wear these things? Well perhaps this next segment of the fashion buying public. Which are drag Queens? So I can definitely see some of those drag Queens on Rupaul drag race adoring that mosquito collection and I would like to recommend to. Our listeners is to follow an instagram account. Called at Drag Bombs D. R. A. G. B. O. M. B. S. and this instagram account is hysterical is actually run by the brother of a former dressed guests. Terrace ain't James. Who CAME ON SEASON? One and talk to us about the intersection in history a sustainability in the fashion industry but her brother. Jordan. He's hilarious. He is obsessed with repulsed dragway. And He's also obsessed with lush products. The cosmetics Carney and so what he does he finds pictures of drag queens and then pairs them up with the lush product that they're outfit and they are hysterical. Some of them are so dead on and so perfect. I showed it to a couple of my friends one time and I tell everybody to follow this all the time. And they're like oh no he has to be the designer of the products and the drag queens are his inspiration but no no no. No that is not the case. He's just really really good at this. So if you WANNA put a giggle in your day follow Jordan on drag vase and I promise you it's GonNa show Ganic smile at your face. I know and I just speaking of. I've never seen this account so I just went to it. And it's Jordan the Raven Claw Lachey. A master bather and he says no drag. Queens harmed in the making of this account. It is pretty incredible. How spot on a lot of these comparisons are. Wow okay well check that out dress listeners. Instagram accounts for you to follow and check out some other things for you to watch them suggestions of some films. I would like to suggest that I just watched. Actually this past week I came across. It's actually a couple years old but I had not seen it. It's a documentary called my generation. That's streaming on Amazon. Have you heard or seen of that? April I have not but you better bet I'm GONNA put it on my list now. I really really liked it Because it is almost entirely comprised of archival footage and photographs. So there's no there's no inter spicing with interviews of people in the modern day there. They just take those voices from those interviews. It's narrated by Michael Caine. It's kind of like has generation and his experience in the nineteen sixties and he interviews. People like famed photographer. David Bailey models penelope tree Mary. Quant twiggy Vidal Sassoon. People interviewed there so integral to this period. And this this documentary. That's really about in the nineteen sixties it just reveals how integral fashion was to the experience of the nineteen sixties by all these interviews. So I highly suggest checking that

Instagram Queens Jordan Paris Washington Post Robin United States Vidal Sassoon N. G. I. V. H. A. Michael Caine David Bailey Maria Grazia Virgil Oslo Givenchy Jeevan Carey Jeremy Scott Ross Global Business
Holiday's 31 lead Pelicans to 124-117 win over Pacers

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

Holiday's 31 lead Pelicans to 124-117 win over Pacers

"Sean New Orleans couturier outscored had two Indiana goals Claude eighteen euro to nine had a goal over and an the assist final in three Brian minutes Elliott for made twenty a one five twenty four saves one seventeen as the flyers win around the capital it was true seven holiday to two who led the Katori way for the a pelicans gave the flyers with are thirty one one nothing points lead in the fourteen first period of them only in to the see final T. J. three Oshie minutes tied of thing the game I just try to consider the flyers paying as much as then possible scored today three goals office within they a minute got and a forty pretty five good shot seconds blocker down to take there but a four one lead from and that they point never looked back Katori a made says some the open flyers looks bounced and back from nicely there after comment being itself shut was on out the stress by the devils New Orleans last manage time the out wind is without just his top you know one two of those scorers games were Brandon Ingram and designed often Williamson seem the pelicans to go our way and and winning for the fifth time in seven games out I rebounded thought you know far Indiana as important fifty a come three out strong to thirty and seven we did the flyers Jeremy kept lamb Alex had events twenty can six at six points hundred for the ninety Pacers eight career who have lost goals five straight Craig heist Tom Washington McCabe Indianapolis

Alex Indianapolis Tom Washington Craig T. J. Brian Claude Sean New Orleans Pacers Elliott Jeremy Indiana Williamson Brandon Ingram New Orleans Devils Katori
Giroux, Flyers rout Capitals and keep Ovechkin at 698 goals

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Giroux, Flyers rout Capitals and keep Ovechkin at 698 goals

"Sean couturier had two goals Claude euro had a goal and an assist in Brian Elliott made twenty five saves as the flyers around the capital seven to two Katori a gave the flyers are one nothing lead in the first period only to see T. J. Oshie tied the game the flyers then scored three goals within a minute and forty five seconds to take a four one lead and they never looked back Katori a says the flyers bounced back nicely after being shut out by the devils last time out is just you know one of those games were often seem to go our way and I thought you know far as important a come out strong and we did the flyers kept Alex events can at six hundred ninety eight career goals Craig heist Washington

Sean Couturier Brian Elliott Katori T. J. Oshie Devils Washington Claude Alex Craig
Half of all children are subjected to violence each year, research finds

UN News

08:18 min | 3 years ago

Half of all children are subjected to violence each year, research finds

"One billion children or half the world's youngsters of victims of violence ranging from conflict and humanitarian crises to cyberbullying and recruitment by terrorist groups. That's according to you an expert Najat Mala Who Advocates for governments civil society and other stakeholders to put children at the heart of their policies? Ms g began her appointments as the UN Secretary General Special Representative on violence against children in July and recently presented her first report to the UN General Assembly. My Yakub asked about progress in the global effort to protect children. My first report really give brought picture about what's going on regarding you know ending violence against children today to have more than one hundred countries who are implementing pink National Strategy regarding child protection you have almost sixty countries who really have adopted legal framework banning all all forms of violence against children. You have more and more coalitions within many key actors including children's themself you have in many countries also more evidence based information but you have one billion of children. We still facing violence worldwide. It means health of children worldwide. This is too much and to add to this. Many countries are facing many many challenges challenges. You have humanitarian crisis. You'll have conflicts. You have social this. You have migration. You have an increasing number of refugees. You have love all this violence on line including cyber bullying child sexual exploitation line. You have also the enrollment of children in gangs. You have more more. And more armored violence that increasing in many countries and you have also currently all this increasing of criminal organization and terrorist organizations that recruit children and children. What is more important? They are even are not victims or witnesses they are facing seeing violence within Internet and violence becomes socially tolerated and it is why really when we think about ending violence again children by twenty thirty we need to do more and more faster and better and we need to stop having commitment and slogan but really to act and to assess what is going on on grassroots if we were to compare the situation and the Arab region to the rest of the world. Where do we lack behind? It's very difficult. Yeah because when we're speaking about Arabic region it's not any animal genius region. You'll have to take into account you have rich countries. You have the developing countries you have many any region currently who are facing or this increasing conflicts humanitarian disaster huge number of refugees and of Migrant Agra children were really fleeing from violence. You have also problem of social discrimination social disparities you have also the gender discrimination you have a processing harmful social norms. It's very difficult to rank. Violence is worldwide but what is important regarding things is the Arabic region. I was just in our men when we had wonderful congress on violence against children into Arabic region and many things going gun regarding legislation guiding national strategies regarding also communication and raising awareness for changing social knows bits. We need to do more and to translate a really in concrete. Acts is very important but in the meantime you need to put an end to all this conflicts just because it's amazing what is going on currently and regarding what's coming on currently Lebanon social protests. You'll have a lot. I think what's really important. Children and use Are expressing themselves and we need to see them not only as quincy but really as actors of positive change and to take into account realism. Commence to build on what you just said you mentioned conflict around the word and the children on the move. How do you tackle the subject to find a solution? It's you know child protection. Even my mandate is global. And Will Casey Mandate I can do my Lord but what is important is how we can build build links and we can have joint strategies joint action within all the other key stakeholders and in the same time working also with civil society. The organizations that it's very important not only at global level but also at look eleven working with a child led organization and initiative and also using using you know or the intergovernmental bodies that are located at regional level to make sure that children are really puts. I'd say half of all the policies because if really will not put children really at the heart of his political agenda and translated by concrete concrete action and accountability mechanism and working very closely with children and seeing them as actor of policies. We are not going to be successful successful. You have recently visited China where you participated in the war Internet forum in a time where we see cyber bullying and Dan sometimes this cyberbullying is leading to children. You work with governments to counter this S- coach. Yes I was in China and During the World Conference on Internet and I had to participate to session on child protection align and regarding what is going gun we have to never forbids that also Internet provide opportunities for children because they can learn it can express they can make their voice hurts and also can't show that it's possible because they are for me actors change but in the same time they are facing many challenges inches and really to deal with these challenges that would be sexual expedition online cyber bullying hate speech radically as many things. What is important? Yes we need to work and I work closely with government to make sure that the legislation consider this are as crimes and really make reporting on this crime Katori. This is very important is the same side. We need to empower children and makes them also aware and becoming kind of peer to peer protection because they are more more aware about all the language Internet language as adults and is the same type the most important part is ICT companies house. They can have a candle safety in designing protecting child's rights and protecting children texting their privacies. This is very important and and also working very closely with low enforcement agencies to make sure that all these criminals are held accountable. This is very important This year is very symbolic i. At marks the tenth anniversary of your office mandate the thirtieth anniversary of the Convention on the right of the child and the first phase of implementation of agenda. Twenty thirty. What do you call to ensure that children are not left behind since arriver? I I ju I. I didn't stop calling for making children off the agenda. I hope I am going to be listened within the same time what's important this is to ensure not only to having commitments. This is good but to make sure and too. Many children are really bad in political agenda and here also I work very very closely with all key stakeholders to have you know kind of information. What is going on? What are the emerging trends? What are things that are going one and what are good practices but for me? What is really more important east to also assess the bottlenecks and also what is important is to identify? And we start. Having having a mapping of these countries that are really doing their best. You have is a political commitment and they are acting to provides more visibility to govern is them to make sure that they are

Un General Assembly Najat Mala UN China Migrant Agra Representative Ms G Lebanon Congress Quincy Arriver DAN
Google I/O: We break down the highlights and lowlights (The 3:59, Ep. 557)

The 3:59

04:36 min | 3 years ago

Google I/O: We break down the highlights and lowlights (The 3:59, Ep. 557)

"The. Tonight or Roger Chang. I'm Ben FOX Ruben Gallego has come and gone and Google loaded. A lot of information a lot new products. Not futures really giving us over look at what its services are going to look like over the next couple of months ban. What was your big highlight your favorite for the yesterday's presentation? I would say probably the Google pixel three. A it's nice to see like a pixel named phone kind of like a flagship style phone that's four hundred dollars. It's about time that there's a least a little bit of pricing pressure pushing the prices lower down as opposed to everybody doing thousand plus not just four hundred dollars. But also a hedgerow Jack. Yes, hijack. Yes. Unbelievable. Gimmie look there are some Meyer trade-offs there right there. No wireless, charging water resistance, a weaker front facing hammer, but the back cameras the same the same nice shot mode. So there you can see they're trying to kiss. Post or something she doesn't have anyone to take. So sad. Well, as for me by say, Google was the most impressive to be offered off of the stuff is very pine sky Sifi ish, but they offer some really tangible benefits, particularly the translation be able to like hold your phone up to sign with four languages at. Having it translate that actually overlay English textile right or vice versa, like foreign language of. That's what you speak. That's lost the ability like Scana menu. And have those items? Pop up information on the like, the dishes the specific dishes pop up. That's like a real practical benefit to me. Yeah. It's nice to see the Google lenses. Actually like now starting to spread out a little bit more. It was really just for pixel devices if I'm correct about that. And now, I can get it on my Samsung phone, so I don't know I use it around my garden. Sometimes like what tree is this. So it's nice to see that they're trying to find different benefits for it. Right. Obviously. This was a data. So, of course, looks amazing. We'll have to see what it looks like it real and real world settings. What about the the lowlights? What what for you was disappointed? Man. So I don't know if you watch till the bitter end of the keynote there. Yeah. The bitter end of the keynote tends to be like really want. He airy like like, they really saved like the very end instead of doing like, a whole fireworks exhibit to be like, hey, check this out a lot of this research is actually like quite fascinating if you dig into it. But I don't know that it was really the right place to do it at the end of a keynote after everybody was sitting through an hour and a half of you know, a lot of heavy stuff. And I think that kind of illustrations the kind of weird balance they've gotta do they're really talking to consumers in the press. And they're talking to developers that was clearly the developer portion of the presentation, it was a little a little dense for sure as me Andrew Q was disappointing. I mean, there was some talk about foldable z-. But really the the big emphasis our privacy, which surface seems great. Just felt like it was a blue Katori. Ragu goals. Like, okay, we can Connie the time of privacy. Yes. Let's make privacy. A big focus in San Ryan. It did kind of feel little boring and a little forced right? But I did appreciate throughout the presentation where they did keep coming back to pry, the they're obviously very mindful of the fact that this is where we are right now in the tech world where people don't really care as much about what the features are. What what are you gonna do with my information? When you're providing us these features. So I appreciate it. But I agree with you that it was they could have made a little more interesting last time about the the nest hub max and a year. You're the the smart speakers play guy. Greg cool. So what did you think? I don't think that there was anything that really stood out specifically that made it that much different than the previous like, let's say you already had a Google home. I is this gonna get you to go buy new one probably not. So and. And I got to go about smart displays this one adds a camera. Right. Yes. Yes. It adds a camera. But I again, if you already have one are you going to go out and get a whole other one just for the Amer feature. I don't really think. So, but it is nice that they lowered the price on the original. So that's good to definitely more for moral. Google coverage accents are Roger Chan I'm Ben FOX urban. Thanks for listening.

Google Ben Fox Roger Chang Ruben Gallego Samsung Meyer San Ryan Ragu Roger Chan Developer Connie Greg Cool Andrew Q Four Hundred Dollars
Are Windowless Airplanes the Future of Flight?

BrainStuff

06:05 min | 3 years ago

Are Windowless Airplanes the Future of Flight?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff Lauren vocal bomb here when commercial air travel. I started to catch on in the nineteen thirties. One of the big attractions for passengers was the chance to stare out the window at the landscape from startlingly, new perspective, high above it. Of course, many of us still like to gays out in wonder from those little portal's a survey by courts in two thousand fourteen found that more than half of Americans prefer having a window seat on an airline, though, people who fly more than once a year are more evenly split between window, and I'll seats that's why you may be surprised to learn that for decades aircraft designers have been contemplating planes with video screens instead of passenger windows back in the mid nineteen nineties. Nasa actually built and flew an experimental Boeing seven thirty-seven with a windowless cockpit equipped with digital and infrared cameras and video monitors and in two thousand fourteen the UK based center for process innovation unveiled design for a windowless airliner in which the entire interior. Of the cabin would be lined with thin. Flexible, high definition video screens that would provide lighting and entertainment as well. As a more expansive view of the outside, but concept has been put into practice. Lest April Dubai based airline Emirates debuted Boeing seven seventy seven's with enclosed private suites equipped with virtual windows to provide of you of outside from the middle of the plane. We spoke by Email with Jerome demar an emerets public relations official. He said the virtual windows were installed for first class suites located in the middle aisle as they are fully enclosed suites with floored ceiling doors, and passengers would not be able to view the windows on the sides of the aircraft. We asked him how they worked and he explained these virtual windows projected the view from outside the aircraft using real time camera technology, the cameras are placed in strategic locations to offer. Passengers a real time view outside the aircraft. The actual view is determined by which side of the aircraft the entrance to the suite is writer. Left that is the view that will appear in these centres suites. The cameras are high resolution devices, which offer a very clear wide view of the outside the virtual window provides a sharp, clear realistic view of what's outside anecdote. Passengers of told us, they prefer the view to that of real windows in a BBC news article emerets president, sir. Tim Clark was quoted about the future possibility of planes without windows. But Demere said that there are no current plans for a windowless airliner. However, at least one aircraft manufacturer does aim to go windowless on a smaller scale for the past several years, a privately owned, Boston based company, spike aerospace has been working to develop a spike s five twelve and eighteen passengers supersonic business jet packed with technology that will enable it to cut travel time significantly without excess you'll consumption or loud, sonic, booms. And we'll do all of that. Without passenger windows. The aircraft's design will include what spike airspace calls a multiplex digital cabin. Instead of gazing through the usual, small portal windows. Passengers will be able to watch a pair of twenty foot long. That's six meter digital video screens that will stretch the length of the cabin on either side of the aircraft. Multiple high definition cameras mounted on the exterior of the plane will provide four K video which computers in the aircraft was stitched together. Using special software developed by the company we spoke with spike airspace. President and chief executive officer, Victoria, who explained whatever image. You want to see can be displayed you can see left or right in front of the plane or behind it looking down or up into the sky. It's a more panoramic view than the very limited view that you can see out of a porthole window. Eliminating conventional acrylic glass windows from an aircraft could have other advantages as well, it would insulate the fuselage making it possible to reduce noise. From the engines, it would also strengthen the aircraft and make it safer. Some serious engineering goes into making those windows sturdy enough to withstand the stresses of flight and besides providing a more expansive view such a video system could also utilize geo location and display augmented reality data about the landscape that the plane is flying over or passengers might be able to choose from other content a display movies, for example, or PowerPoint presentation. The aircraft's pilots would still have a conventional window in the cockpit along with some of that advanced video technology Katori says that spike airspace has several more years of engineering to complete on their aircraft. And then has to go through the testing and certification process. He envisions delivering the first jet without conventional passenger windows in twenty twenty-five initially only corporate executives and people wealthy enough to afford a private jet would be able to experience. Airspaces windowless flights. But you expects that the innovative technology eventually will find its way into regular airliners as well. Today's episode was written by Patrick Jake, Hyder and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more on this and lots of other panoramic, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. And for more podcasts for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water.

Capital One Boeing Lauren Spike Spike Aerospace President And Chief Executive Nasa Tim Clark UK Jerome Demar Airline Emirates Boston Demere BBC Writer Apple