11 Burst results for "Kathy Mccarthy"

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:16 min | 11 months ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"And that was Daniel Johnson's version of rocket ship. And Kathy McCarthy's cover version of that song and talk about Kathy with a little bit and and to me it's like just a classic rock and roll story. The Way Daniel comes to town makes a name for himself and swoops up one of the biggest stars of the scene Kathy McCarthy and they even given the uniqueness of Daniel Johnson's lifestyle briefly item. Yeah well you know at the time was You know the hot Austin Band. Daniel admired them joan on them and she she She dogging back. She was probably one of the first people to get those tapes and she fell in love with The artist I before she realized that what the person she was dealing with Was definitely difficult. What's so That stories well told in the film. I think the the better story is what happens with Gang does best friend in the film. And real life of course Dave thornberry The poet from West Virginia who steals art buddy and I love how ultimately Daniel Couldn't have Kathy. But then his best friend ends up marrying chaffey and they're still together in Austin right now so I think that's a beautiful love story Says a lot about Daniel and his unrequited love theme and also. Cathy goes on to record a full album of Daniel songs. The first person to do that in Nineteen Ninety Four. And you know like she says in the movie she thinks that's her best work and the and the thing she'll be remembered for it and you know in the nineties. I think That album did overshadow daniels work because he was in and out of mental institutions and had a pretty bad deal with Atlantic records that kind of buried him for a while. And and for me. I know playing Kathy McCarthy's version Was a great way to explain Daniel. That people like you play these songs and this is a really good album and then you tell them about Dan rather than seventy times trying to play him. Daniel for people that just weren't prepared for the Lo fi sound and that's another thing. I wanted to talk a little bit about is is Daniel's place in what became known as the Lo fi movement. Yeah well there's there's two conversations to be had I mean the whole the cover version thing is kind of amazing because though I personally prefer my Dana Johnston raw and real and I really enjoy listening to stress cassettes more than the covers. It's amazing how many covers have been recorded and like you know in cafes literally next Friday night Or on world you know. Young people are covering Daniel Justin right now and we're talking tens of thousands so this is a real phenomenon that's been going on not just died recently. It's been going on for a long time and when you see so. Many great artists moved by Daniel whether it was Sonic boom of spacemen. Three or Jason Spacemen. Three and spiritualized covering him and things like that that really they zoned in on You know certain tracks like true level. Find you in the end Those are just so universal great. They're they're becoming very much like woody. Guthrie songs like it's part of the great American songbook and that would really I think moves me definitely. Introduces people you know. I think Nick Cave is recently. It's been covering Daniel. The list is endless But there's not hundreds and hundreds of people around the world and cafes Friday night to my knowledge covering Nick Cave interesting okay. So you know. We're trying to tell you. I think it's great these. Are you know often? Great Artists Acknowledging another great artist and then lovely and it keeps spreading. But you know Daniels now. Finally taken his proper place in that rare Mount Rushmore of super great artists that I've always said he was He belonged in. Which of course is you know. He's right up there with dealing writer. He's right up there with Brian Wilson. He's right up there with Lou Reed you know and people was insane for saying these things back. Then you know. But that's what I felt so It took an independent voice and independent film to to to make that message and put it out there certainly really so magazine times at the time was never going to tell you that and You know it was treated very much like Fulton's folly. When we were making the film some people thought we were absolutely insane for spending one million dollars on Daniel Johnston and I'm glad that I did so. Yes we are too and yeah. It's it's interesting. The aversion to people to Daniel send people have just because of the way. The stress cassettes were originally presented its low recorded on. Cassette. It's Lo fi quality his. He's fairly erratic singer The performances vary wildly in quality. In you know especially back in the day when we would trade tapes around town because Dan would record these things sometimes and you would have the same cassette and you thought you had the same because of that and then you'd hear somebody else play it and you'd be like that's not the one that's not the that's not done in the new year and you're like holy crap. He did this whole thing over which is something that hasn't been done by recording artists. Since the day of you know Edison and and yeah and anyway it's it's just been a fast anything to me to see the different reactions to Daniel based on how it's presented and it's amazing. How much having documentary. That's obviously a great film overwhelmed those objections and so you know thank you for bringing Daniel to so many people and but the Lo fi like. He came along at a time when Lo fi was just beginning to be a thing where where there were few artists Jandak and a few other people that were recording things at home and putting him out on cassette. And you had also a string of sort of barack artists who had burned out like syd Barrett and and skip spence of moby grape and rock Ericsson and then their recordings took on kind of this naive our quality in a way people didn't know how much in control of his abilities and Daniel kind of was on the absolute cutting edge of that and then fair who collaborated with them. And who've you've also documented in in another great film that people probably haven't seen but it's on DVD. You can still get the band who would be king highly recommended. Can you talk a little bit about the relationship between Daniel and Jad fair and the Daniels able to plug himself into this nationwide network of underground artists? Sure I mean we wanted to touch on the low fighting just briefly so I don't know I think is interesting in know it became a tag. You know and people need tags. You know you know genres and things like that. I don't think the mediums ever the message so laws but whatever. If that's what got him some ink that was fine but he he was a real innovator because you know unlike springsteen who latched on early to the task him for track set in made Nebraska. You Know Day of top that Daniel went further gained took just a standard cassette recorder. But he was an incredible innovator with it because he did over dubbing. You know which you don't necessarily or you're not really able to do dubbing with two independent cassette decks so he picked up a lot of room ambience and things like that and it's obviously He had one tiny microphone to plug in. And it didn't get in the way at all of of those field recordings in in many ways he was sort of like a modern day. Self documenting like Alan Lomax. You know recording like Robert Johnson who stood in a corner and made with mono like a false stereo using the ninety degrees at the walls. I don't know if you're aware of that or not. So yes so. Daniel did his own thing and it had its own ambiance and an aesthetic And you know Ba- like you mentioned those tapes were dubbed. So you're getting you know. Second sometimes third generation Dale Johnston and he definitely was yet. I I used to say you had to squeeze your years through. Hess to hear his incredible piano playing in the incredible motion songwriter. But that was part of the fun. You know Now you know a lot of those masters have been better than they're up there up on all the streaming sites and you don't have as much of that problem and I.

Daniel Daniel Johnson daniels Daniel Johnston Kathy McCarthy Daniel Justin Lo fi Dan Austin Band Dale Johnston Nick Cave Gang West Virginia Dana Johnston Jason Spacemen Lou Reed recording artists Dave Robert Johnson
"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

06:57 min | 11 months ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Vice big brother You know I made my way to Amarillo to see that show and it was deal and Daniel definitely yeah. That was my first exposure. Daniel Johnston and the thing about Austin as an awesome night. I can say this. It's a pretty parochial town and getting that validation from MTV really mean the chronicle had already adopted Daniel but but that really put the Cherry on top as far as the city adopting him and and there was. None of the Austin scene at the time was built around bands like the true believers without one hundred veto and Zeitgeist. That later became the reverse. Glass I with Kathy McCarthy and these bans that that thought they might have a chance at MTV and then they kind of the biggest band in town to the extent that they were here but they were from here was about whole surfers. Who were sort of pariahs to the chronicle because it was clear they were never going to be accepted on. Mtv although ironically they ultimately did but but so daniels canonise is something that I've always found fascinating you know like reading discussions. I was reading an IRA robbins of trouser. Press reviews of Daniel's work prepare for the show. And you know there's a little bit of hand wringing about Oh you know is mental health and is this. Is this right to you. Know had qualms questions about this line ization of Daniel Johnson. Somebody who's obviously struggling with mental illness and to me you know that's sort of a recurring theme on the show. Talk about so many casualties who share their musical gifts with the world and then paid us. Enormous price and and Daniel did pay a higher price in a lot of people in his his mental faculties. Were more extreme than a lot of other artists. But I don't really see. Daniel is different than other artists. You know I mean he's obviously a powerful songwriter and like you say a gifted pianist and then his visual art only improved over the decades. And so now he's to me. Don Van vliet Captain Before. It's the only other rock artists. I know of WHO's had a successful art career is Daniel Johnson. Maybe John Lennon sketches. But then he's John Lennon so and so I'm just fascinated daniel sort of this multi-talented figure and yet and a lot of ways he's not functional enough to Ha- to be seen as a careerist and so I don't know I just find that team fascinating to do struggle with that at all that you feel like am I harming Daniel by bringing more attention to more. How much do you feel like you had to protect Daniel? Oh I mean not at all. I didn't think about it from moment. Daniel you know as I came to know because I was privy to. You know an insane amount of audio. Diaries and written diaries and things like that. And also you know became friends with Jeff. Tarnow Danny was the puppet master of his own career. He was very much driven like Gillen leads driven when he invaded Greenwich village in the sixties and hit the folk scene. There was a lot of talented artists. I mean we can replace you know the rivers or Zeitgeist or Kathy McCarty or any of those bands with Dave in rock or other folk artists in the village. But you know just like Gillan was better so as Daniel. You know And he was not shy about a he. He was not that artist hiding in the garage. You know painting crying songs and asking people hey you know. What do you think He knew he was great. He had the goods. He was prolific. He had this incredible body of work and then he was driven to come up with a unique way. You know outside of mainstream culture forget the MTV moment. 'cause I was just a great moment. But he really came up with his own Version of disseminating his art and getting it out into the world and it was very unique. So what did he do? We take cassettes. And he worked at McDonalds and put them you know usually a hip musician in town or cute girl and he would put that in your hamburger. French fries sack next thing. You know you gotta tape handmade tape. It's like getting a little little love letter and you pop it in and I fell my God. That's good that so that really worked. That's spread real fast. In according to people he would stand on the drag and handed out almost like a guy with a sandwich board so he did that. And then the same thing with the art you know this guy put out thousands of pieces of art and got them all the people around the world who had this art over the years and how do they get it. Well you know he would trade them Though the comic bookstore people come in and buy them and he was already a little mythical character and people picked up the real cheap. And it's got out there and spread. You didn't wait for the galleries to show up for the museum. He just put it out there. So that was Kinda brilliant and He knew how to promote you know. He would make a great handmade posters about shows and promote those kind of things and then of course you know. Wmu In hoboken. I give more credit to for really breaking Daniel on more of a national level Yeah no doubt. He conquered Austin but that body of work he did really was before he got Austin. It really was recorded in west. Virginia you know he made he made a name Austin and then. Fm YOU IN hoboken New Jersey New York broke it wide and gain. You'll didn't credible promos for that. He did a one hour radio broadcast that you know I've called it. You know the equal if not better than Orson. Welles is a war of the worlds. It's incredible and really a radio drama. Dvd I highly recommend anybody. Who hasn't what's all the bonus tracks on DVD to do it it's it's incredible radio and Wfan new blog the whole hours up and boy. What an entertaining. How radio 'CAUSE DANIELS DOING He's doing this persona that. I call Mister Showbiz you know. You really get him in overdrive promoting his own career and he's doing multiple voices and characters and overdubbed on his cassettes. And it's really something so anyway for anyone listening to this I recommend to go to the FM you blog and check it out so highly. And I want to jump in and get a play a song snippets. Who can hear some Daniel on? We're going to hear I Dan is primarily a songwriter. He's a great performer. But his songs also have this transfer ability and make great cover version. So we're GONNA do pairings where we do Danes original cover of it and this This one I one is rocket ship by Daniel Johnson. And then we'll hear Kathy McCarty version.

Daniel Daniel Johnson Daniel Johnston MTV Austin John Lennon Kathy McCarty Kathy McCarthy Amarillo Don Van vliet IRA robbins McDonalds Tarnow Danny Mister Showbiz Zeitgeist hoboken Gillen Gillan Jeff
"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Spark My Muse

Spark My Muse

15:36 min | 1 year ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Spark My Muse

"Welcome listeners. You're listening to ABC News. I'm your host Lisa. Delay today is so school lesson one thirty what to resist and what to welcome there are many things that we should resist and take a moral stance against. I want you to be encouraged to resist those things. Even though sometimes it's counter cultural it's not popular or it costs us a lot. We can refuse to to be moved from choosing the wrong thing we can resist the powerful inside with the powerless for the sake of justice and putting things to rights and we can take a posture of resistance we can do this without violence and we want to do this without violence because violence always eventually hurts us personally and the people we love it. It always bounces back and inflicts more violence. I'm going to be speaking a little bit about how to do this how to resist without inflicting violence apart ourselves. I think think there might just be one way to continue to resist stand up for what needs to be stood up for and also welcome. A nun is with a disposition and a posture that welcomes oh comes the types of feelings were feeling the time without holding them at day oftentimes we take an entire posture of resistance which includes our feelings and desires that are negative and we pushed them down with the press them or repressed them. Circumstances can be very entire very despairing and we can also wind up resisting them and the feelings that go along with it this will not sustain S. for the long journey ahead for standing up for the powerless or for justice or for what needs to be stood up for in our own lives if we suppress are natural feelings that occur whatever they may be joyful excited and despairing fearful angry those efforts will grind us to a point of despair or anguish or cynicism or apathy and that will not sustain us or the people around us for the marathon that is our lives so while I encourage resistance towards evil towards wrongdoers towards injustice <hes> I also want to encourage welcome and so what do I mean by welcome in Cynthia Borjas book centering prayer and Inner Awakening which I highly recommend she talks about welcoming prayer and this this is quite a challenge for any of us who enjoy the feeling of control or wanting to have control in our lives and over our feelings but I'm gonna read it because it is very very powerful and and if practiced in our lives can be completely transformative there will be links to this book as well as Cynthia's work at the website sparked by means dot Com for Seoul school lesson one one thirty and at the support page patriotic dot com forward slash sparked my means for soil school lesson one thirty. I really hope that you will help me support this work not just by listening in sharing the podcast with other people on the programs with other people but also by contributing dollar more because you get something out of one. I'm sharing with you. It really goes a long way to defray the costs of producing this show. It's a lot more than you think so. It really encourages me to see the people don't even just a dollar. Thank you so much for doing that. Cynthia rights our page one forty one the founding genius behind the welcoming prayer was a woman named Mary Barra Zaleski who from nineteen nineteen eighty-three when she showed up at the fateful I Lama Foundation retreat until her death in Nineteen ninety-three was one of Thomas Keating's closest associates and a prime mover in the development and popularization of his teachings for those privilege to know Mary. The practice is immediately recognizable and is a direct reflection of her vibrant salty approach to spirituality it combines deep surrender with a Gutsy Z. unflappable presence. Mary was a New Yorker through and through for her Brooklyn accent to her in your feats kind of possess a divorce Catholic back in an era when such things were virtually nearly unheard of she supported her family through her job as an administrator in a psychiatric hospital later offering her spare time as a literacy volunteer in the prisons through her work in therapy she was familiar with the biofeedback. Techniques then sprouting on her own she had already begun to develop a personal life practice combining these techniques with an underlying attitude of surrender that had been deeply imprinted on her through reading abandonment to the divine in providence a seventeenth century spiritual classic by Pierre Day ca said when she encountered centering prayer and Thomas Keating's owning teachings on the full self system the pieces began to come together for her in a single single integrated method the welcoming prayer was I taught at the Christmas House in Warwick New York contemporary of outreaches first experiment in contemporary of living which she helped found several of the community members particularly David Freenet and Kathy McCarthy contributed to the fine tuning the practice proved so successful in bringing out real inner change that it was soon being offered far more widely throughout the network. No welcoming prayer involves three main ideas three step process. If you will number one is that you focus and sink in towards happening you welcome that thing and then you let it go might sound easy but this is done the throes of something that is difficult to endure or maybe is overwhelming in some way maybe for good or bad but involves a kind of litany that will get into soon. Cynthia also reminds insists that there are these things called peacock feathers where we get self-congratulatory over something good we might have mastered <hes> for the moment anyway and we self congratulate and we get a little impressed with ourselves we take joy in some accomplishment that we might have done well and this actually is counterproductive to spiritual growth majority and in those moments to we can focus and sink in welcome those feelings even of pride and then let them go and don't let them harbor investor so they deteriorate us in some way that hinders inhibits our growth in faith so during a time of fighter flight forever able all to get a hold of ourselves during that moment an interrupt that stage somehow. We don't try to change anything. We just try to stay present with it. We don't try to analyze what we're thinking or wondering why we're thinking it instead we are just observing. She says on page one forty four spiritual practice in which separation is to mental I E in which the inner observer is used primarily to dissociate from the unpleasant feelings rather than than to experience an integrate great them will require some difficult on learning somewhere along the line before inter integration is finally achieved by keeping a firm grounding in physical sensation. The welcoming prayer ensures that this mistake does not made a lot of spiritual practices involve something mental but they don't necessarily sink deep into the felt feelings that are happening within us and that way they create a disassociation or even repression instead of spiritual growth we just play the good girl the good boy and shovel way the bad feelings and try to stay good based on what we think is appropriate for the time and we wind up having a religion of proper actions that isn't actually changing us from the inside out so in the case of Mary she actually had an experience where she was hit by a car when she was in Italy at the time she was able to use the welcoming prayer in really in a really horrible circumstance where she was able when she felt extreme pain to say welcome pain or campaign and not be fearful of it not hold it at bay not run away. Hey from it not this associated with it but acknowledged it. Pause with it. Stay with it folks with it. Welcome it and then let it go instead of resisting resisting resisting which is typically normally what we do and we you so much energy doing that we wear ourselves out when we welcome something we relent to the circumstance that is happening as it really is and as we really are on page forty six Cynthia rights there is a crucial distinction between surrender as an inner attitude and as an outer practice and we are concerned only with the former here the inner attitude. We're not saying we have to surrender to all the circumstances outside us and just be a doormat for anyone or anything that's happening. What we're talking about is an inner surrender to the feelings that were actually having instead of saying? They're not happening to us. I'm going to resist them. I'm not gonNA feel them or I'm gonNA show shoved down. Were saying no. These feelings are actually happening to me. I'm going to welcome these feelings and I'm not gonNA say they don't exist that way. We're experiencing them painful as they might be but by allowing them to exist and welcoming them and experiencing them were very fearful of doing that. We can not go into kind of repression of these things where they will pop up later as anger rage or cynicism now once you are rightly aligned then. You can decide what you're going to do in the outer world being able to stop yourself focus on what is bothering you stay with that feeling and then welcome it gives you back your freedom of choice then you can decide what you want to do in your actions in the exterior world without being able to stop pause focus on what's happening and your feelings that are happening to you you lose your free will a new become sort of mechanized and in the fighter fighter flight stage in a reaction reactive stage <hes> just kind of a slave to your own expressions and reflexes so that you will just respond in maybe an angry outbursts or maybe in shutting down. Maybe a running away fleeing the scene or shoving that feeling and burying it far far beneath the surface where you can't notice it anymore and no one else will be the wiser people think you just got over it but there'll there are still be now. The letting go is the part of the real work. It's actually accomplished in the first two steps you stay with them rather like needing a Charlie horse. Cynthia says on page one forty seven needing a Charlie horse in your leg going back and forth between focusing and welcoming until the not begins to dissolve of its own accord and yes letting go is also just for now. It's not a final forever renunciation of your anger or your fear. It is simply a way of gently waving farewell as the emotion starts to recede if you simply can't in good conscience move to the next step. Don't fake it. The bulk of the work has already been accomplished in the short way of doing this welcoming prayer. You simply say something like I let go of my anger or if you prefer I give my anger to God or I enjoy doing a little of both I let go of my anger and I give an odd now Mary Mar Zaleski however preferred more complex and in variable litany when it became time to proceed to this third step after the welcoming she would I use the following formula to help her. She would say and this can be very hard to do if you're clutching on to your desires and I realized for myself this sexually exceptionally hard for me to do. I was.

Cynthia Borjas Mary Barra Zaleski Thomas Keating ABC News Lisa Seoul administrator Pierre Day Italy I Lama Foundation retreat Brooklyn Warwick New York Christmas House David Freenet Kathy McCarthy
"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Not the only thing. Yeah. It's it's interesting because you have this white guy, I would say privilege, but I guess not necessarily. I mean, she did go off and do should on his own. But he was allowed to do that. Because he always had. His family to fall back on and like catch him when he fell and bring him back home recuperate him in than let him do whatever. He wanted him financially. Then it makes me wonder to counter argument it with Wesley Willis for he's diagnosed like mid to late twenties runs. Same time and just kinda like tossed around from place to place it gets very different experience. But yeah, these are very it's funny that they are so commonly like lumped into the same group together because they had vastly different upbringing. Right. Wesley Willis didn't have anybody really. And he sold his art to make his own money and to keep things going for him. And he relied a lot on. I think his friends who were more than willing to help him out and Daniel Johnston had the same kind of safety net right with his friends, but he had a much more privileged upbringing. He had a lot more. I would say a lot more opportunities like readily there for him. He didn't have to struggle so much with his musical career. Right. And it's it's it's debatable. I mean because west stayed near home. But if he had done what Dana Johnston did and just get up go like with any of his family, even like some of his family. I don't even think would have been capable of really noticing right guy had mentioned like whole a lot of the family had issues. Yeah. And like. Daniels family and friends always head tabs on him. Like he could go off and do some random shift that nobody was expecting. But eventually somebody found him right and brought him back and put him in a institution or something to recuperate him and get him help. And then he would be better for a while. And then put back out into society. Interesting. If you were to watch these documentaries that we used for these two episodes of you would see such a vast difference in how they were treated both socially end, psychologically. Yeah. And the help that they received I almost feel like Daniel Johnston. Probably got more sympathy and Morris systems because yes, she will probably saw him thought. Oh this poor man. Is someone's people would see was meant to some crazy homeless guy need to get away from him -solutely. And that has a lot. To do with looks because you have this skinny like mousy kind of white guy from West Virginia. Right or you have a six foot four three hundred plus pound black man from Chicago. Right. Who kind of looks like he's a little homeless. We're gonna pose as opposed to the white guy who's wearing the sweater vest. Like, we're not a political podcast. Yeah. How ever you can't ignore can't ignore those kind of differences think about it? So he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, but the diagnosis didn't do much. He's still only cared about our music in the rest of the world wasn't even registering to him. And we're at this. So where they treating it was like Seropyan medication. I don't think they were doing anything. What I think he got the diagnosis? And then he just kinda if they dig it him drugs. He wasn't taking them. Okay. 'cause that's arguments. We made he might have been dyke a prescribed drug says he didn't take or it could've heat. He probably was recommended therapy or something like that. Probably didn't do it. Probably not the fact that he only cared about our music kind of paid off because somehow he managed to get on the MTV show, the cutting edge where hosts Peter's rember introduced Daniel to the masses. What he just ended up on it this? This is also like a recurring thing with Daniel is just he just happened to things right place at the right time all the time Dan held up his little cassettes to the camera. And he said, and I quote, hi, my name is Daniel Johnston in this is the name of my tape. It's called. Hi, how are you? And I headed nervous breakdown. I recorded it all. The recognition from being on MTV was immediate all of a sudden McDonalds bumps up his hours to thirty or forty week. Because now they have a star on their hands before they were getting pissed when he would spend work hours talking to customers. But now they were encouraging it. Oh my God. But of course, that she gets a little after awhile wants magazines record companies in Lakewood being the phone off the hook looking to talk to Daniel. So they would call McDonald's to talk to would because Daniel didn't have a foam like. Didn't really have like a legit place. He would tell record companies journalists and stuff. Hey, if you wanna get a hold of me combing, Don like. Colin golden arches van. Then in nineteen eighty six after recording three more albums, Dan. What a bunch of Austin musical wards, slow Austin's, a pretty big music scene to. Yeah. And south by southwest sill at this time was a pretty big deal. So the Austin music awards were things that musicians really vied for right? And there's the Austin city limits the big thing too. So he's in a great location. Right. As far as music owes again right place at the right time. This was pretty controversial. Because there were a lot of longtime singer song writers who actually knew how to play guitar vying for these awards, but this new guy that can barely play wins. Instead, I would say I'm sure that the mental illness played a part in that it could certainly you also look at it like the fact that he could do as well as he did with the mental illness, and that the onus definitely had to inspired a lot of his music. Right. So it was a bit of art. Ristic -ly cultural thing to look at. It's not just like motherfucker was a tar. And I don't know can you play like the four chords and single pretty we you think you deserve like Pat on the booty for that. And I also think get the fuck that. I also think that janea was something that people haven't really seen before. Oh, yeah. Because he he was definitely a pioneer of the new sincerity movement, which was not so focused on music, composition wise, but more more concentrating on housing, you were in your delivery and your Leyritz. And if you kind of tugged at somebody's heartstrings, they're gonna fucking love you, and he did that he was not a good singer. He was very good guitar player. But he wrote catchy little like shiftily. Composed. Pop songs that people really responded to in the lyrics are there. Yeah. The lyrics are there. So people are going to respond to that. Right. The mid eighties dance popularity ramping up. So a lot of new people started planting themselves in his life for better or worse. He focused his affections on someone new glass is did he finally get over Laurie? Not really he never did all even to this day is not over her the one. Yeah. For real he focused affections on someone new glass is leading lady Kathy McCarthy. Oh, they had become good friends in the years since meeting and Kathy always thought there was something incredibly innocent in Djelic about Daniel fair. Yeah. She knew he had a crush on her. So she allowed him to think that they were dating even though in her mind, they weren't stop which is up to that bad. Hi, my name. Hello. My name's name. I'm here with the PSA right now if. Amend is interested in you. But you are not interested in him. Ladies, please don't lead him along cute and innocent. He may seem it's still not. Okay. And that was my PSA for the evening. Please continue on your regular schedule podcast. Even though there was no intimacy in the relationship at four don't say 'cause really dating. No, they weren't at all after two weeks his parents came to visit and he introduced Kathy as his fiancee. Oh, no. I know too far too fast too furious. Yup. Almost things that was too much for Kathy. And she broke things off even though they were never on. But it was mostly Daniel refused to believe it. And he was kinda pulling a C c from Wayne's world. I lost you two months ago. Conract? I don't even own God. Let alone many guns to shape. Iraq. You're not careful you're gonna lose me. Once you two months ago. Randy Kemper also came with being a psycho host bees he was kind of being Saigo hose. All right. Randy Kemper also came on board as Dan's manager. He introduced into a lot of drugs, which was not that idea. Don't do that. They knew the news bipolar at least had to of known. They knew some of his point was diagnosed with schizophrenia. No. I don't think he was diagnosed with that until much later. Okay. But I don't really know exactly when but they knew that he had bipolar disorder people with bipolar should never touch a drug ever. You know, they should alcohol alcohol. They shouldn't touch those things because. No. Yeah. It's not a good idea. Wow. Okay. Dan, started smoking a lot of weed and recruit fuse to play on stage. Then at a butthole surfers show. He was really good friends with the butthole surfers. Oh my God. But who isn't? I mean, really we all are in our way. Someone gave him a hit of acid at this show. No trip was the bad one. Yeah. He had a nervous fuck break. Holy fucking Yolly. Don't do this that this was clearly the breaking point for him because his mental state took a fucking nosedive. Yeah. You don't say. And unfortunately, he continued to drop acid a lot like if you have a bad trip. Why would you keep dropping us? See if maybe you have a good trip. I mean, maybe he didn't think it was bad. It was as bad as was. No, it was or maybe somebody was just like, oh, just a bad trip here. Dude. Again, it'll be fine. Stop it. So that was the one thousand nine hundred six and his friends were increasingly worried about his behavior, maybe giving them acid, maybe giving him acid. I mean, this Randy Kemper guiding. So great, right. What are you doing Randi? Andy. Not only was he acting like a totally different person. But he assaulted Randy Kemper. I mean like, you know, what though branding to him. So it was pretty violent though. He he hit him over the head with a lead pipe and sent him to the hospital with severe concussion. I thought it was like he punched him. No. He's looking a okay recinding that redacting that comment Sunday redaction tact. Oh my God. Then in December nineteen eighty six h early scary incident with Dan's family, happened that change their view of their little brother forever. Dan, win two siblings. Home in Texas to celebrate Christmas. You rive in a manic state and continue that way for hours. Arguing with his siblings, accusing them of teaching their children satanic practices in speaking in different voices. And at this point, his his lake manic episodes manifested in a lot of like religious shit. Like, he he's he's started doing the deep dive into religion and getting really into God. And then when he would get on his manic episodes, he would start accusing everybody of being in in league with the devil and practicing state in his own and the devils coming and all this demons. I mean, we've talked about a little bit with Wesley Willis and in general with people who are. Yeah. People who deal with mental illness in that level of severity. Whether you know, it's like manage oppressive or schizophrenia, it does usually lean towards religious and his whole background is. Extremely religious his own. Parents were obsessed with religion who grew up going to church every single week, and, you know, his mom telling him, he was, you know, Ryan satanic exactly's cartoons were say Tanic, even though they weren't they were just fucking doodles weird. Fucking weird kid. Wiz in a weird good. But yeah. Now, like all of his tangents would would be about saying in and you know, accusing everybody of everybody around him of being demons credential like that. But anyway, he was at Christmas with his siblings and at one point they all make Christmas ornaments. But Dan decided to hang a large number nine cut out. Just a cut out of the number nine. Okay. And also Beatles albums on the tree in real ornament on number nine is the worst

Daniel Johnston Dan Wesley Willis Randy Kemper Kathy McCarthy Austin MTV Dana Johnston West Virginia Iraq Colin golden arches van devils Texas McDonalds Morris systems Chicago Don janea Leyritz
"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on KNSS

"Better. Hi, I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans. Thirty percent of Americans who are planning home improvements of five thousand dollars or more pay for those renovations with a high interest credit card that may not be a great idea. A better idea maybe to take cash out of your home with a Quicken Loans. Thirty year fixed rate mortgage the rate today on our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is four and a half percent APR four. Point seven eight percent. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com. To change fifty percents receives discount rate. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states unless number thirty thirty. This is HouseCall for health actor, Luke Perry died after a massive stroke. He was fifty to Albany New York resident Brian Smith suffered a stroke at fifty four the next thing. I knew I was leaving. Leave out on the ground. Doctors say a stroke can happen at any age Kathy McCarthy with the American Stroke Association, says it's important to note, the warning signs, face drooping, arm, weakness, slurred speech time to call nine one. One. Doctor say a stroke often begins with numbness, dizzy, your coordination could be off or at your vision. Doesn't seem right neurologist delude Amaury says there are things you can do to reduce your risk of a stroke living dieting exercise. Watching the weight, Luke Perry stroke proved fatal Brian Smith recovered. But he still has trouble forming words. Hi. For more health news, go to foxnewshealth dot com. Housecall for health. I'm joy, Piazza, Fox News. Southbound.

Quicken Loans Luke Perry American Stroke Association Brian Smith Jay Farner CEO Kathy McCarthy Piazza Amaury Fox News slurred speech Albany New York five thousand dollars seven eight percent Thirty percent Thirty year thirty year
"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on KNSS

"I just don't enjoy it anymore. I don't think anyone including myself thought that I could switch. Caroline made the switch October twenty sixteen make the switch at jewel dot com. That's J U L dot com. Warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical. Macy's forty eight hours sale is full of limited time specials and get this. They're priced so low you don't need a coupon. Take fifty five to seventy percent off select fine jewelry owning prom starts with special occasion dresses when he five percent off save forty percents on handbags, scarves, and more. You'll take sixty percent off memory foam pillows and topper and choose for her are thirty to fifty percent off Friday and Saturday. It makes the savings on regular and sale prices. Exclusions apply. Macy's star rewards offers benefits. Everyone get enjoy no matter. How they visit. Macy's dot com. Five star award. This is HouseCall for health actor, Luke Perry died after a massive stroke. He was fifty to Albany New York resident Brian Smith suffered a stroke at fifty four the next thing. I knew I was laid out on the ground. Doctors say a stroke can happen at any age Kathy McCarthy with the American Stroke Association, says it's important to know the warning signs, face drooping, arm, weakness, slurred speech time to call nine one. One. Doctor say stroke often begins with numbness, you may be dizzy your coordination could be off or at your vision. Doesn't seem right neurologist. Dilemma Amaury says there are things you can do to reduce your risk of a stroke living dieting exercise. Watching the weight Perry stroke proved fatal Brian Smith recovered. But he still has trouble forming words, I..

Macy Luke Perry American Stroke Association Brian Smith Caroline nicotine Amaury Kathy McCarthy slurred speech Albany New York forty eight hours seventy percent fifty percent sixty percent five percent
"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on KNSS

"Back on every purchase unlimited unlimited. Anyway, you say earning unlimited one point five percent cashback on every purchase just sound capital. One butts in your what's in your wallet? Plus in your wallet capital? One Bank USA, this is HouseCall for health actor, Luke Perry died after a massive stroke. He was fifty to Albany New York resident Brian Smith suffered a stroke at fifty four the next thing. I knew I was laid out on the ground. Doctors say a stroke can happen at any age Kathy McCarthy with the American Stroke Association, says it's important to know the warning signs, face drooping, arm, weakness, slurred speech time to call nine one. One. Doctor say a stroke often begins with numbness, you may be dizzy your coordination could be off or at your vision. Doesn't seem right neurologist. Delury memorial says there are things you can do to reduce your risk of a stroke living dieting, exercise watching the weight. Luke, Perry stroke proved fatal Brian Smith recovered. But he still has trouble forming words. For more health news, go to foxnewshealth dot com. Housecall for health. I'm joy, Piazza, Fox News. This is. Eighteen thirty K s Wichita Janus. FM Clearwater wichitas. Never one talk radio dot com station. Military matters.

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"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on WDRC

"Calling for help puts you in danger, you can still reach nine one one in Connecticut, if you need help, and it's not safe to speak or if you can't speak. You can know send a text message to nine one one in an emergency. Call nine one one if you can text if you can't sponsored by the Connecticut department of emergency services and public protection, the Connecticut Broadcasters Association and this station. Here's your on this date update for March seventh Alexander Graham, Bell received a patent for the telephone today in eighteen seventy six, but he had to fight one of the longest patent battles in history to keep it on this date in one thousand nine hundred seventeen. Regional Dixieland jazz band released. This record a livery stable blues was the first jazz record ever to go on sale. And today in nineteen fifty five. Fans cast live on NBC for the first time it became an annual tradition. Born on this date. Football's Franco, Harris, tennis star, Yvonne, Lendl and. Composer MAURICE rebel. I Mitch Davis. And that's your on this date update. This is HouseCall for health actor, Luke Perry died after a massive stroke. He was fifty to Albany New York resident Brian Smith suffered a stroke at fifty four the next thing. I knew I was laid out on the ground. Doctors say a stroke can happen at any age Kathy McCarthy with the American Stroke Association, says it's important to know the warning signs, face drooping, arm, weakness, slurred speech time to call nine one one. Doctors say stroke often begins with numbness, you may be dizzy your coordination could be off or at your vision. Doesn't seem right dilemma Maury says there are things you can do to reduce your risk of a stroke living dieting exercise. Watching the rate. Luke, Perry stroke fatal Brian Smith recovered by. He still has trouble forming words. Hi. For more health news, go to foxnewshealth dot com. Housecall for health. I'm joined Fox News. You're listening to the LARs Larson show. Glad to have you with me and I'll get back here calls in a short while at eight six.

Luke Perry Brian Smith American Stroke Association Connecticut department of emer MAURICE rebel Connecticut Broadcasters Assoc Connecticut LARs Larson Mitch Davis Fox News Bell Kathy McCarthy Alexander Graham NBC Maury slurred speech Albany Football Lendl Yvonne
"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Civics 101

Civics 101

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Civics 101

"Civics. One one is supported in part by the corporation for public broadcasting. From ABC. This is world news tonight with Peter Jennings good evening. We begin tonight with the most straight forward reaction. We've heard all day for the results of yesterday's midterm election, the democratic chairman, David Wilhelm said, simply, we got our butts kicked law. Democrats are now in charge in the house. They needed fifteen seats to retake the majority. We don't need a belt turtles telling us out of five caracal Bah. I'm rural, not proc Obama disagreement on then at the Democratic Party posted such a tight. This election was to summer stand up very big referendum on President Bush. I would like to be a mandate would look. I'm not. I'm nothing you've heard. Welcome to civics to one. I'm Nick Kathy McCarthy and the more observant of you out there may have noticed. We are taking a pause on producing new episodes. It is not Slough. It's industry. That's right. We are developing our next season of civics. A one which will commence with a five part series on the mid-term elections, it's going to feature the voices of politicians professors pages and civic teachers from across the country. We're focusing on things like campaigning and voting, but also the powers of senators representatives and all of the people you may see on your midterm ballot this year, each episode will also feature a famous midterm from American history, so don't miss it. The series will be on Tober second. Well, before you cast your midterm vote. And as for today, here is an episode that we did on the flag and the pledge of allegiance. Enjoy. He came down into the street Laden flag. We're proud of our, we've respect our. Regulated here. We're simply trying to preserve the flag as I send all four. For example, flag Aquinas, their plug everything. Oh, it's that time again time for another civics wanna one. I r. l. where we dive into the historic moments related to our regular episode topics. I'm Nick Kappa Jay, and with me as always Hannah McCarthy, hey, there folks, this is a supplement to our episode seventy nine, which is about the US flag code, and there was so much to talk about that. We had to cut the flag in half for my half do history of the flag history of the pledge of allegiance. Yes, and I'm gonna do supreme court cases that involve the flag and the pledge. Do you wanna start with history? Yes. Please. Let's do it. Through the ages manage to distinguish his castle, his clan lorries country by means of a credit. Generally, a flag claim to the world is ideal, a symbol of patriotism. So. No wear the American flag comes from who designed the American flag. I was always taught, Betsy Ross sewed and design the first American flag that is the prevailing history. But as it turns out, there is no written documentation that this is the case. The story actually comes from Betsy Ross's grandson. He goes to the historical society of Philadelphia, and he says, my grandmother designed the American flag what, and all that he has is testimony from Ross family members, you know? So the thing is the Betsy Ross was a flag maker in Philadelphia through the late seventeen seventies. So she was probably sewing American flags, but this idea that she came up with the design, the thirteen stars a circle. There's no real evidence. Aside from the Ross's insisting that this was the case they had no evidence. Evidence to back it up, no written documentation. You know is true this she didn't design the flag. I'm not going to say for sure because it's possible. Right? But all that you've got our affidavits from her family members. So if Betsy Ross didn't design the American flag a good question. Some historians not all believe that it was a man named Francis Hopkinson and there's good reason to believe him, but that idea that he designed the American flag is based entirely on the fact that he claimed to have designed the American flag. So once again, you're running up against this, there's no written proof that this person designed it. The reason it's more likely to have been Francis Hopkinson is that he definitely helped to create the design of the seal for the university of Pennsylvania, the seal of the state of New Jersey and the great seal of the United States. He's a seal man. He designed the US seal and that's enough of kind of like, well, this guy's got some background in designed to this too. Patriotic design. He was a known patriot so seems a little more likely and real quick John win. This was is around like oh yeah, of course. This was in the late seventeen seventy. So seventeen seventy six hundred seventy seven. We've got this flag that the continental congress is flying and dissension from the kings. The Union. Jack also indicated they feeling of loyalty to the mother country. Now, this lag very closely resembles our flag except for the fact that the canton, which is that inner upper left hand corner square that's called the canton's called the canton squares. That's right. Learn something new. We already had the thirteen stripes, and that was actually a very popular design that would be displayed on coats of arms across Europe so that there was precedent for that. The canton that we had was actually just the British Union, Jack. So we had that plus our thirteen stripes representing our thirteen colonies. So the mini stripes was a trope exactly. Yes. The number thirteen was because of our thirteen call it was because of our thirteen colonies were not strictly flying that British flag. We were flying thirteen British colonies flag and we were working toward independence from the British. Now, although we cannot say definitively who designed our. Our new flag that new flag on June fourteenth seventeen seventy seven was the result of the continental congress passing an act that established this official flag of the new nation. So the phrasing of that resolution it is resolved. But the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white, and the union thirteen stars white in a Bluefield representing a new constellation. Very nice. So initially we had this flag which had our thirteen five pointed stars in a circle in the blue canton judge. And then as states joined the union, we would add both stars and stripes. The. So on January sixteen seventeen ninety four. Congress enacted a law, giving us the flag with fifteen stars and fifteen. What did we stop? So we actually stopped just after Vermont and Kentucky were introduced. We only got two fifteen. The realized, then they realized that it was going to be visual chaos on the American flag. If you know, they knew that the nation was going to continue to grow, they might not have known it was going to get to fifty, but just imagine that fifty stars next to fifty tunnel stripes. So in eighteen eighteen in their great wisdom. Congress passes a loss to piloting that the original thirteen stripes be restored and only new stars be added. Oh, cool. So are there like a couple of fifteen stripe flags? You can actually order one, they still make them. So somebody can say, no, this is the flag that we had for this period of time in history. It's really cool. Yeah. So the flag we know today because the flag has changed so many times it's actually the twenty seventh iterating of the US star. Every time we added to state there like wait for a couple, correct? Yeah, because we were adding at such a rapid rate. So you have only these twenty-seven different versions of the flag a roof. Dr. Every state star. Cool. That's the flag that's the flag. Now the pledge is tied to the flag, right? So the pledge is tied to the flag, but it's also really closely tied to patriotism union, and I would say the Americanization of people in this country while come ask you, did you say the pledge when you're in school? I said the pledge every single morning. I believe through middle school stuff from middle school to school. So what's up with the pledge? Yeah, I'm actually going to start us before the pledge of allegiance because we had a flag salute before we ever had a pledge of allegiance. So the original flag salute is by Rear Admiral George Baulch he'd been at West Point. He served in the civil war and then later on in his career, he finds himself working for the New York City board of education. And he starts noticing that there are suddenly a ton of immigrant children. Classrooms across the city, and they don't necessarily sound like native born. Americans might not might not think like native born Americans because he's in countering these foreign born students. He wants to teach American principles and help them to develop this ritual that could foster an American identity. So what he does, he develops this pledge salute combo where children would salute the flag and speak the following. I give my heart and my hand to my country one country. One language, one flag one language to language. So this was a straight up. This is a guy who wanted America to look and sound a certain way. Yes. What years are we talking about here? So this is in eighteen eighty seven. Okay. Yeah, so it actually the height. This is like just near the height of both German and Russian Jewish immigration. The Italians are just starting to come in exact. So this is when the face. The sound of America's changing again, a big way and big way. He's like, we put a stop to that. We have to change. That sounds like there was perhaps a fear of the influence of immigrants if not the immigrants themselves, let them in, but make sure they become us think was kind of the idea. So not that long after this fact, we are gonna come up on the pledge and this is in eighteen ninety two, which I believe was the same year that Ellis Island was officially opened for business and you've got millions of people coming in through Ellis Island. It's a very visible immigration from elsewhere into the United States. Not only that, but the country is only thirty years into post civil war recovery. So this idea of national union is still kind of fragile because we almost broke up, you know. So there are some who think that patriotism is kind of sinking in the country too many people who are foreign. Born are moving in changing the ways that we think and we speak. And we also aren't totally certain that we can keep this country together if only because we came so close to losing it. So there's this man named Daniel sharp Ford. He's the owner of a magazine called youth's companion, and he was particularly concerned with what he saw as this, you know, sinking morale in this country sinking patriotism, and he wants to boost it. So one of his employees is one of the people who writes for him is named Francis Bellamy. He's a minister author for youth's companion, and so he asks Bellamy to compose a pledge of allegiance to the flag in hopes that it's going to boost patriotism, and here's the original language of the pledge allegiance. I pledge allegiance to my flag anther public for which it says.

United States Betsy Ross congress Francis Hopkinson Union ABC Peter Jennings Jack America President Bush Obama Francis Bellamy Nick Kathy McCarthy Democratic Party Ellis Island David Wilhelm Civics. chairman British Union
"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Fourth of july inbound brewing company also has something starting at noon those their activities are going all day and into the night so plenty for the adult crowd there and then you know check out a bar or a restaurant that has a rooftop to take advantage of what we hope will be the nice weather but then you want to figure out where you're going to go to see the fireworks dave i don't know if you knew but minneapolis was ranked one of the top ten cities in america for fireworks i did not know that but i believe it most recently yeah so red white and boom is something put on by the minneapolis parks and recreation board and so starting at six o'clock in the evening they have live music vendors that gets you ready for the fireworks that'll be it father hennepin bluffs park and then the fireworks are scheduled to take place at ten o'clock and we do have some suggestions both on our website i'll give you a couple of now but check out our website for some good places to see those fireworks stone arch bridge would be one really great place gold medal park would be another one maybe if you are near hennepin avenue bridge you can be on the bridge to take a look at that or maybe move a little further out the day marcus ga other previously known as lake calhoun for people who may be coming in from slightly out of town have a picnic and sit out there and then watch watch the fireworks go off over the skyline so plenty of activities for adults and families to enjoy fourth of july this year i want to sit where you're going to sit what kind of you will you have for that kathy you know what i think i'd really like to take in the stone arch bridge so the view from there so i would suggest people go a little early make sure you know how you're going to get downtown and then you know just enjoy relax enjoy get your spot early and then and hope for the best when it comes to the weather hey i wondered you know on i don't know if you have to try to guesstimate how many people you're going to have their to accommodate everybody but you think was saint paul not doing any fireworks that'll be more people this year well we would certainly encourage everyone to come and enjoy our fireworks if they're not having fireworks in their own city typically red white and boom attracts more than seventy five thousand people so i would think that those numbers would pick up a bit based on based on what we know about some other cities maybe not having fireworks this year but you did hit on one key if you're not used to coming downtown like you and i are you might wanna just kinda get your just figure out where the detours aren't all that sort of thing absolutely checkout maybe checkout public transportation and metro transit take a look at the men dot website no you know where there is some construction going on and then make sure if you if you're gonna come downtown and you're going to drive make sure you know where you're gonna park but you know public transportation may be a really good option in good ticket especially if that many people will be coming downtown to enjoy the festivities i appreciate your time have a great fourth of july there are no days offer you kathy apparently there are not but have a have a happy and say fourth of july yourself thank you very much used kathy mccarthy from meet minneapolis and this is w c on this fourth of july.

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"kathy mccarthy" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Sprint wide savings till six thousand nine hundred sixty dollars per month for line one forty dollars per month for line two and thirty dollars a month for five with autopay speed maximums use rules and restrictions apply excludes taxes fees roaming coverage and offer not available everywhere for this kind of phone subject to credit through telling the stories from all four corners of our great state from the carrier cooling studio this is news radio eight three oh w c c o kathy mccarthy director of public relations communications for meat minneapolis kathy good morning good morning how are you today happy fourth of july to you same to you what's happening here in minneapolis oh well do you want to start with the big boom at the end or do you wanna start more during the day i let let's start with the day 'cause i the night will be spectacular yeah you know what there is plenty going on in one thing that i would encourage people to do is be a tourist in your own hometown whether it's things that you've thought about doing and haven't really tackled you know what you have free day in the middle of the week so you know what check out the mill city museum or the sculpture garden rent a nice ride bike and go around the lakes but if you're looking for some specific stuff we have some great information on our website minneapolis dot org which is the meat minneapolis website you could go out to fort smelling starting about ten o'clock in the morning they have a parade and they have activities going all day long until five o'clock anything from a mock battle to a fife and drum performance if you're into a small little parade you could go to one of the neighbourhoods tangled.

minneapolis mill city museum kathy mccarthy director of public relations six thousand nine hundred sixt one forty dollars thirty dollars mill