4 Burst results for "Kathy Gillis"

"kathy gillis" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

Let's Start A Cult

06:01 min | 3 d ago

"kathy gillis" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

"Manson and the family a few months later on july twenty fourth nineteen seventy. Their trial began. There was no doubt that charles had orchestrated the murders however that didn't stop several members of his family from continuing to support him. In fact. kathy. Gillis kitty lead singer sandy. Good and brendan mccain. All kept a vigil throughout the entire trial kneeling on the hot sidewalk outside the los angeles hall of justice with their shaved heads bowed in solidarity some carve xs into their forehead like they were still doing literally whatever he told them or did they just do it so they saw him do it and then they did the same thing and then they turn because it's his started as an act before it became a swastika so they were describing him. That's not great that is usually you. What kind of power and manipulation. He had over them that even after he's arrested not even telling them anything they're still just following blindly and they shaved their heads and carter xs on their him. So what was the whole deal was shaving. Their heads like why. Why did they do that. Maybe it's just way too hot off gets you man i honestly i'm not sure why they shaved their heads. I don't think they even knew. Yeah it could've just been at that point. You're probably going crazy from the heat. The defense put up a good fight but the evidence was just too overwhelming and impossible to refute. They also had to deal with the sentiment of horrified american public. Who couldn't stomach the idea how much a bunch of wealthy people living in a huge gated mansion was brutally killed by a group whom they perceived to be mere drugged up hippies which is fair No all the parents that are like telling their kids hall. You can't do drugs. You don't wanna be a hippy. You're gonna turn out to this and they're like man we're just about peace and love and then this happens and the parents like odd told you. Yeah i going to be honest. I think this this had a huge influence on on america when it comes to like drug legalization i think then nixon got elected so yeah like it. Both of these rightback are back to back. Why were the state that we're in today. You guys taxing drugs for years and you'd be it'd be great right. I never murdered anyone high on that you remember i remember. That's true. Are there pawprint sir or any any bloodstains your house. She tried to say that our kids drawn on. The walls didn't look like crown. All of those involved in the tate labianca massacre were ultimately found guilty on june twenty-fifth nineteen seventy-one charles. Manson was convicted of first degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder which landed him. The death penalty capital punishment however was by the california supreme court the following year which was why his sentence was commuted to life imprisonment. Which if there's anyone who probably deserved the death penalty might have been him. My you might have deserved it. During his incarceration charles reportedly received more mail than any other prisoner in the united states. Most of these containing questions regarding his motivations given that he apparently had no personal connection with any of the victims and the tate labianca murder they also asked how he managed to turn a group of liberal peace loving and free thinking use into mass murders cruel enough to kill a pregnant woman which are fair questions drugs drugs. Yeah well that's a lot of people do assume there's more to that. But that's a lot of conspiracy With the fbi and right mind control and probably bullshit but you never know alyce alone is not going to make you murder walnut all but it makes them very very susceptible to bullshit preaching from somebody that they think is the son of god. Yeah i guess my only push back to that would be that. I've i've covered quite a few call to this point and someone can control young people without drugs. There's a lot of those as well. I think the drugs definitely maybe worked quicker into him controlling them and maybe took it to a further extent than most other calls that i've covered but for younger people. They are just mostly looking for some sort of answer to life's questions. They're not getting it from from life. I and so they go. Searching and a lot of them find like charismatic leaders and start to follow them. And so i i would say i would argue. It probably wasn't just. The drugs probably played a part but like these young girls like he knew exactly who he was. Preying on most of them had like huge abandonment. Issues were incredibly young. They didn't have the best relationship with their families and things patty said in one of her interviews was that you know she joined the group and then she immediately slept with manson and he was the first person to ever even tell her that she was beautiful and she says from that moment on like he literally could do no wrong in her eyes. Yeah that and that's what it is. It's it's young people who don't necessarily know any better and eastbound along. Yeah yeah and belong in a group that that will be welcome you. And it's not like he just not like as susie creatively ruby was like are we hate. Black people like boiling a frog in water. You slowly raise the temperature and before long the frogs dead. That's a morbid description by that's basically what it is they eases them into it. And then gets all these young and vulnerable people into group and then slowly raises the temperature of of the circumstances. And what the groups about so. I know a lot of them. A lot of the followers in interviews said that he just had this uncanny ability to make you feel like the most special person on earth. Just that alone. If you're you know and then you seek out vulnerable people that are coming from broken families or you know broke situation. Just that in in.

kathy Manson today nixon tate labianca massacre sandy brendan mccain july twenty fourth nineteen se Gillis susie los angeles united states earth Both ruby first person first degree charles california supreme court june twenty-fifth nineteen sev
"kathy gillis" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

08:14 min | 8 months ago

"kathy gillis" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"In Los Angeles I'm Kai Rozelle is Wednesday dated twenty eighth of October good as always to have you along everybody. Yet things up it's pretty simple. Virus cases are way way higher in way more places. There is no relief package coming probably February at the earliest if at all, if everybody is honest with themselves. And that's it that all spills over into the real economy which the stock market is not thank you very much but it does reflect and so you get a cratering day on Wall Street today all three major indices off three three and a half percent all sectors got clobbered including the reason commercial aviation. We mentioned that because Boeing reported a quarterly loss of four hundred and sixty, six, million dollars this morning planes just aren't selling right now company also said it's GonNa lay off and other seven thousand people. So marketplaces and Euler gets his going with a story about a company that is a big factor in that real economy I was talking about. Boeing said today expects to end next year with around one hundred, thirty, thousand employees. It started twenty twenty with a workforce of one, hundred, sixty, thousand. Richard Otto Lafi as an aviation analyst at -Til Group historically, Boeing's been the world single biggest planemaker and the biggest single exporting manufacturer in the US. So it really isn't needle mover in terms of the broader economy and Sorta like Ge. Boeing has worked to diversify Boeing has a lot of commercial military defense software and engineering programs. It's not just building the. Big Seven, forty, seven jets of old. That's Arthur Wheaton at Cornell University. It's a pretty big corporation and has a huge impact on supply chains. He says there's a vast array of subcontractors in the US and worldwide that produce four and with Boeing. So in demand for Boeing products declines, it's felt by many of Boeing seventeen, thousand suppliers like those who make. Jet Engines and parts for wings keeping my you know these are not just people that are turning wrench. Michael Boyd is an aviation industry consultant in Evergreen Colorado. So it's not like just getting rid of couple of mechanics you're getting rid of some highly trained people that you're going to have to get back eventually when people eventually returned to flying but Richard. APPALACHIA te'o groups as his fear is that manufacturing will soon start feeling the pain of the pandemic like retail and hospitality already have and I think unfortunately, we're bound to see additional production cuts in job losses in the commercial aerospace industry along with other similar losses and other parts of the economy because as the biggest companies go so goes the American economy. I mean dealer for marketplace speaking of the American Economy Tomorrow Morning Eight, Thirty Eastern. We will get from the good people at the Bureau of Economic Analysis the number four third quarter, gross domestic product the government's estimate for how much the economy grew in July August and September we know it is going to be big a record breaking number by a lot because for. Part of q three billions of dollars were flowing into the economy through relief checks and extra unemployment benefits and the paycheck protection program, and all the rest of the cares act. There was a big rebound in jobs numbers though that rebound has slowed, there was a rebound in retail spending data even though tens of millions of people were then and still are collecting unemployment assistance. But there is something we want you to keep in mind that it's important for when you hear that GDP number tomorrow it's that whole annualized thing that was me back in June reminding you that quarterly GDP gets reported on an annualized basis. Let me say it again annualized a refresher perhaps annualising means something that happens over a short period of time and extrapolating it out over entire year you make thousand dollars a week for instance, that weekly wage annualized is fifty, two, thousand dollars. So we have been obviously over that whole annualized thing before, but we are going to give it another quick pass today because it matters. So here we go say the economy grows one percent over one core. To annualize that as the government does you assume the economy is going to grow one percent the next quarter? And then one percent the quarter after that. and. Then one percent again, the quarter after that. That is one percent growth annualized at four percent. All. Right. Actually, it's a hair more than four percent because of the magic of compounding. But will spare you the math. Here is the thing you need understand though that terrible terrible terrible second quarter the Atlanta Fed is predicting that in the third quarter, the economy grew thirty seven percent annualized, which is yes and eye-popping number but it doesn't mean the economy grew thirty seven percent just in the third quarter thirty, seven percent annualized is about eight point, two percent quarterly. So. There was thirty or thirty seven or whatever percent growth in third quarter as you surely will tomorrow. And is not nothing, but it's not the whole thing either and as we started with with virus cases climbing in the easy part of the recovery behind us and no relief bill in sight. Even. If the third quarter is the fastest growing record, which you will hear tomorrow, it should not be. Exactly, music to your ears if you'll pardon fund speaking of music. It's going to be the wall was when we get there. First, before we dig into this next story, it is worth noting for the record I guess 'cause it's not like any of us could forget, but we are less than a week out from the end of voting in this election, which means that everything that happens on Capitol Hill includes political calculations of the highest order, and so we turn to the CEO's of facebook. and Google and twitter spending a couple of hours this morning enjoying a bipartisan, the virtual grilling by members of the Senate. Commerce Committee over what they are allowing those companies or not allowing on their platforms. The Republican beef is that the social media giant's censor conservative content questionable reports about Joe Biden Son was recently Democrats are concerned about misinformation as well. especially. Corona virus. That removes. Margaret Place's Scott Tong reports that the root of this whole thing is the law that underpins a lot of what happens online is known as section two thirty. And both parties want to change it section to thirty of the communications, Decency Act Social Media Platforms, a lot of leeway to police content as long as companies work in good faith to remove inappropriate stuff. The law protects them from liability. Still there's plenty of anger over what's online on both sides of the Aisle Daphne Keller at Stanford Cyber. Policy Center thinks Congress will likely change the law though how is anyone's guess here? So she describes the anger on the right. Tech platforms are silencing people with conservative political views more than their silencing everyone else. That's claim that doesn't have a ton of evidence but on the other hand, nobody has the data to answer these questions. One way or the other liberals want more content moderation of misinformation says researcher Paul Galant at the Investment Bank Cowan for instance, the deep fake video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that made it appear as though she was an abbreviated Google Youtube took that video down. FACEBOOK, left it up. The lawn thinks anything Congress passes will likely be challenged in court by tech companies violates the First Amendment still, Silicon Valley is nervous section to thirty protect sites like yelp read it basically any site with a comment section bay. Area Lawyer Kathy Gillis.

Boeing US Richard Otto Lafi facebook. Google Kai Rozelle Los Angeles Bureau of Economic Analysis Michael Boyd Congress Cornell University APPALACHIA Arthur Wheaton Kathy Gillis Joe Biden
"kathy gillis" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

06:24 min | 3 years ago

"kathy gillis" Discussed on Techdirt

"Hello, and welcome to the tech podcast. I'm Mike mass, Nick. Quincy the doctor. Digital journalism. But the thing in the modern Monica. Throat came to take control. Blake does sound up to the. Back to one. When we were kids. The old scarce story was that if we did anything wrong, it would go on our permanent record. It took us well took some of us at least quite some time to realize that there was no such thing as a real permanent record. But that was back when I was a kid today. There actually is something that seems like a semi permanent record in terms of the stuff that you put on mine that stays there forever. And in some cases that can lead to perhaps a fair bit of embarrassment. Now, there are some people who argue that this just means that future generations will learn not to put too much stock into the things that people said in the past. But as we've seen in quite a few stories recently involving people being publicly shamed by things that they said on social media years ago, it doesn't appear that most people are so accepting of the excuse that everyone has their. Youthful indiscretions online. So as we've discussed on a previous podcast, this is possibly why at least I think Snapchat took off the way that it did with its initial success mostly focused on a younger demographic, and that was because unlike many other platforms, it mostly didn't contribute to the public record. And that allowed people to be in some ways, more true to themselves and perhaps worry a bit less about how their future sells might be viewed. But there's also an issue of the general historical record. Certainly things get destroyed, and some stuff was never meant to be kept around, but having historical letters and documents has always been really valuable as well. And maybe personally valuable to anyone looking back over what they said or did or photographed or witnessed many years ago. And this is an issue that's actually pretty important and really hasn't received that much detail thought. I think. As it's basically so far been up to the whims of whoever controls the various platforms that that has all this content. So to discuss this concept of the digital promo- permanent record and which be done and should we keep stuff or should we get rid of stuff? We have to excellent guests who have both been on the podcast in the past multiple times in fact, but never together has. So I, we've got lawyer Kathy Gillis who spends much of her time trying to think through the various thorny legal questions concerning innovation and how it impacts society. And we've got Parker Higgins who currently works at the freedom of the press foundation working on a variety of special projects, including a project to help archive new sites that were at risk of disappearing. This preserving an aspect of at least part of the permanent record. But more recently, he actually wrote a post on his personal sites, suggesting different sort of approach that. At least Twitter might wanna take one that would allow users to hide, but not delete old tweets, potentially protecting those tweets from someone going through them to find clips to take things out of context with, but not but not in a way that would delete those tweets permanently. I think that this discussion will end up being much broader talking about all these different things related to the permanent record, but Parker, let's start with your proposal. Can you? I guess just give a quick summary beyond what I did and explain sort of, you know, what was your thinking in coming up with that. Yeah, I'd be happy to thanks for having me on. So on on the one hand, it's just basically a feature request. It's there. I, you know, a lot of people have written about why they've chosen to delete all their all tweets, but my case and in many cases, UNICEF represents a decade of of writing in thinking, and you're obviously not every tweet is valuable, but there's there's conversations that I had maybe six or seven years ago that I don't want to get caught up in that in in a mass, delete rum. And over the course of that time I've been, you know, quoted in news articles and things like that where this stuff that I've put online has has become part of the web part of the the broader web. And you know, it's got a URL and people have access it overnight PI and it's embedded in things, and I don't want to break all of that. And I understand the. The desire to go back and delete everything that the value of that permanent record has been. The value hasn't always been apparent and the costs have been extremely obvious in the last couple of weeks and months, especially. But I think that if if there were a way to configure this a in in a non-permanent way, so you know, because when you deleted tweet, it's gone mistress, gone forever for your purposes. And then so so the the non-permanent is a big part. And then then like a per post configuration. And on the one hand, small feature request is just, you know, I, I'm as if I'm on the product team at at Twitter. On the other hand, I think that when you think about these sorts of things, it brings up beer questions about things like this permanent record and and questions of of. Privacy and publicity in and public conversations. And so I, I was hoping to be a little provocative, but I'm also certain. This is the right way to do things.

Twitter Parker Higgins Quincy Mike mass UNICEF Blake Kathy Gillis Snapchat Nick one hand seven years
"kathy gillis" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"kathy gillis" Discussed on KELO

"And giving away with it oh chose gonna be so proud of me you know so i'm still seeking his you know like a child seeking their parents you know approval um which seems crazy to me now but uh so most of the people were arrested and taken away and then um it turns out kathy gillis and i were were left and a few days later charlie shows up a susan atkins and and bruce davis and then the police cher show up you know arrest us susan atkins gets taken to la county jail with because she has a warrant for her arrest and while she's there she starts um uh telling her cellmate all about charlie and you know this this race war and then she then she starts telling her how her involvement in it and so then we all get you know this is now to mali two months later we all get taken to the uh uh la who testify in front of the grand jury and this is the for after not having drugs having good food i'm not in in the cell with all the girls um which we have been because it's just a small jail um i'm in front of the the bill if at the grand jury and he asked me my name and i tell them i'm diane leaked i'm sixteen them i want my mommy it's like i i finally felt safe enough to you know reach out for help and so then when i went back to in you'll county they separated me from the other girls and um all the you know detectives and everybody started you know coming and talk to me and eventually you know broke down my um my guard and so i started you know telling them then i was made a word of the cork 'cause i'm under age and the spend some time in the mental hospital than my arresting officer took me in those his foster child and um it by the nabil's me to uh get to the point where i could actually lee testifying for the prosecution against charles charlie manson and the girls were you afraid to come forward to do that especially knowing with the family was capable of and.

kathy gillis susan atkins officer foster child nabil bruce davis la county diane lee charles charlie manson two months