3 Burst results for "Katie Kilkenny"

"katie kilkenny" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"katie kilkenny" Discussed on KCRW

"You're listening to KCRW. This is morning edition. David E. Kelly has the kind of career in the entertainment business that could be the topic of well Hollywood movie or TV show. He started as a writer and story editor working on L. A law. He then moved on to create a long list of hit shows, including Picket Fences. Chicago Hope Allie McBeal in Boston Public His latest Syriza's a crime drama called Big Sky Set in Montana. Here's a clip. Yeah. You sure you're in the right place? It's that truck. Lock the doors. What are fine? But the show is running into a lot of pushback from indigenous groups. Katie Kilkenny has been covering the story for the Hollywood Reporter, Big Sky and you show on ABC sort of centers on an investigation into a serious of disappearances. Of women on a Montana highway. The reason why native and indigenous groups have sort of been up in arms about this Syriza's is that the disproportionate number of people who go missing in Montana are Native Americans. Indigenous people account for about 6.5% of the population, but 26% of people who go missing each year, according to the latest Montana Department of Justice, Justice, Sex So it is a major problem. But there doesn't seem to be acknowledgement of that problem or representation of it in the Syriza so far, and so around. 225 tribes and First nations now have joined a protest asking for Acknowledgment of some kind. They've mostly been asking for an educational placard at the end of episodes that have already taped to point to yours to the issue and where they can learn more about it. Big sky isn't the only recent serious facing this kind of criticism what other shows air being called out? HBO's Lovecraft country had an episode a few months back that featured an arrow walking to spirit character who was introduced and then in the same episode was sort of violently killed. Andre that prompted some controversy from viewers who are hoping for a sort of better depiction of that character. Eventually, the Showrunner actually apologized for that depiction, she said it had failed. And then there was AH comic book that came out a few months ago that also prompted some controversy. It was about time for a woman in very, very early Los Angeles and her daughter, and there was depiction of Violence against native women, and there was no native creators behind it. There was a consultant and so that also prompted people toe call for that comic to be retracted. Kind of changes what they like to see. Rather than be hired his cultural consultants, which is somebody who doesn't really have much creative impact, they're not really there in the room at the beginning, working on the creative storytelling, and so they're looking for. Reductions to hire them in above the line positions so positions where they do have creative leadership role As a writer, producer director. They're also looking for more contemporary stories to be told involving native characters. Often people will come to them with a new idea for a period piece. But you know, advocates that I spoke to were saying We very much have amazing contemporary stories to tell and so often, Americans on Lee think of the native Americans and indigenous peoples in the past, and we really want to change that. And finally, there is still a recurring problem of non native people being cast in native rolls. These are issues that we've seen other groups advocating for years with Hollywood, You know when it comes to more accurate depictions, more representation. Both in front of him behind the camera. Latino black Asian LGBT Q artists. Um, is this something new for indigenous groups? Do they feel like they're making headway? I think it's something they've been advocating for for a long time. When I spoke to one source, he said that you know he's got in an uptick and outreach since Standing Rock and you know, Hollywood producers have been really interested in working more with indigenous creators and native creators since then. But it's still something that lags behind for the community. Do they feel like they have the same kind of clout in Hollywood as far as dealing with executives that say other groups do Some of the creatives that I spoke with talked about that as an ongoing problem that they're not getting as many resource is, as other groups do, or that they're often left out of even diversity studies. And they were really asking for the same about a resource is being given to them as to other communities and really not to be left behind. It looks like the message maybe starting to get through. I mean, for starters, indigenous groups are hopeful about some shows in the pipeline. Absolutely. There are several landmark shows that are coming out imminently to our better, very important include a peacock show that features television's first native female show runner. It's called Rutherford Falls, and that show runner is the Navajo in Mexican American filmmaker Sierra Ornelas has a writer's room that's half Native American, which is really remarkable. And there's also a Netflix animated series coming out called Spirit Rangers, and that also has a Chumash travel citizen. It's a sure winner and a writer's room that's entirely native American. And then there are two shows in Development one at FX. That's a pilot called reservation Dogs and another at NBC called Sovereign. That's also in development, which also features significant amounts of above the line native and indigenous talent. And so these seem to be really hopeful signs of a new era to come. Katie Kilkenny is a staff reporter with the Hollywood reporter. And you are listening to KCRW KCRW sponsors include sales force providing small business support in today's changing world with sales, service and marketing, all on one platform. Salesforce help small businesses connect with customers in new ways more at salesforce dot.

Hollywood Montana writer Katie Kilkenny Hollywood Reporter David E. Kelly KCRW Salesforce Chicago reporter Allie McBeal Boston HBO Syriza Department of Justice Andre Showrunner NBC
"katie kilkenny" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:09 min | 2 years ago

"katie kilkenny" Discussed on KPCC

"National law organization fighting for the right to a healthy environment earth justice attorneys take polluters and the government to court no matter who's in office earth justice because the earth needs a good lawyer welcome to the frame I'm John horn this is a segment that aired earlier this month but it's a topic that's so important we think it merits an encore assistance in the entertainment industry are overworked underpaid physically abused and often have to run personal errands for their bosses even after they leave work for the day that's according to a new survey of more than fifteen hundred assistance released by a grassroots movement called pay up Hollywood Katie Kilkenny as an associate editor at The Hollywood Reporter where she covers labor and she explains how the movement grew out of an episode of our podcast about screenwriting called script notes any assistant road and saying you know I think one of the big issues that's going to be coming forward in in the next few decades in Hollywood is that we're gonna have to talk about the low pay that assistance are facing and how that is related to rising cost of living in Los Angeles and from there the host which are John Augustine crate Mason who are both really powerful writers in Hollywood read that note and asked for more people to talk about their stories of being an assistant Los Angeles and they just got an overwhelming amount of email and a writer named Liz author who is on the board of the writers guild of America started a hashtag called actually pay a poly what so a couple days before thanksgiving script notes facilitated a pay up Hollywood town hall where assistance had a chance to talk about some of the issues and here's what one woman who didn't provide her name had to say about Bernau we almost have like three jobs at once like not only are we working our day job for forty to sixty hours a week and not making enough and then there for doing work on the side like babysitting driving xterra but we also have the work of our own careers and I think that is like what leads that burn out his were not only expected to have the state job that like puts all these things in place for us to move forward and on top of that were expected to have like an hour to write a day or or to find our own short films and make them on the weekends like that is just impossible I think impossible then afterward for what she's describing what were some of the other issues that came up around the hash tag around the town hall so I think a big one is the question of access you know Hollywood has been talking a lot about its diversity issues and wanting to get more folks into the pipeline backgrounds but what we're looking at here is a situation where you have to be able to afford to be an assistant in the first place to get that first like up in the industry and so Hollywood has just released a survey of one thousand five hundred and fifty one assistance and they found that seventy eight percent of the people who were surveyed were white and that fifty two percent were receiving financial aid from family and friends to make ends meet as they were assistance in Hollywood so I think we're seeing that this industry in order to diversify does have to become more accessible more economically accessible to folks who aren't coming in with with that aid so that to me was notable as well as the fact that a lot of assistance were also talking about this sort of demeaning work conditions that were expected of them you know Hollywood has to pay your dues culture and I think a lot of folks remember ask some difficult work conditions when their assistance and so sort of expect that their assistance walk to go through that as well but in this survey it showed that a hundred and four respondents had an object thrown at them in the workplace so I think that we're looking at conditions were systems are not only being pretty badly paid but also they are facing work conditions that are pretty rocks we're talking with Katie Kilkenny at The Hollywood Reporter about pay up Hollywood there are other things that really jumped out to me one is that almost ninety three percent of those people surveyed said they work more than forty hours a week and fifteen percent said they were working more than sixty hours a week and here is something that was really troubling almost a quarter said that they had reported an increase in substance abuse so it sounds like the job is really taking a terrible toll on the people who are in this line of work completely I mean I I think these numbers sort of show is something that you know assistance have been talking to each other about for a long time and so I think for a lot of assistance this is not a surprise but this survey really shines a light on some of these issues and the fact that things need to change and it sounds like some show runners are actually saying this is unsustainable and maybe even immoral absolutely so I talked to a few folks who'd been vocal on Twitter at their support and basically found out what I was talking to them that they were advocating for higher wages on projects that are currently developing and these are Adam Conner thanks my notes from two TV's Adam ruins everything David H. Steinberg who was a kosher runner on Netflix is no good neck and the writer producer creator I went Waltman who was an executive producer on Netflix is unbelievable well then it's a killer told me that she was trying to get her assistance twenty dollars an hour plus benefits and however it was saying that he was trying to adjust various aspects of the job to make it more tenable you said in your story that you had reached out to the major studios and talent agencies for comment and let's just say they weren't flooding the phone lines calling back have any of them had anything to say one agency is doing something and they didn't provide comment for this story but you know I heard by sources that for which is the talent agency that represents spoke on August who helped create this movement as well as live soccer who coined the hash tag has conducted an anonymous survey of their systems and I will also be receiving and looking at the results of the Hollywood survey and I imagine that in weeks to come others will speak up more but for now they are remaining mum and even if the hours are horrible the working conditions aren't great a lot of people want these jobs right because it's so hard to get in the business and this is one possible path for people who want to become creative people in Hollywood definitely there extremely competitive jobs and and often a line that is used with assistance you want to speak out about work conditions is that you no there were thousands that will take your place but it's gotten to the point where the wages are the same as they were twenty years ago in some cases that's what we're hearing from a lot of the stories Walt the cost of living in Los Angeles has skyrocketed and so these assistance argument is that the situation is untenable at this point Katie kill can a is an associate editor at The Hollywood Reporter Katie thanks so much for coming on the show thanks.

#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

The Frame

06:44 min | 2 years ago

#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

"Assistance in the entertainment industry are overworked underpaid and and often have to run personal errands for their bosses even after they leave for the day. That's according to a new survey of more than fifteen hundred assistance. It was released this this week by the grassroots movement called pay up Hollywood. The campaign started as a twitter Hashtag back in October and has been gaining momentum since then Katie kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter where she covers labor and she explains how the Hashtag grew out of an episode of script notes. A podcast asked about screenwriting. A assistant wrote in saying you know I think one of the big issues. That's going to be coming forward in the next few decades in Hollywood is that we're gonna I have to talk about the low pay. That assistance are facing in how that is related to rising cost of living in Los Angeles and from near the hosts which cacus Craig Mason. Who are both really powerful writers in Hollywood? Read that note and ask for more people to talk about their stories of being an assistant in Los Angeles they just got an overwhelming matic. Email and a writer named Alber who is on the board at the Writers Guild of America started Hashtag called Hashtag Champ. Hollywood so a couple of days before Thanksgiving script notes facilitated a pay up Hollywood town hall where assistance had a chance to talk about some of the issues. And here's what one woman who didn't provide. Her name had to say about burnout. We almost have like three jobs at once. Like not only. Are we working our day. The job for forty to sixty hours a week and not making enough and then therefore doing work on the side like babysitting driving etc but we also have the work of our own careers. I and I think that is what leads that burnout. Because we're not only expected to have this day job that puts all these things in place for us to move forward and then on top of that we're expected to have like an hour to write a day or or to fund their own short films and make them on the weekends like that is just like impossible. I think impossible's inaccurate word word for what she's describing. What some of the other issues that came up around the Hashtag and around the town hall so I think a big one is the question of access? Hollywood has been talking talking a lot about its diversity issues wanting to get more folks into the pipeline of diverse backgrounds. But what we're looking at. Here's the situation where you have to to be able to afford to be an assistant in the first place to get that first leg up in the industry and so Paige Hollywood has just released a survey of one thousand thousand five hundred fifty one assistance and they found that seventy percent of the people who were surveyed were white and that fifty two percent were receiving financial -sential aid from family and friends to make ends meet as they were assistance in Hollywood. So I think we're seeing that this industry in order to diversify does have to become more accessible or economically manically accessible to folks who aren't coming in with with that aid so that to me was notable as well as the fact that a lot of assistance were also talking thing about this sort of demeaning conditions that were expected of them. Hollywood has pay your dues culture and I think a lot of folks remember at its in difficult conditions when they or assistance and so sort of expect. There is a lot to go through that as well. But in the survey it showed that one hundred and four respondents had an object thrown at them in the workplace. So I think that we're looking at conditions assistance or not only being pretty badly paid but also they are facing conditions that are pretty rough. We're talking with Katie kilkenny at the Hollywood reporter about pay up. Hollywood there are other things that really jumped out to me. One is that almost ninety three percent of those. The people surveyed said they work more than forty hours a week and fifteen percent said they were working more than sixty hours a week and hero's something that was really troubling. Almost almost a quarter said that they had reported an increase in substance abuse. So it sounds like the job is really taking a terrible terrible toll on the people who are in this line of work completely. I mean I think these numbers sort of show something that assistance have been talking to each other about for a long time and so I think for a lot of this is not a surprise but this survey really shines a light on some of these issues and the fact that things need to change and it sounds like some show runners are actually saying this is unsustainable and maybe even immoral absolutely so I talked to a few folks. We'd been vocal on twitter with their support and basically found out talking to them that they were advocating for higher wages on projects that they're currently developing and these are Adam conifer who Folks might know true. TV's Adam Ruins everything. David H Steinberg. who was a CO show runner? Netflix is no good nick. And the writer producer producer Creator Ayelet Waldman who was an executive producer on Netflix. Unbelievable Waldman in particular told me that she was trying to get her assistance twenty dollars an hour plus benefits and hover was saying that he was trying to just various aspects of the job to make it more. Tenable you said in your story Lori that you had reached out to the major studios and talent agencies for comment and let's just say they weren't flooding the phone lines calling back. have any of them. Had anything anything to say. One Agency is doing something and they didn't provide comment for the story. But you know I heard via sources that for which is the talent agency that represents spoke John August who helped movement as well as Liz Alpert who coined. The HASHTAG has conducted in anonymous pace survey of their assistance. And and I will also be receiving and looking at the results of the pay up Hollywood survey and I imagine that in weeks to come others will speak up more but for now they our remaining mum and even if the hours are horrible. The working conditions aren't great. A lot of people want these jobs right because it's so hard hard to get into the business and this is one possible path for people who want to become creative people in Hollywood definitely. They're extremely competitive jobs and often a line that is used with assistance to speak up about work. Conditions is that you know there were thousands. That will take place but it's gotten to the point where the wages are the same as they were twenty years ago in some cases That's what we're hearing from. These stories while the cost of living in Los Angeles has skyrocketed. And so these assistance missiles argument is that the situation is untenable at the slain. Katie Kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter. Katie thanks so much for coming on the show as much for having me

Hollywood Katie Kilkenny Paige Hollywood Los Angeles Reporter Writer Twitter Associate Editor Writers Guild Of America Unbelievable Waldman Netflix Craig Mason John August Alber Lori David H Steinberg. Adam Liz Alpert Executive Producer