17 Burst results for "Katie Silva"

"katie silva" Discussed on True Consequences

True Consequences

02:19 min | Last month

"katie silva" Discussed on True Consequences

"Southwest. I'm your host eric. Carter bonding everybody in. Welcome back to another episode of true consequences podcast and before we get started today. I just need to send some. thank you. Shout outs to carbon this for being a patron to debra whales to katie silva garcia. I wanna think really night. I think automation i wanna thank sonya gunter. Thank you britney mcdaniel. Thank you lucy. Far thank you heather cowan. Thank you so much to all of you for your patronage you help keep the show going and you help keep me going so thank you so much just a reminder if you want to support this. Show good a patriotic dot com slash true consequences. You'll get access to add free episodes early. You'll get merchandise as well as a signs. No for me. And i am behind on those but i promise i will get them out asap. Thanks again so much for your support okay. Let's get into this case today. I have had several requests to cover this case and it is definitely very mysterious but before we get into that. I want to set some background for where this case is located. And if you've been a listener of the show for a long time you may have already heard a lot of this information. And i apologize for that but this is for those people who are tuning in for the first time or have not had a chance to listen to the back catalogue. Anybody knows me knows it tells. New mexico is one of my favorite places in new mexico. It is so beautiful the mountains and the grass and it is just one of the most gorgeous places i've ever been and that's where we're going to be heading to today. Taus is a small town in northern new mexico which is situated at the base of the sangre decrease still mountains. The town is known for its vibrant culture and beautiful scenery and over. The years has been featured in many movies such as easy runner and the sundance kid. That's made it an ideal bucket list. Destination for tourists. Worldwide is only seventy three miles north of santa fe in one hundred thirty. Three miles north of albuquerque causses known worldwide for its popular art scene. There's large number museums and galleries. That people can visit. There's focus on.

katie silva garcia sonya gunter britney mcdaniel heather cowan debra Southwest Carter eric new mexico New mexico santa fe albuquerque
"katie silva" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:48 min | 2 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on KQED Radio

"She said we suffered now both of us with this cancer for a number of years. It has changed our lives, and they still very resentful to Monsanto for that. She said that they bought that dream home a few decades ago they wanted to keep it that way. And so they sprayed it with roundup weed killer. She said had the label been labeled properly, then they would have known that it could have caused cancer. And she said, we will then we would have had a choice and we will chosen not to use it. She said the fact that it wasn't meant that they have developed cancer, which has ruined their lives. Now bear will appeal that decision. It has also appealed the two other verdicts which went against them. There are now many thousands of cases waiting to be heard. I spoke to a lawyer associated with this case. He's a federal as an officer. He told me he believes there are now fifteen thousand cases waiting to be heard. He said there were as many as a thousand new cases, nausea laughed. Alone. So this is a very big day, of course, in the lives of the Mary couple Alba and Alberto Pouliot, but also a big day and a bad day for the company. So if you long now, the Moonies shrinking and not only that it's shaking as it does. So that's according to new data from NASA as it strings the surface of the moon breaks up because he's brittle forming something called a thrust fault. Now, these folks are still active and loon quake's shake the surface. Even today. Some of them are strongest five on the Richter scale Thomas waters is from the center of earth and planetary studies in Washington DC. He led the research we detected these small, and when I say small, they're not features or landforms that you would miss if you were walking along the landscape, they are very noticeable. But from that scale in orbit you really need high resolution imaging and the right lighting conditions to see them, which is. Why they basically went for the most part undetected until we were able to start imaging these. We've now literally found thousands of these small young fault scarfs, and these are literally an expression of the crust of the moon being pushed together, you know, we deduced that the moon was contracting. The most likely cause of that contraction is the fact that the moon is still hot in its interior. So that as the moon is cooling down, you have the change in the volume in the interior. And then the crust has to adjust that nicic example or analogy is sort of the overripe and apple no that develops wrinkles. And that's kind of what's happening to the moon. It sounds like when you're saying that the moon is contracting. How far does it contracting? I'm trying to get worried. No worries. It's very slow. It's been going on for millions of years. If you look at all the evidence that we have it only amounts to at most, and it's probably less than this. But at most a radius change of about one hundred years, which is occurred again over probably the last tens of millions of years. But is it going to affect tides though? Because obviously the moon does affect you know, the season the ties and things like that. I would imagine that even if it's a small contraction in might have some small bearing on us on planet earth. It doesn't because the mass doesn't change the critical issue with the earth moon interaction in our tides is the mass of the moon, but you bring up another really interesting point, which was one of the surprises is that this young network of faults is being actually influenced by the earth the earth title forces are actually contributing. To the formation of these young faults. Thomas swatters leading that research and no need to worry. Good news. Now every year roughly three million babies born under what's known as assisted childbirth. This involves using either full sets vacuums to deliver the baby, but these methods can lead to a risk of infection for the mother. Now, a new study has found that giving women antibiotics preventatively can greatly reduce the risk of infection. Katie Silva reports twenty thousand women die every year because infections related to childbirth while wasn't developing countries. It's a problem that affects new mothers across the board. And one of the groups most at risk of getting these infections is women who have assisted childbirth fees will four hundred thirty thousand of these mothers gets infections as a result of getting both using forceps or vacuum. But experts say the risk of infections can be homed. If these women receive an antibiotic within six hours of delivery, professor Marian is from the university of Oxford conducted there. Research on more than three thousand assisted boats in the UK. She says that's counter intuitively that preventatively taking these drugs could actually be good for juicing antibiotic resistance. What was a ratio about? This study is that for every hundred women who had a single preventative dose. We actually don't prevented the one hundred sixty eight treatment dosage so actually overrule it reduced the amount of antibiotics really using it also reduced the overall cost with mothers who receives the antibiotic having few visits oughta woods to the GP a hospital now professor night and colleagues a cooling on the World Health Organization and national health authorities to change guidelines Silva, you're listening to the newsroom and a reminder of all main headlines Facebook says a serious security flaw in its what's that messaging service announced spyware to be installed on users phones and a Chinese plane. Landed in Venezuela. Carry more than seventy tons of medical supplies in a gesture of support for president Madurai coming up to four twenty GMT tr- Lenka has lifted an overnight curfew put in place because of an upset in anti-muslim violence. Tensions on the island is still high three weeks since the Easter Sunday attacks on churches and hotels in which more than two hundred and fifty people were killed and now Muslim shops and mosques have come under attack will Muslim businessmen described the situation in the north west of the country. We have his own says because of the poor quality of a phone line. Tony came at the commute today. It was the Christian community. He came to attackers yesterday because of the attack on the church, she's on the twenty-first by Muslim terrorist. But today was different because then buddies people are attacking around Lenka most of them in the western province Hetty polar, Nikki Verita and Kenya. I think at the moment. No one was being killed only property has been attacked businesses houses mosques and vehicles of banning actually, it's a very scary situation for Sri Lankan Muslims. Very clearly security forces steak or the rights to fire. What they're not doing inexpensive them actually the security forces have the right to find it. But they're not taking any action happening right in front of them. The has been announced by the government today. All but still people are attacking. I don't know what they are doing. Actually, we have the video clips evidence attacks are happening in front of the Lincoln full system. It's ridiculous. We can't trust them than protecting us. But I can tell you that the main. Army base is giving the oldest of the soldiers. They're not taking any action. So you of inaction and indifference from the authorities. So what does this for Lincoln government have to say to that? Show lack Tila is adviser to the president. I agree with that. That.

cancer Lenka Katie Silva president professor Monsanto NASA Washington DC nausea officer Lincoln government Thomas swatters UK government apple Army Alba university of Oxford Alberto Pouliot
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Physician sir and this information is not only how the brain is done but how the different parts of the brain are related to each other the team thinks this matter should be a cost effective way to diagnose people earlier the burden of alzheimer's still remains enormous causing stress for family members who don't have access to places such as cavs out simar according to founder piero ski no the whole family get sick when there was a patient without seimas in in fact with a patient who doesn't remember anything no recognize the relatives the family feels isolated and lonely and that's probably the worst aspect was and even though nicola amore ozone works with computers rather than people is only too aware of the benefits is research could bring to future patients like johnny when we think about this is now days we can somehow forget that there are real lives behind this data we care about this this lives in four of physicists are usually dealing with number so this is quite a bit strange at the beginning but when you know that you're doing something that can have a real impact on real life everyday life of patients and their family you can think of yourself in the battalion and the bushy with that report despite the growth an impact of diseases like outsiders life expectancy is rising globally people born in two thousand sixteen will on average live seven years longer than those born twenty five years ago so how long will you live and you can't relate as being developed by the bbc health team bbc reporter katie silva's back to take a look katie bit morbid how does this work i came money might sound mobile but it was actually quite fun so you put in your age your gender and your nationality and so for me thirty one female ustralian and it tells me calculate through tells me i'm going to leave till i'm eighty six years old and it tells me that eighty two percent the rest of my life will be healthy so my age for the thirty one year old female australia actually ranks in that sense seventh of one hundred ninety eight countries and i know you did it as well money how did you go.

alzheimer johnny katie silva founder bbc reporter australia eighty two percent twenty five years eighty six years thirty one year seven years
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Seventy six and this is the ninth time obviously they have challenges but they do have expertise in this in their national lab is very good at testing for ola which is critical knowing who is a case and following up with their contacts is the way you get an able outbreak under control so the response is much more rapid the brechin nation of the potential risk of spread to large cities in what that would do was spotted early countries in the area have been put on alert so there's a lot better recognition of how this could go and a lot more rapid response yes helen breath well token to claudia hammond only this week bbc health and science reporter katie silva joins me now unfortunately we do now know that that all confirmed cases in daca and as we were just hearing that that's what was fitted katie yes money so what we as we say that this case is there and the reason this is potentially really big issue is that whilst at six hundred kilometers from the capital can asa but cities lie on the congo river so there's a potential there for things to spread through that water system and as we speak today the world health organization is currently meeting to decide whether or not what's going on in the democratic republic of congo can be seen as being close classified basically as an international threat and this is the ninth time this outbreak is a code in the diaz e since the disease was first identified in nine in the nineteen seventies and there was talk about an experimental vaccine arrived in west africa do you have any news or progress on that yes so the world health organization has decided they're sending four thousand doses of this experimental vaccine and it's going to the capital to health workers and people who may have already come into contact and they've already example raise the estimate of you know the condition of the seriousness of the situation from high to very high so the probably not doubt be you know sending more of these vaccines in the coming days this is the latest outbreak.

ola health and science reporter congo river congo west africa brechin helen claudia hammond katie silva six hundred kilometers
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Beautiful singing that and from an italian classic to modern pope we'll be looking at the rapidly evolving trends in musical tastes and the research that says pope is getting sadder each song has twelve features such as happiness or relaxed nece or dance ability so we were able to look at the trends in those indices in we found that for example the happiness index was going down considerably my studio guest today is bbc health and science reporter katie silva and you've been relating how long you're likely to live yes money and i don't want to but because i'm a stray leeann it's actually going to be a little while but i've got quite a fun little calculated tell you about that you can also calculate everyone can calculate how long they going to live okay we'll be having some fun with that in a moment but first to the outbreak of a bola in the democratic republic of congo now at the time of coding this program that have been at least forty five people infected and twenty five people on known to have died but the international community has swung into action fast with a visit from the director general of the w h o and confirmation that people in certain areas will be given an experimental vaccine will this be enough to prevent the spread of a disease which killed more than eleven thousand people in the outbreak of two thousand fourteen in just a moment we'll get the latest from bbc science and health reporter katie sova but first earlier this week claudia hammond spiked to helen brownsville a senior writer for the us health website stat she says people are worried about the locations of the current cases there are a couple of reasons for that one because which is being considered the epicenter where the hospital is is on a lake so it's a port city end the lake actresses out into the congo any vangi rivers which means that people from the coral will could get on a boat and travel widely and another thing that is a concern.

pope health and science reporter congo director general katie sova claudia hammond writer bbc katie silva reporter helen brownsville us
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"It being released it actually appears to be being produced money okay so we sure that this is people cheating or is it just that cfc's breaking down the way that lets postie will the researchers looked at potential other options for example like it was being accidentally released or there was a change in atmosphere or you know something was going on with buildings and it was releasing it but they say that's very unlikely that it strongly suggests as perhaps being released and the evidence points to it coming out of east asia and they get that from all the gases that it's mixed with they can't narrow it down further at this point but they're very concerned about it because it saves sees further deplete the ocean lay so the eleven specifically it exists informs and often what it does it last in the atmosphere for up to fifty years and then the only way to basically destroy it is for to reach the stratosphere and then it destroys the ozone layer further so it's going to both weaken protection from uv radiation more and it's also associated with increasing global warming and just remind me what is the montreal protocol okay so it came about in nineteen eighty seven and it was this really optimistic move basically countries coming together knowing that change was needed and the goal was the cfc's we're going to be phased out by twenty tens of eight years ago and that's what makes this all the more problematic and as i say they cool it but environmentally and politically serious and the un environment department they say that if this is true it's a critical issue katie silva thank you very much.

cfc east asia katie silva montreal un eight years fifty years
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Hi this is the science our where a whole world of science becomes clearer as we examine all it is being tested developed and discovered bbc world service pocus are supported by advertising hello on money chesterton and welcome to the signs our from the bbc this is the podcast where we off you the highlights in science health and technology on today's show how activities like mining and deforestation a having a devastating impact on areas that should be protected more on the state of our national parks in a moment meanwhile drones being deployed over me and mas coastal areas to help reverse deforestation and sticking with a technological theme the rising trend in computers dedicated to virtually mining the digital currency bitcoin and there's concern over just how much energy they using right now we can establish this whole network of computers is consuming two point five gigawatts of electricity not that far from what ireland is consuming in terms of electrical energy and we can also see that it's growing fast my studio guest today is bbc health and science reporter katie silva joining us today from singapore hello katy hi manny nice to be with you and i've got a nice story well not not such a nice story for you coming up it's on the chemical cfc actually see the eleven and it's about this story about somebody or some some companies perhaps releasing it into the atmosphere despite an international ban so i'll tell you more in just a little while about the origins of this legal dissemination looking forward to hearing more on that thanks katie but first national parks are a global success story launch areas across the planet set aside to try and preserve the natural world almost a sixth of the planets land surface has been set aside for national parks and the areas protected in this way has doubled since the rio earth summit in nine hundred ninety two but the news is not all good.

bbc ireland health and science reporter katie silva rio five gigawatts
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Of infusing an enzyme and that's uh the the drug at european an at european will sit on some of the receptors that aspect coating would bind to and um you keep giving atrophine to an individual until the nerve agent a is metabolized unexp greeted from the body there's a second line of defence and that's using a family of chemical called oxy means and the ark seems will bind to any freelycirculating nerve agent in the body complex the nerve agent prevented blocking enzymatic activity and it's the combination of a asher pain an obscene that all necessary for effective treatment chemical weapons expert alastair hey almost feels like a chilling revival of the cold war paused and we've another reminder of the cold war the moment following president putin's dream of a nuclear powered new agreements all will look back at the technologies flawed history but before that a reminder you're listening to the song sour with me run in peace and in the studio with me bbc some supporter katie silva still to come we look back at the curious cold war history of nuclear rockets following president putin's claim that russia's just tested one lost year and we've a scientific gem from the deep that can tell us about the earth's makeup diamonds are billions of years old senate kind of a time capsule it has been brought up to the surface and then we have discovered it end shot xrays at revealing the tiniest traces of water trapped inside evidence of a hidden ocean of water in the earth's mantle also we deconstruct angry hungry slash angry i think eto and sack psychedelic hails at south e.

nerve agent katie silva president putin russia president bbc south e
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"In life in the atlantic yes yes very much would use in in fisheries particularly in the atlantic ocean is particularly strong it's a decrease of sixty percent that's a ferry strong effect isn't it yes are also be chalked rondo went to pay from but also need to stress that it happens under strong climate change so if we keep on the carbon emission path that we are right now and we don't try to a jewish who missions and we don't do any climate mitigation then this is a scenario that might happen might be the operative word but it's only by doing studies like these that scientists can start to look into the long term impacts of climate change thanks to charlotte laugh qatar off the university of burned climate and environment programme for explaining that work and now two diabetes the grew coast control disorder that's the fastest growing disease in the world type 2 diabetes has been the form concern in the one that has brought about by consuming too much sugar type one is an autoimmune condition that destroys the incident producing cells in the print creased insulin being the glucose regulating hormone but a new study suggests there are more subtypes we've an interview on the implications with one of the research is in a moment but i'm katie silva we will bbc health reporting hands on what are the key points this is a study out of sweden and finland involved fifteen thousand patients and basically what they did it seem at scandinavia's incredible when it comes to being able to do these largescale studies they have such an advanced healthcare system and recordkeeping and basically looked at the blood tests of these people and they found contrary to what we had away thought that there's five types so as you mentioned the two types of diabetes diabetes is when you go is out of control blood sugar levels so your body can't control it's blood sugar as you said so tight one is the severe autoimmune disease basically your immune system turns against cells in your pancras which produced is hormone insulin and then type 2 is typically associated with.

atlantic ocean qatar katie silva sweden finland scandinavia autoimmune disease charlotte bbc sixty percent
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Fascinating thank you very much indeed for that katie silver and apologies if any of that content caused any offence or if it didn't goals quite enough offence austral anything goes in podcasting land these dice if you into that kind of thing still to come name all swearing because i like my job and i want to keep it but they will unafraid be job losses in the united states with announcements of big federal cuts to the science budget that will discuss that in a few moments and also how wealthy for unpropitious might be stepping in also in this hov more on loneliness and how it can be beneficial if you feel lonely in a transit she waisale feeling it for sure mount of time at sheets really pick up to full eu because she gives you look at your say she relationships and decide you're going to change something about those we'll tell you all about how you can take part in what could be the world's biggest ever loneliness survey it also how a tablet computer and some treats could be just the thing to teach an old dog new tricks and will have comment as we go along from bbc health and science reporter ladies and gentleman say heretic katie silva who amongst other things kt in this have what we talking about attitudes to green spaces in india that's right so at the moment in anglo it is a big debate about native trees and how public spaces should serve the population and it's really interesting looking forward to that now than it depends how you measure it whether in absolute terms proportion of gdp or per capita but the united states is one of the world's biggest if not the biggest spending nations when it comes to science but early this week us president donald trump release his budget proposal for the next fiscal year and on initial inspection it didn't look great for science with plans to cut federal research programmes including a fleet of nasa satellites energy research and climate and environmental science programmes as i reported earlier in the week on all tech program quick there are proposals to cut funding to the international space station by 2024 as.

katie silver united states katie silva india donald trump unpropitious bbc health and science reporter president nasa
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Evolve towards being winter brown and then to disperse out into the winter right populations so that individuals will increasingly just skipped the multi entirely in remained brown so if you've got vice populations in one place you can say that at least one of the types is going to survive no matter what the weather's like that right and that's why these things have persisted over deep time because of course we all know that in some years and in some places where the snow is sketchy it just may become for a short time or it comes a lot melts comes melts that's what's imposed the natural selection for both of these forms to persist in the same place but again what we expect to see now is this very rapid directional change towards lesson less numbers a day with no on the ground past professor scott mills of the university of montana speaking see monte chester tim right now parents beware we're gonna talk about something knows he now swearing the use of bad language with our thank think ratchet going to say wow ourselves where we are going to talk about that topic set maybe sensitive for some people katie silva tell us a little bit more about this apparently swearing might be good for us that's right now china to swear on describing is story which is quite difficult to do so yes last week i am i was at this event emptied an event at the royal institution and it was a talk by emma burn and she's reasonable cold swearing is good for you and why does is it looks into old literature and all the research that's gone into swearing and it's actually a really vast field which might surprise you and what cheese looked at his you know this was one primary study at basically looks at whether or not swearing can help us get through difficult situations so this is the way it works is the way the said he worked they get volunteers to put their hand in a bucket of i freezing we'll shop and they eat i need to say a swearword the swear word of their choice when it comes to my or another innocuous words are for example in this case it was a word used to describe a table so the woman was saying would.

scott mills royal institution cheese professor university of montana monte chester ratchet katie silva china emma burn
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Which seems like a pretty small price to pay to me that is jim coalpit so let's hear from katie silva now she's with me in the studio with some common tree this hour and oversee those figures are quite astonishing but as with so many things in science and technology things on straightforward say reducing sulphur emissions rule a good thing but there are some downsides valenta that's right it's a trade off is classic title so it's not all good news and sulphites have this cooling effect so whilst there might be bad patch foul health they have a cooling effect on the environment so what happens is when sulfur dioxide is relased it creates small particles and they small particles actually reflects sunlight so they can make out clouds brighter and what these happens by reflecting the sunlight actually reduces the effects of global warming so there's an offset you on one hand by reducing the sulphur emissions yuan pats having health benefits but you you're going to have a negative effect when it comes to greenhouse gases and what this type of found is that if you have these clean a ship fuels what you actually could end up doing is increasing the global rice the rate of global warming by three percent so there's an offset sooner you need a policy basically that is combining both health and th these global warming aspects all your sights a trade off as there so often but these things on when you more nuanced than they may come across and i will certainly struck by the the economics of it our just reducing those emissions and not a huge cost on the products that we will buy in tough ships in these big containers case he will leave it there thank you very much indeed for that now do you feel like me if so why not tell us about it this week the bbc who's launched what we hope might become the world's largest ever survey on the issue this is the bbc luminous experiment now everyone of course feels lonely sometimes but if it becomes chronic well that can affect your sleep.

jim coalpit katie silva three percent one hand
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"So it's very important to listen both positive and negative emotions because it's really a way of knowing i will world and that's one of the main problems with what some people want to do namely transform people's negative emotions into a positive ones without changing the circumstances people are in but changing the emotions directly because that will harm or even destroy this emotional rada that we have where we can use our emotions to understand the world around us the best way to have people experience more positive emotions is creating more positive environments working indirectly to develop better context institutions organisations rather than simply changing people's mindsets that essay reassuring minutes kate to be melancholic that says sonia leave a meskhi from the university of california riverside no seats brinkman of opec university in denmark say finally katie silva i must have sufficient what would you be using to abc's lee sunny disposition you would likes happy oh that's fetus share that that it it's interesting 'cause on i listen to this pace and i just think we are old was striving ought we to giant especially this time of year january all anyone can talk about is all i wanna be seena fisia stronger vastagh more brilliant at everything and you do wonder does this quest for perfection rarely make you happy ah mubarak is a better person i'm very happy just to do i will that selfhelp stuff unjust except myself a who i am so yeah i think carry on as you were effects that might vice to myself anyway thank you say much katie it's been lovely at speaking tuesday in hearing about we will science insights and well i'm gareth mitchell by the white plenty more science health and technology across the bbc online and on the right here in the week ahead in creating a set meal program cold click that set on tuesday from the bbc world service but for now from all of us on the team and produce a katie tech zeki thanks for listening and capacity.

sonia brinkman opec university denmark katie silva abc mubarak gareth mitchell kate university of california river bbc
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"The reason that biologically our eyes are sensitive to visible light because there's massive amounts of information there they're just not possible to sense with other types of radiation signals right and so to the driverless cars of the future that's one use case for this technology what you're saying is that you can use this technique c potentially create depth perception from optical senses that perhaps wasn't possible before said this war kind of difference that would make as we try to move into a failed into a a realm of autonomous vehicles autonomous vehicles are the futures my personal belief is that we won't get the ai to be strong enough to be far superior than a human in all situations but we can certainly build machines sensors that exceed our human census and that's our goal here so in contrast to previous approaches this new approach is able to obtain very highquality positioning of object what's that surround robot so if i have a robot it can tell me exactly where objects are placed in the scene and of course it can smartly avoid them that's the goal there is critical importance to understand the depth because without depth you don't know exactly how far away objects are you to see them and so i can have a small object that is nearby and a large object that is far away and you know you'll perceived them similar lee from a single camera viewpoint but he's a camry you can estimate the size and position of the objects and navigate and avoid them in the real world so at mit where partnering with a number of automotive manufacturers were in early stage discussions to see how we can start to deploy this new form of light are in the next generation of autonomous cars that's a cheetah kme be nervous nervousness that with meat was bbc health and science minister katie silva and i served not sure of jury a game or on an amazing liam inside games for easter quakes sliced the fat this whole idea serve depth.

katie silva liam easter
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Novel clinic in pencil organic but i mean they're enough components in that uh such that they're on microbes in the oceans that's that beat the oil the great the old on fatty rapidly and as long as it has a good sort of exposure to the microbes then a well dispersed oil slick can actually pretty much disappeared when the space without four to six weeks in the case the condensate the microbes to what can quite the same way an effective anything somebody's condensate components can destroy the microbes and so we rely then on either evaporation from the surface moving it from the oceans atmosphere all in the material dispersing and the problem with essentially is that she's in relatively shallow water about fifty two six made two steps so we'll take a while for that to disperse it will happen eventually in the long term the problem will disappear but in the short term it means we have a very focused pollution incident and in terms of the tucks his tin hau defects the ek system you've mentioned benzene which is a carcinogen cycles his cancer but so how else will condensate affects the uk system in the sea and beyond in the same way as have euros goes a smothering of at a causes us motoring faxes distrupt the the systems of the animals and plants in the ocean and so it will tend to destroy in high concentrations it'll pretty much destroy would have his that and we see that and in heavy crudes bills as well as not unique contin site i think the big thing as it is difficult to deal with we don't have much experience of dealing with contin sites bills uh globally if the ship breaks up if the oil salt to leak um what few sleep than it becomes one of the worst spills when all twenty five years so that's simon box oh speaking say adam rather fed cite the table do you think of this then and katie silva bbc health and science gentlest we all making this program on friday often aim vets as you note sitting here now will d we understand about the situation as well as have just had the oil tanker fanshi it still banning in the ice china fate and appear.

simon box adam uk katie silva oil tanker twenty five years six weeks
"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Hello i'm garth mitchell and welcomes the putt cost edition of the science hour from the bbc when out listen the feedback over the years has told me that you'd like to be told the date just in case it doesn't shirt on your actual device site since you ask it's the weekend of the 13th and fourteenth of january 2018 thank you all part of the service so let's tell you what's in this edition and wit gauging the human and indeed environmental cost of this week's catastrophic oiltanker collision off the coast of china and we'll say to come how some simple techniques can help relief the psychological burden borne by children who have suffered war will natural disasters give the kid skills they can use to dampen down their reactions their memories and we've grown a simple exercises for them to get that heard the opener infielder and put and also we hear about the new camera that could bring three d vision two driverless cars and we will have some comment has become long today from my studio guest bbc health and science journalist katie silva have just met for the first time stayed nice to meet you ktm that iran how are you in lovely meet you as well i'm very well thanks accede rats have you so let's jump in and talk about the human and indeed environmental catastrophe that's being unfolding since last weekend off china's coast the collision of the oil tanker sonji with a fright at now the sentence he had thirty onboard and as of recording this program on friday afternoon only one body had been recovered but unlike previous oil spills that you might remember this one doesn't involve all those black slicks of crude oil instead the million barrels on board the sun she all condensate an ultralight form of oil that is highly explosive and more toxic than crude oil adam rutherford has been hearing more from asional griffeth simon.

garth mitchell bbc china katie silva oil spills crude oil adam rutherford ktm iran oil tanker million barrels
"katie silva" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"katie silva" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"He is our health reporter katie silva who told me how it works secret lies in this thing called in a day and it's a molecule that helps our cells to generate energy and repair dna now the body normally make this by eating a diet that includes eggs salmon cheese turkey nuts it's an on biological process but if the woman and the man both have this mutation in the gene that means that they daren't create this the faces weren't receive this vital in a date thing basically what they found is that seems to be causing these birth defects and miscarriage and what's quite remarkable that the studies i didn't just find this 'cause they also found a means to prevent it so basically using myse they found if these mice who had these genetic defect were given vitamin b three one hundred percent of these mice didn't have miscarriages and the offspring didn't have birth defects and obviously there are a lot of caveats here because his own you'd moi's at what stage all week towards sir vince can work with him and very early days you make a very good point sir it's only mice they have similar metabolic processes and genetically and temps the genetic mutation in the mice and humans that with one hundred percent the same but basically what they need to look at is women absorb nice and differently so what they want to do is women who have had miscarriages they went to test than to say if they are deficient in vitamin b 3 or an in a day and then screen them and may be prescribed them to save that can if they give them a high a nisin if they can prevent miscarriages certain somewhere d'arvillard but if they sort out all these issues how many people could this hope eight million babies worldwide a born with defects one percent of women worldwide have multiple miscarriages so the potential is huge and as i was making threesetter earlier even if it only affects a small percentage of these women it's still a really great benefit was all health reporter katie silver.

katie silva sir vince katie silver reporter three one hundred percent one hundred percent one percent