3 Episode results for "Katie Fitzgerald"

US hunger crisis persists, especially for children.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

06:03 min | Last week

US hunger crisis persists, especially for children.

"Coming up on five minute news. Us hunger crisis persists especially for children. Black could finds a uk government in wake of racism reports and apple to build battery based solar energy storage in california. It's friday april two. I'm anthony davis. America is starting to claw its way out of the economic fallout from the corona virus pandemic but food insecurity persists especially for children and older adults. Food banks around the us continue giving away far more canned packaged fresh provisions than they did before. The virus outbreak tossed millions of people out of work forcing many to seek something to eat for the first time for those who are now back at work. Many are still struggling paying back. Rent or trying to rebuild savings data from feeding america a national network of food banks in the us shows that its members dispensed far more in the last three months of twenty twenty compared with the same period in two thousand. Nineteen katie fitzgerald. Feeding america's chief operating officer said the networks members are still seeing demand above pre pandemic levels although final numbers for this year's first-quarter anti-eta valuable fitzgerald said she expects the food banks will collectively distribute the equivalent of six billion meals this year about the same amounts. They gave away last year and far above the four point. Two billion meals given out in two thousand and nineteen america's yearlong food insecurity crisis has been felt especially sharply by children who lost easy access to free school meals and all adults who struggled to get groceries or meals that senior centers because they are worried about contracting the virus. The most senior black advise it the uk prime minister. Boris johnson has resigned. The government said on thursday. The day after a report on racial disparities concluded that britain does not have a systemic problem with racism. The government denied any link between the departure of samuel kazoo and the much criticised report which activists and academics have accused of ignoring the experiences of ethnic minority. Britain's the prime minister's office said kasuma would leave his job as a special adviser for civil society and communities in may as had been his plan for several months. it denied. The resignation was related to wednesday's publication of the report by the government-appointed commission on race and ethnic disparities which concluded that britain is not an institutionally racist country but simon woolley a former government equalities adviser and a member of the uk. House of lords said kasuma's was connected to grubby and divisive report. There is a crisis at number ten when it comes to acknowledging and dealing with persistent race inequality will. He said kasumi who had considered quitting in february. He wrote a resignation letter. That accused johnson's conservative. Party of pursuing a politics steeped in division. He was persuaded to remain temporarily to work. On a campaign encouraging people from ethnic minorities to get vaccinated against corona virus. The conservative government launched the inquiry into racial disparities in the wake of anti-racism protests last year a panel of experts concluded that while rights racism exists in britain. The country is not institutionally racist or rigged against ethnic minorities many anti-racism activists skeptical of the findings saying the commission ignored real barriers to equality. Apple has announced it will build a battery based renewable energy storage facility in central california near solar energy installation that already provides energy for all of its facilities in the state apple said. The project will store two hundred and forty megawatt tons of energy or enough to power more than seven thousand homes for one day it is located next to the california flats solar installation in southeast in monterey county about one hundred miles southeast of apple's cupertino california headquarters the site sends one hundred thirty megawatts of electricity directly to apple's california facilities during daylight hours but does not provide power during dark out. lisa jackson. Apple's vice president of environment policy in social initiatives said the company intends to develop what it believes will be one of the largest battery based storage systems in the united states. Jackson said that apple plans to share its findings from building the project with other companies but said it was too early to say precisely how it would do so apple has other projects where it has shared environmental technology developments including an aluminium smelting joint venture in canada and apple. Recycling technology lab in texas. You can subscribe to five minute news on youtube with your preferred podcast app. Ask your smart speaker or enable five minute news as your amazon alexa flash briefings scheme subscribe rates and review online at five minutes dot news. Five minute news is an evergreen podcast covering politics inequality health and climate delivering independent unbiased and essential world news daily.

united states kasuma katie fitzgerald apple samuel kazoo anthony davis uk britain commission on race and ethnic simon woolley california conservative government Boris johnson fitzgerald government kasumi House of lords Black cupertino california
The pandemic-resistant Dow Jones Industrial Average

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

08:38 min | 4 months ago

The pandemic-resistant Dow Jones Industrial Average

"This marketplace podcast is sponsored by merrill when questions find you merrill edge self directed investing has personalized tools and insights to help you find answers get started at merrill edge dot com slash within reach merrill lynch pierce fenner and smith inc. registered broker dealer member. Sipc in unpredictable year. There's one thing you can always count on. Marketplace is here for you and that's largely thanks to our growing community of listeners who've gone above and beyond to support our work ensuring that quality news and information is available to all regardless of their ability to pay each and every one of our marketplace investors is essential to keeping trustworthy independent journalism. Going strong. If you're already giving thank you for your generous commitment and if you're not yet an investor you can find out more at marketplace dot org slash investors. The pandemic resistant dow jones industrial average. I'm david brancaccio. good morning. Corona virus cases are surging with recorded infections. Likely to hit four and a half million for this month twice the number for october. We're expecting about another quarter million. People will have signed up in the last week for unemployment benefits after fresh layoffs. That data later today yet. The dow jones industrial average yesterday crossed thirty thousand for the first time. It's at thirty thousand and forty six to start the day. What was that about the stock market. Not being the economy marketplace's nova sophos joins us here nova the acronym. Tina comes to mind. There is no alternative to stocks. Say right. I also like the way the wall street journal put this morning. David collings a self perpetuating upward spiral referring to of course as interest rates there at close to zero parking money in the bank account or in bonds will not yield much and the fed has said interest rates will stay near zero until twenty twenty three. So what that means is. If you're an investor low-risk investments like bonds are not attractive leaves stocks. And we're seeing the rally. Another element of this is investors have remained optimistic. Unlike other downturns. We have a timeline more or less for this one. We know vaccines are coming in. Short order and wild distribution and logistics are still unknowns. There's a light at the end of the tunnel and markets are reacting to that now when companies use prophets not to invest in research or worker paychecks or plants or equipment but to buy back the company's own stock that pushes up stock prices are stock buybacks part of the rally. It is part of the mix because if you look back it took the dow more than one hundred years to cross ten thousand. That was in one thousand nine hundred nine but just three years to go from twenty thousand to thirty thousand. So what's fueling that well. At the two thousand seventeen tax overhaul corporate tax rate went from thirty five to twenty one percent flurry of stock buybacks followed that slowed dramatically during the pandemic but has been gaining ground again. And of course how much that's helping rally is up for debate. But it's part of the mix. David nova thank you. The footsie in london now is down half a percent here. The dow future down. It's below thirty thousand at the moments down about three. tenths percent. Nasdaq future up less than two. Tenths percent the new york times commissioned a massive study of one hundred and fifty thousand people. Nationwide that finds that most people in this covert year are not doing thanksgiving with anyone except the people in their households. Just twenty seven percent will do guests by political party affiliation libertarians and greens are most likely to ignore the cdc recommendation and eat with people from outside their household in the thirty seven percent range. Republicans thirty four percent democrats twenty two percent and some people are cutting back their plans because they have to after breadwinners lost their jobs. Here's marketplace's mitchell hartman phil right now. They are unloading frozen. Meats yogurts a lot of vegetables and jacobson. Valentine runs feed the mass in portland since early in the pandemic the group's been taking donations of unsold food from places like costco and amazon and preparing free meals for people in need. We started out doing about one hundred fifty every weekend and now we're up to close thousand day. Nationwide demand for food. Assistance has soared says katie fitzgerald at feeding america. An umbrella group for food banks. A two hundred eighty in american food banks that consistently reported about sixty percent more people showing up at Distributions than before the pandemic heading into winter fitzgerald predicts food insecurity will worsen meanwhile she says foodbanks a decline in supply as to federal programs that provide food from. Us farmers are set to expire. I mitchell hartman for marketplace podcast supported by transfer wise the smart new way to send and receive money internationally. Transfer wise gives you the real exchange rate. Every time you send money abroad you can even get an account that holds up to fifty four currencies at once and convert between them any time. Join over eight million customers. In more than eighty countries who are already saving. Try them out for free at transfer. Wise dot com slash marketplace or download. The app another pandemic affect people buying recreational vehicles so they can go on trips and cook bathe and sleep inside the rv. Marketplace's andy euler spoke to some rv years in austin about this growth industry thirty two year. Old pickens is the proud owner of a brand new twelve thousand dollar camper. She and her husband ryan to behind their toyota tacoma when they want to get out of austin and it's just a little pop up so instead of like you know the canvas pop-ups skit like wider. Just kind of pops up like an a frame. She says they've been talking about getting an rv for a while and then decided to make it a christmas present for each other. We got it in january and then as like come march and april became a boom where everybody was getting one. So i'm kind of actually really glad we got it before that. Our prices have been rising during the pandemic monica teresi with the rv. Industry association says sellers. I noticed something going on in the spring. Which is already usually a good time for rv sales but it became clear very quickly that this was not demand these were new people who had either maybe considered are ing but this was what pushed them over the edge or a lot of people who had never considered are being now. We're looking for a way to get out and travel. Theresa says suppliers or seeing a big increase in first time buyers who were overwhelmingly buying cheaper. Total rv's shipments are up more than thirty five percent from a year ago. The industry is actually having a hard time keeping up with demand colin. Duffy's rv's at camper clinic. Just south of austin like this montana fifth wheel motor home. Run sixty five grand so this is a house on wheels. Duffy says he can't order enough units from manufacturers that's partly because our v makers were forced to shut down for a while in the early days of the pandemic so what happened. was the factory. Shut down for forty five days for all of these different brands and the dealership sold off of what their existing lot hat. While new buyers are snapping. Up the rv's they can find a dealerships. Not all of these rv converts in for the long haul industry observers are expecting a strong used rv market to develop on the other side of the pandemic in austin texas. I made the euler for marketplace and not in an rv but in a basement in new jersey. I'm david brancaccio marketplace morning report from apm american public media. Hey everyone. I'm eddie method as host of the marketplace podcast. This is talking about money with friends can be hard for him. A lot of my other punk friends saying i came into like four hundred and fifty thousand dollars would be like saying. I came into a million jillion dollars. How one man hit a huge windfall from his friends. Like the dirty little secret until you no longer cut. You can catch this episode of this is uncomfortable wherever you get your podcasts.

merrill merrill edge self pierce fenner smith inc. david brancaccio mitchell hartman David collings twenty one percent Sipc twenty seven percent thirty seven percent thirty four percent twenty two percent phil right thousand day katie fitzgerald one hundred years wall street journal Tina andy euler
Full Episode: Friday, December 4, 2020

Perspective

37:36 min | 4 months ago

Full Episode: Friday, December 4, 2020

"It's your last chance to give a great holiday gift and dell has big savings on alienware and xps computers with intel core processors and top brand electronics like samsung plus free shipping. Just call eight hundred buy dell. That's eight hundred buy dell from. Abc news this is perspective this week stories and why they matter. I'm cheri preston. coming up. As colin cases mount once again hope on the horizon millions of doses are going to go out before the end of this year. Everyone is getting ready to deliver this vaccine as quickly as possible but is it soon enough for healthcare workers who were struggling to keep up and worry of our nurses getting each other and what happens to indigenous people when the earth warms and the land on which they've lived for generations melts though is is breaking and they all right through with their machinery or with their dogs in into into the ocean all had on perspective some big developments on the coronavirus from infections are way up but a vaccine we're told is on its way however it's not here yet we are in humanitarian crisis with this pandemic dr john brownstein epidemiologist and abc news medical contributor as cases continue to surge across the country so to hospitalizations and deaths in a twenty four hour period this week two thousand eight hundred and seventy nine people died of covid nineteen at is the most recorded on a single day throughout the pandemic and we haven't even hit the expected surge following the thanksgiving holiday resort operation warp speed. Well we need operation speed for masking operation warp speed for testing. I'm the cdc needs to engage here to get people to understand that they need to stay at home. Cancel all non-essential gatherings and get through these next few months. The toll is clearly being felt on healthcare workers and so so many of us for now. Let's simply say that wherever you are in the country. There's a good chance you may be feeling the same stress worry anxiety and fear as you did during the pandemic release days but there is a vaccine three of them actually the one created by pfizer given the green light by british regulators this week. Abc's maggie rulli was in london when the announcement was made the uk is now the first country in the world to approve. The pfizer vaccine is that they're gonna start rolling it out in just a matter of days now in this first round about four hundred thousand people are going to get the vaccine. It was gonna go to the people that need it. The most people living in care homes as well as their caregivers were told that millions of doses are going to go out before the end of this year. Hospitals are standing by vaccination centers are getting set up. This is the fastest. A vaccine has ever gone from concept to reality and scientists stressed though that despite that speed no corners have been cut. The health secretary even offered to take the vaccine live on british television. Just approve it. He then went on to say something that i think we have all been waiting to hear. He said this is the light at the end of the tunnel is confident that by next summer it could be one that everyone could enjoy so yea britain they'll get the first doses of the most studied vaccine on the planet not to make it all about us. But what about uh us. Dr monsef slough. We use the chief science officer for operation warp speed the project designed to develop these vaccines in record time. He talked about that with us this week. It's great news. I think that an independent regulatory body that outside of the us outside of the context in which these vaccines have been developed has come to a positive decision regarding the pfizer vaccine. I would expect the fda to reach similar but of course As you know the operation is totally separated from the fda as far as judgments are concerned and things will follow the course. But i hope by the tenth or the eleventh of december pfizer. vaccines approved. Dr thomas friedman is the former head of the cdc he and numerous other public health. Officials are vouching for the safety of the shots but he also knows that some are skeptical. Which is one of the many reasons transparency. He says must be key. We do expect approval to come pretty soon. But i would also expect there to be bumps in the road in the vaccination program when you vaccinate millions of people some people get really sick after the vaccination and you don't know whether that was the vaccine or that was just coincidence so that has to be studied carefully or you're going to all sorts of wild rumors flying around. That's another place where you really need. Transparency there may be production problems. They may be rumors. There may be people who don't want to take it even if you do have the vaccine. So this is probably the single most complicated vaccination program in american history this past week our own chief. Medical correspondent. Dr jennifer ashton was supposed to hold an instagram live event with the head of the fda on the rollout of the covid vaccine but the fda had technical difficulties who couldn't join so abc news. Not wanting to squander. The time had dr jen take questions from her thousands of instagram followers. And those questions. Were really good thumb just as good as the ones we would have asked here for example if you've had covid nineteen should you be vaccinated so i've asked both dr anthony fauci and dr steven question if we're when really when these vaccines get fda emergency use authorization or full fda approval down the road. They go by the patient population of the clinical trials so for example if pregnant women were not studied then pregnant. Women are an off label indication or not indicated to get this vaccine the initial phase three clinical trials people were excluded from participation if they were known to have had covid nineteen years another one. Will this vaccine have to be taken every year like the flu or will it be a one and done short answer is they. Don't know let's talk about what we do know about. Sars kobe to this is an rn a vaccine. There's an ornate virus and arnie viruses mutate for a living. However as they've been looking at genetic fingerprint of this virus since last december january when it was first identified it really appears that it is mutating very very slowly. That's a good thing for the vaccine. Also remember that corona virus causes ten to thirty percent of common colds experienced worldwide. And as we all know you can get a cold one year and then get another cold either the same year or a couple of years later do people think it is possible to need other doses of this vaccine as we do with. Let's say influenza down the road. Yes but remember right now. We just don't have that time study period yet. So it's unknown finally when someone refuses to take the vaccination then what. We haven't heard anything about this yet. I can tell you as a practicing physician that goes through an informed consent process with my patients generally for surgery but sometimes for certain types of tests or treatment there is a very important ethical principle called autonomy. My job is to educate Patient as to the pros the cons the risks benefits options and alternatives. It's the patient's job to make a decision and that principle of patient autonomy is at the backbone of our medical system. It's really a legal question and a government question as to whether or not there will be legislation about this in my professional and medical opinion as a practicing physician. I will always respect a patient's decision even if it is to decline or refuse treatment or decline or refuse certain tests as long as they have been appropriately educated as to pros and cons risks versus benefits. We're very lucky to have dr john hair. She's not only our chief medical correspondent. She's also a practicing. Obgyn and she knows firsthand how hard this has been for so many doctors and nurses a recent survey of a thousand frontline. Healthcare workers found more than ninety percent of them are experiencing stress directly related to covid nineteen. Only is that a concern right now. It a lot of questions about the future of those going into the profession. abc's jim ryan reports. Her pain is palpable. Has an el paso. Icu nurse who asked not to be identified describe seeing terminally ill covid patients facetime with their families. It's just really heartbreaking to have to watch that because you feel completely helpless. There's nothing you can say. That is going to make it better. Nonprofit mental health america has tried to objectively quantify the emotions that nurse and her colleagues are feeling. We did a survey in reach more than thousand healthcare workers. May president paul. John frito ninety three percent of them reported to us that they were experiencing stress and eighty two percent were experiencing emotional exhaustion a much greater percentage than the number who were even feeling physical exhaustion along with the exhaustion says. Uc davis medical center nurse. Melissa johnson camacho the overall tension in the hospital. It's hard and then there's the fear that you or a colleague might contract corona virus and worried about nurses getting each other sick and not having enough nurses for all these patients that are coming in stress exhaustion. fear and then frustration. Has a party rages. At a home in nashville. No masks no distancing doctors and nurses in a nearby hospital struggle to save the lives of covid patients. Keep calling frontline heroes. But we don't treat them that way. Do all john frito says frustration and anger set in when doctors and nurses see people refusing to take simple precautions against corona virus infections in a. We're not doing the one thing that we can do. That would most take care of our frontline healthcare workers and that's do what we can to stay healthy. He says the lasting impact of covid nineteen might be an exodus of healthcare workers from the profession. Some people told us in her survey that they've certainly had second thoughts about whether or not this is the right profession for them and whether or not they're going to stay in the profession. We may see healthcare. Employers healthcare institutions having to change dramatically kinds of mental health supports. Emotional health supports the give to workers back in el paso where eleven hundred people have died of covid. Nineteen a nurse puts on her scrubs and heads back to the hospital. I dread going into work. Because i just know like it might not be a good day. You know depending on the day one person my code ten people my code. It's a very stressful situation. Reporting perspective jim ryan. Abc news this week. One of the top election officials in the state of georgia gabriel sterling spoke up about the rhetoric surrounding the election and threats of violence. That resulted is all gone too. Far specifically called on president trump to rein in supporters mr president. You've not condemned these actions this language. Senators you've not condemned this language or these actions. This has to stop. We need you to step up. And if you're gonna take a position of leadership show sell the president's continued to claim voter fraud in the election. Despite continued losses in court and he's targeted georgiana twitter sterling oversaw the new voting system in the state and was visibly angry while providing an update on the state's second recount. There some balls out there. We're gonna take this as the president told me to do this. Essentially you have to be responsible enough. Elections are held in georgia when no candidate wins the required majority of votes. And that's what happened this year. So on january fifth democratic candidates raphael warnock and jon ossoff are looking to unseat republican incumbents kelly laughlin and david purdue with control of the senate is the prize. If either party wins both races this has made the state a magnet for political volunteers and for fundraising to talk. More about what they're doing and how much this means to both sides. We talked about the races with abc news. Deputy political director maryalice parks. What are you foresee happening over the next month. I think it's gonna be really closed and we're all going to be focused on this republicans. These races signify unimportant. Check on on. Joe biden administration. And if you're democrats it's hard to imagine. Joe biden being able to make significant progress on nearly anything without winning these to see your biden likes to pitch himself as a consensus builder who can work across the aisle but it is a whole lot easier to get votes. Pass through congress if you control the majority in both chambers. So what are we going to look at. Is it pouring unprecedented amounts of money into the storage arrays. These are candidates that can raise record amounts of money exceeds democrats on the ground. Actually pretty worried that there might be a flood of volunteers and supporters outside interest in the state. Democrats tend to do well in georgia when the races about local issues. I think that it does pose a potential risk for democrats if this starts to become an issue about national democratic sort of big ticket items. That sort of national attention could backfire for democrats. But i think a lot of what we're going to be looking at is how exactly joe biden was able to win in the stage and whether or not the two democrats can now replicate his success. You know in some ways that you can't. It's almost represent three been simple terms coalition that repel joe biden to take the state. You have reverend warren up who in some ways represents just a strange and how or of the black vote in georgia unbelievable organizing power in the black church and a real engagement again with young black voters on a lot of these key issues around racial equity and police violence. And then you have a john Who ran his first race. He lost when he ran for the house in georgia suburbs and was able to kind of speak to women suburbanites who are frustrated with the current trouble party and so if john warner conservative play to those strength balance each other's weaknesses they might be able to replicate the success. That joe biden had that said a month ago. Joe biden the lobby or in the state that those two democrats on their own so it really remains to be a senior. They can do what you did. What did you think of what happened with one of the when the top election official came out and really railed against what he's seen when it came to republicans and the vote counting and calling them out this week. He was really emotional. And lookie saying we're the ones that actually hobby information where they're doing the work of elections and that the rhetoric has just gotten so explosive so retin-a so scary that you mean like you said he said The religious cross the line republicans are in a really tricky spot. Right now where. The president's rhetoric could backfire for them horribly. They're a big conversation early on when we saw so many senate republicans unwilling to publicly call. Joe biden the president elect and a lot of the whispering in washington was look. They're worried about georgia. They need the president to show up and campaign for them in georgia. If they're going to win those two seats which they desperately need they need the president's help and now that's looking totally backward looking like they might of sort of placing their chips in the wrong basket. Because now you have the president and his team still a month then saying that george. The voters should maybe not trust elections and suggest that elections themselves are rid and we saw some of the president's own supporters even this idea of boycotting the georgia election switching gears a little bit going to washington pardons at the white house as president. Trump leaves thoughts on what we might see. And how many of them been kinds of pardons. I think we should be prepared to cede part is. I think that the president has enjoyed this power of his. We've seen and white sort of the absolute nature being able to grant them. What a part in. I don't think that he feels Sort of worried about any of the political blowback doing it. I think that there's real talk of. Even granting pardons to members of his own family members is unveiling have been thought to be the potential suspects of charges in case if as soon as the president leaves office whether it's how some of the trump charities were water how money was raised for his inauguration and then some of the owns an inner workings of the trump business. The family could also wear the middle of or cases. I think that that is exactly the fear that the president has its lows close to have and so he might be willing to grant a pardon. But of course it's really politically risky to grant. Pardon to write a part in apart by south isn't a mission guilt. It's an acceptance of bill. You're saying you're parting someone or something. They have done wrong. Of course if the trump's family doesn't think that they've really done anything wrong or they would think that you're a potential criminal. Charges would be unfair overblown. Then you have to kind of pretzel logic until why apart would be necessary so it adds pressure to the president. Give this right. Abc deputy political director. Maryalice parks has arizona and wisconsin certified their election results this week becoming the last two of the big battleground states to do so with another seven hundred and twelve thousand americans filing for unemployment benefits last week one of the things. President-elect joe biden will have to tackle right away when he takes office in a little over. Six weeks is the battered. Us economy is now announced. He'll be heading the team working on that. Here's abc news. Chief congressional correspondent mary. Bruce president elect joe biden. Speaking directly to suffering. Americans are message to everybody struggling right now. Is this help is on the way introducing. The team that he says will rebuild the economy former fed chair. Janet yellen his pick for treasury secretary. It's essential that we move with urgency. This scope of the economic crisis is more than fifty million. Americans could go hungry this year. Nearly seven million are at risk of fiction and more than twenty million are now on employment one of them sixty year old. Diana download of san antonio texas was laid off field. Just gassed. that stinks. I wanna stay positive and think. Oh baby you know something will come but this point imploring congress to act now the full congress you come together and pass a robust package for relief. Abc's mary bruce. In washington where senate republicans and democrats appear to be moving closer to a nine hundred eight billion dollar. Partisan pandemic relief bill coming up as the world breaks more weather. Records will talk to one person who's community depends on reversing the effects of climate change. It's a matter of life and death on perspective after this. It's time to enjoy the view. Wherever the day takes you come on. Now have no fear of you. Girls are here. The biggest names unafraid to share their views. And hold nothing back. Talk about things on this. Show that people don't talk about and now. Abc's the view is available. As a podcast. With whoopi joy. Sarah sunny meghan and diana. This is going to be good. Enjoy the view podcast. Listen for free on apple podcasts. Or your favorite podcast app. Every weekday afternoon from abc news. This is perspective this week stories and why they matter. I'm cheri preston coming up a demand for more diversity. Some of america's top companies. But i the world has obliterated whether records in twenty twenty according to the un weather agency. It was one of the most extreme years ever for hurricanes wildfires heat waves floods droughts and melt president-elect by recently named john kerry climate envoys as he looks to address an issue that voters told us during the election was on their minds at top three issue. When i'm talking voters climate change even right now despite everything going on it's climate really for people living in other parts of the world like around or close to the arctic. The weather hasn't just been an inconvenience though. It's been a matter of life and deaf is highlighted in the new documentary. The last ice produced by partners at national geographic matella colic has built awareness around the waist. Climate change affects her in it community in the northern part of the world. Something i talked with her about ahead of the film's release explain to our listeners. For those who may not know what area of the world Are we talking about. How many miles is it How big is it and how many people are there so easily. We occupy in meat. No net our homeland and it stretches across four nation states in the arctic so from russia to the us across canada and up an over to greenland. And so we are. We cover the top of the world and we are over a large area of water land An ice but we are a small population of about a hundred and seventy thousand people. How long have people live there. Since the beginning of time for thousands and thousands of years and we intend to continue to live here in our homeland. Tell me what life is like there Right now right now. I am doing my grad school in nuke greenland. Even though i'm from canada. It's just the most wonderful place to be so peaceful. We have a very good balance of tradition in terms of our culture and our language and our way of life but also Modern ways as well tell me more about the culture and the way of life there. What what what is it like well. We're hunting people. So we're completely dependent on our land and the water in our environment and so We are very much Dependent on the food sources that we harvest which we have for thousands of years and Some things that we consume include whale caribou fish seal in these are all staples in our In our food source. So it's our food security. The cost of living is really really high because all of the places that we live are mostly accessible by air. Only and so we import food Which is very expensive and so We have to supplement our our main food source which is food that we hunt with. The store bought food is really costly. It sounds like i mean it's not it doesn't sound like it is people stretched across a very very vast area how bigger the villages typically with the number of people who were there. Well it varies so we have Cities Like nuke where. I'm living right now. As a student is the capital of greenland and there are about nineteen thousand people who live here. And that's like a huge city in newton imminenet and then some of the smaller communities can be from thirty or so people So it varies in terms of size. Then the name of the national geographic documentary is the last ice and it and it chronicles. What the people there are fighting against with climate change. Describe for us what it's like now and what it was you know maybe ten years ago twenty years ago and how things are changing and how quickly they're changing. The last ice is really a great fell on feature length documentary. That helps tell that story because some as you can hear in the film allocates perry who is a hunter from the northern part of greenland indicates that the ability to access traditional knowledge and ways of being in terms of hunting has changed substantially in his lifetime alone and he is a relatively young man. Because it's that quick that climate change is affecting our environment and so he indicates that there are areas that we were able to hunt before that we can no longer access due to the breakdown of the cis. Whenever we were making the film we traveled to different areas of our homeland and we heard different ways in which climate change has affected people on a day to day basis today and so there are communities that have had to evacuate because of the melting permafrost underneath the land where the homes are built. That's melting and So they've had to evacuate and change up route their entire lives and adapt to a new life in a new place. And then another places. We're losing our hunters through the sea ice because it's just changing so quickly and it is not the same anymore so it affects you know families and it affects food security because those hunters would be the ones that would be putting the food on the table. Have you seen it change. Personally just You know with your own eyes. Yes because i've attended funerals of hunters who who have died because of the the changing sea ice are cic are highway and so in order to be able to access the animals that we harvest and their migration patterns. You have to travel quite far from where we have our communities today when the sea ice is melting and it's much more unpredictable There are circumstances. Whereby if you're traveling by skidoo Which is like a snowmobile or a dog team. Which you see in the film to last ice there are areas that are no longer strong enough to sustain our people. And so what happens is they're falling through. The ice is breaking and they fall right through with their machinery or with their dogs and into the into the ocean and so There have been cases where hunters have been able to successfully come back up In onto the ice and and become saved and they lose equipment and so on and then our community members really rallied together to fundraise so that the hunter can get those things back and continue hunting. But there are many instances where unfortunately they are unable to resurface and so we had to hadam funerals without bodies and we really are the human face of climate change in this world. Do you see changing in the future. We could be doing more. And and one of the solutions put forward in the last. Ice is the Seeing through the picasso which is the north water linnea and conserving that area. So that we could be proactive. Players in ensuring that an area is protected to prevent further degradation of the sea ice as with other incoming traffic from outsiders. And the other thing is. I think that it will only get worse when there is more traffic shipping or more resource development. It is really problematic for us because we we don't want to end up in you know in the back and crying for help. And why not be proactive. And the film. Really identifies a really solid solution. Moving forward well. The film is called the last ice. It's from national geographic pristine sees and matali colic. I wanna thank you very much. This is a really fascinating topic. And i think it's something that a lot of people should see and will want to see because it's beautiful. Thank you so much. Thank you as well. I really appreciated this conversation. Nonprofits that typically benefit from a year end. Push facing a real challenge this year. More americans are in need of assistance but traditional means of collecting donations are being interrupted. Abc news producer. Stephanie pawlowski has the story of one popular organization looking to continue. Its charity fundraising in a new way. This holiday season is a sound. That's familiar to the holiday season. The iconic salvation army bell ringer standing outside stores with a red kettle collecting donations for local campaigns. But with so much change this year because the pandemic will sell the army. Even have bell ringers. This year the salvation army is going to be ringing bells in every location that is available to us between now and christmas. Kenneth potter's the national commander of the salvation army. He says the decline in the number of retail spots a national coin shortage and less foot traffic. The salvation army's traditional fund raising is at risk in a normal year. Our christmas kettle campaign would raise about one hundred twenty six million dollars. Our current projection is that we will see a fifty percent decline in net figure. So we're trying to find ways by which we can find the missing sixty million dollars. In addition commissioner hotter says even more people are in need of assistance this year for things like rent food and utilities. We currently project that there will be one hundred and fifty five percent. More people coming to the salvation army for christmas assistance this year. So how does the organization cope with a fifty percent decline in donations. A one hundred fifty five percent increase in need and fewer places to donate going online. Of course rescue. Christmas dot org is the heart and soul of what we're trying to do this year and primarily. That's because that location which will be tailored to their own zip code will give them information. Not only on what the salvation army is doing there but will give them the opportunity to apply for assistance if they need help from the salvation army this year. It's going to be a one. Stop shop commissioner. Hotter says donors can also drop a digital donation at a red kettle site. They can text kettle to nine one nine nine nine to make a donation or they can donate via amazon alexa but the salvation army isn't alone this year. Deputy vice president of the marine toys for tots foundation. Kelly hardison says not as many retailers host the organizations classic white collection boxes this year and on top of that. There are fewer people shopping in person we're used to our local collection boxes being overflowing and right now. They're they have a very sparse fortune. Poison artisan says they typically distribute eighteen to nineteen million toys to seven million children in the us in our country we have about fifteen and a half million children living in poverty so we re barely half of the out there and this year toys for tots is already seeing an increase in demand. Hardison says they're also pushing for donations at toys for tots dot org and partnering with corporations. What we're doing right now. Is encouraging people to donate online and it gives the foundation the opportunity to augment or supplemental campaigns and cut needs wear typically local toys for tots campaigns have big parties to distribute the toys. But that also be possible this year. We're following the model of auto retailers. And so we're doing you know curbside curbside collection and fred site is curbside collection has also been the model. That food banks across america have been following for months during the pandemic families waiting hours in their cars to get boxes of fruits and vegetables in atlanta thousands lining up in their cars for food. Some waiting up to eighteen hours foodbank organizers. Say these long lines won't disappear anytime soon. And never they think that whatever happened and i think it would be this hall at feeding america. Executive vice president and chief operating officer katie fitzgerald says they estimate fifty million americans are considered food insecure. Just this year. We've seen demand on average across the two hundred feeding america. Food banks sit pretty steadily at about a sixty percent increase in need In the number of people who are showing up for charitable food assistance as compared to pre pandemic levels in food banks are entering the worst months in terms of food insecurity. That's because people make economic trade-offs they're you know they're going to have to pay for to heat there home medications. They're going to scrimp skimp on their food budget before they cut those kinds of things because that's what they need. Also to survive fitzgerald stresses those who find themselves in need of food should not feel shame. Life happens especially in twenty twenty. We know what the whole country has witnessed which is for reasons beyond our control in our lives. Bad things happen that disrupt our ability to pay bills and feed her family's health crisis loss job and it's not a reflection on your worthiness as human being. This is why we're here fitzgerald says feeding america's network of food banks have risen to the occasion so far but asks anyone in a position to donate to feeding america dot org reporting four perspective. I'm stephanie pulaski. Abc news new york every morning at nine thirty eastern time. The bell rings on the new york. Stock exchange the largest stock insecurities exchange in the world representing twenty eight hundred companies worth about thirty trillion dollars. The much smaller nasdaq lists about thirty. Three hundred companies with a combined worth around six billion but nasdaq made news this week by proposing that all of the company's listed on its exchange have at least one member of the board who identifies as a woman. At least one who identifies as an under represented minority or who identifies lgbtq. If they don't they'd have to publicly explain why not or they would be delisted eventually as of today only about twenty five percent of the companies currently trading on the nasdaq can meet that requirement. Nasdaq's ceo dina. Friedman tells the new york times. Even this isn't an optimal composition of aboard but it is a minimum level of diversity that they think every board should have not. Everybody agrees the conservative legal group. Judicial watch recently sued the state of california for requesting similar diversity and calls nasdaq's proposal. An allison wonderland approach the wall street journal. Opinion page asks how you'd even find out how someone was a member of a certain under represented group without breaking well established privacy laws by asking them but some are already moving in this direction goldman sachs is implemented a new policy requiring companies. It helps have at least one diverse board member of the hoping to up that to to by twenty twenty one and california as we mentioned instituting a diversity quota for public companies that are headquartered in the state. What happens next is that the securities and exchange commission will read over nasdaq's proposal then take public comments after that it will decide what the next steps should be and finally very nice pay day for this woman snow for selling a majority stake in her publishing catalog. stevie nicks has sold them. eighty percent interest in the copyright. Two songs that she's written to music publisher primary wave edge of seventeen landslide riano. They're all included. It coincides with fleetwood. Mac's dreams making the billboard. Hot one hundred in october more than forty years after it was originally a hit thanks to skateboard writing. Cranberry juice chugging band on tiktok from abc news. This has been perspective. Thanks for listening. If you wanna listen to any of our past shows you can subscribe to the prospective podcast. Give us a review. If you've got the time tell us what you like. And what you'd like to hear in the future. You can find it on apple podcasts. Spotify stitcher or wherever you listen to your podcast. You can also find perspective and other. Abc news shows at abc. News podcasts dot. Com perspective is produced by eric malo. Abc news i'm sherry preston.

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