23 Burst results for "Katie Hi"

Protecting Individual-Level Census Data with Differential Privacy

Linear Digressions

09:48 min | 2 months ago

Protecting Individual-Level Census Data with Differential Privacy

"Hey Katie hi Ben. So I got a postcard in the mail From the Census Survey. Can you feel it? I filled it. Yeah I filled it out but it got me thinking how. How do I know what is happening with? Statea that's being collected like it's always great to collect good data But in this case I'm in that data set so Are there any protections that are being put in place for Census Data? Really interesting question. Glad you asked total coincidence because this was what I wanted to talk about any way about that. Yeah so we're going to talk about differential privacy today and will use the census as an example. But it's a topic that's generally interesting to see who works with data around people which tends to be Ohio data. If you look under the covers you are listening to the new year decorations. So we'll focus on the example of the census here today because this is one of the biggest and most expensive and most famous data sets on people that exists but the topic of differential. Privacy is something that's general to really any data that you have but the problem that they have in. The census is collecting this very granular detailed data on everyone in America extensively. Although I think I think we all know that that's probably not totally realistic. But as many people as possible but a lot of people are understandably a little bit nervous about how is my data going to be used and what what protections are there that my individual level like personal data won't be disclosed based on the downstream uses of this data set. And I guess they're kind of two things in that one is. How do we know that the government won't use this data to say Target people who are undocumented but then the other piece of it is if the data set is out there for researchers to use. How do I know that the researchers won't be able to kind of pull it apart and find to be in that data set and the second one is what we're talking about today? Yeah we're going to focus on the second news case and it's an important one and I think it you know the meaning of the word research in this context. It's actually pretty broad So it can refer to folks like academic researchers who are getting versions of this data set to rate sociology or political science papers but it also refers to the way that many parts of the government just run and operate so when things like congressional districts are being drawn there being drawn on the basis of census results when state and local governments are asking for resources from the federal government. They're doing so on the on the basis of the number of people who live in their jurisdiction In some cases if you have a certain make up in terms of socioeconomic status or race or something like that then I can sometimes be the basis of additional funds that you can request for like parameter these kinds of things so it's not just like oh we're kind of interested in this in an academic sense but it's actually a pretty important for the functioning of many of these pieces and so there's different levels of data disclosure that are allowed for different types of research. So obviously if you're making something externally available to an academic researcher who's going to publish on the basis of that data. There might be a different set of expectations versus internal usage for bookkeeping and accounting for the operations of the government. But in general The question that you might have especially for that case where your pieces of the data set with your individual information of them. If those are being made publicly available you as a person in that data set might be wondering what someone who is smart and motivated and has access to that data set could discover about you as an individual as differential. Privacy comes in and that seems that that might seem a little far fetched. But we've had a number of episodes where we've gone into details of how what seem like fairly anonymous data sets even intentionally anonymous data sets can be. You can kind of back out Individual details especially when you combine it with another source So although it may seem far fetched it actually is feasible in does happen is. There's like a fun story about this. That's called a a record linkage attack. And so that's the data set that you release is not does not itself have any personally identifying information but there's a way that you could link it with perhaps some other data set maybe it's a data set. That doesn't even exist yet. But that when you join them together you can identify individuals fun story about this that I read as doing some research There is a woman who is if. I'm not mistaken a professor at Harvard. Now she's very distinguished In the field of this sort of special topics in data science like ethics privacy inequality of of Algorithms when they're being applied to like minority groups. These kinds of things. Her name is Ladonna Sweeney when she was a graduate student at MIT. If I recall correctly so this was in Massachusetts. There was a data set that was released of medical records of a whole bunch of people who were I think state employees or there's some kind of public public database of medical records that The governor said look we have taken off everybody's names. We've taken off any publicly identifying information so if you are an individual who's in the state of set like don't worry nobody's going to be able to know that it's you don't worry about it So as a graduate student she figured out how to do a record linkage ration- so she figured out how to join this publicly de identified medical records database to another database that had P. I approached and was able identifiable information. Yes thank you and was able to do that. Information to find the governor in the medical records database. Oh that's funny. I know this so really a devastating to in a very direct way that you stick in This was in. I think some of the earlier days of differential privacy when people were just starting to think about. Yeah how having your data out In public view. Even if you thought it was deified could was not entirely secure. So yeah so. It's pretty cool so anyway. The place where we are now as a society or something academic community. Let's say is Folks thinking about this problem for for a while now because obviously it's a it's a problem it's really important to a lot of folks who have data being collected about them which is basically everyone and tech companies and the Census Bureau which we're going to focus on today have different ways of dealing with it and one of the methods is differential privacy. That's going to be the main focus here today so differential privacy is kind of interesting. The rough idea is that you add noise to the data site in such a way that If you do a particular calculation on that data set you'll get the same answer regardless of whether a given individual as in the data set or not so. Here's a simple example. Let's suppose that you have a data site and you want to run a query on it. This is what is the average salary of people in the state set and you have individual level salary information for all of them or network. Let's use net worth wasn't worth of all the people in this data set and there's one hundred people on the data side and let's suppose that there's two different versions of the data sat and I give them both to you and one of those versions has Bill Gates in the day and one of them doesn't so the average salary in one of the data sets is going to be. Let's say it has one hundred people in it. It's GonNa be something like a billion dollars yeah And then the other one without Bill Gates in it. We'll have an average net worth of. I Dunno whatever the network is for literally any other group of people who say hundred people who live in my building was like in the tens of thousands of dollars the hundreds of thousands of dollars perhaps depending on like the group that you have or anyway you get the idea. Yeah so the idea of differential privacy is that then. Let's add a certain amount of noise to that output. So that what you'll get instead is a range. Plus minus some uncertainty and that uncertainty can change when you when you query the data set multiple times and things like this. You never quite exactly if you're getting the precisely correct answer and you're probably usually not but it does mean that whether now maybe Bill Gates would be pretty hard to hide in a data set like best but in many cases a little bit of fuzzy and can obscure whether any particular person is in there or not

Bill Gates Census Bureau Katie Ohio America Massachusetts Researcher Harvard Graduate Student Ladonna Sweeney MIT Professor P. I
"katie hi" Discussed on Linear Digressions

Linear Digressions

10:04 min | 3 months ago

"katie hi" Discussed on Linear Digressions

"Hey Katie Hi ben high you doing? What are we talking about today? We're talking about the grammar of graphics. The Grammar of graphics yeah. This is a visual episode in audio form. So let's see how this goes. This can be okay. You're listening to linear digressions. Okay so I know what? The term grammar means as it applies to language It's kind of the the rules about how you would construct sentences and I'm sure that there are many people who find better than me but that's kind of how I think about it. Yeah that when we are using language to communicate. There's an order in which we place subjects in verbs and objects. There's a recurring to language in the sense that you can have phrases. That have substructure. There's also Orders in which things tend to appear like I would say I would always say the big black car I would never say the black big car. Yes grammar is yes this this thing. That's a little bit hard to define but once you start to think of it is pretty common to think of it. In terms of the rules of language I actually was reading. Something really interesting about this It's so I just found it a tweet by Matthew Anderson things native English speakers. No but don't know why we know and the quote is adjectives in English. Absolutely have to be in the following order opinion size age shape color origin material purpose noun. So you can have a lovely little old rectangular green French silver WHITTLING KNIFE. But if you mess with that word order in the slightest. You'll sound like a maniac. It's an odd thing that every English speaker uses that list but almost none of us could write it out yeah. I think I've heard something similar to so I think that was what I would like drawing on a little bit in that Great Green Great Dragons. No Great Green Dragons. Yeah exactly so. We're not talking about language in this talk of graphics. What how what does that mean yes? So that's what we're going to spend the next fifteen minutes talking about a little bit but the rough idea here. Is that so just like? There's an expectation that you have about the word order or the construction of phrases when you're listening to someone speaker when you're reading a sentence. There's a similar idea. Perhaps for visualizing drawing visualizations of data or consuming visualizations of data. Things that you expect to see whether or not you even really think about it. Or when you're composing a visualization things that you're planning for or taking into account that again. Maybe you aren't thinking about but this comes up in a really deep way if you are say. Dealing with data visualization software at a at a pretty fundamental level. So for those of you who are into our universe and particularly The tidy verse Hadley Wickham 's corner of the our universe. You're probably familiar with a package called G. G Plot to which is a visualization library. In our that's can famously makes very beautiful graphics especially with its its defaults make for really nice graphics. the gee-gee NJIT PLOT TO REVERSE TO GRAMMAR OF GRAPHICS and own. And actually. Yeah the most of the research that I did for. This episode was reading a twenty five page paper. That had they wickham wrote about how he thinks about. And how the field a general thinks about the grammar of graphics. Data visualization says where. We're going to talk about very cool. I don't even know where to start in thinking about this. This is this is GonNa be neat. Yeah this this was a pretty challenging Topic for me to try to understand because it gets into theory pretty quickly of like what is a facet and what is the scale and what is A. What's the difference between a mapping to an aesthetic and coordinate system I think There's certainly a lot to unpack if you're just really excited about this idea but rather than getting into some of these kind of esoteric concepts especially concepts that are ESA teric without having examples to look at. I wanted to illustrate the main pieces of the grammar of graphics as highly working for example talks about it using an example of a visualization. That probably a lot of people are really familiar. With and how that illustrates a few of the big important concept that again. We all kind of take for granted probably in our day to day. Visualizations Okay so what's the. What's the example graphic then? All right let's talk about a stacked histogram stacked histogram yet can you? Can you describe it for me? Yes so let me give you an example of stacked histogram ice to make all the time when I was a physicist so when I was a physicist we used to make lots and lots of plots where what you are trying to do was look at distributions of particles that you are getting in your detector and in general there were lots of different kinds of particles that were classified as what we would call background so these were types of particles that were you know interesting but not what we are really searching for and then there were in certain situations. You'll be looking for signal particles as well so this might be like a higgs bows on if you're doing a heck search and so when you were creating visualizations of your data. What you're looking for is okay. Do we have a distribution of data? That's more consistent with there. Only being background present or does it look more consistent with background plus signal for the second cases like Oh maybe we discovered some new physics or something so we would think a lot about how to visualize background and when you're doing that analysis you tend to have different kinds of particles that are coming in from different places in your detector and so if you just look at one of those systems at a time you're going to get an incomplete picture of all of the particles instead what you wanted to layer them all on top of each other so that you have yes so that you have like a picture of the overall distribution of the particles that you see but you also have them stratified by the different types of physics processes that they correspond to and so you're kind of stacking each of those strata on top of each other and you have a visualization that shows you know each of them separately but also all of them adding together. That's roughly what a histogram is God. I think I've seen these before are I'm sure I've seen them in many places but I'm thinking about when you look at when you do a software release and you look at all of the different All of the different computers that are running the software. And what version. They're on and you can see how people have upgraded. Each version of the software will be represented by different color. And over time. You'll see them kind of go and peak and then as new software later is released than the previous version will kind of trail off and The I guess the representation that you're talking about is showing all of that in a single graph with time. Let's say being the x axis and in in my example. It's always at one hundred per cent hike because every user is on some version but you can see the dip the I guess the distribution at any given point of those versions yeah or a few decided to represent it instead of as a percentage of the whole if you had your y. Axis was allowed float and instead it was the total number of users using that system than you could imagine like the overall rate could actually go up and down as users join. Leave your your system or you're right are using your software or whatever so. I haven't I have an image in my head now. Okay great and so hopefully for most of the folks who are listening to this. Hopefully you do too. But if you don't or if you're really struggling to think about what a stacked histogram might look like an might be worth taking like five seconds to Google this on your phone to see like a mental snapshot because it's I don't imagine that the rest of this will make tons of sense if you have no idea. We're talking about so okay So stacked histogram how do we think about this in terms of the grammar of graphics so let me layer in a few of the fundamental ideas of grammar graphic so either taking place in a very explicit order to the first layer the most foundational layer of when you need to make? Data visualization is What is the data? Set that you'RE GONNA BE VISUALIZING. And how does that map from The the variables in the data set to a set of aesthetics. So what's the data set? Let's talk about that first. Let's use my example of. Let's use your example. Actually I think that's probably a little bit more familiar to our listeners than like a particle physics date set but instead we have some notion of a data set that has all of the users of our software through time and the type of what did he say. It was like the version of the software that they're using yet and actually. Can I make this a little bit? Meta and tweak this and we'll say this could be a linear digressions episode downloads. Like we can go. We can go into our hosting provider and we can see how many people download on on a given day and so of course the day after we release an episode we see a lot of downloads and then maybe two months ago by and now that episode is a small sliver.

Hadley Wickham Katie Hi physicist NJIT Google Matthew Anderson ESA higgs
The Grammar Of Graphics

Linear Digressions

10:04 min | 3 months ago

The Grammar Of Graphics

"Hey Katie Hi ben high you doing? What are we talking about today? We're talking about the grammar of graphics. The Grammar of graphics yeah. This is a visual episode in audio form. So let's see how this goes. This can be okay. You're listening to linear digressions. Okay so I know what? The term grammar means as it applies to language It's kind of the the rules about how you would construct sentences and I'm sure that there are many people who find better than me but that's kind of how I think about it. Yeah that when we are using language to communicate. There's an order in which we place subjects in verbs and objects. There's a recurring to language in the sense that you can have phrases. That have substructure. There's also Orders in which things tend to appear like I would say I would always say the big black car I would never say the black big car. Yes grammar is yes this this thing. That's a little bit hard to define but once you start to think of it is pretty common to think of it. In terms of the rules of language I actually was reading. Something really interesting about this It's so I just found it a tweet by Matthew Anderson things native English speakers. No but don't know why we know and the quote is adjectives in English. Absolutely have to be in the following order opinion size age shape color origin material purpose noun. So you can have a lovely little old rectangular green French silver WHITTLING KNIFE. But if you mess with that word order in the slightest. You'll sound like a maniac. It's an odd thing that every English speaker uses that list but almost none of us could write it out yeah. I think I've heard something similar to so I think that was what I would like drawing on a little bit in that Great Green Great Dragons. No Great Green Dragons. Yeah exactly so. We're not talking about language in this talk of graphics. What how what does that mean yes? So that's what we're going to spend the next fifteen minutes talking about a little bit but the rough idea here. Is that so just like? There's an expectation that you have about the word order or the construction of phrases when you're listening to someone speaker when you're reading a sentence. There's a similar idea. Perhaps for visualizing drawing visualizations of data or consuming visualizations of data. Things that you expect to see whether or not you even really think about it. Or when you're composing a visualization things that you're planning for or taking into account that again. Maybe you aren't thinking about but this comes up in a really deep way if you are say. Dealing with data visualization software at a at a pretty fundamental level. So for those of you who are into our universe and particularly The tidy verse Hadley Wickham 's corner of the our universe. You're probably familiar with a package called G. G Plot to which is a visualization library. In our that's can famously makes very beautiful graphics especially with its its defaults make for really nice graphics. the gee-gee NJIT PLOT TO REVERSE TO GRAMMAR OF GRAPHICS and own. And actually. Yeah the most of the research that I did for. This episode was reading a twenty five page paper. That had they wickham wrote about how he thinks about. And how the field a general thinks about the grammar of graphics. Data visualization says where. We're going to talk about very cool. I don't even know where to start in thinking about this. This is this is GonNa be neat. Yeah this this was a pretty challenging Topic for me to try to understand because it gets into theory pretty quickly of like what is a facet and what is the scale and what is A. What's the difference between a mapping to an aesthetic and coordinate system I think There's certainly a lot to unpack if you're just really excited about this idea but rather than getting into some of these kind of esoteric concepts especially concepts that are ESA teric without having examples to look at. I wanted to illustrate the main pieces of the grammar of graphics as highly working for example talks about it using an example of a visualization. That probably a lot of people are really familiar. With and how that illustrates a few of the big important concept that again. We all kind of take for granted probably in our day to day. Visualizations Okay so what's the. What's the example graphic then? All right let's talk about a stacked histogram stacked histogram yet can you? Can you describe it for me? Yes so let me give you an example of stacked histogram ice to make all the time when I was a physicist so when I was a physicist we used to make lots and lots of plots where what you are trying to do was look at distributions of particles that you are getting in your detector and in general there were lots of different kinds of particles that were classified as what we would call background so these were types of particles that were you know interesting but not what we are really searching for and then there were in certain situations. You'll be looking for signal particles as well so this might be like a higgs bows on if you're doing a heck search and so when you were creating visualizations of your data. What you're looking for is okay. Do we have a distribution of data? That's more consistent with there. Only being background present or does it look more consistent with background plus signal for the second cases like Oh maybe we discovered some new physics or something so we would think a lot about how to visualize background and when you're doing that analysis you tend to have different kinds of particles that are coming in from different places in your detector and so if you just look at one of those systems at a time you're going to get an incomplete picture of all of the particles instead what you wanted to layer them all on top of each other so that you have yes so that you have like a picture of the overall distribution of the particles that you see but you also have them stratified by the different types of physics processes that they correspond to and so you're kind of stacking each of those strata on top of each other and you have a visualization that shows you know each of them separately but also all of them adding together. That's roughly what a histogram is God. I think I've seen these before are I'm sure I've seen them in many places but I'm thinking about when you look at when you do a software release and you look at all of the different All of the different computers that are running the software. And what version. They're on and you can see how people have upgraded. Each version of the software will be represented by different color. And over time. You'll see them kind of go and peak and then as new software later is released than the previous version will kind of trail off and The I guess the representation that you're talking about is showing all of that in a single graph with time. Let's say being the x axis and in in my example. It's always at one hundred per cent hike because every user is on some version but you can see the dip the I guess the distribution at any given point of those versions yeah or a few decided to represent it instead of as a percentage of the whole if you had your y. Axis was allowed float and instead it was the total number of users using that system than you could imagine like the overall rate could actually go up and down as users join. Leave your your system or you're right are using your software or whatever so. I haven't I have an image in my head now. Okay great and so hopefully for most of the folks who are listening to this. Hopefully you do too. But if you don't or if you're really struggling to think about what a stacked histogram might look like an might be worth taking like five seconds to Google this on your phone to see like a mental snapshot because it's I don't imagine that the rest of this will make tons of sense if you have no idea. We're talking about so okay So stacked histogram how do we think about this in terms of the grammar of graphics so let me layer in a few of the fundamental ideas of grammar graphic so either taking place in a very explicit order to the first layer the most foundational layer of when you need to make? Data visualization is What is the data? Set that you'RE GONNA BE VISUALIZING. And how does that map from The the variables in the data set to a set of aesthetics. So what's the data set? Let's talk about that first. Let's use my example of. Let's use your example. Actually I think that's probably a little bit more familiar to our listeners than like a particle physics date set but instead we have some notion of a data set that has all of the users of our software through time and the type of what did he say. It was like the version of the software that they're using yet and actually. Can I make this a little bit? Meta and tweak this and we'll say this could be a linear digressions episode downloads. Like we can go. We can go into our hosting provider and we can see how many people download on on a given day and so of course the day after we release an episode we see a lot of downloads and then maybe two months ago by and now that episode is a small sliver.

Hadley Wickham Physicist Katie Hi Njit Matthew Anderson Google ESA Higgs
Gaussian Processes

Linear Digressions

05:28 min | 3 months ago

Gaussian Processes

"Hey Katie hi Ben What are we talking about today? We're GonNa talk about Galaxy and processes as a way to solve pretty gnarly regression problems. All right let's dig into the NARAL. You are listening to linear digressions. So what do you? What do you why? Why use the word gnarly? Yeah so let's talk about regression for a second and kind of build up some complexity in in our mental model here so that we are we arrive at gnarly in a minute or two and so just quizzing myself. A LINEAR regression would be. You've got a bunch of points and then you try to draw a line. That's representative of those points through it. Right yeah so. That's a pretty classic. That's usually the first thing that I think of. When somebody says regression is exactly that you have a bunch of points. You're trying to draw a line through it. The best fit line is the one that minimizes the difference between the line and the point for all of the points in your data set and a linear regression example of what we call a parametric model. So sometimes we talk about like the parameters of the models that people are fitting for so in this case the parameters of a linear regression will be things like the the slope of. If it's one dimensional the slope of the line it can be multidimensional or multi variant. So you can have the slope or the coefficients that multiply several different terms. And then there's the intercept term which is another parameter of the model so when you're fitting the model kind of a rule it says it has to have this. Functional form y equals M. X. Plus B And then you're finding 'em and be that best fit the data that you have which is your X.'s. In your wise so there's kind of a a set form a set mathematical functional form of the answer that you're trying to find And then there's a couple parameters that you're discreetly allowed to tune in in finding the solution subject to that mathematical form. Okay got it cool so but as I think. Probably a lot of our listeners know probably you know a linear regression is not the only type of regression. That's out there the for for the purposes of this conversation. Let's talk about some other functional forms that that mathematical equation could take so you could imagine if you saw a particular pattern of the data points like. Let's suppose your data points were hourly temperature measurements taken over the course of the year. So yes you wouldn't want to fit. That was just a line right. No no especially. If you have did you say hourly yeah. Yeah then that's probably GONNA be. I mean it's going to be curvy and it's probably going to be a sign. You SEIDEL. Because every day the temperature goes up and then it goes back down. Yes so there's a periodicity to the daily measurements that you're gonna take where on average. The temperature is higher in the day lower at night. See except you expect that in general. There's maybe a roughly twenty four hour period or pattern that you see of course there can be days when you have a cold front. That comes through first thing in the morning or whatever so it's not it's not guaranteed But in general that periodic structure is something that you generally expect to see and moreover there's going to be an annual trend where the temperatures are going to be higher or lower in the winter. So if you had ten years worth of data there might be Signing soil functions that you would have had a couple of different periods and then when you were fitting the data together a couple of different terms to account for the structure in the model and then boom you have another example of parametric model. That's totally different functional form but again we can use it to fit a regression model for temperature as a function of date and time. Okay so a parametric model can be one of many different shapes and it can also be a combination of those shapes. Is that right because you were saying in? If you had ten years with a data for example you probably have roughly speaking to sign waves. Yeah I would say instead of calling it shapes. I'M GONNA use a a slightly more precise term. Which would be like a mathematical form so by mathematical form? I mean do you have a function? That's signing soil in the case of the temperature measurements linear in the case of trying to fit align. Let me toss in a few more here. You could have something that is polynomial. So if you have a bunch of data that looks like it's Distributed kind of a parabolic shape than. Maybe you'RE GONNA fit it with a quadrant function or a quarterback function like x squared. Squared cubed yeah or like sums of terms like that yeah so those are all GonNa have different characteristic shapes and and and that's so coming back to the point you make yes. They have different shapes but In terms of when we're thinking about them as as mathematical objects they have different functional forms

Naral Katie Representative
"katie hi" Discussed on The Children's Hour

The Children's Hour

09:42 min | 4 months ago

"katie hi" Discussed on The Children's Hour

"Seth off with a song he wrote for the Children's hour porcupine and before that the happy racers. You're listening to the children's hour and we are so excited to have back in the studio folks from the bow skate ecosystem monitoring project and with us on the line is Katie elder. Hi Katie Hi. Katie and Michaela ran spot. Hello Michaela Hello so katy. You are an educator and a biologist with the organization Boesky Ecosystem Monitoring Project. Can you tell us what vamp is them is a citizen science program that collects data that used by agencies and local officials in all the data is collected by students the boss gay ecosystem which is the ripe heroin or river forest? That goes right through. Albuquerque is where we do a lot of our research in this is on the Rio Guerande. Yes we focused on the middle section of the Rio Grande Day that goes through New Mexico. We have researched sites as far north as Santo Domingo Pueblo and all the way down south to LAS CRUCES. Michaela ran spot. Your twelfth grader at a public charter school here called Amy Biehl and can you tell us about your involvement with vamp. And what you do there. I am intern at them. Through Amy Bill. We do thing called senior projects and that is where we pick a site that we do one hundred hours of service and so my sight is at. Bam and do that. I am able to do different projects with Katie involving with ecosystem in Albuquerque today on the show Michaela and Katie are with us from bump and Michaela's project involves porcupines so today on the show. We were really hoping that you all could teach us about the mysterious and beautiful porcupine. What is a PORCUPINE PORCUPINE? Is a large rodent? That lives in the Albuquerque. Bosquet it can also live in desert habitats in mountainous habitats. They're very common but not a lot of research has been done on them. They're very quiet instead up in a tree. A lot of the times in people sometimes walk right by them without even noticing coupons. Ever come down to the ground. They do so. Porcupines are nocturnal. Which means that. They're mostly active at night so they spend most of the day sitting up in a tree sleeping and come down at night to eat and to switch trees stretch out. Go find a better bud to munch on. What kind of things do they eat? They eat a lot of different things. So the with me working. Katie was part of my project to look at what they were eating Mostly what we eat a lot of cottonwood trees. They also eat different species on the ground so they like things such as Almar they can see different trees or different plans easy on the ground so it depends on. That's what I project focusing on still look at that. How were you able to find out what they eat? So I was able to learn about stable isotopes and I went to a workshop. That Katy invited me to so a stable isotope it's A Proton that has different numbers of neutrons within it so through that we can look at c thirteen to twelve. Those are the ones that are kind of industrialized tope. But with those we can determine the carbon nitrogen quills. Everything made up of atoms around us. Animals are mostly made out of carbon atoms in nitrogen atoms and the way in an atom. Works is there. Is You know the nucleus that has protons and neutrons and around that nucleus there are the negative electrons but not all atoms of the same element are made the same. Some atoms have more neutrons which makes them heavier. So what Michaela was talking about with the carbon. I forget she knows better than me. The exact number of the isotope but some carbon atoms are more heavy than other carbon atoms because they have more neutrons in their nucleus and so looking at the ratio of the heavy carbon atoms versus the lighter carbon atoms. You can tell exactly what an animal has been eating. I comparing that ratio in the animal to the ratio of those carbon atoms in the plant. If you get stabbed by porcupine-quill Is there a high chance of getting infection? That is a great question. Porcupine quills are meant to stick into a Predator so that they remember not to mess with them again But Porcupines actually have an antibiotic on their skin in that can be on their clothes So initially you should be okay and not get infected because of that property porcupines have although if he leave equivalent or don't clean the wound afterwards. You could definitely get an infection from something else down the road. Why do they had this antibiotic on their quills? So porcupines like Michaela said liked fine up into cottonwood trees and eat the buds that are at the very tip of the stem and they're a pretty heavy animals. Most of them are about fifteen pounds. And so if you can imagine a really heavy animal up on top of a really thin stick on a branch on the tree. They have the possibility of falling out of that tree. And Porcupines can be a little clumsy in fall out of trees or accidentally poke themselves so in the case that they do accidentally poke themselves they need to have that in Abayat ix so that they can prevent themselves from getting sick or infected from their own clumsiness. How many quilt says the Porcupine have porcupines have thirty thousand quills in there all modified hairs so the that's just the number of quills but they also have other hairs on their bodies as well? Do THEY HAVE BABIES? And how many will they do have babies? I'm getting until we saw one the other day industry when we went on a walk generally they have one per year. They're kind of weird as a rodent. 'cause you think of other rodents like mice? They have lots of babies all year round But porcupines only have one baby. Generally per year in the babies are called porcupine. Let's in yeah the one Michaela and I saw was super cute. Does it have pleasing in the clothes? They do not have poisoned in their quills. But it can be very painful to get poked by one of them. So I've been thinking before and I only seen for wines in cottonwood trees. Doom Perkins Lyndon any other trees or only so yes. Porcupines can live in a variety of different trees they can also live in dens underground or in brush piles of sticks in the boss gang. They're just easiest to see from cottonwood trees because they're really high up in cottonwood trees. Don't have really dense branches. So that's where it's easiest to see them. They also feel pretty safe up there because not a lot of predators can reach them on their up that high in a tree. What is the big role of porcupines in like the life cycle or in the world? That's a great question. That's actually really important. A big reason why. There's not a lot of research done on porcupines. All that I know of is Beth in the southwest researching porcupines so one reason that they're researched a lot in other parts of the United States is because they can be pest they like to eat. Would that's been treated with salts because their diet is salt deficient in nature. Salt is pretty rare and a lot of wood that we use for building is treated with type of salt in so porcupines have actually been chewing on people's houses so that's why there's been more research in other areas but in the boss guy they are important food sources for various predators. How can any Predator possibly eat a porcupine because don't they eject their quills onto anyone who tries to touch them? Ooh thank you for bringing that up. That is an urban legend. That porcupines can shoot their quills. They actually cannot do that in. They don't have any quills on their face or on their bellies. So if a Predator is able to flip them over they can. They can eat them from their belly. We're talking with.

Michaela Hello Katie Albuquerque Boesky Ecosystem Monitoring Pr Katie Hi Katie elder New Mexico Amy Biehl Rio Guerande heroin Seth Santo Domingo Pueblo intern Amy Bill Katy LAS CRUCES Perkins Lyndon Abayat United States Beth
The Lottery Ticket Hypothesis

Linear Digressions

09:06 min | 5 months ago

The Lottery Ticket Hypothesis

"Hey Katie hi Ben. What are we talking about today? We're talking about the lottery ticket hypothesis. Which is a really interesting way that you can win. Lots of money. Yeah I know about that one. Scratch off tickets were actually. That's the thing in neural nets. Okay I thought it was the hypothesis. Was that every time you buy a ticket? You will never win the lottery. Well that's not true that was actually panned out pretty well for me. You're listening to linear digressions. Also I don't play the lottery so just disregard everything I said all right well. Let's talk about the neural net lottery. Then which you probably don't play also but that's okay so a lottery ticket hypothesis. This is a pretty cool result. I think it's a research hypothesis. This gotten a decent amount of attention in the last year or so and the rough idea. Is this imagine that you have a neural network? That's doing like I don't know we'll see some image classification pretty standard thing for a neural net to do and it's this big complicated deep neural network. It's got lots of hidden layers. They're all very densely connected to each other so that all the neurons in one layer are feeding into all of the neurons in the next layer and so on and you're trading this neuro network learning how to classify pictures the lottery ticket. Hypothesis is the hypothesis which is backed up by some evidence that maybe it's not the whole network that is doing the heavy lifting on the classification task. But if you were able to interest a little bit you would find that. There's actually sub networks within that big dense network so only a small fraction of of the actual network is in the sub networks but this sub- networks are the ones that are doing. Actually all of the heavy lifting around that classification and a whole lot of the network is actually not really doing very much at all. That's really interesting so I guess than those I mean are those sub networks than the lottery tickets. Is that where it gets his name? Yeah so that's the idea. Is that you have this. Big Rally neural net. That's got all kinds of junk and connections and weights and all these things in it and then there's just a little slice of it. Some small percentage of it. That's actually that's the the winning lottery ticket if you like. It's hard to know in advance where it is But we'll talk about how to find it and why people think that this is that this is something that could be going on But yeah the notion is that you start with this. Big Pile of possibility in the form of this densely connected journal net. And then you as a researcher when you're training it part of what you may be doing is finding the winning lottery tickets inside of that big pile of stuff. That's interesting So as a software engineer. I'm very accustomed to thinking of systems as being designed because that's what I do all day. Is I design systems on I write functions and methods and all of that and so I know as I'm building it and in fact I specifically decide where the complexity lies and what you're saying. Is that our neural network? We don't know where it's going to lie because we're not designing it. Were just past like feeding it with a bunch of Data to train on and then it's arranging itself in a way that does this task really well but we have no idea necessarily how and you were saying that. These networks are small. Fraction of the larger network is the hypothesis. Could it also be like fifty percent of the neural network? That's doing this or seventy percent Yeah so let's talk about how you actually find a lottery ticket and why people think lottery tickets exist. Oh and just to clarify when you say when you say lottery ticket. You're talking about winning lottery ticket. Yeah tickets exist. I've seen them right so when I say winning lottery ticket in the context of this episode I mean the sub network within your big densely connected neural network. That's the the smaller sub network that is actually doing the heavy lifting when it comes to the classification task. It's part of the network. That's actually predicting things correctly. Got It and the implication here is that much of the rest of the network isn't really doing anything So let's unpack that piece by piece number one. How do we know that the rest of the network is really doing anything? Well because these researchers basically came up with an algorithm for getting rid of big pieces of the network as the training process. Yeah and this is something that we've talked about it a little bit before in the episode about dropout. Which I know is was a while ago. So I'll refresh real quick but it's roughly the idea that as you are training your network you are getting rid of some of the connections as you go and maybe you're just getting rid of them randomly or in this case. What they're doing is as their training. The network if they find the weights are small. Then they set the weights two zero. The weight being that connection between One individual neuron in one layer and an individual neuron another layer. So you have many many weights in the whole thing. And some of them are taking on large values. Which tells you that there's kind of a lot of signal passing through. That part of the network in some of them are decreasing value or they very small values and those are the ones that in this case they would be setting two zero As part of the training algorithm okay. So you take your your range of probabilities or your different probabilities within each neuron you set the low ones the ones that are under some threshold. I guess that you tune two zero and then you redistribute that's small probability over maybe the remaining remaining connections. Yes that's about right. I don't know if there's that step of explicitly redistributing the rest of the weight but I think that's probably a minor detail effectively. I imagine that if you keep training it it kind of does the same thing but yeah you set them two zero and he locked the minutes era which is effectively getting rid of those connections. So it's a parameter of the Algorithm. What percentage of the weights? You WANNA set to zero in any given iteration but each time you pass it through your reducing the connectivity of your network by whatever. That percentage is okay. So you're basically taking your algorithm as your training. You're getting rid of the week connections. And the I guess I'm in. I'm assuming that if you have weak connections that means probably that connection is not very involved in the algorithm making successful prediction and so effectively. You're getting rid of the parts of the algorithm that are not doing much in terms of predicting. Yeah and the thing that you're doing the same time to usually when you're training is that the connections that are remaining the ones that are you know winning the the horse race here to get to stay in in the In the neural net their weights are moving around as well so they might be going up maybe in some cases they're going down but one thing that's worth pointing out here that I've implied so far but we'll just make it explicit. Is that when you start out with training? Euronet you have to set those weights to something and see what people will do is just. They'll just initialized them randomly. So there's this notion of the initialisation of your neural net as being a thing that you have to think about. You have to start somewhere. That's what your initial conditions are says. You're training your of course moving away from those initial conditions. Some of the way to going up some of them are going down or being set to zero and the thing. That's curious here to my mind is not exactly that you can prune away some of the weights and have the remaining neural net. Be Pretty strong. Like that. Seems knocked strange. The thing that's interesting and why they call it the lottery ticket. Hypothesis is now. Let's imagine that you get to the end of this whole training improving process and you have maybe twenty percent of the connections left now take those connections and set them back to their initial values the ones that they had before you did any training you got rid of the other eighty percent. Those are those are gone. But we're going back to the initial conditions for the twenty percent. Now see how good your enrollment is. It's pretty darn good. It's almost as good as it was. When you trained it and it's just the initial conditions again

Researcher Katie Big Rally Software Engineer
Thinking of data science initiatives as innovation initiatives

Linear Digressions

09:07 min | 6 months ago

Thinking of data science initiatives as innovation initiatives

"Hey Katie Hi ben we talk a lot about startups and startup things on this podcast. But there are a whole all set of businesses that need data science that maybe don't work in quite the same way is right for every facebook or Netflix. Search Google or tech I start up. There's lots and lots of lacy companies that have been around for a long time that that have been doing their thing since long before the internet or cloud computing or any of. That was a thing and that are trying to figure out how how to bring data science into their companies and I would bet moreover that a lot of people who listen to this podcast our data scientists who work at companies like that and it is a totally different dynamic than from companies. That are technically. It's you like Nice so this one is for all of you. You are listening to linear digressions. So this episode is fairly heavily inspired by a very famous book. It's like a business book called the innovators dilemma. It was written by Clay Christensen. Who just passed away this week so I was thinking about him a little bit the recording? That is yes. Yeah there's usually a delay of a few weeks so the beginning later but it's a book that is pretty popular with managerial and executive types and so for a lot of people I would bet that like your boss's boss might know this argument from business school or something but a lot of data scientists aren't familiar earlier with it but I think it's very Germane to the task that many data scientists have when they work in these established legacy companies so you're talking about the IBM's of the world I think IBM is a really good example But it's basically any company. Yeah I think any company could be a candidate for this. So here's here's the argument. Here is the question that Clay Christiansen is trying trying to answer in. Innovators still have that at any point. In time you can imagine that it was twenty years ago and you're looking at the market and pick an the industry pick pick a market and say what firm is the market leader in this industry right now and you would see some firm like the sears Roebuck. TUCK INC or Twa You get these big old companies IBM arguably and he's companies were so dominant in their fields. That it seemed like at the time they would never lose that edge and yet you fast forward. Twenty years thirty years forty years with striking regularity. They not only did lose that edge but they in many cases fell. Oh pretty far behind the rest of the market and basically what happens is as technology rolls along and innovates in new stuff comes out. These firms are are disproportionately likely to miss the next technological wave which then means that they get left behind as technology moves on without them right. H Hewlett Packard isn't on that podium anymore cracked yeah. This argument was originally had The computing industry as as is one of the core tenets but it. It's something that repeats itself and this argument is it's not a new argument. No this book was written in Nineteen Ninety-seven if if I'm not mistaken which is ages and ages well. It has withstood the test of time. I was actually listening to another podcast this weekend where the hosts were talking themselves about basically this exact hypothesis about how big companies that kind of miss the next thing and so the thing that in particular particular Clay Christensen was really interested in. What are the dynamics that are happening inside of a market inside of a firm that makes it so difficult for them to catch that next technical technological advance right because these companies aren't stupid they know that technically if you're in a computer company like you know that new computers are going to be coming out every year you know that the technology changes but in particular there's types of innovation technological innovation especially that are very disruptive and that require acquire you to change around the types of customers that you market to the business model or the the structure of your organization to accommodate say faster production schedules or different economies of scale? And so if you're one of these big incumbent firms you have almost by definition gotten very very good very very efficient at executing on whatever it is that the market is demanding of you right now like you are stupor good at giving in your customers. What it is they want and you make a lot of money doing it and so when something new comes along if very often pops up in a smaller side market? It's a distraction to you if you try to go capture this new technology and put it into your roadmap and usually when it first comes out. It's very good. It's not the new thing is usually not as good as the big establish things like. PC's are in terms of just pure computing power. They are not as powerful as mainframe computers. And so if you're a big mainframe computer manufacturer and you're looking at this new technology that's coming up and you're like this is not as good as the thing that I'm selling right now. Like why would I stop doing this. Extremely profitable extremely efficient. Well oiled machine process that I have to go make a bet on this technology that my customers are not asking for and that does not work as well as what I do right now and that's really interesting The the what doesn't work work as well as what I'm doing right now. Even if you think okay what if this was a mature product you may be stuck in a way of thinking of measuring in your product and this new product against metrics. That are not really as relevant to the new product like for example If you measure desktop machines and laptops obviously laptops key selling feature is mobility right and you may just not be prioritizing using that given that you sell desktop computers. And that's never been a thing you even thought about you. Don't evaluate your desktop computer on its portability Lord ability but you do evaluate your desktop computer on. Its speed up credibility number of other things. Yeah it's it's much less expensive. It's easier so much easier to repair You can use the keyboard that you like with it. I don't know so it's it's it seems like it's also a paradigm shift that even if you're willing to make that paradigm shift you're Kinda stuck. Yeah and the reason that we're talking about this on this podcast is i. I think that there is a lot of what we're talking about right now. Like I think data science in many cases is a technological innovation. And so if you are a good executive at a big legacy company you see startups. you see Google Amazon and facebook and if they haven't overtaken you already they're coming up very fast in your rear view mirror and so of course if you're running one of these big incoming in companies you have to figure out you have to confront the innovators dilemma. So it's like how are you going to you know. The data science is this disruptive technology and that if view don't confront that and come up with a strategy to deal with it you're going to be left behind. Somebody's GonNa pass you but at the same time. It's super super hard to turn an aircraft carrier and so if you're a data scientist WHO's working one of these companies. I've talked to so many people who work at these companies in data science teams and they really struggle against the momentum of the institution to just keep doing things the way that they've always been doing it because like we talked about before for there's just so much momentum behind that it's such a it's such a Well oiled machine for cranking out the thing that has always been cranking out and use a data the scientists. You're you're very small you maybe. If you're lucky you have a team and you are tasked with being this this this little germ of technological innovation. That in the long run is how the company is hoping to save itself from sliding into obsolescence as is everything becomes totally data driven. But at the same time you know you might be a team of ten people in a company of ten thousand and that's very very very difficult for you to pull the whole mass of of the organization toward your new way of doing

IBM Clay Christensen Google Facebook Scientist Executive Clay Christiansen Katie Hi Sears Roebuck Hewlett Packard Netflix TWA Tuck Inc Amazon
"katie hi" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

10:12 min | 10 months ago

"katie hi" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"Along the lines of here you're talking to the bitch again I'll say basically the hell with it I'm not going to go up daydream back at each other on trying to stop flickr on his put downs this isn't what it looks like we're talking about the girls very entertainment here at Dateline when we heard the tale of Katie Spill Bauer in Amarillo Texas the case at first glance seemed open shot forty eight oh Katie Baur is accused of killing Robin Spielberg TV was locked up on charges she murdered Robin Spiel our with a bullet to the hand bullet invest the gators thought came from Katie's vary owned pink twenty two Katie's alibi looked shaky and she'd failed two polygraphs and that how Robin also happened to be the ex wife of Katie's husband jd and that Robbins Romantic relationship with jd somehow seem to survive the end of their marriage there was a river of bad blood between the two women a bunch of blinking signs that said Katie did it we started being a bit and we wondered if there was more of the story so in February two thousand fifteen one of our producers sent a letter to Katie at the Lamoure County jail dear Ms Spiel Bauer I've been following your case for the past several months and felt it was time I reached out to you directly a week later we received a response from inmate number eight Oh five nine housing unit to Pod B. Cell Twenty you too it was the kind of ladder that makes an impression I appreciate your interest and my story and your desire to want to know what is really going on in this pathetic excuse seven investigation she clearly knew her audience as long as you respect me and mine I will give you one hell the story because she said she had information we would want to hear about her ex husband. Jd the man she said was the real killer there is a very dangerous man walking the streets of this town I know the truth I won't stop screaming until someone listens listen we did those letters kept on coming and sue Katie and our producer Karen Israel were chatting by phone hi Katie Hi Miss Israel yes I'm glad we were finally able to connect I'm just coming out there trying to learn as much as I can and want to hear what you have to say about about the whole situation well it's it's a pretty rotten situation I found myself fighting for my life my ex husband did some pretty it's pretty wicked things and cotton middle of it anyone who knows me would know that I'm not capable of doing what they're accusing me how would never do that city but he's keep in mind we hear this a lot I didn't do it couldn't have done it the other guy did it but the more we talked the more we realized there was something about Katie we couldn't ignore she was smart strong insistent could she possibly be telling the truth. Our correspondence continued for six months good day I hope you had a wonderful vacation arrested so I thought I would have a letter waiting for you to catch you up on what's been going on here in Randall County Texas a relationship like none other this careful dance unique to journalist and inmate I will not quit fighting for Robin and her family even though they have been led to hate me I cannot wait to meet you when we met face to face it was in Amarillo where you'll find something called the Cadillac ranch. it's a chunk of the recent past buried in plain sight and that is a pretty good metaphor for Katie Spiel Bauer wore her own past the crown of thorns you pretty far from the perfect jail that's pretty rough childhood my father passed away just a month before my second left and my mother could not cope with that very well and she ended up addicted to heroin crack She was an alcoholic we never had a stable home she was in and out of jail most of my childhood and out of Rehab Structure New cutie was a self-described wild child in eighth grade I ended up dropping out of school in Eighth Grade I was homeless I was doing drugs I don't know how I'm still alive.

Katie Katie Spill Bauer Katie Baur Katie Hi jd Robin Spielberg Robin Spiel Robin Lamoure County flickr Texas gators Amarillo Karen Israel Randall County Texas producer heroin Robbins six months
A wave of graduate programs drops the GRE application requirement

Science Magazine Podcast

10:53 min | 1 year ago

A wave of graduate programs drops the GRE application requirement

"Now we have Katie Lincoln a staff writer at science. She's been trying to quantify the perception, that graduate programs have begun the great Greg's, sit or the GRE exodus. Hi, katie. Hi. Okay. Just a background question here. Did you take the GRE? I did take the Jerry way back in two thousand and five. I took the GRE end went through the process of studying for this standardized test to get into grad school me, too. Took the general or was it? The biology one. I just took the general test me, too. If you know, people in the sciences, these days, oh, you've probably heard at least anecdotally that grad schools aren't really asking for the GRE as much anymore. But that's kind of been a, you know, something, a school will announce or people start talking about about. How did you go about finding out that this was more than, you know, a case here or there, how that was more than anecdote? Yes, there's been this chatter on Twitter in particular, that the so-called Brexit movement has been gaining steam in number of programs have been announcing that they've dropped the GRE, but I was really curious to quantify how many programs have actually dropped it. And how that differs between scientific disciplines. And so what I did is I sampled peachy programs at fifty of the top ranked research, universities in the US, and looked at whether they required, the General Jerry tests in eight different disciplines, so molecular biology, neuroscience ecology. Chemistry computer science psychology physics, and geology. And when you say top ranked where those rankings come from bay came from the times, higher education ranking system. Okay. When you looked at all these schools at all these different disciplines, did you were you able to say? Yeah. Something's happening here. The GRE is starting to go away in a big way. Yes. So is interesting going into this. I knew that there had been a shift in recent years, but I didn't realize how dramatic it had been and what I found is that if I had collected these data just a few years ago, the vast majority of peachy programs would have required that year general test, but the changes been really dramatic in the life sciences, in particular. So in two thousand eighteen forty four percent of molecular biology. Peachy program stopped requiring joss force end just the year before one hundred percent of programs. At least. In my sample require the jury that is a big change. And, and you saw some decrease across the board. Yes. So Euroscience in college about a third of programs, did not require General Jerry scores in two thousand eighteen and a lot of them are actually going to move to not require the jury to nine. So these numbers are on the rise for sure. In two thousand nineteen. Yeah. Were there any of these categories that we're not doing this? When I looked at chemistry computer science psychology physics, geology more than ninety percent of programs required the Jiri, but in a number of those disciplines, there does seem to be a movement as well. So so chemistry, they're supposed to drop the GRE geology, actually hundred percent of programs in two thousand eighteen that I survey require the jury, but there are a couple of programs already this year, that have announced that they're gonna drop the Jerry. And so there seems. To movement in those areas as well. It just seems to be a little bit slower or not as dramatic as what I found in the life sciences, while, I'm not gonna make a Brexit, joke because I don't really understand what is happening there. But what, what do we know about why these institutions are stopping requiring Jerry? Do you talk to people, and ask them what, what was the main driver of this? Yes, they're number of different reasons. One, one reason, is that a number of studies have come out in the last few years questioning whether GRE scores are predictive of success in grad school. So admissions officers look at the jury scores and a lot of people think that they are indicative of someone's in the intelligence their ability to succeed. But when you actually look at the data in a number of programs studies found that they aren't predictive of things like the number of for southern publications Umbro, fellowships, students, receive their time in grad school, whether they graduate, some of them have. Found that the jury scores are predictive of for semester grades but for for research base PHD programs. I think a lot of people view that as not a particularly important thing to predict. Yup. Another reason is that especially in the current climate of wanting to increase diversity in science. There's concern that the use of the GRE actually disadvantages underrepresented groups. So women and underrepresented racial ethnic minorities tend to score lower on the jury end. It's kind of expensive tests for a lot of people that puts people from lower socio economic backgrounds at a disadvantage. So the test costs to engine five dollars, it costs extra money. If you want to retake it to up your scores in. That's a fairly common thing on for grad school applicants to take the test multiple times to get a better score. It also costs money to travel to take the test, and it costs extra money to suppress. Jiri score so you can take off multiple times. And then suppress the scores that you don't want schools to see for an undergraduate student, who's may be working one or two side jobs to pay for their education. It can be a financial burden to pay for this test, but it also can be a time burden so they have to spend a lot of time studying in some cases, people who have the means to do. So actually pay upwards of thousand dollars or more for GRE prep. Course and so it really advantages people who have the time in the money to study in pay for this test. The sounds like there's a few categories of reasons that the universities are thinking about dropping the GRE as requirement, but let's talk about the testing company that runs this test. What do they say to the fact that the studies are saying, you know, this isn't correlating with things that departments, particularly care about in might be a barrier? What, what is there? Argument for continuing use of this test from their perspective. The juries are another piece of data and they're a rare, part of that -plication is actually standardized across applicants. They also say that, you know, the other parts of application, reference letters, educational background. They're also subject to bias. And so, you know, it's hard to drop the Jiri think that there is, no bias remaining in the admissions procedures in so, so they argue that it's another piece of information, it shouldn't be used to make emissions decisions alone. But it should be part part of the package. They also take issue with some of the recent studies. So one of the drawbacks of these recent study says that they're looking at admitted students than for the most part of students have fairly Hijiri scores to begin once in the students who have lower Jiri, scores probably really stand out in other parts of their application. So maybe they just. Had a bad day that day they happen to get a low Jerry scored. They didn't quite steady enough. And so what they say is that we really don't have the best experimental design in the studies, and that they're not really designed to find a correlation between Jerry scores in these measures of success in grad school in so ideally, what you would have is basically study that randomly admit students across the range of Jerry scores. And then look at success in grad school, it's hard. It's hard to imagine a study like that ever happening. So the testing company feels that they provide enough of a service that institutions should continue to use this, but it does look like the trend in the science and the sciences that they're saying there's not enough science there for this to be a test that we use. And it also seems to create a barrier. So if this test is dropped more broadly, do you think it'll change not only who's accepted, but also who applies to graduate school? Yeah. That's. Great question. So they're actually some people looking at this right now and looking to take advantage of the so-called Grech set movement. Some researchers at the university of Minnesota sent out a survey last month to biomedical peach programs that have dropped the Jiri also ones that have maintained the requirements and what they're interested in trying to figure out whether dropping the Jerry requirement will diversify applicant pool. And there's some argument that, that might be the case some students might do poorly on the Jerry. Maybe they can't afford to retake tests, and their teary scores in so they just decided not to apply to grad school. Others might not be able to Ford the tests to begin with. What about the idea of making the GRE optional, so not making a requirement but adding it as an extra data point to your application. They're proponents of that. And so one reason that might be a good thing is because there can be some difficulty for applicant. Aunts that come from less well-known schools, or maybe had some sort of disadvantage in their past that hinder application, who could benefit from having Hijiri scores, so can help them get noticed in application process. And so, so people say, well, you should give them the option of submitting their cheery score through other people who I spoke to who think that's not a very good idea. Because basically, when you give applicants option of submitting, Jerry scores, they actually look at that and think that, that is a requirement in one person. I spoke to said that in his experience, working with underrepresented minorities, they in particular see that as a requirement because they bet that's the only way they can really compete with other applicants, as if they have a strong. Jiri scored another drawback is that faculty members may look at applicants who don't cement, Jerry scores in a bad light. They might be biased against them. Because the applicants who do summit, Jerry scores. More likely than not have Hijiri scores. Right. And so it could lead to a question in the faculty members mind, even if it's not conscious even if it's at an unconscious level that could be thinking what about the student who didn't Smith? Jerry scores is it because their scores were very strong.

General Jerry Katie Lincoln Twitter United States Jiri Greg Staff Writer Joss Smith University Of Minnesota Two Thousand Eighteen Forty Fo One Hundred Percent Thousand Dollars Hundred Percent Ninety Percent Five Dollars
"katie hi" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

11:14 min | 1 year ago

"katie hi" Discussed on What'sHerName

"By girls can create girls can create is a unique subscription box inspiring girls to believe that they can be and do anything. How do they do it like us girls can create believes that real women make the best heroes and every month they deliver them to your doorstep. Hi, katie. Hi olivia. So I think one thing that in our family, we have specially believe in is the power and importance of a good narrative. The power of a really good story goes beyond just entertainment that its littoral power. Yeah. From being able to create a good story. I always just talking to my students about that last night. I was telling them that as historians they get to be the storytellers, there happened. And then there's how you tell it and what it means to conclusions that you draw from it, and that's where the real power is. I mean, there's the phrase history is told by the victors, but I think history is often told by the best storyteller. If you can create a.

olivia katie
"katie hi" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"katie hi" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Again. Thank you. podcasts FM Chicago's number one hit music station. Fred Nancy are on I Katie. Hi,.

"katie hi" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Everything entertainment Is. Mantis Hey thanks for staying. With, this yes we're live at the Minnesota state fair and the sudden now raises ugly head hit a little. Bit hot that's one thing I hope they do with the booth. Next year we need a, screen here so when the, son gets, I'm. Sure Lori and Julia has been talking about this all week because this is their time slot that they would. Be here and then at the rate this where the, sun is so we need a little bit of a sun screen coming down is what. We need, so anyway so thank you all for stop and, buying saying. Hi greatly. Appreciate it relied. Out here the new FM channel seven digs we are just next to northern hydraulics or gray building and with mytalk, one zero seven one on the outside. Of it. So. Anyway okay how many acres is the? Minnesota. State fair what do you want somebody Michelle Ding. Ding ding. Ding. Did you hear that Carly I think she. Said three hundred and twenty two Yes got it right to Reenter twenty. Two acres he's pretty cool you know what's really crazy about this that the farmer that's around us has got. Three hundred sixty five acres that. Wraps. Around us any new now I look at what they've done with three hundred twenty. Two acres where I live they. Could. Put another state fair Something Fifty five acres I think is what they got and this is three hundred twenty. Two so that's. Unbelievable holy. Holy-moly it's amazing what you can do when you put it in the right, place? Right Okay do we got some calls down there we do yes. Okay Judy and Judy has a question about? Grain free, dog. Food All right Not. Right. Now, okay. Hi there Judy is. Julia Judy Hi Katie hi. Judy. Taking, my. Call thanks for calling.

Julia Judy Michelle Ding Minnesota Lori Carly Two acres Three hundred sixty five acres Fifty five acres
"katie hi" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on KGO 810

"Country with your seventy national park nestled next to. It Katie Kirkland is a spokeswoman for county. Visitors, bureau. Welcome to John Hammond. On, the go Katie hi John thanks for having me oh you most welcome now for never ever described Ptolemy county. Size major towns and approximate distance from our bay area so we're in. About two and a half hours from the bay area our biggest town is Sonora which, is part of the goal country, and in the country we have Columbia. State historic park which is an eighteen fifty goldrush town we also have rail town state historic park with the famous here number three that was featured on back to the future three and sounds like, Lassie and then we have. The high Sierra which Is the emigrant wilderness we have places like pine crest Blake in Aspen meadows and Kennedy meadows. Pack stations and then of course we have so. Many national park and going back to Columbia. For, just. A minute of the. State, park it is unique I mean it's it's the old one the old buildings are still there from the gold. Rush time but one of the most fun things I've done besides walking. Around and just shop and so on but going to that little theater is that still, going where they have they have, old fashioned theater and it's such fun. Definitely it's the Fallon house theater and they have life productions and they in Columbia also they they can't be in which is the fifth generation and. Candy kitchen where they make over eighty, percent There can't be homemade and then. There's. A working live working blacksmith and stagecoach rides and gold, panning got to visit when you're, in dwelling me county, now Katy tell us about the three vacations in one the county's offers us So like we were talking, about this the goldrush part of it, the gold country so there's some, BS and Jamestown and we also have the twenty adventure trolley, which, runs free. Every Saturday through October you can explore the gold country on the adventure trolley and then we have the high Sierra which is another vacation in itself starts places like. Penn lake Rican bike and hike and fish nine Aspen meadows we, can take, a horseback ride and Kennedy meadows, tax station where you're really up in the high Sierra at, the base of scenario pass with horseback rides as well and then. The, third part of the vacation would be. The wonderful, chronic city national park Yeah he's at back everything back to normal they're. Going to get back to normal but I know the the fire is out, now right Yes Is one hundred percent contained all roads are open into somebody and you seventy is fully opened with tons of activities to do some great things to do into arming county is it had, touchy take a hike around eight and they've also twelve me, matters which is the higher part of you somebody which is only open. Seasonally so now it's the best time to get in there and check out twenty. Us that's one of the best hikes I've ever taken is around the hetch. Hetchy A. Lot of people grow go right by it on what is it one twenty The Go right. By don't don't spin off and going ahead Checchi which of course I'm assessing a lot of its water from what are the types of accommodations around to Alameda. County so we have accommodations anywhere from camping to luxury, hotels like rush creek lodge to cabin Pines like. At the resort and then we have, some really awesome. Bed-and-breakfast which. Are the old traditional type, of places where you're the, person who owns a bed and breakfast is cooking. You breakfast in the morning and you're tore guide suggesting where to go and wait a visit now you've got all sorts of activities including golf courses we do. We have tied mountain lake which is up in Groveland, which is the gateway to you Thirty, one twenty it'll be golfing, amongst pines and then we have We also. Have a little. Miniature golf place which is, really fun for families Hi to you how about events coming up this fall in. The months ahead so we have the forty Niners festival. Happening in growth. Land it'll be September fifteenth, from nine AM, to, size pan there's a parade. There's a Chilean sausa- kickoff live music options, raffles even have chainsaw carving competition One of the things we we should tell people that are? Just moving here is when you say forty Niner here that's. Gold rush that's eighteen forty nine when the gold rush. Of California took. Off like a bat out, of nowhere and, people, came from all over and And the. San Francisco grew very began, to really grow is a big ships were coming in so that that's one big event coming up what else you. Got happening so. We also have if. You haven't heard black resort opened up the Westside pavilion coming up it's an, outdoor venue we had on September four There's a conflict coming up So some great live. Out their contracts? To now in. What way my last question in what way does? Your website visit. To Walla me dot com and I spell. Out to me for everybody how does it assist in? Planning a visit to you Well if it's. Easier you can go to visit TC today dot com Wonderful Visit T. c. today today TC. Today oh that's good spelling out to Allah make Luke Yeah, that's a tough line. We, always get. To loon county.

Columbia Kennedy meadows Katie Kirkland John Hammond TC Aspen meadows State historic park Ptolemy county loon county Fallon house theater rush creek Alameda Westside pavilion Sonora Katy cabin Pines mountain lake Jamestown San Francisco Groveland
"katie hi" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Stories up next good news stories in feels. Good gut our blog status updates coming up to it would surprise people to know that you live without. Angie do you have anything, dad Surprising You know what I do wanna live without actually changing in our how we bought a new house in February in the bathtub is, beautiful but I wanna rip it out because I don't ever know what a. Bath I never take baths and I want to make a much bigger like shower. Area I don't want it because he's just sitting there collecting, dust I don't take baths I hate. Taking back I have a bathtub with a view use it Yeah I feel like I'm sitting in my human, bacteria frat. Pay I don't wanna sit. There I'd love, that but I just sit there live without. Things so in my, apartment you name my air conditioning broke for a, month so I don't have air conditioning in the middle, of Oh I would bitch yeah I'm dying. It's okay and then, I don't have a steering what is it called, when you put the window down you press the button A crank Frank Do you? Live And I like. To do that I just get up and I Jason Brian owner of. Fanta would surprise people to know that you live without the car, I just sold. Had didn't have power steering. Driving. Manual parallel parking all my Rubio has it, all right car true but you. Have a little motorbike elegant people You. Know I didn't have one. For. Like five years hi Ashley how are you Good. How are you I. Don't have a microwave? How does that happen how you did you? Move into a place you. Just, didn't have it yeah I moved to the city, about five years ago and my kitchen was so tiny that we have space for it and then I got used. To. Living without it So I haven't. Thought. One a lot of the old houses like didn't, have them put in so you know people buy them and set, them on their counter or whatever but you know I didn't have the little space you live with that microwave. Thank you Ashley Bye hey Claire. How are you Very well thanks for calling you. Don't. Have, a. TV at all I. Do not. Know what do. You watch stuff on like your ipad That? Either or computer are? You in the stone age? Are you calling us? What are you doing how So, one day I. Don't have frame can't afford it that's even more surprising though that your teacher without? Think I don't know do you? Like play around on? At school on the? Computer No I just I just come home Really sad that, she said it's because. I'm a. Teacher. I can't afford to. Thank, you Claire have a good day Welcome, back teachers by the. Way thank. God. You're back shoddy shoddy I was going on how do people or people would. Be surprised. That you live without Yeah I grew up without a game too so my whole life. Actually I do feel like that's rare figure every kid's parents, buy them a gaming system if not for the kid. For their own peace. Of mind go played a thing for a while and shut up Literally. They, all they want to focus on school. Now like no gaming, outside, on online gaming system all right thank you have a good day call Leslie Hello. Hi you, live without a dresser address or you know what, I don't have a dresser either I don't have address Yeah I used? To have one and I sold. It after I moved Where are you put on your socks Where you put your. Socks and underwear is in your bras I actually have like these little. Compartment bins that I put those in Else's in my closet I don't. Have a dresser anymore I have more space in my room without you must have a huge closet I actually have other room so I just You'll. Have, address and neither do I, thank you Leslie Underwear on size I have little bins to, same thing I don't have a formal. Dress or. No I think. They're ugly they take up too much space Oh my closet Does that? Work. For, you. Sure okay good, he might Mike you live? Without. WI fi, no WI fi steal your. Next door neighbors what do? You do, now I mean, everything is hardwired but all my friends would make them over there surprised by. You, just plug You plug your. Computer into the wall correct Wow Hassle, to because And it's cost you expert? Ford. Does it yeah how do you plug an ipad in the wall Yeah know you Yeah That'd be so weird to see an ipad with a wire dads do it like scroll, x dial up sound when you open your computer? Lake Yeah he's When you? Wind up probably is friends are, probably like. That's fine I don't. Have, one Thank you Mike have a good day I've, never heard. Of that hey Brad Red I kind. Of wish. I. Were you man but. You live without and it. Surprises, people Live without social media I could do, it I really could but you don't have. Any any of them none of the platforms Nothing Have. Never. Well it just doesn't interest me for some odd. Reason there you. Go thank, you. Brad have a good. One Thanks for. Calling, thanks for listening hi Katie hi hey good morning. It surprises people. That you, live. Without any credit cards So you pay cash for everything I do yeah I actually I've been set up with a credit union since I was born and they've got, my loans and stuff through them but I've never. Actually owned the physical credit card so when you go to the, grocery store or whatever you? Like how do you pay bills? You. Still. Checks in the mail Yep Yep Debit. Card Credit cards because you could do all your online billing with your debit cards have like a. Credit card, you know whatever Yeah It's very important to live within your means or a debit. Card I just love knowing I have that because I rarely use my credit. Card so I just like having the security of it just in case something. Happens you're right, though your credit, card you, know especially when you're, young you have a tendency to be like our you about it later and you rack it up and then it yet causes. Problems thank, you. Katie you're. Welcome have a great. Day What's. Trending in. Chicago with Bredon Angie On one, of, the three five kiss FM stuff, quickly power outage at Reagan national airport DC last. Night didn't affect too many flights but, it had the terminals pitch black for a. Minute ninety minutes. No power between nine forty five at eleven thirteen ATC ran on backup, at some point it, only, had a temporary impact on flights A number of popular breakfast foods including cereals. Granola bars instant oats contained potentially dangerous, amounts of the main ingredient in weed killer. A story says. Today and environmental advocacy organization founded the chemical The, life of, Saint I, hope I'm, saying that right was founded all but five of twenty nine based foods that were treated at the main ingredient in roundup Wow. Did you post this list is it up at, financially dot com we'll get it up there Boehner of Jason breath older.

Lake Yeah Claire Jason Brian Katie Brad Red Mike WI Angie Leslie Underwear Ashley Fanta Reagan national airport Rubio DC Ford Leslie Hello Chicago Boehner
"katie hi" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Katie hi welcome what's going on well. I've got five kids and my oldest tour in high, school and they if you laptop so the kids to do. Their work on and last year I noticed that. There was this incognito window. That they could open and at first right there Nothing. On, Harris. Thing and obviously? That, served me there I went and bought Chromebooks thinking I could install some family or some. Control software on there and I really they have the same little incognito window and from what I can tell it doesn't look like it's tracked by the The holiday disable that Inc There are ways. To do it program early? How old are the kids would. You say you had five Yeah well the oldest are the. Ones that got the computers are sixteen and. Fourteen okay and of course? They know all about incognito mode Let's see here Here's the deal let. Me tell you That if it's. Not chrome there's. Also it's on. Safari it's, on Ed it's on offer. I. Mean. It's on all the browsers okay yeah and, so when you start going into this it's almost like it's almost like you're going, to be going down that rabbit hole so to speak and to, say that you. You don't care need don't do anything I'm just disabling the cognitively incognito mode on one browser isn't necessarily the best way because there are other ways. That they can. Do the same thing When you start looking at parental control software is that, one of the ones that I really like it's actually made by, Disney Disney purchases. Company called circle and circle can you can actually buy as a router or you can buy it as an app to work across the entire network And so when you install us across the entire network that's where you can set up, different time limits you can set up filters you can also I what I like about this has also you can sit up, rewards and by looking at by when you have this particular app when you look at it is that you're able to actually. See where the kids are going and then you'll be able to replay and. You'll know exactly where they're what they're. Looking up and how they're spending their time and then you can adjust things accordingly so that, you see what they're looking at. And searching for and good things like that I'll put a link to that, or if you wanna just check it out it's over? At lead circle dot com come right back around talking about all. The data that people are tracking and collecting about online what you can do about it you're on the Kim Komando show You're hiring you don't want to waste time.

Harris Disney Disney Kim Komando Katie
"katie hi" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

11:19 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Anytime anywhere AM ten twenty it's Katy KABC radio Sean I'm sorry at bummed out. But I'm glad you let me know about it And he. Got me it made me jump into something that needs to be said and we'll go? Back to the program after that? The programs Kroto peo-, we've been talking about what is censorship and what. Is your right. And social media and, free. Speech and I'm telling you, you want your kid to have a lucrative occupation Tell your kid to go to law school. And specialize in technology law because these are discussions that have never ever happened before but? Sean emailed man reference a music. So let's go ahead, and get this out of the way right now I don't know whose idea it was For weezer to cover a TOTO song Don't do it again Weezer. Here's a phenomenal. Ban rivers Cuomo brilliant It never rains. In Africa by TOTO I was in radio I was in, music radio when. That song was getting played it was garbage then it's garbage now, and just because they hit band, covers it ironically. Doesn't make it good. Rivers. I love you don't. Do that again Horrible, it was horrible song when it, was when it. Was the Todo song Here's a good guideline should we, cover, this song. By this band. I don't know who's the band named after oh Dorothy dog maybe not That needed to be cleared up before we we went any further I, mentioned this very briefly. Earlier and I told you I was going? To have to push it back until later, in, the night. Because honestly I need to make sure I can get through the story without completely flipping out Because free speech does not apply to my job You with your right to free speech can use all manner Of unpleasant words I cannot But If I, could In the case, of this story. I absolutely would Containing Council is trying to remove One of their members they can't Vice president of Catanon. Council Thursday David John Crowell was, arrested and charged with felony, counts Statutory sexual assault, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse unlawful contact with a minor aggravated indecent assault of a person with a mental disability corruption of minors Kreil is the editor and the publisher of the tanning paper and senior pastor at the. Family, life church on south Jefferson and containing also arrested Facing identical charges apple walled council president Mark Allen Feeney he also serves as the chief of the east Franklin township fire department and fire marshal for north north buffalo township Both are in the Armstrong county jail in lieu of one hundred and fifty thousand dollar bond each I thought I could get through this and read enough specifics of the story to at least make you. Understand And I'm going to be real honest with you I can't Because I read. The story And the long and short of it reading it made me want to bomb it And reading it made me want to become violent I did. Post the story on my Facebook page Yes innocent until proven guilty absolute However I make this statement is a general. Statement there are some things that if you're guilty, of In my mind It's. Worse than murder There, should be in. Again this is me there's some. Things that you do That The option of putting you to death for the benefit of the entire planet should be. Available not just if you kill somebody Nobody's nobody's returning comment yeah I guess not according to court documents the victim told police he. First met Fini two years ago Do we mutual friend the victim told police Fini Skuld in ham over his, contact with their mutual. Friend, and unidentified don't. Have further contact with, the man due to. The victim's relative young age despite this If you take advantage of somebody or some creature dick can't. Defend themselves That's lower than anything else, that comes to mind By a lot If you take advantage in any, way of, somebody they're, old they're young they have, mental, capability issues animals anything like that That's worse Three different occasions for. Sexual encounters And they're in jail right now The Fini guy has been removed, from his position as fire Marshall I'll run down the list of charges again ready The charges are, that They containing, council, vice president. Don David John Crowell Engaged. In sexual contact with a disabled, fourteen, year old Also arrested Mark Allen, Pini same charges And then you get oh. Well this guy works at a church and, this guy, does this I got through it better than I, thought I would and I'm going to go ahead and answer the phone because. If I don't I'm gonna just. Start, screaming and that? Won't help. Any us Ryan in Bellevue thank you for calling urine Katie hi how, you doing I got, I, got, two things one on the statement on the question for sure Oh Toda todos a great song it's like Like the whole note they were huge in the. Eighties. And, make kind of like went. Away yeah They came back a little bit. Dr Alana hipsters down Right well now you heard what. I said you you heard what. I said about you shouldn't. Cover, any song ironically Okay all right that's the hipster. Thing I noticed that you're right. But okay and what's your. Question The. Question about bail on I, never. Understood. It's maybe you can Let's say, the two guys. That are in jail In jail for sexual assault you, said, there. Was a hundred and fifty thousand dollar right right Why why, would you pay your money like one hundred fifty thousand dollars to like get. Out, of jail and. Then. You're going to eventually go to court and probably be sound guilty well now you bay? Wow. Now the, general question of why do you post bond is to get out of jail yeah I mean that's that's all you're posting bond. To do is do not be locked up pending a, court? Date Okay do they do they today. Like, set the bail. Or. The barn at such a high rate because they know he's found guilty is like no? They. Don't set, a, bond at a knowing anything about it they set bond based on the severity of the charges It's, what you did that they charged you. With that will have the, judge look and say okay bond. Is this amount and most of the time there is a straight. Bond. There's different versions but most of the time if it's one hundred and fifty thousand dollar bond? You have to put ten percent up that's, not, always the case but often that is the gates you've gotta. Come up with ten percent literally to hand to them Okay so you, only, pay ten percent and. Then not always totally depends all this says is a. Hundred and fifty, thousand dollars bond it doesn't, specify but your year bond is based on the, severity of the charges it's not based. On if they think you're, guilty or not they already think. You're guilty that's why they're charging you with whatever the charges are Kinda. Glad I don't know about. It's a good thing to be ignorant of you know All right all. Right Brian And Ryan we're going to have to agree to. Disagree. On that. Todo business. Okay What you said is exactly right, you've got the the Lawrenceville crowd let's call them that the hipster. People Did everything from the. Eighties cool because the from the eighties I lived. Through the eighties not everything from. The eighties was cool some of. The stuff from the eighties was garbage That's why it doesn't still exist one example Toto Just because it's ironic doesn't mean it's entertaining Todo Katie king. High Amazon has everything, for back to school zebra, lunchbox check cool. Adidas gear, like t shirts. Shoes and. Backpacks check. Triceratops folders and pencils check.

assault vice president Katie king Fini Skuld Ryan Katy KABC Armstrong county jail Sean Africa Facebook Don David John Crowell Adidas Cuomo David John Crowell Dr Alana hipsters Dorothy Mark Allen involuntary deviate sexual int
"katie hi" Discussed on Z100

Z100

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on Z100

"Hundred morning show is intern kitty. Around we gotta talk to enter kitty because I found out something about intern. Kitty that just blows my mind mind, blown. Poof are you talking to people doing that Here she comes in. Turn Katie hi kitty how are you. I'm. Good how are you Elvis I'm good You seem a little apprehensive about. This conversation. Do you know? Why called. You in yeah? I'm, pretty sure True intern kitty that you've never chewed gum you've never had. A sip of soda you've never eaten marshmallows. You've never eaten or experienced whipped cream? Cotton, candy or coffee Yeah it's true Okay okay before you start, chastising intern kitty. Let's find out why did you did you grow up in a household that prohibited the eating or partaking? With, cream things No I just as a kid. I didn't I looked at that stuff when I was at lake kids birthday parties. And stuff and I was just more. Interested in like pizza and stuff like that I wasn't interested. In any of, that and then just kind of became a. Thing it was like. A really good icebreaker. Why, see gum soda. Marshmallows. Whipped. Cream cotton candy and coffee if, it's sweet those. Are all things that can be sweet you don't like sweet you're a savory girl I I like chocolate A. Smaller, now marshmallow now And just like feel a chocolate bar. And like some Graham crackers but what's on top of this is the fact that people give you hell for, it like People are just on top of me. About it every, time I would, go to camp that was my big ice breaker was never had, like soda and, that was always the. Big one for. Kids they were like oh my God, you've never had soda and they'd go into this thing of, like oh my God. We're, going. To. Get you'd have. Soda we're going to trick you into drinking which. First of all is like a horrible thing to do please don't do that well? Yeah okay so, could, okay I hope I'm not gonna wreck it for everyone could this. Have anything to do with the fact that you were attest to baby I don't know maybe So as they say it's good. To be a test to baby because you have a womb with a view you? Know what I'm. Saying Who's been me Oh yeah. Saw. Everything straight Nate he always laughs. At my jokes. I don't know he's here today Great I love. It Never heard that before in twenty years of of living life as. Test tube baby I never heard with a.

intern Kitty Nate Katie Graham twenty years
"katie hi" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"The thing why not why not and there you go and the last of the africa covers i think that's the end of the trend right there excellent your good american garrett thank you so much by the way garrett is a good american if i've said that before esquire say that because you are good american but you know it's funny when don't say it i get so much like what did you do to elvis today did you thank you so much you're is intern kitty around we gotta talk to interim kitty found out something about intern kitty that just blows my mind mind blown are you tired of people doing that here's your comes intern katie hi kitty how are you i'm good how are you elvis i'm good you seem a little apprehensive about this conversation do you know why called you in and pretty sure true intern kitty that you've never chewed gum you've never had a sip of soda you've never eaten marshmallows you've never eaten or experienced whipped cream cotton candy or coffee it's true true okay okay before you start chastising intern kitty let's find out why did you did you grow up in a household that that would prohibited the eating or partake taking in whip cream things and they usually enough no i just as a kid like i didn't i looked at that stuff when i was at like kids birthday parties and stuff and i was just more interested in like pizza and stuff like that i wasn't interested in any of that and then it just kind of became a thing it was like a really good icebreaker washed gum soda marshmallows whipped cream cotton candy and coffee if it sweet baiser all things that can be sweet.

garrett esquire africa elvis intern kitty
"katie hi" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"You for waiting on me i appreciate it deer urine katie hi hi you might be overqualified underqualified but hunger is a great motivator ran away yeah when rent is due i'm not worried about being better than this job you're right join point at least sound like so that it says this generation but i'm gonna tell you something there people younger people today in the thirties even even early forties the ones that are still living at home the ones that are trying to sell the ones that always have a backup i have no sense of how to get a hustle on they don't know how to do a side gig i solo art market one day a week i enjoy it i mean on these people coming in here mommy daddy's got they're always your backup plan or monitor i don't wanna pay thousands of dollars her kid to go to college to get out on the weekend yeah it's all about the parent if you say look i want my kids to get to get a good education get a good job look i've got an education the whole thing the bottom line is people don't know how to hustle anymore and mom and dad are their backup i really do believe if maybe instead of just paying for your kids college education get a better life peace and get a thicker skin eight somehow to hustle feed somehow to be resilient hates them what you know ramen noodles will pay good if you have not noticed because they can live in your basement bar twenty thousand dollars and they get married to put down on a house because they don't wanna live in a crappy apartment have to work a second job and stuff people take the path of least resistance and unfortunately there's just no hustle anymore i mean i don't want fast but how i get it nobody nobody's living the gig if you'd get one good job you get to other jobs or three a lady called earlier and said at one point she had four jobs there have been a couple of times in my life i had three different jobs and it wasn't at any point did i go well one of these threes what i'm going to decide to be my life's work it was about i got rent do listen crafts floating these jobs occasions to somebody to take russian history mark cuban said it best he said people always say do what you love and the money will follow that's alive in the hell do what you're good at and the money could follow but you gotta start somewhere and if mom and dad say nothing about getting the ten put on a house i'm not going to do it or they say you know what you've got ninety days to stay in this house until you find a job after that here's the list of light allies with some of these other places and if they said no i'm not paying your corn shorts not lama floating your money down for a car no no no no no now if you have an emergency you got a broken tooth you gotta go to the dentist yeah kordestan well i'm fine what happened is you have a college student with the bachelor becomes a graduate student in your basement picnic and you have people masters in business administration stan i'd love to disagree with you to further this call barbara but i pretty much agree with everything you said wiseman your teeth i'm back okay bye bye i love you in addition to that karma conversation i had earlier as the status steve martin put god loves working man there's something else that's vitally important when it comes to getting a job and we're not not talking about careers we're not talking about my goodness i'll do this forever about jobs there's something vitally important that comes from that and it's got nothing to do with money and it's got nothing to do with getting out of your parent's basement my parents don't have a basement so that was never an option but it's a buydell buydell thing that you need to learn.

twenty thousand dollars ninety days one day
"katie hi" Discussed on Stick to Football

Stick to Football

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on Stick to Football

"Knowing katie hi actually like do so i'm just going to say but damaris randall chin channel and he's a friend of the pod so maybe we rubbed off on him he tweets that if the cavs win the finals he'll by anyone who read tweets his tweet a jersey last time i checked it was at nine hundred fifty thousand retu ivory tweeted this week he says that he's good on his word i think he needs to step back from that see i actually this is a football podcast he's totally saying there's no way has one million fifty nine thousand six hundred four retweets yeah i'll go ahead and put it out there if the cavs win i will buy jersey you know he said you have befalling me to get one he would have picked one in a million followers yeah old is the tweet though i think it's actually pretty old no it is actually from may twenty eighth okay so i thought it was actually the last year that he was like if they win the two thousand eight year right someone tweeted him zero chance he delivers he said one hundred percent chance that he does yes oh good on him but he couldn't get eric hosmer to stay in kansas city so i don't know about we did yeah he couldn't get himself green bay i don't know maybe not the guy too so but percent chance to cavs win you not much basketball i watch i say zero percent they have no one that's good on their team we bet on this last year and i watched the lebron in the eastern conference finals and i was like holy shit i can't bet against this guy when i told mitch and dan i was like got to do it you can't bet against lebron they called me an idiot and was like l cavs into this bet yeah we lost we had to five years in a row is that why we had to do that yeah it was over the nba finals no idea about that you chugged to out.

cavs eric hosmer kansas city basketball lebron mitch nba katie dan i two thousand eight year one hundred percent zero percent five years
"katie hi" Discussed on Diet Starts Tomorrow

Diet Starts Tomorrow

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on Diet Starts Tomorrow

"And you ice yeah it says oh no one's license pizza is like a very reasonable meal if you had a salad on the side you have a very healthy diet adds a protein and your credit cards and then you eat like that chabal a salad with it you have a very balanced meal there's nothing crazy about it talian speaking of italians pizza all and they're not like the fattest country in the world now sort of this like it's just this like premium that we put on eating certain foods and the way we look at certain yeah froyo like it's the ceremonious thing and when you kind of take away that that that i don't know energy around it but it's like oh my god this needs to be handled with care and like i can only have sometimes once he's once you take that away you're much more free yeah i agree so i suggest everyone just do it like just you're walking pizza but don't eat don't see like this is my my pizza my pizza from the died starts tomorrow but he maybe could be and like this is it and just like like not mindfully but just eat it feel good about it and walk away and you will i'm telling you it's like such a freeing experience i will eat pizza for dinner okay i am a dinner piece of her girl it's it's yeah it's like it's yeah i mean i think that it just all sort of goes along with this idea of like changing your mindset that like what you eat doesn't mean to be this like crazy thing and it doesn't need to be like photographed and it doesn't need jay wright wrapped for it's just eating to give your body nutrients so they can continue along with your day and then stop thinking about it stop eight your your mind you're not starving totally well on that note katie's joining us right now she has like a really good perspective on that hello we are back with katie's thereto of the twelve s style should follow her at the twelve or style on instagram and founder of mega bay beauty welcome katie hi hi we're happy to have you here i was so happy to be we just happenstance you're came to our thoroughbreds event and i stopped you and i was like high right and then we.

jay wright katie founder
"katie hi" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Every cop protecting every person had a gun that you could see i mean the photos are out there yeah none of the speakers waive the protections of an armed officer now you would have thought no keep that damn got away from me give it away from me right every highlight the word every every major movie star every singer every student leaving the rally was surrounded by a bubble of well armed security and that that includes when they traveled to the gated backs gated hello walled backstage area the idling limousines the private cars etc they were all escorted by armed guards some of them were police some of them were private security they were all frigging armed i mean share shows up private security armed packing heat emma gonzales same thing clooney same thing same thing and you had all these young people trying to rush you know they they want they want a piece of this they want they want to get close to the stars they want a selfie they want to get a photograph and they're all be blocked by police with guns on their holsters and everybody seems oblivious that the absolute hypocrisy of this whole thing this is stupid break break i'm looking at the the star studded list of people that were at this march and yeah there were certainly quite a few armed guards that i can see you know it was interesting i have a friend with three teenage daughters that in castro valley and they went to the march in san francisco no joke one of them had a sign that said ban guns disarm police see okay katie hi point banned arms disarm ban guns disarray police and all of these stars including the people who spoke at the san francisco rally editor who they included were all be protected by police the people that were assembled to protests were protected by police wearing guns what a budget dumpy oh man come on folks.

officer emma gonzales castro valley san francisco editor clooney
"katie hi" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"katie hi" Discussed on Channel 955

"The commercial breaks air get us get to see if i can make a little bit of money doing the same thing at lunch but making money exactly i wonder by the way speaking of that i wonder how many people will leave work in the middle of work to go do that if you know what i'm talking about like but not for getting money out of the hey was up jake good is this you are you calling out a coworker a courtroom you go through uh gal what kind of community services you have to do a quarter orders on really so he actually leaves in the middle of the day goes and does his community service than comes back in the boss has no idea that faye wow katie hi how you doing katie all i really wanted to talk to her should have been great get disconnected katie actually left work to go on tinder date really yeah maybe slim amazon maybe slim really wasn't by in breeze trips daphne what's up i remember when my car coworker going it thirty minute luncheon he was gone i wonder why are you aw so where do the booty call happens it she going the car in the parking lot or knows you are wrong all all the way home did she passed that guy that had to go home to go to the bathroom i mean that's vials in the bad if the guy going to the bathroom comes home after you come back after your budi call that'd be abed budi call haste to fawn or or oh here what's happening now did i pronounce it right because it that's initiating version of stefan stefan coal high stiff on what is your coworker a leave work to go do go work crew oh no recording couldn't uber people do that on a lunchbreak to a notches wait till after worker a weekend why do people do backpage i know that's the obvious quite what is but i just mean you risk in his back his basic for sex is basically before tinder was out there that was the way to go find your hookers or prostitutes is in an actual place it's it's like craigslist tone yeah i i've never heard of you that.

jake community services katie abed budi amazon stefan stefan craigslist thirty minute