30 Burst results for "Katie Golden"

"katie golden" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

07:15 min | 7 months ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Or him cartoon isn't decreed of PhD comics I'm Daniel. I'm a particle physicist, and if the aliens come I demand an audience with them even if they're microbes. Hey My. Wife is a microbiologist so I. I think I've learned to speak microbe a little bit well as he might be funny. Our first contact with dating life is that we accidentally breed them. And then kill them with our immune system. That's right. Maybe they'd be inside US right. We catch them. Alien Diseases I think I've seen that movie, but welcome podcast Daniel and explain the university production of iheartradio, in which we take you on a tour of everything that's amazing and beautiful and squishy and dangerous in this universe, and try to explain it all to you or squishy and dangerous at the same time. And Amazing and bonkers. The Universe is bizarre is stranger than fiction and what we discover out? There is always weirder than what we imagine. That's right, and it's also really big universe into a big question for us, and for everyone is. Are we alone in the universe? This huge giant cosmos are we the only sent in life? Or are there other living things out there in this solar system or in this galaxy? That's right because we WANNA know. Are we the only ones thinking these questions? Are we the only ones trying to figure out how this universe works? Why were here what we're supposed to do with our lives? And should we get out of bed in the morning? Are we the only ones or are there other people out there who have maybe made significant advances in? Would you know give us a clue that would be fun but to be honest. I record from my bed so literally. I don't have to get. Ever! Will maybe you answered the question horrid, but not everybody out. There has bigoted out for themselves. And you know this is a question that when we think about, we wonder sometimes cosmetically like are there alien civilizations in minds out there deep deep far away in space, but it's also a question. We can ask about our own neighborhood. Yeah, because I feel like most science fiction, movies assume they wouldn't be fine alien life. It's you know from a galaxy far far away, or you know maybe from another part of the galaxy or somewhere way out there in space, but maybe you know there's the question of whether or not live could also. Also be here in our own backyard in our own solar system. Yeah, I think historically is a fascinating question because a long time ago, hundreds of years ago, we didn't know the answer to that question. People wondered you know. Is there life on Mars and then more recently like one hundred years ago fifty years ago, it seemed to be sort of settled that there wasn't a place in this solar system where we could find intelligent life life all, but then recently I think the question is changed again and now we have a new perspective on life in our own backyard so to the on the podcast. We'll be asking the question. What's the most likely place in the solar system to find life other than of course here on earth and I. Guess Not Twitter. Twitter wouldn't be Daniel not if we're talking about intelligent. Yeah, we'll be tackling this question of whether or not an. Where would we most likely find life in our own solar system, and so we have a special treat for you guys. Today we have a guest who they to help us answer this question and to talk about the possible places in our solar system that we can find life. She's the guests of the podcast creature features which you. You can also find on the iheartradio. APP or wherever you listen to podcasts, answer welcome Katie Golden Guys. Thank you so much for having me. Thanks very much for being a guest on our podcast. Yeah, I was a guest on creature features last week, or so, and had a blast talking to Katie about a radiating animals or animals at survivor radiation. No animals were intentionally irradiated for that podcast. I, was can ask. Peter knocking on our podcast doors, although we did of course, create our own radiation. You know the sound waves you are hearing in your ear right now are a form of non ionizing non damaging intellectual radio. Generic Radiation Pure. And it'll make your brain grow. Cruzi brain a kiss located your biology background rate. Yeah, so I actually studied both psychology and biology at Harvard as Undergrad, and after that I went into the various fields of both. Science Education and comedy natural, Mix, signs, comedy or signs education kind of plus comedy science. Education plus comedy. The comedy thing came after the science education because I think I, having to do a bunch of learning modules about all these diseases and stuff. I was like I need a little comedy in my life, nothing says disease like. That's what I did. When I would I would do. These educational animations for pharmaceutical researchers say, but you know at the best medicine is laughter. Yeah, for sure for sure. And so Katie. That's kind of what your podcast is bad. You talk about biology and creatures. You also makes comedians in a lot of funny stuff you WanNa tell us a little bit about it. Yeah, so it's called creature feature, and I like to explore. What is it like to be an animal and I think it's it's a lot easier to relate to animals when you think about it from a Human Lens, so it's fun to look at all this huge variety in great diversity of animal behaviors kind of try to imagine yourself as that animal like imagined a rat that gets infected with toxic Plasma Gandhi. And how it would be to suddenly be attracted to Kat your most dreaded of predators and nature is so full of. Behaviors that there's no, there's no better way to experience it than to imagine what it's like to be. Those animals and dive right in. Deep questions you know. What is it like to be bat? What is it like to be attracted to a cat I? Mean I don't know that anybody's ever going to answer. Those questions thought you were gonNA rhyme that Daniel. Anything about that. Right there. Makes Comedy Size, and Dr Suess of all time comedy, science and children's education that sounds like a great mixture horry. We should do that. Let's get on Daniel. Cool so. Katie were attacking today. The question of whether there could be life in our solar system, and if there could, where might we find it and so we're so glad to have. Here's a Sir Biology Guy. Does we talk about life and what it needs, and where it can possibly thrive, but as usual we sit are like to go out there and ask people what they think of this subject and so. So Daniel went out there, and he asked people on the Internet. What they thought was the most likely place in the solar system to find like veteran, so I got these questions answered from people on the Internet now is soon their people. Some of them may well be aliens that have slipped their way into human society. Try to influence the direction of human thought, but so I can't attest irradiated animals. Irradiated birds from Chernobyl be as they very well could be so I cannot attest to their actually humanness, but I think you'll hear some quite interesting answer. Here's what people had to say depends for we define life. There's a frozen moon of Jupiter. I think. What is? Proper Conditions Water Nozoe. Hold I would say in March or maybe some.

Daniel Katie Golden US physicist Twitter Harvard Dr Suess Peter Kat
"katie golden" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

The Bechdel Cast

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"katie golden" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

"She's like retaining her dignity through this but this is an but it's like yeah you could use such because we see knowledge mom for one line. She's cleaning her child exactly looking your child asked that's literally always have her yeah. That would of been good for everyone to because it's because you are sort of like chatted scar. Pull this off you so out well so outnumbered right that brings me to some <hes> some science facts have so yes. We talked to Katie Golden. She is the host of creature feature podcasts right here on the network <hes> and she knows a lot about animals and she told us a thing or two about how blind behavior actually works in nature versus how it's depicted in the lion king so she's female lions make up the core for pride which we see in the movie <hes> males come and go prides are often thought to only contain one male and like a Harem females but that's not always totally accurate. Only sowo lion prides contain a single male adult most other subspecies of lions have pride in which they're up to four males typically brothers and typically one dominant male is allowed to mate <hes> with several row females and then they all produce cubs so in the Lion King Nala in Simba would be related because Moss would be both of their dad's yet because we see only one we seem a Fossa and then we see scar who we assume isn't he's an insult. He is getting sucked. Yes major in-cell like he lives in a basement right literally yeah all the other adult. Lions are females talking some bosses. It's fucking Oh. Well now that sexy time fucking jungle is really Yep <hes> in in real life in nature. This kind of inbreeding is usually avoided by dispersal so the male lions.

Katie Golden Lion King Nala Moss
"katie golden" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey folks remember that episode we did a while back with katie golden host of the new podcast creature feature well creature feature is back for season two an so they were giving her a plug again if you have not checked out katie's podcast creature feature yet you should do it that's right eat episode features a new gas comedian as they explore incredible animal and human behaviors in this season this upcoming season also features interviews with the animal experts including doctor greg polly curator in her pathology researcher at the museum of natural history of loss angeles county that's awesome so if you have not checked out creature feature yet you should go look it up right now unsubscribe listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind my name is robert lamb and i'm joe mccormick and it's saturday time to go into the old volt this time for an episode that you and christian did back i think this would publish originally in september of twenty seventeen that's right since were doing the series on psychedelic a thought it'd be good to revisit these older episodes of christian i did a on timothy leary looking at timothy leary his biography graffiti and the role he played in the history of psychedelic which is kind of a double edged sword here i guess you know on one hand he was at the forefront of the the counterculture movement but he undoubtedly did a lot of damage to the reputation of psychedelic yeah interesting that he has a controversial legacy not just among a people who were opposed the psychedelic spin among a lot of psychedelic supporters oh absolutely people who were involved in psychedelic research there there's a lot of i dunno if you'd say anger but even in contemporary accounts you reid about people who were who just kinda hang their head and they're like man timothy really really made things difficult for us yeah yeah indeed and we discuss some of that in the second alex episodes of publishing right now so let's go in jump into this one part one of two thousand seventeen look at timothy leary welcome to you to blow your mind from how stuff works dot com hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind my name is robert lamb and i'm christian sager and this week we're talking about timothy leary now were not just gonna talk about timothy leary we're also gonna talk about science of lsd history of lsd abusive lsd and suicide in in various a a research projects a what these substances actually due to the mind to the brain but we're going to use timothy leary is kind of a you know sort of a guiding principle i guess for this episode andy if you're if you're out there and you're thinking well i love timothy larry welcome strap in if you're out there you're you're thinking to yourself well i i don't know that i liked this timothy leary guy well strap in his well yeah i think we've got something for everybody here we were basically sheltered during a hurricane this week in so robert and i just binge read read about timothy leary for four days straight we've got a lot to share with you my eyes you're bleeding little but i think you're gonna be interested in this so much so they were gonna do this is a two parter yes a now just to refresh anybody out there into an to inform anyone one who just who doesn't know who timothy leary is well timothy leary was an american psychologist author and a key figure of the nineteen sixties counterculture in psychedelic you know movement in general you love nineteen twenty two nineteen ninety six and he managed to run and south pretty much every organization he was a part of thought he was arrested enough time cities louis salvi inside of thirty six different prisons he he earned a virus many americans eased in as he was able to submit a reputation as also kind of a you know a counter cultural leader a his then i think the reason is because he has this message of inner exploration of antifa stablishment thinking and this this resonated with folks and continues to resonate his writings his a soothing sage like voice on numerous audio recordings his his his irresistible celebrity allure it all made him just impossible to ignore love them or hate it

katie golden four days one hand
New York Knicks Lose Out in Free Agency

WEEI Late Night

03:16 min | 1 year ago

New York Knicks Lose Out in Free Agency

"New York Knicks come up empty and when you're talking about the biggest loser free agency the biggest loser free agency has to start the next we'll get to some of the other candidates out there our poll question is who had one of the better off seasons to this point but when it comes to had one of the worst it's hard for you not to say the New York Knicks and hard for anybody disagree that it's not the New York Knicks this is a franchise that from the start of the season hi everybody presumed all right they're going to go ahead and take all the login Zion Williamson maybe that was a long shot is a lottery right literally is a lottery but still the thought was designed William send your cabin to write you get Tyree Irving and guess what they didn't get a single one instead the Knicks tanked they traded for saying yes they got the two Max spots open it may end up with Reggie balik Taj Gibson Bobby Portis and Julius Randle could not have gone any worse and while I don't think you Israel's about player when you were all season taking with the thought process that you were going to get at least one of the MAC's spots filled by Kevin Durant or Tyree Irving and you also lost a lottery and that when you can't you can't blame them for I it's a lottery however you were taking all year throughout the season the expectation was all at Katie's golden mix I'm Katie injury complicated everything and I guess a case could be made of Kevin Durant doesn't suffer the Achilles injury what data made the next more likely the destination for Katie I I think you can make a case there because the next little bit prime maybe from that from the get go but as we see in more more more stuff coming out around this I'm not so sure that actually would have been the case James Dolan the owner of the next by far is the worst owner in the NBA one of the worst owners in sports if not the worst in this is another example in another wake up call though I don't know how many were you need that the next are no longer a prime destination in the NBA it's been like that for a while but I I've been to Madison Square Garden once that was under renovations the time we always hear about there's nothing like Madison Square Garden and it is an amazing venue I was there for a college basketball game I can only imagine what it's like for New York next it so I'm I'm not gonna come here and tell y'all MSG doesn't matter however we hear so much about there's nothing like having the opportunity play at MSG in play in New York City and live in Manhattan and all this it doesn't matter as much as we all like to think Gurley's Knicks fans or James Dolan things how many years we heard the prime free agents are gonna go to the next yeah guys get up in New York they have not stopped them and this time around they tank they traded for saying yes and they totally with nobody had a worst off season by far then the next set nobody wants to play for James Dolan that's the biggest

Knicks New York
"katie golden" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"katie golden" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"From iheartradio hosted by Katie golden, so their actual like horrific chest Burster like ailing babies in nature for some talk about Sealions not Cecilia NHS from Princess bride. Okay. Whom you never want to engage in bets with but Cecilia look like worms but they're not they can be as small worms that can be up to four feet, but they're actually legless amphibians. You're making a face that just knowing that the route, we're taking and we're starting to like it could be this before long, who knows could be as tall building. I don't know. Okay. So Sicilian Sicilians and their empha- beans. They don't have any legs. And they, they squash around. Squander scientific term. No. It's, it's, you know, it's like imagine they make is that because they do the thing like a like a warm like bunch there. But up twenty and then snakes slithering? Yeah. Okay. Yeah. Exactly. So the baby's assailants have specialties that resemble grappling hooks that they use to peel and eat their mother skin for nourishment. What? So our, we're gonna picture of this here. They look like little worms and they got. So disgusting, you know like the Sarlak pit and Star Wars, it's like that. Yeah. That looks like a buck teeth teeth phone. This is actually the second time on this podcast. We've talked about. Yeah. It's a whole genre. It is a whole it is. It's coming back. So the mother will lose about fourteen percent of her body weight. But she's totally cool with this. She allows her offspring to eat or skill offspring is within the mother or it. Kennedy, sometimes so some live bearing species of ceilings, they're actually eating inside of the mother. So they eat the fatty secretions from the reproductive organs, but other times they're already born, and they're like, or the eggs are laid in like they pop out and then they start eating like mom jerky. Just like. Mom. It's nutritious, and delicious make that assure tested, mom approved jer. In fact, mom, my kids, my skin love. Love. A bunch of little kids, just like kind of away. There's no nipples or others. Okay, it's kind of a weird heavily Nery step towards like drinking milk. Because like so some of the very early versions of mammals like monitoring select a plot A-plus kidneys. They don't have nipples. They just kinda who's milk. All their pores. I think out of their stomach pours. Okay. So it's not just like a mess. Sweating milk is your baby? Sweating all over the place. And in the baby's kind of lick it up, so, but it's not, I don't want to make a claim that this is the direct link between that but you can kinda see this is a weird step because the mother is actually growing the skin, especially for the kids, so it's nutritious, delicious, mom skin, and they actually survive this, so it's it doesn't kill them. Okay. But sometimes for not all moms who let their children, eat them are so lucky. So there's this creature called the pseudo scorpion. It's not a scorpion. It's type of Iraq. Never. I knew that the name. Yeah. Yeah. So again, can we explore things miles already? That's I think, to get to stars. Thank you. So it looks like a lot like a scorpion run as you would imagine. That's why they named it. What is it in, in actual acted? I want to be. So the moms will offer her self up to her babies to eat in the babies will set out those sweet, mom juices through her joints. And then discard Herkus, okay, imagine like you have a straw, bendy straw, and soda, and you drink out of it there during her juices out of her joints like their straws that they've stuck into like through her joints like the entry point. Yeah, yeah. And then from there, they just suck mom. For lack of a better word and the mom. Like. Wow. Tale of a really when you look at it from a very specific perspective. This is heartwarming because researchers think this has given rise to these pro social behaviors in pseudo scorpion. So the young hunt together, and parents like help protect the young. So, like since the, the mother is encouraging the young like when they don't have enough to eat in. They're like, oh, well, you can eat me your mom. They don't eat each other and they don't compete with each other. So they think that this allowed for more fraternally social Ceuta scorpions to have survived in volved, so, yeah. So, like if you want your kids to get along, let the meet you. Down in there fighting you can both have some mom. So get your strong put in my knee. Have a few sips of that. There's a similar case with a black lace Weaver, spiders, where they will eat their own mom, and then they'll dance together. So black lace Weaver, spiders, will have over hundred young. So first step is they lay trophic eggs trophy eggs, are unfertilized eggs are just there for eating. And so once the baby's eat all of these eggs, than the spider will actually guide them under her and kind of press down on them to kind of encourage them to eat her, which. Yeah. And they do. And then once they've eaten some good mom they go onto the web and start the internet. No, it's a physical. Okay. I'm see how modern technology. It's, it's ruined nature. They and their mother their mother dead. Yeah. Yeah killer, they eater she's all right with it. And how much are we talking? The body is gone. I like just enough to wounded basically. Well, no, probably like the eat most of the fluids, like the which is sort of, like it's probably not gonna eat the outer the excess Skelton because that's tough and not row Tristesse bits. They'll eat all of that. And. The mom Mira, and then so they eat the mom, and then they go onto the spiders. Yes. And then they dance so they have the synchronized thing where they're contracting their bodies like together in sync, and it makes the web vibrate. And the thought is that this is now that they're suddenly orphaned by strange chance they have to protect themselves. So if they if they moved together in like dance together, they're vibrating the web, as if a much larger spiders on there. So like it wards off predators. So they think like, oh this. There's a big ones home. Yes. Someone's home. I get home alone. Kevin has a little Michael Jordan. On the train, or the inflatable clowns uncles in the shower. Yeah. Where we can Bernie's pretend dead bodies. See I'm thinking I'm having to put in scientific terms. The science of home alone. And again like the scorpion. They actually form social groups and they hunt together. So that's a heart warming thought of like these little mother, eating babies, all in one group hunting together dancing. Right. There's something so impacts. Is there video of this dance? Do they call dancing the science? Yeah. I mean some of them do. It's not technically dance but we're not gonna start doing rock. So I know there's a question that's burning in everyone's mind, do babies every other. Answer that because I know the answer. Yeah, they do. Oh, yeah. Yeah. No, I'm joking. Way to babies. Eat each other like of their own their own kin. Or do they just are babies wild and they go like you'll let's go eat some other babies like their own kin? I mean nature of the answer has to be. You're learning this learning podcasting. Phenotype. Have you heard of like there's this medical urban legend where like you've twins? And then one twenty it's the other twin Dwight shoot these action. Yes. And that's why he doesn't not only has the strength of a man. What a man in a little twin that. Yeah. So the legend goes like you get an ultrasound, there's like twins. And then you get another ultrasound. And there's suspiciously. Only one twin remaining. So like the conclusion drawn is like, oh my twin eight the other twin so that they can grow into a strong shoot double. Boy child the double boy. So this meth is actually false, mostly don't like that idea, though, this is an actual medical issue called, vanishing, twin syndrome. It's a miscarriage in which one of the fetuses see every time like oh I like that. And then it ends up being some form of miscarriage. Okay. So the it's a syndrome in which okay, there's start off with two. Right. So like miscarriages happen. Pretty often in naturally, so like one of the fetus will die, and then, like we were talking about earlier. What happens is it gets reabsorbed back into the womb. The other twin is innocent. It didn't eat the twin. It just is like just hanging out to the same doctor ferry took the kid also that kid twin. You may want to ask him some, those ferries love eating babies anyways. Here's twenty more leeches, and we're going to believe you. We'll be right back with more of the iheartradio original podcast creature feature..

Cecilia NHS twin syndrome Katie golden Sarlak pit Sealions Iraq volved Kennedy Skelton Mira Bernie Dwight Kevin Michael Jordan milk fourteen percent four feet
"katie golden" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"katie golden" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Podcast from iheartradio hosted by Katie golden. So they're like a real life human changeling in nineteen Ninety-four a boy named nNcholas Barclay went missing. His family was devastated. So in nineteen Ninety-seven when French authorities said they found nNcholas they were really excited to be reunited with him. But there are a few things that were kind of off about him. So his eyes were dark when nNcholas is, is were lighter. He wore Hatton, a scarf around his face. His accent was vaguely, French. Benny explained these differences by saying he had been in this like human slave trade, and like he, he had been abused 'cause it says accent changed and the some chemical on his eyes. And even if they were a little suspicious, he knew all these intimate details about the family like their names stories about their childhood even had the same tattoo on his finger that. Nncholas had how old is he? Disappeared. He is like in his like preteens, and he had a hand to. A little little like cross tattoo on his hand. Okay. Why does that child of a tattoo? I dunno are cool man. Europe. So, okay. It's not the kids do as well in the nineties tattoos, so passing so surprise. He wasn't nNcholas Barclay, and he wasn't even a kid. He was a twenty three year old Frenchman named Frederick Borden. Right. Wasn't there documentary about? Yes. Now, I remember when it was like it was a it was a man, the whole an adult man. And it wasn't just this one time he was a serial impostor who repeatedly pretended to be a young boy, so he could attend school and live in youth shelters. And except just to get by just for shelter or was he was complicated because he was saying that it wasn't just for like any kind of, like security, or financial gain it was because he liked the attention. He wanted the love from the his peers and families, and like teachers. Right. Yeah. But in the case of like nNcholas Berkeley, he was actually trying to get out of potentially going to jail because they're like, oh, you are not who you say yours like he wanted to go to America to escape these charges. Yes. A messy this American kid. Right. Right. I know I sound French, but you know how it is like to go a semester abroad. Oh, wow. Those. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. We. Multi-lingual podcast. I mean like today, though, I it's hard to imagine like teenagers falling for this like, maybe it was different in the nineties, like I feel like if a man was like like a fully grown man was like, oh, I like to play those fork nights. Yeah. I like to watch the poopie dis. Oh, yeah. I love LeBron Wayne. And see. What was? How did that guy Naw those stories? Well, he, he did he was actually really talented because he would like go like as soon as his really nervous when she like went to their home. But he was like going through everything like going through photo albums, like reading stuff, and diaries and stuff. So. Genuinely talented guy who just put all of his like I know, intelligence towards something so bad. He could have been an improviser. Everyone in improv is just like a smidge away from impersonating. I mean, you know, we need that kind of talent. So you Rosemary's baby. Yeah. I mean Rosemary grew I went to high school. She, I think she had the baby after we graduated. Not quite the one I was talking about what are you talking about the movie where she's having Satan's baby? Oh, you know what? I've never seen that movie familiar with the concept and it's funny because all the pre semi highschool told Rosemary the same thing. Having Satan south. Oh, we all, but so other movies have kind of got into this because I think we have like this. There's this fear of like something's growing inside of you. That's like evil or going to hurt you. You feel like this. I mean, don't we all you later, I'm curious darkness, you're they most cheery person. But I'm sure yes, there's some kind of demon within you the demon within. But like, you know, like an alien alien in the movie alien like you know, it's like it's not like the chest Burster scarier to me than even just like the big mother alien kids. Like, there's like John hurt. He just like sitting around eating a space salad, and like all of a sudden, he feels sick and then, then thing sorry spoilers, but it like bursts out of his chest. Is that what happens? Yeah. Oh my God. And it's just like what the movie was capturing was this, like, feeling it bursts from his chest, you might want to do the movie, I I've, I don't want to spoil. I, I have a problem lying about seeing movies. That sounds awful. Well, he died, but. But like you have this thing, it's like this version of the joy of like parenthood. Very sensitive. So I would not talk about some very real nightmare fueled of. Yeah, I think just to, to go off of that, right? I think anytime I see a movie where something is crawling around on someone's inside unbeknownst to them. Or maybe they did know like even in the matrix when push that weird like digital shrimp on belly button. This. I think I know you mean you feel especially vulnerable because this isn't an an external threat. Now it's coming from inside the body. The call is coming from inside the house. Okay. I'm sorry. I think most of us can sympathize with the fear of being pregnant and not knowing it just like like a million voices are just, like, yes. But what if it took you sixty years to find out you've been carrying a fetus, the whole time? I think I understand. Okay. I guess is it that women in Thailand? Maybe be more specific fossilized embryo. Yes. But all I know is I remember that, like a woman gave birth to a rock or no. She had a she had a pain Ray. And they I'm sorry. I'm I don't show. No. But you're, you're on the right track because it's called a life OPN, which translates to stone, baby. It's. It's an extremely rare form of miscarriages. So typically. I was left for the record. I left at stone laughing at stone, baby. Everybody just leave him off his back off my mentioned. So typically, when you have when something goes wrong, the fetus gets reabsorbed back into the, the wound, but and really rare cases like if it's too big or it doesn't reabsorb, and it isn't ojected from the body. What happens is it starts to calcified in fossilized like you're saying, because what's actually happening is the mother's body is reacting to a foreign object and shielding itself from the dead tissue. Right. It's kind of, like so when oysters create. Catholic. So, like, you know, like moisture's create pearls. Like people say, oh, it's a grain of sand, but it's usually from like a parasite. So what they do is they produce this substance called Nacre and code it over a long period of time in it results in this beautiful Pearl. But I mean, in the case of litho peons. It's a nightmare Pearl. Wait Qabail hor parole is a stone, baby for an oyster, basically. But it's so beautiful pretty much. So it's like it's not covering their own fetus. Or. Yeah. Yeah. Because like that parasite or, or foreign body could cause problems for the waster like infection or is like so the strategy is just Saran wrap it out. Mess us up. That's exactly right. Yeah. I'm trying to put it in layman's. Nacre and then you get a Pearl, and you turn into necklace turn into old. Ladies are pros back in. Are they never left? Person to ask. Real jewelry. So like you're saying in the case of the that one, lady, she carried the stone baby for sixty years. It weighed four and a half pounds. And actually, you said like like she gave birth to it. No is just it remained inside her. The doctors determined she was too old for surgery. So it was safer just to leave it there, which just as awful. Oh, no. I no way. So it never it was never removed now. Wow. How common is this? It's pretty rare, rare rare, because I feel like it was just one of those headlines, like years ago, internet. Yeah. Woman has fossilized maybe it's extremely rare and even more rare for it to be so long unnoticed. So this basically will don't worry this will not happen to you for science. Does this one was still alive? You know, I'm not sure I mean just for scientists sake, you would think you would want to extract that just to kind of look, they do have samples of the. They do have like specimens of, of stone babies, it'll be Affleck's for jewelry. What's the you know the my new? Linux jewelry an alien race who has necklaces made out of human again. Now, we're writing a sci-fi scrip. Yeah..

nNcholas Barclay Rosemary Hatton Frederick Borden Benny iheartradio Europe Katie golden LeBron Wayne Berkeley Thailand Affleck John America Ray Qabail sixty years twenty three year
"katie golden" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

10:05 min | 1 year ago

"katie golden" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Hosted by Katie golden. Both into creature feature the podcasts are we shrink downing gonna journey through the brains of people and animals. I'm Katie golden, I studied psychology and biology at Harvard, and I'm a birds rights activist on Twitter. This time we're looking at motherhood. It's no shock. That parenting, children can be scary. You're trying to turn a wild drooling biting poopie, little freshly minted human into an upstanding citizen. Even though all he wants to do is shove marbles way up his nose, but are dark sides to motherhood that go beyond the typical challenges, we're going to take a look at some of the freaky, est filial phenomenons in the animal kingdom and the truth behind some of the horror movie, tropes, about motherhood with me today to discuss some of these wild mothers is co host of the daily zeitgeist miles. Great, it's up miles. Oh, hi. I was in suspended animation. I'm not used to a good podcast. Yes. Hi. Thank you for having me. Just hypnotized by my radio voice. Yeah. Knows amazing. So there's this creature in folklore called the changeling. Have you ever heard of the Angelina Jolie movie? Well, I mean that's from science sets. Well, it's from folklore and mythology see, I'm not I'm my folklore in mythology. Game is not on points as someone say, well, you're in for awhile ride, because so the changeling is this thing where a ferry steals, a human baby. And then it replaces it with a disguised, very baby. So that's the changeling parent raises the fairy child. Exactly. So the changeling looks like a human child, but its behavior is kind of weird, you know, I it's just like off somehow and it's not human because it's not a human. It's a ferry. And then, like one of the parts of the myth is one day, it's gonna leave the human world and return to. It's very family. Meanwhile, so the human baby, that was stolen is like put to work in the ferry court as like a servant or in some cases of the myth like the fairies, raise it, because they're like, oh, it's, it's cool to have a human child. But the fairies rely on human slave labor. Yeah, that's the that'll in human slaves. That is a very sober. Take on it. But yes, we'll go with that the. And then the parents, they think what, what is the weird thing, changeling can do that a human paralegal this, that's not like what a human baby would do. This is where it gets a little bit more dark. So anthropologists and people who study folklore's think that this was an explanation for children who were born with developmental disabilities, mental illness or physical deformities. Yeah. So it's like, oh, this child is different. And it's like oh so, you know, it must be a ferry just because they're like, maybe on the spectrum have some kind of cognitive difference, or just narrowly atypical, or some eight or even logically, typical neurologically, or even just like physically a little different. Oh, that sounds like a scam artist. Pediatrician doesn't know anything and just goes, you're not thinking ferry guy. And then like, doctor, I need answers. Well, that's sorta, that's funny. 'cause that it does remind me of, like, you know how like there are a lot of anti vaccine who are like, oh, you know, like my child just suddenly changed into a completely different personality overnight with autism. Those parents say because one of the characteristics of autism is you have normal child development, and then at a certain point at a very young age like around toddler hood like you regress, so the child regresses starts to -veloping lot slower. So they're the perception of the parent. Is that they had a normally developing child that suddenly just became a like started regressing? And that's just a normal part of the development of autism or Asperger's. So it's like they're using that timing to rationalize, it must have been the Beijing because that's around the age where you get a lot of inoculations, so from their perspective. And I can actually really sympathize with that, because from their perspective, they get the shot then suddenly, the child regressive, and so, well, this must have been I mean it's essentially like the changeling thing like now, we don't have a cultural belief in fairies, but you know make. B skepticism about vaccinations place that sort of you check your ring camera on your front door, and see if the night and took off with jail. And that's why all of a sudden your kid heels every capital city in the United States. I don't know. I mean that's video overly redux. I understand well, but what if there really was a supernatural explanation? Like what if your child really was taken? So I wanna go on an imagination journey. I you got to imagine that you have a baby. Right. It's already very dark. A grim future us, you've just come home from a long day of podcast in you. I like the idea where I'm like, that's the equivalent of like real hard. And I got you know, many ads I had to record today. Just got back from the podcast mind been sitting all day. You go to the nursery to check on your kid and you look in the crib, and you just feel like I mean your baby looks like your baby. But there's something just a little off, like she seems like she's grown a little bit, and she starts crying. And you're like, okay, she needs something like she needs to be changed or held, and you trolleys things that she keeps crying craze, louder and louder. And it's just like this earsplitting cries, and you just feel like, oh, I have to feed her right? And you clearly that's the ticket, that's the ticket like a warm bottle milk juice. I don't have. I will do for a young. But that sounds like too much. I'm not a parent, either. I don't know how to how to handle a baby. I'm like, maybe we cook up some hot pockets corn added. I'm not really sure. So we try feed it feed it the crisis keep getting louder and it just feels like you have to keep feeding it and you're feeding her feeding, or you're going like you're working around the clock like pumping breath, milk, mixing Romulu going to the store to get Graham, crackers, freezing the breast milk lost in the Bronx. But nothing is ever enough. But you're just like if you've ever heard like a baby cry or like one of the reasons it's so irritating, isn't just because it's noisy. But we have this instinctive desire to, like, oh, this is a problem. So it's like really distressing. So like when you're on a plane, and a baby's crying, it's worse than like someone sneezing or coughing because it's like you feel this stress. Have you been on plane where someone sneezes? His open mouth, right? Next to you. I've. I've actually been on a plane where someone I was like, in the third seat in were two seats and she was there with her husband and since she didn't wanna sneeze on her husband. She turned to me direct all her sneezes at me. Oh I no way hold on. That has to be a legal or something. But let's putting you at risk and also doesn't make sense because like if there's anyone you should be able to sneeze on. It's your husband, right? Right. Well, I've got bad news for birds miles would rubbing it is a real thing. So their actual changeling 's in the bird world, and you may have heard of them, they're called cuckoos and they're not just the clocks there. Also a real bird, nest one flew over at some point. Well, this is the thing there aren't there aren't enough. Elodie trash. Okay. What is it? Kuku look like well, there's not actually one look and we'll get into that. But so Kuka's are actually parasites. And I know normally when you think of parasites, do you think of like an insect that gets into your eyes and makes you go blinders? Right. Right. Right. But it can be any animal as long as it's a non mutual relationship. So the parasite is living off of the host to the detriment of the host, and one of the differences between, like parasites and predators is a predator eats. The thing like killing eats it in a parasite slowly feeds off of it over time. And this is the relationship of a Kuku from child to parent, no cuckoo, and the host family so birds that it infiltrates. So what it does is because it doesn't wanna waste time making a nest like that's. Doesn't wanna make a nest and fuss with that or to what am I can't take care of a kid, boring? So it finds a bird, that's a good parent is like, oh, you'll do in laser eggs in their nests and just leaves it for this other bird to take care of an raises its own child, like a like a changeling. We'll be right back with more of the iheartradio original podcast creature feature. Message and data rates may apply. Earning your degree from one of the top business schools in the country might sound impossible to fit into your workload..

Katie golden drooling Harvard Angelina Jolie Beijing United States Asperger Graham Kuka milk one day
"katie golden" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"katie golden" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Best case scenario. He's backing game three and do this. I it's imple-. I hope you appreciate it. And when I mean, appreciated, I mean, Kevin Durant. We can talk all day long about whether or not you like the fact that he went to Golden State. We can talk all day long about whether or not his championships earned in the mind of stugatz, we can talk about all day long, whether or not, you think it was an unfair decision or the wrong decision we can disagree on that all day long. I disagree with so many of you that have a problem with Katie going over to join the warriors, I've never hidden that, if somebody wants to take less money to go when play for championships we, we love to credit, Tom Brady on the ones I've doing it. We love the fault, Kevin Durant. Because there's this concept that he joined the bad guy. I get it. I understand where you're coming from. I'm not here to have that same debate. This is simple. I hope you appreciate it. What what you had right now. Because in a generation or two, you're gonna pretend like you did. If Twitter existed today if you were I'm sorry, Twitter existed twenty years ago. Doesn't exist today. You guys reminded me of that already if this twenty years ago during the bulls era. When Dennis Rodman went over and join Chicago. How many of you would have destroyed them, and you can come in and decide well that was different because that was different because you wanna look back on history and make it make sense to your mind. That's the thing you're going gonna do now. In twenty years when there's another dynasty going on and your kids and your grandkids are sitting there. And they're talking about all this current this current Knicks dynasties the best thing I've ever seen. I don't know why we're just going with it in twenty years, when that's what the kids are saying you're gonna clapback so hard. No, no, it's nothing. Like, what I watched Golden State. Oh, that was so good. Katie Golden State. Steph curry Klay Thompson, Draymond green. You're going to go back and talk about all these hall of famers, you're gonna pretend in that moment like you appreciated it. And this one no matter where Katie goes. None of us know, maybe decides to leave. Maybe decides to stay. We don't know. Maybe as I told the world earlier, he decides to leave in collide is just going to take less money and go play Golden State. We have no idea what's going to happen in player movement. But the one thing I know for certain is that this era, a basketball right now for Golden State is being under appreciated by people that wanna find reason to hate in those same people will look back on it later, as reason to love, look, no further than Bill Buckner, Bill Buckner passed yesterday. And in that moment, how many of you thought about the one play the air the ball goes to the legs? How many of you thought about that moment? You live in this. We live in this cycle negatively instead is s v p pointed out last night. Beautifully on one big thing you should go. Check it out instead of looking at a twenty two year major league career where he put up epic numbers instead of looking at the greatness, Bill Buckner. We like to look at the negative, that's the way we are a society. We wanna find this one negative moment and drill down on it. We wanna find something negative and make a defining to an air. That's what we wanna do. But at some point, you have to turn around you have to look around, and you have to see what we're watching right now from Golden State and appreciate the fact that in a league that has so much star power right now in the league where you can talk about James harden in onto, and Kawhi Leonard. And C P three and you can go Anthony Davis. You can go up and down the list of superstars in the NBA league, the twenty years ago, people were trying to sit in the early two thousands is the NBA gonna be fine. Is it going to be? Okay. Post shacking. Kobe are they going to be able to find the right superstars? We don't have those conversations anymore because the league has superstars everywhere. The league has fun moments to watch everywhere. There are great players in cities, all over the NBA where we can sit here and say, hey, Philly might have the second best assembled roster talent top to bottom Tim Legler said that on a Golic and wingo last month the month before lake said, you know what seventy Sixers top to bottom might be the second best roster. In the NBA they're not playing in the finals. Having a great team doesn't suddenly mean get every finals appearance. Golden State's done that having the best player on the planet doesn't always mean that you win championships Golden State's done that. We've been so busy in this era of the NBA trying to decide how lebrons compares to Michael, we've been so busy trying to decide why the systems broke because Katie went to to the warriors. We haven't stepped back in a pre. She added it in Katie MRs game one and two. It's reasonable to say Kevin Durant has played his last game as a Golden State warrior. It's reasonable to say there's a shot, you'll never see Katie again, for Golden State amino has an ESPN NBA front office, 'insider says it's done deal going somewhere else ticket up. It'd be rent is done deal. I think he will be New York, and if he doesn't go to New York. I don't think if it gets dominoes may fall. I think his mindset is to be the Domino's that makes every other domino, full. So he's not going to wait and see. You guys got and then risk being poor. Create as oh you waited until they got so until until then you join this, he's going to be the one that goes, and then others will join him and Amine is saying it's a done deal that he's headed to the Knicks that's gonna start a whole nother era. It's going to start a whole conversation. And that point, we can start to smartly look at what katie's legacy is what he accomplished in New York. We'll define so much of that. What do you -ccomplish wherever he goes next will define so much of how we remember Katie? But no matter what some point, you're going to look back at this era. And even if you don't appreciate right now, you're going to pretend that you did it, this is hall of fame level basketball being played by one of the best teams of all time. And you might hate it in the moment because it's not your favorite team. You might not love the way that it all went down. But you're gonna pre sheet it because this level of play doesn't come by every once in a while doesn't come by every year every few years. This is once in a generation Golic and wingo is up next. I will be hanging out there. You don't wanna miss it every single day. They're gonna let me hang out with the cool kids, I get to there's going to be a lot of group. Hugs again, promise anything, but I can't promise you that we're going to be we're going to be back every single day from five to six AM right here, first and last. I'm so excited to be joining. Thanks for hanging out with may continue to do it. We're gonna get you woken up or put the bed either single way every single day. Either way, hanging out first and last, I'm Jason Fitz, this show and all of ESPN is streaming live on the ESPN now with ESPN plus where you get more ESPN download the ESPN app today and take SPN everywhere. One hundred years of hard work can take you far. No one knows that better than Goodyear in nineteen eighteen. We started the Akron wing, foots basketball team, laced up and took to the court. And we've been outperforming the rest ever since Goodyear proudly celebrates our one hundred anniversary and basketball band. A relentless dedication to being unstoppable. Goodyear, more driven. Ted here dialing in from Denver Henze and this team dialing in. Let's get started Ted's in charge at this product as a total. Guber. What's with the cut girls? Definitely here. You really good reception. Conference calls..

Katie Golden Golden State NBA Kevin Durant basketball ESPN Bill Buckner Knicks New York Twitter wingo Dennis Rodman bulls Ted Tom Brady Goodyear
"katie golden" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Riley, sudden rise to fame, and you you can't remember who your real friends. Are you win the lottery or something? Like that. Right. How does it affect you, psychologically? Well, clear the right now souroush had a sudden stratospheric rise to fame is it possible that this rise to fame could have affected her the same way, it affects a human being, admittedly. No, this is a pretty great question. But I think we could use a little bit of help exploring it. What are you saying? I think we have to because we set up a special guest being a show, and if we don't follow through with that people will think we're liars, they'll be chaos. In the streets, my friend. Luckily, that wasn't just a bunch of smoke and mirrors of fellow ridiculous historians, we are delighted to introduce you to today's guest peer podcasts of hours of big friend of the show, Katie golden, the host of creature feature Kate guys. Happy to be here. We are so happy to have you. And you might remember Katie because an episode of her amazing show snuck into our feed. And then obviously, you subscribe to her show immediately. And now you're huge fan. So we're all family here. So we were we were very curious on to hear your take on this. Katie we set up earlier that question of how sudden fame could impact human being, psychologically. We were we were hoping to learn if there's whether there's any analog to that in the world of earned the mind rather of the rhinoceros. Yeah. I think that's a really interesting question because there is so there's a lot of research into animals in captivity and their psychology, especially these larger animals like elephants and rhinos. And Tigers where they they are require a lot of territory and a lot their natural environment is just so expensive that when you put them in captivity and you put them in a different environment. It is a drastic psychological shift for them. So I think like to explore the question of fame like I you kind of have to know little. A bit about animals in captivity. So like even when animals are really well looked after and cared for and the the zookeepers really love them say at like, the San Diego zoo where it's just it's a fantastic zoo. But they still have these issues of what are called a Syrah type he's which are like these of like obsessive compulsive behaviors that animals do when they're in captivity like polar bears elephants, and they'll do things like repeated ticks movements obsessive grooming pacing and for rhinos one of the things. They do is. They have these awesome print sil- upper lips or they're semi prehensile. And that's how they can like grasp twigs or grasp stocks of grass and chew those up though, kind of fidget with that upper lip and do these repeated motions with that as a sign of stress and so. There is something in in terms of captivity that can really stress out animals, and especially the large ones, but there's evidence that increased enrichment helps them out it helps de-stress them so things like having to work through puzzles to get through their food like games and toys and positive interactions with their trainers. So allowing them to. One thing that I think people might not know about rhinos is you can actually train. They're trainable. They're fairly intelligent. You can give them there's one rhino that has learned learned how to paint using its upper lip so the so the keeper applies a dab of paint to its upper lip. And then it just kind of the paintings are. I gotta say they aren't great a little abstract perhaps. I mean, I know it's it's easy to be a critic. But. I mean, there's a certain Genesee qua- that's lacking in them. But you looking paintings or superior elephant all the way, they might be even elephant paintings. I think are a little better. I'm really sorry to say. But I mean the rhino paintings. He they put an real good effort there. Put it on my friends. A limp isn't quite the same as a trunk or like, you know, I waited for the octopus paintings. I have a question for you. Because this is all super fascinating ready..

Tigers Katie golden Riley San Diego Genesee Kate
"katie golden" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Probably Science

"Right. So probably a newer island. Failure would always found it fascinating. Yeah. By the way, this ties in nicely with offers while I was going to mention that there's always something. Terrifying. Happening with animals in Australia, just thought huge python found in Australia and toilet. That's nice and terrifying. Oh, I wasn't an awesome in Australia for like two weeks. And it would there's a massive python that used to just cruise through where we ate every single day at the time. Yeah. Huge and the hunters spiders, you take your towel after getting out of the shower, and there were just be a hunter spider right there. And they're at hunter split his honor. Tool that just massive and looks. No. And then there were these like fire ants that jumped these jumping aunts, and you would be gardening and the little Buddha guy was like, oh, it's just a reminder to say president. But these things like they it is the worst one hundred times worse than a beasts thing. And it gets like fire on your block. I should say that I've been to Australia a few times and mostly sticking to Sydney. Melvin and oh, yeah. We weren't you. You you really don't encounter that stuff that as Mazing in. though, the sounds at night just of the Bush, and like the the were of the the jungle when it would start the sun we go down in like clockwork. It was just like the frogs and the and the insects and oh highlight do won't do if I'm if we do make it out to us. So when I was in Adelaide, I did comedy show and then a podcast with Ernie dingo. Who's Australia's national treasure? Who's the Ernie one of straight national treasures, also you'd know him from crocodile Dundee too. Make sure I saw katelyn new too. But I two weeks a fab. Okay. But but he would I did a podcast with him in the end of that. He's like, well if you wanna come out camping in the Bush like holy shit. Yeah. So I do want to try and take him up on that offer. If that's impossibility, man. No. I wish we're doing more than two weeks. It's really not enough time to see all the shit. I wanna see. No, it's not there for like a month. Oh, yeah. That's that's the right amount of time. Maybe I'll extend my trip. We gotta come back for. Yeah. We haven't mentioned that. We're also going to be in Portland around the sixteenth of February. I believe I gotta get the exact maybe it's a seventeen hundred Portland podcasts. At the listen up festival and also sketch fest is coming up. Oh, yeah. We didn't mention this Saturday. We're going to be at cafe du Nord at seven thirty. Maybe we should put that at the beginning of the episode. Well, I don't know. I was also about to mentioned that speaking of creepy animals. This week's episode is brought to you by creature feature an animal podcast from the how stuff works network. I listened to the episode last night that featured former probably science guest Erik lamb pair where they were doing the worst at sex awards, and I learned about anglerfish, and how when they may they fuse together and like melt and become this human centipede, like gross being very fun podcast hosted by Katie golden, a former writer at cracked dot com who studied evolutionary biology and rights as a.

Australia Bush Portland Ernie dingo cafe du Nord hunter Dundee Adelaide katelyn Melvin Erik lamb Sydney president Katie golden writer two weeks
"katie golden" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Because as for the odds of finding long forgotten resting places. And these corpses that have disappeared. We can end on a somewhat less bleak note, we do find these things I can't believe forgot to mention this last episode. We recently discovered another famous Royal body king, Richard the third himself, The Hunchback of Shakespearean fame. His body was lost to antiquity until two thousand twelve when somebody found it underneath a parking lot. It's that's not a joke. That's not kidding. Yeah. That's real. That's real didn't really have one Hunchback. Yeah. This kind of thing has occurred. A couple of times not necessarily with the king was someone of this stature what an interesting unmarked grave that was found underneath a building somewhere where there's just been a building for a couple of decades. And it just happened to get cemented over or in this. You know, whatever case bricked-over or wooded over. Would it over paved over bricked-over whatever it is built a top yet? And this is in no way, an inspiring optimistic thing we want to hear your stories, and we want to hear what your take is is this worthwhile. Is this waste of time. There is clearly more out there. What what are some of the mysteries may be in your neck of the global woods? Or if you were a treasure hunter and adventurer and archaeologists what would be your number one quest. What would be your oak island money pit, for instance. And why you can let us know on Facebook at our community page. Here's where it gets crazy when you can where you can talk to the best part of this show, your fellow listeners. You can also follow us on Instagram. You can follow me personally on Instagram at Ben Bullen or you can follow me at embryonic insider, think match uses to stay. Off the personal Graham. That's correct in our show Instagram is at conspiracy stuff show. If you don't want to do any of that stuff. You can call us. Our number is one eight three three S T D W Y T K, honestly, just in full disclosure to everyone. I haven't checked that number in a little while. So I'm gonna go do that this weekend. Are we do for another voice mail episode of those are probably hopefully, I think we should knock went out. I like, let's make a six parter. Yeah. Sure, why not just release it over the course of the year got to feed the content monster. All right. So if you don't wanna do any of those things send us a good old fashioned Email. We are conspiracy at how stuff works dot com. I'm Katie golden.

Ben Bullen Facebook Richard Katie golden Graham
Why Is Lobster So Expensive?

BrainStuff

06:45 min | 2 years ago

Why Is Lobster So Expensive?

"Killers. Don't make any effort to involve media or best Gators. They're very secretive. They don't want attention. They almost want their crimes to go on notice. But the idea of committing a crime, and then calling up the police and bragging about it. That's a whole 'nother level of terror. A man who wore a mediaeval style executioner's hood who has police and baffled the media. He seems to crave publicity. He sent letters and Ramsden newspapers. And the beliefs subject stated, I wanna report murder. No, a double murder. I did it. Here. We are fifty years to the first sodium killing in today's world of friends IX, the old cases are being solved who doesn't wanna know how it turns out from the creators of Atlanta monster come season two. This is monster the zodiac killer. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain Steph, Lauren Vogel bomb here in two thousand eighteen US lobster sold for ten to twelve dollars. A pound a price range that reflects lobster being a luxury in our minds and culture. It's on the menu at find dining restaurants in pricey steakhouses. And in the best New England, summer shacks and sandwich shops, a lobster. Roll can sell for as much as seventy dollars, but lobster hasn't always been expensive and current political intrigue trade policies are not only changing its prices. They're hurting the US lobster business long-term. It may impact how we even think about the lobster itself. Back in the seventeenth century. When America was still a bunch of colonies colonists. Read about lobsters in the New England area wing sixteen to twenty five pounds that's seven to just over eleven kilograms some of the largest twice that in grew four to six feet that's one to two meters long in there were so many lobsters. There are claims that the shellfish would wash up knee-deep on Massachusetts chores obser- was so abundant wasn't worth anything, really colonists considered. Lobster cheap eats. It's what you'd eat. When there was nothing else. And you didn't want to starve was foisted off on indentured servants enslaved people and prisoners, even pigs. Everyone was embarrassed about eating it, by the way fell into the same category. Colonists did however see lobster as a resource it was plentiful cheap, and they could make money from it by shipping. It back to Europe. The Dutch had come up with a way of transport lobster across the Atlantic. And keep it fresh organized lobster fisheries opened in Maine in the mid eighteen hundreds and lobster canning businesses. Started and flourished near the turn of the century main lobstermen were landing more than eleven thousand tons of the critters and lobster wasn't just crossing the ocean. But also the nation thanks to the railroad industry unborn, dining and inland restaurants, where lobster was served new audiences as a side dish or salad ingredient the experience of dining on a rail car or enjoying seafood far from coast helped turn lobster into a luxury dish overfishing at the beginning of the twentieth century, drove prices up as did. Conservation laws in the mid twentieth. Century. Longterm at the supply of lobster has been going up those conservation laws worked and Maine has had lobster boom that took landings from eighteen million pounds. That's eight million kilograms in nineteen fifty to nearly one hundred and thirty one million pounds or sixty million kilograms in two thousand sixteen Maine's lobster industry, the largest in the United States contributes one point four billion dollars to the state's economy every year, and that's a good thing too. Because in recent years, lobster industry representatives for main have built international demand for their products and China has been poised purchase significant amounts of lobster in the first two quarters of two thousand seventeen trying to imported thirty nine point five million dollars worth of live lobster the best here today and between January and June of two thousand eighteen the US sold eighty seven million dollars in live lobster to China. But the dollar signs that people in Maine's lobster industry were seeing vanished. After the Trump administration impose tariffs that caused China to retaliate with tariffs of his own including twenty five percent tariff. On US lobster. The impact of the tariffs is dramatic in June of two thousand eighteen live. Lobster exports to China topped eleven point eight million dollars in July the first month under the new tariffs. Exports to China dropped to four point two million dollars lower than the amount shipped in July the year before the Chinese and Canadians have even created a work around as candidates supply goes through at seasonal drop their buying US lobster and selling it to China. We spoke with John Saxton editor and publisher of seafood news by Email. He said the US lobster industry is at an extreme disadvantage with international trade right now as we face tariffs in Europe and China while the Canadians don't this means the US must look for niche markets like Singapore or Korea with the US apply higher than it's ever been and China's demand suddenly dropping to below twenty seven teens levels. You might think lobster may become painfully abundant and cheap. But the US economy is strong and lobster industry. Experts say there's not only opportunity, but work arounds second said, what is happening to lobster. Prices is unclear because there are many contradictory factors. Maine has lost the ability to ship lobsters to China. But on the other hand demand for lobster tail is very strong and these are processed in Canada. So there is continued strong demand from processors for Maine lobster, so will we see a shift in the price and culture of lobster sucked. In report. Did that the industry was waiting to see how live lobster prices fared over the two thousand eighteen holiday season, and that their strategies might change accordingly? But we wonder whether culture is flexible as the market would he by Mick lobster? Today's episode was written by Shawn Chavez and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other wicked awesome, topics. Visit our home planet has works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bounds and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join this every Wednesday

Mick Lobster United States China Maine New England Europe Murder Atlantic Harvard Massachusetts Atlanta Iheartradio John Saxton Editor And Publisher Twitter Apple Katie Golden America Canada Shawn Chavez
Skim Versus Whole Milk: Which Spoils Faster?

BrainStuff

05:50 min | 2 years ago

Skim Versus Whole Milk: Which Spoils Faster?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners today I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten and Jonathan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you new stories of the trials and triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make when the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Vogel bomb, and we've all had moments of uncertainty, and let's face it paranoia about the state of the food sitting in our refrigerators, you might be able to eyeball some of this suspicious items check for expiration dates on others and with some milk. Maybe you'll probably take a quick with and hope for the best. But if you've ever looked a shelf-life chart to figure out how long your milk might last. You might have noticed that skim milk is said to last a day or two longer than whole milk. But is that really true? And if so why before we really get started. I should state that there is by no means universal agreement on this issue. Some dairy scientists say skim milk lasts longer because certain fat loving microbes can develop as quickly in nonfat milk. Other say that whole milk lasts longer because free fatty acids might actually be natural preservatives. Still others say that maybe there isn't a difference in spoilage at. All it's just that. We noticed flavor changes more in one or the other. There's only been one major controlled study on these spoilage rates of whole and skim milk. And it was somewhat inconclusive skim milk was found to spoil slightly faster. But the researchers weren't exactly sure why bacteria that are psychotropic that is cold resistant are what causes spoilage in the fridge. And in the study, they multiplied at the same rate in both types of milk when the milk spoiled both whole and skim contained similar strains of bacteria. There was a pronounced difference in how whole and skim milk reacted when they were injected with the same spoilage microorganisms, but they affected the milk's taste and smell more than they did the actual spoilage rate whole milk for the record tended to turn sour and skim milk was on the bitter side. So for the purposes of your average milk consumer. There's really no hard and fast rule about which kind will spoil faster if whole. Ilk does last longer than skim the difference is so slight that any given gallon of skim milk could outlast any given gallon of whole milk. The spoilage rate depends on so many variables manufacturer production methods milk formulation plant sanitation storage, temperatures, ph level moisture content just to name a few a small change in just one of them could give any particular container of milk a slightly longer shelf life than another a couple of other factors make things even more ambiguous for one. It's pretty much impossible to pinpoint the exact moment of spoilage, depending on your sense of smell and taste and your tolerance for changes in milk flavor. You might turn up your nose at a gallon of milk that someone else might readily swig, and there's no federal regulation of milk expiration dates in the United States only twenty states, legally standardized, the date that's printed on the bottle, and those standards vary widely one state might mandate a sell by date of a certain number of days after pasteurization, whereas milk jugs in another state would be printed. With a used by date, the upshot don't base your milk purchases on which type might last longer. If you're concerned about shelf life, you'd be better off following a few simple steps to slow down milk spoilage. Whether you're a whole or skimmed drinker, I make sure your refrigerator is the correct temperature. It should be set at forty degrees Fahrenheit. That's four point four degrees celsius store, your milk on an interior shelf instead of on the door, which fluctuates more in temperature and make sure you put your milk back in the fridge as soon as possible after using it leaving it out on the counter for even a few minutes exposes it to light and heat giving 'Bacterial a chance to spring into action. Today's episode was written by Alison Cooper and produced by Tyler clang. Bonus fact for the episode, the origin of milk's, expiration date labels, and of expiration date labels general in the United States rests with a campaign started by Al Capone to learn more about that checkout. An episode of my other podcast. Savor the episode is called expiration dates best if listened by and of course for more on this and lots of other fresh topics visit our home planet. Custom works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Apple United States Walt Disney Casten Lauren Vogel Harvard Iheartradio Vietnam Twitter Katie Golden Jonathan Strickland Al Capone Alison Cooper Tyler Clang Milk Forty Degrees Fahrenheit Four Degrees Celsius
"katie golden" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"No. Well, I thought it was a good. I thought it was a good little witticism. I coulda rung my bell. If I had one, but Rochester has an abandoned subway system with the whole system the whole system and some of it or a large kind of the main line was built in the remnant of the Erie canal as it flowed through Rochester. So they took the old path under the city, and they turned it into a subway. And then the subway itself, they turned it into a subway when Rochester was a burgeoning American manufacturing city. And then as Rochester fell into the Klein, they also closed the subway put the canal back, they did not put the canals. So they should do that you just flooded. Well, the canal system, the Erie canal is always being restored. And in the United Kingdom. They're canal system also is having a resurgence people are are advocating kind of restoring disused parts of it. And it's it's really a kind of a great little feature of the country. I'm sure it's fantastic. But is it really efficient for goods and services? And you never know. But it's neat to have a little canal Boden. Bit sort of Amsterdam e there's so many locks is what I've noticed like what just walking along canal, Manchester. I was like I can't imagine trying to go through here on any kind of voter barge. It would if there was a lock every, you know, five hundred feet, there are these wonderful places along that system where a railroad will be going in a trench. There will be another railroad crossing it over that in a bridge. And then above that will be the canal in. A viaduct. Overhead the canal is over to trail railway tracks. It's great. But during the beaching plan, they took so many railroads out of the United Kingdom and left all these rail right of ways, beautiful viaducts and tunnels, and and and paths cutting through the countryside, and railway stations all abandoned and in recent years, they've turned a lot of those into bike paths. That's that's happened here with like streetcar, right? Lonzo a lot of American cities of gotten great by trails and jogging trails out of there. Well, and all three Carl old railroads to have turned into bike paths. But people are trying to get some of those rail lines restored in the UK. But there's the whole Trainspotting culture is really into old railway stations and very British. Right. I mean for all the for every American train spotters. There are twenty thousand British people in anoraks out looking at just like a platform there goes, and you know, why Thomas? The tank engine. They all were raised on or talking trains with them and personalities, and of course, if you believe that every train has has a story in a biography. Right. You're going to go stand by the tracks. And even if they don't have googly eyes, you're going to be like there's the four seventeen well, as we know all British people are overgrown children also there. So they're just like they they've got those rosy cheeks. They want people to bring them cookies in the middle of the afternoon with tea. That's right there breast fetishists. Like Benny Hill's bosomy women because they all breastfed till they were like nine. John you're well known for your love of animals or aminals. I do love 'em as you say. We've talked about different aminals on this show. We've talked about reckons. Yes. Darlings? Yep. All different kinds of animals, but there's a new show. I want to tell you about that really enables people to get inside the mind of animals think like are washing bear it's called creature feature and it's the new comedy educational podcast from how stuff works. So what happens on this show that you were just introducing? Katie golden, a former writer at crack dot com who this is her field. She studies biology at Harvard, and I hear rights as a bird on Twitter. I don't see what the necessary part of her resume. Okay. Character of a bird. She's already inside the mind of a nominal more power to her. So is this a situation where she is. It's a dry podcast without any fun hour. John. No, she's gonna have guests comedians on there every show and she's going to take them through a series of mental exercises in thinking, like different kinds of animals..

Erie canal Rochester United Kingdom John Amsterdam Benny Hill Klein Katie golden Manchester Trainspotting anoraks Carl Harvard Thomas writer five hundred feet
How Can We Make Better Resolutions?

BrainStuff

04:12 min | 2 years ago

How Can We Make Better Resolutions?

"The coming year. They often resolved to get out of debt. Sound familiar? Many of us are still making that resolution today. So what's the secret to actually keeping it just wanting something to change is not enough? You need a strategy to make it stick one way to do. This is to share your resolution with others. We spoke with Joe Ferrari, professor of psychology at depaul university in Chicago as he pointed out when you keep resolutions secret. No one is going to check up on you. You're only accountable to yourself. He says that a party to publicly share your resolutions an admirable way to ring in the new year. Social media offers another avenue to let others and on your goals. But once you've involved others in your resolutions. What steps can you? You take to ensure that when they do check up on you. You'll have something positive to report. Success of your New Year's resolutions starts in your head limiting yourself to a few resolutions, maybe even one and being specific are a few things to keep in mind. This prevents overload and frustration for example, I want to lose ten pounds by March first or I want to save fifty dollars each paycheck. The best goals are challenging but manageable, and that's a sensitive balance that only you can find for yourself overly ambitious goals can drain a person's confidence when they're not met instead build on small observable victories and possibly achieve bigger goals down the line and take things on one at a time. Whatever goals, you do tackle be sure to monitor your progress. Ferrari said if your resolution is to lose weight check your weight regularly if it's to save money right down where you spent your money monitoring those few challenging goals, you set will dramatically improve your success rate. Sometimes just the active recording everything you eat or spend can cause you to eat or spend less, even if you don't consciously change anything else. Whatever. Your New Year's goals. Give yourself some time to make them a reality more time than you may have planned on actually while most people cling to the widespread belief that new habits can be formed in twenty one days. New research is Justin that we need a longer timetable one. We study found that it took participants average of sixty six days to do something different and stick with it. Today's episode was written by loyal dove and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other fresh topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bounds and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Joe Ferrari Professor Of Psychology Harvard Katie Golden Depaul University Twitter Chicago Iheartradio Justin Tyler Clang Apple Twenty One Days Sixty Six Days Fifty Dollars Ten Pounds
How Can We Make Better Resolutions?

BrainStuff

05:59 min | 2 years ago

How Can We Make Better Resolutions?

"In two thousand and four in a tiny town. A young woman named Rebecca Gould was brutally murdered nearly fifteen years later her killer is still on the loose. It's just really surreal walking around. Ideal. Mention so much ear to guys out there yell depressed, dude. I'm Katherine towns. And this is Helen gone binge all of season one now at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, bring stuff I'm Lauren Boga bomb and the concept of creating New Year's resolutions is so ingrained in US culture that the government keeps a list of popular resolutions and resources for achieving them. It's a baker's dozen of good intentions including drink alcohol. Eat healthy food, get a better education. Get a better job get fit managed at manage stress and recycle digital research. Backs up this lists universality. According to a twenty eleven Marced university poll losing weight top the list for one in five resolution making Americans closely followed by exercising more with spending less than saving more quitting smoking. And being a better person all tied for third. But is it true that most people don't keep their resolutions? The answer as many of us around the house to forks office were relieved to discover appears to be a resounding. Yes. Richard Wiseman as I collagen and author with a penchant for mass participation experiments found that fifty two percent of people making New Year's resolutions or confident that they'd stick it out yet only a scant twelve percent really did. So why bother a New Year's resolutions are as one author wrote a triumph of hope over experience there a way to quantify what we wish for selves, their means of cataloging, our personal satisfactions, and perhaps most importantly their method of racing errors of the past year. Yes. New Year's resolutions are all about hopefulness. And it's always been that way. Of course ringing in the new year isn't a construct of modern Americans some four thousand years ago by balloons rang in their new year with an eleven day festival in March and ancient Egyptians celebrated the advent of their new calendar during the Nile rivers annual flood by forty six BC e Roman emperor Julius Caesar had moved the first day of the year to January first in honor of the Roman God of beginnings. Janice, an idea that took some time. To catch on however in fifteen eighty to see pope, Gregory, the eighth breath January first new year back in vogue with the Gregorian. Calendar. A concept the persists today. The origin of making New Year's resolutions rests with the Babylonians who reportedly made promises to the gods in hopes that earn good favor in the coming year. They often resolved to get out of debt. Sound familiar? Many of us are still making that resolution today. So what's the secret to actually keeping it just wanting something to change is not enough? You need a strategy to make it stick one way to do. This is to share your resolution with others. We spoke with Joe Ferrari, professor of psychology at depaul university in Chicago as he pointed out when you keep resolutions secret. No one is going to check up on you. You're only accountable to yourself. He says that a party to publicly share your resolutions an admirable way to ring in the new year. Social media offers another avenue to let others and on your goals. But once you've involved others in your resolutions. What steps can you? You take to ensure that when they do check up on you. You'll have something positive to report. Success of your New Year's resolutions starts in your head limiting yourself to a few resolutions, maybe even one and being specific are a few things to keep in mind. This prevents overload and frustration for example, I want to lose ten pounds by March first or I want to save fifty dollars each paycheck. The best goals are challenging but manageable, and that's a sensitive balance that only you can find for yourself overly ambitious goals can drain a person's confidence when they're not met instead build on small observable victories and possibly achieve bigger goals down the line and take things on one at a time. Whatever goals, you do tackle be sure to monitor your progress. Ferrari said if your resolution is to lose weight check your weight regularly if it's to save money right down where you spent your money monitoring those few challenging goals, you set will dramatically improve your success rate. Sometimes just the active recording everything you eat or spend can cause you to eat or spend less, even if you don't consciously change anything else. Whatever. Your New Year's goals. Give yourself some time to make them a reality more time than you may have planned on actually while most people cling to the widespread belief that new habits can be formed in twenty one days. New research is Justin that we need a longer timetable one. We study found that it took participants average of sixty six days to do something different and stick with it. Today's episode was written by loyal dove and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other fresh topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bounds and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Iheartradio Apple Rebecca Gould Richard Wiseman Helen Lauren Boga United States Forks Harvard Marced University Tyler Clang Twitter Katie Golden Janice Professor Of Psychology Joe Ferrari Depaul University Ferrari Nile Rivers
Do Whales Have Pop Songs?

BrainStuff

04:06 min | 2 years ago

Do Whales Have Pop Songs?

"I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and Evelyn Schnur biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking a comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the I heart radio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Vogel bomb. And as it turns out, humans aren't the only creatures the create and riff on catchy tunes Wales. Have pop music to during breeding season as male humpback whales swim along they sing the same song. Females never sing only males due to find a mate or to posture for other males the songs passed back and forth between the members of a pod each WALE, adding his own little flourishes. And as that pod meets other pods. They pass the tunes along until whole oceans ring with a song of the moment in the world of human pop music. What was the hot song of the summer will be dropped by every radio station in the fall to make room for the new hot thing? Research published in the proceedings of the Royal Society b suggests that the same is true for whale songs. The popular tune becomes gradually more and more complex. It's altered by different populations of humpbacks. But after a few years, the wheels grow tired of their complicated Diddy and start from scratch again the research team. Based out of the university of Queensland rated the complexity of song recordings of ninety five humpback whales from different populations in the Indian Ocean, of course, thirteen consecutive years. They found that over the course of a couple years. The same song spread all the way across the South Pacific from east Australia to French Polynesia lead author Jenny Allen marine biologist and the sedation ecology and acoustics laboratory at the university of Queensland said in a press release typically these songs changed gradually possibly through embellishments by individual singers. We suspect the embellishments allow bowls to stand out from their peers much teenage boys trying to stand out from the crowd. But every few years the songs are replaced always buy something simpler, suggesting there's a limit to the whales capacity to learn new material. Although there is evidently a limit to how much Wales can learn the build up and abandonment of particular songs signifies, a rapid cultural change over thousands of miles of ocean. Allen said that's basically unparalleled in non human culture. Dolphins. Do have fads too though. They have only been observed on a smaller scale an individual named Billy who learned to walk backwards on her tail and captivity later taught the trick to some wild dolphins after she was released the dolphin moonwalk really took off for awhile. Today's episode was written by Justin shields and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other catchy science, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical event. And this season has been all about the Salem witch trials with the release of episode twelve on December nineteenth the entire season is out. It's the perfect opportunity to get caught up and finish the journey. You started or to dive in and binge the entire show, but we're not done. Just yet starting on January second we'll be releasing all six of our incredible historian interviews for you to hear in full. These were great conversations with the leading scholars in the world of the Salem witch trials, and you won't want to miss them. Learn more about the show over at history on

Wales Indian Ocean University Of Queensland Jenny Allen Salem Katie Golden Evelyn Schnur Twitter Harvard Apple Lauren Vogel Royal Society Diddy Erin Minke South Pacific Billy Justin Shields Australia
"katie golden" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Welcome to a show ridiculous story. And see what you did. This is what they call the old ridiculous history. Bayton switch. It's true. Yes. And your nose may we've got our super producer Casey peg rope. And we want to introduce you to a show that we did that we we had so much fun doing. It was a lot of fun. It's also not show not our show. Here's nothing folks. I it's it's a little thing called the holiday season. And we really needed a little something to Pat out our feed give you guys something juicy to listen to over the holidays, but make it we didn't have to actually record a whole episode of our show ridiculous history. So we were asked to be guests on an episode of a wonderful show called creature feature which is hosted by the wonderfully, smart and funny, Katie golden. Yes. And we had such a great time on this show. We don't want to spoil too much of it for you. But we had such a great time on this show that at the end of it, we are Aspel scoundrels that we are said, hey, Katie is it cool. If we publish this episode on our feet as well. So that. More of our listeners can find out about creature feature and all the neat. Strange stuff, you dive into so what is creature feature. Well, it's this. It's a spread new podcast from how stuff works that take say, quote, critters, I view to explore how animal behavior parallels human behavior, and we entered into a dark yet paradoxically illuminating exploration of something called the dark Tetra. That's right. Ben, which includes psychopathy, narcissistic personality, Machiavelli, Evaline ISM. Right. That's the original try, but there's a fourth that is added occasionally, which is good ole everyday seat is sadism. That's right. And that was actually my favorite entry in the episode. We talk about a particularly nasty parasitic wasp that does horrible horrible things to tarantulas. So check out our appearance on creature feature. Thanks again. Katie if you're hearing this for having us over on your show. And if you enjoy this exploration of human behavior, please check out the rest of the fine episodes of creature feature that are available today. Wherever you find your favorite shows. Listen up for a guest spot from Katie herself.

Katie golden producer Pat Casey Ben
"katie golden" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Probably Science

"Precedes us to keep. Alcohol is rubbish. Every honestly. I mean, this is someone whose family comes from India that purchase people visited. With things. Late tour. Yeah. What a bunch of kind people. You know, they came in. They took some trinkets. And then they went home. Yeah. So nice nice. That Gandhi was right down in front of the thank them. Yeah. He just spent some he walked across the country just to thank each and every one of them individually for all all the good things that they did Holly. Most y'all science background. Well, is this said I had a chemistry. So that's rates. Go on. John. Confrontations with MRs Parker in physics. And then I got out of our soon as I could. Sees where you confrontations about your performance in the class or just you're much. Just generally it wasn't my topic of choice. I was much more sort of more time in the arts and of things, and I'm sort of more visual and literary than I am numbers and graphs, and I stopped it. And I left it soon as I could. But as I said, I love the fact it keeps doing the things does and keeps keeps a world. I just don't need to be involved in the no house. Dunking? It's sure is baby is going to be really helpful in This this. holiday you. You will be you have. No, I think we will be. We'll bring a a childlike naievety. Yes. Yes. Yes, he question. Hey, you know, what things you could find down your microscope from your science set that also some interesting creatures that may or may not be the subject to the brand new creature feature put cost comedy and educational podcast from how stuff works. I'm intrigued. Yeah. It's hosted by Katie golden, who's a former writer at cracked who's studied biology at hovered and rights as a bid on Twitter. I still don't know what that bit means. I think she has like a, you know, Twitter persona. That's I haven't looked it up. Like a cartoon bird bid. Missile. What we got here. I shouldn't I shouldn't commit to arrive fossil bird. I follow a cartoon bird account on Instagram. I wonder if if it's the same one it's like a sarcastic bird at pro bird rights. This. But this is a very funny. She has four hundred thousand followers, I'm sorry. Bird rights activists at pro bird rate. Sweet somebody okay here, we go. Here's one of them. It's so nice of of human to install a couple of burbot perch on windshield of car for me to sit on specially on cold rainy day. Like, oh, what is happening? It's actually g thinks here's what I want to know. We could this out because we haven't. Yeah. I wanna I wanna know whether Katie actually pecks out the individual tweets with her nose. Yeah. I'd say so that will Mike right has a beak has a stylus on the end of that. And she's in a coffee shop being like, I got to work. Nothing if not committed to the business. Almost half a million people who rely on like this. Oh, here's one. I clap emoji. Don't clap emoji have clap emoji hands. Clapping. That's great. And also the bed cone spell. Bergkamp pulpy says that's. That's cute. Very cute. All right. I'm fully I'm fully back on board again Haiti. But also this podcast. You will like this. If you like our show, this seems right up the street. It seems to be right in the middle of the Vendee gram of things that people who listen to show. Like, it's comedians is go actually, well, research creek stuff. They take a different guest comedian each episode through some downright freaky evolutionary auditees. They'll make you wonder what mother nature has been smoking. Can you put in a word, maintenance rooks? Maybe we can. I should say. So so comedians are us to shrink down and get inside the minds of animals, what shrink down, this is a thought experiment egos. We've got we're not shrinking I'll never shrink for anyone opener. That's what invertebrates are is. They're all just hosts. My headline. I wanna headliner animal. Shitty. And it's the most specific comedian specific. Yeah. I want an apex predator. On nothing. That's all. Okay. I just realized there's also you can follow creature feature on Twitter at creature feet pod creature fee, EPA pod. But also, you can get it wherever you get your podcasts, apple podcast..

Twitter Katie golden Gandhi India MRs Parker Haiti John Bergkamp apple EPA Holly writer Mike
When We Lose Weight, Where Does It Go?

BrainStuff

05:26 min | 2 years ago

When We Lose Weight, Where Does It Go?

"Hello. I'm Kevin Pollak. Yes that Kevin Pollock. What's that? I did save room for pie. Thank you. And may I offer you a slice of my new comedy podcast. It's called alchemy. This. I've gathered five hilarious improvisers. And each episode. I set the scene and the comedy gold fills your life with undeniable joy, be the first a yellow your friends about Kevin politics. New comedy podcasts. Alchemy this listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuck Lauren Bogle bomb here for many of us, humans our body size and shape are things influx from one month to the next depending on a host of factors both within and without our control our genes might be a little tighter or a little looser. Our question of the day is when we lose weight where does that lost weight go? The short answer is that our bodies convert molecules in fat cells to usable forms of energy, thus shrinking the cells. But getting this to happen isn't just about sweating to the oldies. Or however, you prefer to work out understanding how our bodies perform this tummy, trimming trick requires a little more detail. We know that weight loss. Hinges on burning calories. Calories are the measure of the potential energy in the food. You eat in the form of fats, proteins and carbohydrates. If our bodies were cars energy would be the gas. That keeps everything running lounging in front of the television is like cruising the strip while sprinting around to track is more like drag racing at maximum speeds in short more. Or work means more energy is needed. The body uses. Some of the calories we ingest to digest that very food. Once the food is broken down into its respective parts of carbohydrates fats and proteins it. Either uses the remaining energy or converts to fat for storage in fat cells, and as doctor who fans no fat cells live in adipose tissue, which basically acts like an internal gestation storing away fuel reserves to lose weight. You must burn more calories or energy than you consume to start using up that fuel reserve, essentially, if you're not ingesting enough calories to fuel your additional work. Your body must pull from fat stores. According to the law of conservation of mass matter is neither created nor destroyed, but it may alter its form through chemical reaction, essentially that tells us that while we lose mass in our bodies by burning fat. It doesn't just disappear. It's simply changes for him. When we eat the glucose and other sugars harnessed from carbohydrates are the first things our bodies use as fuel stores liver stores the glucose in the form of glycogen and releases it into the bloodstream as necessary to keep our bodies trucking long think of your bloodstream as an interconnected conveyor belt that takes necessary nutrients to the body parts that need them. Once that glucose runs out fat takes over harnessing energy by burning fat is referred to as ketosis. It works like this hormones, regulating our blood sugar levels, activate an enzyme in the blood vessels of fat tissue called lie pace, lie ignites, fat cells to release macromolecules called triglycerides, which are what makes fat cells bet triglycerides are made up of glycerin and three fatty acid chains when they received the signal from lipase to exit the fat cells the triglycerides break up into their respective components and enter the bloodstream for us the liver snatches at the glacier, all to break it down for energy, and some of the fatty acids moved to the muscles that can farm them for energy. As well. The action of breaking down triglycerides into usable energy is called like policies. Once the components of the glycerin and fatty acids are inside our muscle or liver cells. Organ hills called my Takao Andrea shuffle in reshuffle. There's compounds to harness their potential energy sorta like a furnace burns would the might Akande breakdown and recombine those components of our fat cells and produce heat water carbon dioxide and Denison triphosphate or ATP ATP halls potential energy in its molecular bonds for us when we exercise like inner cellular carb loading the water exits our bodies as sweat and urine, and we exhaled carbon dioxide. Now that the body has relieved at cells of some glycerin and fatty acids, the cells get smaller and sew sell buy-sell, our body shape changes. Today's episode was written by Kristen conger and produced by Tyler playing to hear more from Kristen out her podcast unladylike available wherever you listen to podcasts. And of course, to get the skinny on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts for on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Iheartradio Apple Kevin Pollak Kevin Pollock Kristen Conger Kevin Lauren Bogle Harvard Ketosis Organ Hills Twitter Katie Golden Andrea Tyler One Month
BrainStuff Classics: What Is The Oldest Living Thing?

BrainStuff

05:53 min | 2 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: What Is The Oldest Living Thing?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren bulk ObamaCare with a classic episode from the vault our earth while host Christian Sager is exploring a tangling question. What is earth's oldest living thing? Neighboring stuff Krishan Sager here. So as far as aging goes humans have it pretty good. I mean, we're no giant tortoises, but we're generally capable of living for decades some of us for more than a century here at brand stuff. It got us thinking, what is the world's oldest living thing. Well, that's a tricky question. And the answer depends on how we define living and thing, I let's tackle what we mean. By thing. If we say a thing could also be a clone will colony than the competition heats up quickly. There are numerous plant and fungal. Clone. Colonies that have been around for tens of thousands of years, and they're still barreling along. There's king clone the creosote Bush in the Mojave almost twelve thousand years old, and we can't forget pando the gigantic male quaking Aspen, colonial colony in Utah. He is about eighty thousand years old. Incidentally, he's also the heaviest living thing weighing in around six million kilograms. But what if we stick to sing? Single organisms if so then the tiny end lifts are strong contenders. These extrema file Methuselah like to kick back and take it easy for millions of years. They've lived a mile and a half below the ocean floor with metabolism slower than molasses only reproducing once every few centuries or millennia. I mean that makes pandas look like rabbits, there's a big let's call it loophole in the definition of living dormancy what if something was frozen in time trapped in stasis and then revived like captain America the alien in the thing in two thousand and eleven professor Brian Schubert published a paper on just that he discovered bacteria in what he called a kind of hibernation state inside tiny bubbles of thirty four thousand year old salt crystals. Other scientists have claimed to find older organisms such as the two hundred fifty million-year-old bacteria in southeast New Mexico. But Schubert's work was. Independently reproduced. So if we allow an organism to take a time out and spent thousands of years in stasis there are loads of competitors for the title of oldest living thing, many of which may still lurk undiscovered in the isolated hinterlands of earth. You know, deep oceans remote mountains, endless Arctic wastes. Now, I'm thinking of HP lovecraft well moving on. There's one other important thing. Some organisms might be immortal. Now, don't get jealous. We're not talking about some super sexy vampire type immortality. No. We're talking about jellyfish specifically hydra and the turritopsis Dory. The turritopsis is only four point five millimeters large, but capable of something that may be unique in the animal world after reaching sexual maturity, it can revert to its polyp stage, it can reverse and reset its aging cycle rendering it biologically, immortal, and the hydra doesn't seem to age at all. That means that potentially the oldest living organism could one day be a jellyfish. But for now, even counting states of dormancy, the oldest living continually active things on earth appear to be the extreme file organisms collectively called Endo Litz. But of course, there may be something older varied in time. Dormant waiting for intrepid humans to wake it from its deathly slump. Today's episode was written by Joan McCormick and produced by Tyler playing to hear more from Joe check out his weird science podcast stuff to blow your mind wherever you tuned podcasts. This vary up perhaps. And of course, for lots more on this and other well preserved topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking a comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts for on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Quicken Loans Brian Schubert Krishan Sager America Harvard Turritopsis Dory Christian Sager Twitter Obamacare Katie Golden Iheartradio Endo Litz New Mexico Bush Captain America Apple HP Professor Utah Joan Mccormick
"katie golden" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Movie Crush

"So weird the first I'm just gonna say the first person that came to mind, which I don't know if it's really true that I feel that way a constant Zimmer. Okay. I think she's a she's bad ass, and she's had a really cool career vice? Yeah, love that. And that was surprising that that's what came out. I wasn't expecting that that very shocking, but she's she's a bad ass. All right. And then finally movie going one on one what is your movie going ritual? Where do you sit? Do you get anything in the concession stands? No, okay. So nothing to eat or drink. What what rituals? Do. I have a movie I mean. Listen, if I'm gonna be making out with somebody. I'm gonna sit in the back row. But otherwise, I'm going to go for the the best like center top left, always go towards on left handed. Maybe that's why I don't know. But I always go in the left side there. That's a ritual. I always from the left. I don't think anyone's ever said. That's right. Yeah. Always from the left. Okay. All right. That's great. Thank you tasha. Thank you so much. So a lot of fun. Yeah. Thanks. All right, everyone. Hope you enjoyed that. It was sort of a more of a philosophical discussion that I've had in here about most movies. But I think that is because it is the graduate a movie that is very much under the surface of this, quote, unquote, romantic comedy. There's a lot more going on than meets the eye and I loved watching it again last night. And I love talking to Natasha about it very insightful stuff, and she's wonderful. So hope you enjoyed it to go out and watch it again, if you didn't watch it before this episode. It is well worth it's one of those movies. It's well we're seeing like every six or seven years to see what your take is time marches on for us. All so thanks for tuning in. And until next week. Don't go stock someone at college, man. It's just it makes you spineless loser. Crush is produced engineered edited and soundtrack by no Brown in Ramsey at how stuff works studios. Punt city market it land, Georgia. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and biology

Zimmer Natasha Katie golden Georgia Brown Ramsey seven years
Could Cheap Magnets Help Save Sharks?

BrainStuff

05:28 min | 2 years ago

Could Cheap Magnets Help Save Sharks?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb. Here we humans in general, not us on this podcast, kill one hundred million sharks. Every year for starters, some people each sharks. So they kill them on purpose for that reason. However, the big shark killing culprit is accidental by-catch bycatch is the Claro damage of the large scale commercial fishing industry. It works. Like this say, you're in charge of a commercial shrimping boat. And it's outfitted with all the gear you need to catch shrimp, including a trawling net. The size of a sports field, which sinks to the sea floor and bumps along the bottom picking up whatever's down there when it's hold back in some of what's in the net is shrimp. But it also contains sharks sea turtles seals dolphins. Raise countless animals of all descriptions. Some of these needlessly die before they can be thrown back overboard Assam are halted deport and their bodies disposed of later the same goes for baited longlines and gillnets which untangle everything that's wims into them. The result is that it's many as two billion pounds. That's almost one metric ton of marine. Life is killed and wasted by the fishing industry. Every year which puts the whole a hundred million sharks thing into perspective. But there may be hope at least for the sharks a cheap simple fix for big problem. Like, this is rarely forthcoming. But according to a study published any twenty eighteen issue of the journal fisheries research, the answer to the shark bycatch problem might be magnets sharks are Alaska Bronx that is they belong to a group of cartilage in his fishes. That also includes raisins skates, and they have special sensory organs around their nostrils called amputate of Lorenzini that looked like little craters all over the shark's snout behind. These little pores are sacks of jelly the consents electromagnetic fields. They helped sharks hunt by letting them sense. The bio electric city of their praise heartbeat and scientists think might also help the migrate using the earth's magnetic field the research team behind the aforementioned study hypothesized that incorporating magnets into fish traps might alert Alaska Bronx to their presence and reduce overall shark bycatch because bony fishes which are often. What fishing outfits are looking to catch have low sensitivity to electromagnetic fields. They figured that. Even if it worked to keep sharks steering clear the traps, it would lower the cat traits of desirable fish to test their hypothesis the research team monitored thousand fish traps off the coast of Sydney, New South Wales, all of which were baited to catch a stray alien, snapper. A segment of the industry that accidentally catches sharks about ten percent of the time. One third of the traps were set with cheap magnets around the entrances worth about twenty two American dollars or thirty dollars. Australian another third of the traps were set with metal bars at the entrance to provide a physical barrier. And the last third were left alone as controls in a press release. Co author REEs Richards of the school of environmental and life sciences university of Newcastle said developing ways to reduce by catches a priority for many fisheries, we found the traps with magnets had roughly thirty percent less likelihood of catching sharks and rays compared to traps without in addition those traps with magnets would catch roughly thirty percent more targeted fish, which is a rare win win for fisheries. Win wins are great. But we've got a long way to go before we make a dent in that one hundred million sharks per year the magnet seemed to work well for traps, but magnets, won't work on lines. The lines are fitted with metal hooks. So magnets would tangle. The gear more research is needed. But as fans of these fascinating thinned creatures regard to see one possible solution. Today's episode was written by just windshields and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other not so fishy, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter in my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in men from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like dumb show for babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts for on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Sharks Quicken Loans Bronx America Lauren Vogel Assam Harvard Alaska Tyler Clang Rees Richards Twitter Iheartradio Katie Golden Lorenzini School Of Environmental And Li Apple Sydney South Wales Thirty Percent
"katie golden" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"A comedian joins host Katie golden, and they explore the connections between the animal world and humans right now. Katie Goldens on the live line to talk about a good morning morning. I love how you set that up. It's so funny. Why are you fascinated? Do you think by the links between animals and humans? Well, I think it's kind of the we have this shared history of evolution. So staying very human-like behaviors in animals is humbling and also really funny. Well, you have the background in psychology and evolutionary biology. So I'm wondering what sets us I guess apart from the animals. Well, you know, that's a really good question. It's interesting because one of the potential criteria is self awareness to it's called a medic cognitive understanding that were alive, and we exist, but this is been challenged somewhat recently because chimpanzees has shown some limited forms of self awareness, such as researchers sedated them and then put like a red dot on their forehead. And so when they came to the only way for them to know that that was on them would be to look in the mirror, and when they did look in a mirror, they moved to remove the red dot to try to rub it off. So that shows an understanding that they are death thing. That's in the MIR which is a pretty revolutionary thing. If these they have awareness nail seem one one thing would be an understanding of mortality. And we do fine animals who seem to cling on to the dead bodies of their loved ones in a way that is very similar to human mornings. So ring a hands and orcas and other primates will hold on to their dead infants when they when they die young because they seem to want to keep that contact up. And they they do behaviors that is not found in mothers of live instance. So an orca carried her dead infant by keeping it afloat for for many, many miles on for a long period of time, which to me kind of seems to indicate that even though she might know that something is wrong. And that this baby is not necessarily alive. She just doesn't want to let go of it yet. Ever wonder why your dog barks when you leave the house or why birds sit together in groups on lampposts, then you've got to listen to this podcast creature feature. Katie golden is the host and you can hear it on the iheartradio podcast page. Thanks so much Katy for coming on. We appreciate it. Thank you. Nine fifty five money news, Robert W,.

Katie golden Katie Goldens Katy Robert W
"katie golden" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Whether you're hall, or or you don't have a Starbucks card from our vantage point here and just past. We have no idea how long our civilization or any of its great religious traditions survived. We hope and pray that the catastrophe or may never come and will not be caused by religious strife here here. But if the worst comes soon this recording like all our maybe our final word, we'll never get the exit one. But if providence allows we hope to back with you soon for another entry in the. John you're well known for your love of animals or aminals. I do say we've talked about different aminals on this share. We've talked about records. Yes. Darlings all different kinds of animals, but there's a new show. I want to tell you about that really enables people to get inside the mind of animals think like are washing bear it's called creature feature and it's the new comedy educational podcast from how stuff works. So what happens on this show that you were just introducing? Katie golden, a former writer at crack dot com who this is her field. She studies ever Lucien area biology at Harvard, and I hear rights as a bird on Twitter. I don't see the necessary part of her resume. Okay. Character of a burden. Okay. She's already inside the mind of a nominal more power to or so is this a situation where she is. It's a dry podcast without any fun. John. No, she's gonna have guests comedians on there every show and she's going to take them through a series of mental exercises and thinking like different kinds of animals. What would it be like if you were the victim of a parasitic wasp or a mouse who fell in love with a cat or penguin who turns to the life of crime? These are real life. Strange animal stories that are guests will be invited all of our sexy. But with aminals instead of with the half human to his penguin for the mouse who mistook his cat for a nip on my gosh, why isn't called that instead of creature? Well, for some reason they call. Creature feature. And if you wanna get in touch with your wild side, you can listen to subscribe to creature feature on apple podcasts or on iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

John Katie golden Starbucks Harvard writer
"katie golden" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"katie golden" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"Buy t shirts if you're in a t shirt buying mood t public or hoodies that have assorted designs, we don't have an L Ron Hubbard learn to fuck shit up yet. But we're working on that. We're working on that. Did you guys do L? Ron Hubbard a. Yeah, we. Like a four hour on our on. I I was I I don't live far from here. And I was walking by and I saw two Scientologists 'cause I could tell from their like uniform things they were walking past me. So I got about half a second of their conversation. But I heard one fully grown adult women say to the other fully woman. This is the one sentence. I heard my walk. Yeah. They changed shower time. I just thought it was so creepy no shower time, and they changed it at like. Now, you're in distress. I just thought the whole thing was like, I don't wanna know more. But I do I mean, I think when you're talking about a Colt like Scientology or you're talking about the desire to vote for an authoritarian who promises strict government control and violence against people. You don't like they both have a similar route. Which is that like people are just exhausted. At how many choices they have politics is exhausting vote in the midterms? There's all these different proposals. And you've got to figure out like what you feel about them and understand them in a lot of them. It's usually not something that's as simple as like abortion. Right. Right. Pretty depending on your belief. Chiefs, you're gonna land up. But if it's like, well, okay. Do we allocate this much money to firefighting? But if that happens like because we're you know in order to allocate this money when posing an additional property tax like a lot of stuff is like in, it's exhausting. So whether you're poison as a Colt or a dictator in a society, that's free and open. There's always a huge amount of fuck it just let some asshole out. Yeah. So don't let some asshole figure it out. Thank for yourself. And and by T shirt from t- public dot com behind the pastors. All right. Good ad pivot. All right. Thank you. We will see you later on this week and Tuesdays and Thursdays. Hind the bastards chick. So. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and Evelyn Schnur

Ron Hubbard Evelyn Schnur Katie golden four hour
Does Apple Cider Vinegar Really Help With Weight Loss?

BrainStuff

06:04 min | 2 years ago

Does Apple Cider Vinegar Really Help With Weight Loss?

"I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and Evelyn Schnur biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking a comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb. Here apple cider vinegar has been making these social media rounds as the weight loss, cure jor. Maybe you've seen videos of Dr Oz touting the health benefits of apple cider vinegar, or of YouTubers claiming to have shed ten pounds of belly fat just seven days by drinking apple cider vinegar cocktails before meals, even if we know the health claim sound too good to be true for anyone who struggles with their health and body image as it relates to their body weight. It can be tempting to try any weight loss regimen that so cheap all natural in seemingly effortless. So what's the deal? Can apple cider vinegar really help? You lose weight. I ate quick explainer apple cider vinegar versus other types of vinegar, the active ingredient in all vinegar is a scenic acid most of the vendors. We commonly eat or cook with a white vinegar red wine vinegar balsamic and apple cider contain between five and six percent. Acidic acid, though, mild rice vinegar can be as low as two to four percent when people. Talk about the health benefits of apple cider vinegar. They're really talking about the health benefits of having more acidic acid in your diet, you could consume any vinegar to get the same effect, but the relatively mild and sweet flavor of apple cider vinegar is more palatable barely when mixed into a beverage, which has boosted its popularity. Plus there are several brands of raw organic, unfiltered and unpasteurized apple cider vinegar that achieved cult following for their purported health benefits. But what does the research say we spoke with Deborah Murphy, a registered dietitian in Chicago who says the current scientific research on the weight loss benefits of apple cider vinegar is limited. Although there have been a handful of small studies that make a case for this health remedy several animal studies showed that doses of Sita acid seemed to suppress the accumulation of body fat in mice that we're fed high fat diets the biggest study today from two thousand fourteen followed the progress of a hundred and seventy five OB's adults in Japan, some of whom. Were given a beverage containing one or two tablespoons that's fifteen or thirty milliliters of apple cider vinegar everyday with their meals and some who were not after twelve weeks. The folks who drank a little vinegar everyday lost two to four pounds. That's one to two kilograms compared to know statistical improvements in the group who did not drink vinegar low and slow decreases in weight are definitely these safest and healthiest way to lose weight. But only losing two four pounds over three months. That's third of a pound a week hardly qualifies as a secret weight loss cure as some claim apple cider vinegar to be other much smaller. Studies have linked apple cider vinegar to slowing down gastric emptying a which is the time. It takes for food to move from the stomach to these small intestine in an experiment involving just ten people type one diabetes. The folks who drank a little apple cider vinegar each day kept food in their stomach longer and their stomach size. Also swelled more after eating a meal both of these findings support the idea that apple cider vinegar could help you feel fuller. And stay fuller longer. Although these scientific proof there is still modest. A Murphy said, unfortunately, there is still no single food that holds the secret to weight loss, despite what many on the internet may say about apple cider vinegar, the only way to achieve and sustain weight loss is these same thing you've likely heard one hundred times before eat healthy and move your body. Even if apple cider vinegar, isn't the cure all it sometimes cracked up to be it can still be part of a healthy diet and lifestyle. There's even promising research underway about apple cider vinegar and insulin response a small study did show that vinegar can significantly improve insulin sensitivity in diabetic and pre diabetic patients after a high carb meal. We also spoke with Cynthia sass, performance nutritionist based in New York and Los Angeles who warns against drinking apple cider vinegar straight because the acidic acid can wear away to the normal and even burn the Asaf Agha's if you want to give cider vinegar beverages at Tri SAS recommends swirling two teaspoons that's about nine milliliters of apple cider vinegar. Plus a teaspoon about four point five milliliters of Honey and a Cup of warm water once a day, but she says don't go overboard on the quantity or frequency. There's also no reason that apple cider vinegar has to be imbibed in order to access any potential health benefits. Murphy suggests working at into your existing recipes making vinaigrette for your salads, attaining coleslaw, a marinade for chicken or fish or adding some two salted greens to give them a punch. Today's episode was written by Dave rou and produced by Tyler clay for more on this and lots of other healthy, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Two thousand four in a tiny town. A young woman named Rebecca Gould was brutally murdered nearly fifteen years later her killer still on the loose. Work

Apple Deborah Murphy Harvard Katie Golden Iheartradio Evelyn Schnur Twitter Dr Oz Lauren Vogel Rebecca Gould Sita Dave Rou Japan Chicago Cynthia Sass Asaf Agha Tyler Clay New York
Why Are Dogs Noses Wet?

BrainStuff

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Why Are Dogs Noses Wet?

"Hello. I'm Kevin Pollack. Yes. That Kevin Pollack. What's that? I did save room for by. Thank you. And may I offer you a slice of my new comedy podcast. It's called alchemy. This. What the heck is that you ask well easy on the cousin I've carefully handpicked five Larry's improvisers and each episode. I set the scene and the comedy gold fills your life with undeniable joy, alchemy this drops October eighteenth be the first to yell at your friends about Kevin Pollack's new comedy podcasts exclusively from how stuff works. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here, if you've ever shared a home with a dog, you've probably had these startling experience of while minding your own business. Having a cold wet nose thrust into your skin like a friendly ice cube. It's your pups way of getting your attention, the end, it's an old wives tale that such a wet nose is a good thing. Because it supposedly means your dog is in good health. But this idea has no basis. In fact, whether a dog has a wet nose is not a signal one way or another of health, but why are dogs noses sometimes dry and sometimes wet the short answer is that dogs sometimes look their noses. But the catch is that no one knows for sure why they do that one theory suggests that because dogs are always looking their noses. Their saliva helps paint their schmos with the mucus produced and the nostrils as a result. All that mucus looking improves a dog's ability to smell things L. Let's breakdown how that works when dogs sniff the air, and they are always sniffing the air, they inhale tiniest. Offended particles. These particles get trapped in their nasal mucus, which helps the dog figure out what they're smelling as a dog licks it snows in picks up some of these sent Latin goop the tongue then brushes against an factory gland on the roof of the mouth, which helps our four legged companions figure out exactly what they're smelling. Another reason. Some have suggested could be that a wet nose helps keep a dog cool in warm weather when we human sweat, the perspiration, our sweat glands produce evaporates off of our skin cooling down dogs. However, do not sweat. That's because they have no sweat glands except from the bottom of their pop heads. Instead, they pinned to cool off. However, a dog's nose. Unlike the rest of its body is not covered in for it also brims with blood vessels when a dog licks its nose the theory suggests it's cooling itself down as it saliva like human sweat evaporates that leaves the surface area of the nose cool along with the blood circulating in and around. Fido, snout comes. Consequently, cooler blood flows the dog's head and body keeping our best friends a little bit cooler, but then why are dogs noses often dry? A few factors can lead to less licking touch. Your dog's news in the morning chances are it'll be tries the Sahara, that's because as a dog sleeps it rarely licks its nose and certain breeds like BULLDOGS in pugs have noses that are mostly dry age. Also tends to make a dog knows dryer the bottom line is that if your dog has dry nose chill out the dog isn't sick. Wait a few hours, and it will be wet again. Oh, and a bonus pump knows fact have you noticed that your dog has slits on the sides of its knows? There's a reason when dogs exhaled they do so out of those slits that so that the X hailed air does not mix with these scented inhaled air, which flows into the nostrils. Today's episode was written by John perr, Tano and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other startling topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey listeners today I wanted to tell you about a new comedy educational podcast from how stuff works creature feature hosted by Katie golden, a former writer at cracked dot com. Who studied evolutionary biology at Harvard and rights as a bird on Twitter each episode, Katie takes a different guest comedian through some downright freaky. Evolutionary oddities that will make you wonder what mother nature has been smoking. So get in touch with your wild side. Listen every Wednesday and subscribe for free to creature feature on apple podcasts, Google podcasts. Spotify or wherever you happen to find your podcasts.

Kevin Pollack Katie Golden Lauren Bogle Spotify Harvard Larry Bulldogs Twitter Apple Writer Google John Perr Tyler Clang Tano
BrainStuff Classics: How Does Silica Gel Work?

BrainStuff

04:47 min | 2 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: How Does Silica Gel Work?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m l s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren mogul bomb here with a classic episode from our erstwhile host Christian Sager today. He's talking about one of my favorite bits of everyday science. Those little packets of silica gel that you find in everything from vitamin containers to the new bags that you buy and why you should not eat them. I'm Christian Sager. This is brain stuff. And today's question is what is silica gel. And why do I find little packets of it in so many things? I mean, that's weird. Right. Why would my new boots and my beef jerky be packed with the same stuff? Silica or more. Precisely silicon dioxide is the same stuff that quartz in Sander made of it's a desolate, meaning it adds orbs and holds water vapor, and that's adds orbs with an ad not absorbed when we say that something ads orbs moisture we mean that water molecules adhere to the surface of the material. Think of the way that sand can seem to soak up water the water's really just adhering to each grain, basically silica gel does the same thing. It's covered in millions of tiny pores that can retain moisture it can actually adsorb about forty percent of its weight in moisture. And can thus reduce the relative humidity in a closed container down to around forty percent. So you'll find silica jopacks and anything that would be affected by excess moisture it's in with leather products where it can limit the growth of mold you'll see it package with electron ICs to reduce condensation, and because silica gel is nearly harmless. You'll find it preventing spoilage in foods like pepperoni. You still don't want to eat it, though, if you emptied out a packet in eight the beads, they would begin ads orbin moisture from your tongue gums and the rest of your mouth, your first instinct would probably be to spit it out. But if you did swallow it. Well, okay, probably you'd be fine. But not all silica gel is the same. Some has a toxic coating of cobalt chloride swallowing this stuff probably won't kill you. But it might cause nausea vomiting and a few other less than awesome symptoms. And when it comes to keeping things dry silica. Joe works pretty well. Which is why it so widespread? It's also found in vitamin. Containers industrial air systems and oddly enough containers of cat litter, and this stuff is reusable. You can dry it out by heating in an oven at about three hundred degrees Fahrenheit, that's about one hundred and fifty degrees celsius and people have found all sorts of ways to reuse it. There might be too many to list. I mean, all right. I guess I can try here. It goes protecting papers from humidity drying, flowers, preventing Ruston, tools, preventing condensation on windows and inside picture frames preserving art in display cases, mitigating small spills in luggage, slowing silver, tarnishing stopping seed mold and preventing hammer lens from FOX. Episode was written by me and produced by Tyler clan for more on this and lots of other reusable, topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. Hey listeners today I wanted to tell you about a new comedy educational podcast from how stuff works creature feature hosted by Katie golden, a former writer at cracked dot com. Who studied evolutionary biology at Harvard and rights as a bird on Twitter each episode, Katie takes a different guest comedian through some downright freaky. Evolutionary oddities that will make you wonder what mother nature has been smoking. So get in touch with your wild side. Listen every Wednesday and subscribe for free to creature feature on apple podcasts, Google podcasts. Spotify or wherever you happen to find your podcasts.

Quicken Loans Christian Sager Katie Golden America Nausea Harvard Spotify Lauren Mogul Twitter Apple Ruston Writer Tyler Clan JOE Google Forty Percent Three Hundred Degrees Fahrenhe Fifty Degrees Celsius Ninety Days
How Effective Are Bulletproof Vests?

BrainStuff

05:29 min | 2 years ago

How Effective Are Bulletproof Vests?

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Bulletproof vests have saved plenty of lives. But this gear isn't perfectly well bulletproof in all situations. So exactly how. Well do. They work and do bulletproof vests degrade over time can they fail. Let's look at a bit of history early bulletproof vests were mainly made from Polipara Fennelly tear thalidomide better known as kevlar. It was invented by. Stephanie folic a chemist working for DuPont in the early nineteen sixties DuPont, head already invented nylon. And spandex and was on the hunt for the next generation of high performance fibers synthetic fibres are created with polymers large molecules composed of repeating sub-units effectively creating a linked chain of molecules that are more than some of their parts. What folic discovered would eventually become kevlar and would see application in tires racing. Sales and bulletproof vests bulletproof vests today are made from polyethylene fibres a popular plastic polymer seen in. Nearly everything we use grocery bags toys. Plastic trash bins. And so on polyethylene fibers or P as it's called are woven in layers to form the guts of protective vests that are cheaper and stronger than kevlar in nine hundred eighty nine a company called Allied Signal developed a competitor for kevlar and called it spectra shield originally used for sale cloth. This polyethylene fibre is now used to make lighter yet stronger material for use in bulletproof vests alongside the traditional kevlar. According to a manufacturer of bulletproof vests, the layers inside a vest are designed to reduce the velocity of around to a point below the speed of sound at roughly this point the fibers can have time to react to the bullet and exert their toughness their strength and how much they'll bend before they break the more layers or the greater the density of the weaving of those layers, the greater the toughness of the fibers and the more capable they are of stopping a bullet most pistols fire bullets at velocities that are just slightly above the speed of sound. A bullet from a nine millimeter, for example, travels at around nine hundred eighty feet per second. That's about three hundred and eighty meters per second. The speed of sound is around one thousand one hundred and twenty feet or three hundred and forty meters per second. Thus a good vest doesn't need to work too hard to bring a nine millimeter bullets velocity down to eight point where it can make use of the toughness of its fibers and slugs from shotguns travel, even slower, so they are relatively easy to stop as well a rifle bullet, however is another matter entirely depending on the grain and quality of the propellant a bullet fired from an AR fifteen travels roughly three thousand three hundred feet per second. That's about a thousand meters per second, which is nearly three times the speed of sound it'll take a far greater density of ballistic fiber to stop that. Bullet most vests designed to stop rifle bullets are backed up with high density, insert plates made from ceramics and polyethylene that break-up a bullet into pieces and capture it vests without those plates would likely fail to capture a rifle bullet the. The material of the vests themselves is also prone to breakdown for various reasons kevlar, for instance, degrades when exposed to salt such as salt and human sweat the longer a person exerts themselves while enabled professed made of kevlar to the tune of years. The greater the likelihood of failure vests made from polyethylene will also break down over time. When exposed to UV light manufacturers say that there's about a five year life span on vests and cautioned against buying used vests, unless you know, the manufacturer date and the materials used to make it as with any product or idea or anything really a we recommend always doing your research, especially if your life might be on the line. Today's episode was written by Jared w Alexander and produced by Tyler playing for more on this and lots of other tough, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. 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Quicken Loans Katie Golden America Polipara Fennelly Lauren Boko Allied Signal Dupont Harvard Spotify Thalidomide Brian Twitter Apple Stephanie Writer Google Jared W Alexander Tyler Three Thousand Three Hundred F