37 Burst results for "Kathleen"

Fresh "Kathleen" from 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:34 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "Kathleen" from 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

"Actually in the middle of thirties. Tomorrow Monday, Dr Martin Luther King Jr Day Clouds and Sun Brisk headed to high of 44. Tuesday's looking good sunshine. Patchy clouds high 41 Wednesday bitterly cold, blustery chili, the high 35 real fields in the teens 39 Right now sunny skies in New York We are headed up to 45 in midtown. This is 10. 10 wins New York's one and on Lee all news station. Shimon Siegel is our service. Eight. AJ Fabbri is our studio producer Julie von is the writer Jim Powers is at the editor's desk and I'm Brian Britain. All news all the time. This'll is 10 10 wins you give us 22 minutes. We'll give you the world. Good morning 39 degrees at 11 o'clock. I'm Kathleen Marshall. Calvin. Here's what's happening. A terrifying attack in a Harlem subway station. Naked man pushes a writer under the tracks. Ultimately, the naked guy ended up dead. Scary incident in D. C. A man arrested with a loaded gun and fake inauguration pass. He claims it was just a misunderstanding. New covert concerned the virus turns up in ice cream in China. You didn't win, but neither does anybody else. Power ball rolls over to meeting two huge jackpots this week and then win Zach, you weather Partly sunny, windy, high 45 real fields In the low to mid 30. Zeus had 11 01 traffic and transit with Jodi Veil and Kathleen. Let's head to Connecticut, Bridgeport. It's on that road work that slamming you North bound Connecticut Turnpike jamming you up. Between East Main Street, Bridgeport Avenue..

Kathleen Marshall New York Writer Shimon Siegel Dr Martin Luther King Sun Brisk Aj Fabbri Bridgeport Connecticut Harlem Jodi Veil Zeus Julie Von Jim Powers Calvin Brian Britain Zach LEE China Editor
Data and AI in the state of North Dakota, Interview with Dorman Bazzell, CDO of North Dakota

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:27 min | 4 d ago

Data and AI in the state of North Dakota, Interview with Dorman Bazzell, CDO of North Dakota

"Today with us. Our guest is dorman basell. Who is the chief data officer for the state of north dakota so high doormen and thanks for joining us today. Kathleen ron thank you for the opportunity. Either to hang out with you guys for a little bit. Yeah we'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role as the chief data officer for the state of north dakota. Sure sure well. Good morning everyone So my my background is You know went to college. Got a degree in computer science mathematics and then when often like everyone else When i lived in saint louis you. It was kind of a requirement. You had to work for mcdonnell. Douglas which is now boeing corporation. So did that for it. But but then after a while Got got involved in consulting and worked my way up through the Consulting ranked says developer and they as a project manager is the data architect the solution architect and then finally got into a position of driving business intelligence and analytics for a couple of large international consulting firms where ran their north america. Big data and the i practice And the great ride. A thoroughly enjoyed all of the things we did. I think we added a lot of value to Our customers which was private industry And had great teams Had a strong onshore team strong offshore kimes and delivered a lot of value. But i think two years ago Over two years ago. When i applied for this position as the chief data officer At first i really didn't want position Didn't like the idea of state government state government has has a bad connotation Of kind of a nine to five job And a people people who just weren't really motivated to To move the world change the world and my boss who i interviewed my off. Now the cio. Sean reilly Who i interviewed with his his final comment to me was well. I can't pay what you make today. But are you wanna paycheck or do want to change the world. And i had never thought about life that way. Never tried to change the world and So i decided to take on this opportunity This was the first chief data officer position for the state of north dakota so there were a lot of unknowns Certainly certainly my presence Was a bit chaotic for the organization. Because i came in with a completely different agenda and completely different way of looking at the world through the eyes of the pillars that are assigned a line to me which application development and automation. And the second pillar is data analytics data science artificial intelligence and had some very different opinions about those things. And how we might move those forward So as i became involved with this role i became an. I had made an assumption that every state had a chief data officer come to find out there are only twenty seven of us out of fifty states So it's it's an interesting It's an interesting mix of of individuals who are chief data officers and getting to know them is. It has been a really amazing opportunity because they have such a very backgrounds and they bring such such different perspectives to cheap date officer role I like to joke and tell people that the last thing i focus on data which is obviously not true but but my real focus is really around cultural change within the city physician and what that means in the context of not not necessarily data. Because i have to executives are on my team who Are just are just brilliant at running the operations and managing the two pillars within my organization.

North Dakota Dorman Basell Kathleen Ron Boeing Corporation Kimes Sean Reilly Saint Louis Mcdonnell Douglas North America
Fresh "Kathleen" from 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:15 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh "Kathleen" from 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

"Through NASA and stuff. A county's I'm Jodi Veil. Our next report at 8 21 on 10 10 wins. Now the Acura Other ex urgent four day forecast with meteorologist Matt Bends handsome, bright sunshine out there this morning, Kathleen and certainly some sun glare. If you're heading in an easterly direction, so sunglasses and must here for this morning, and we'll be back and forth with the sun in a few clouds today. Lost three, though high 45 degrees but factor in those winds Actor whether real field temp tres really telling the story here today I feel more like the low to mid thirties and for tonight Brisk in Chile. Partly cloudy, low 34 for Martin Luther King Day tomorrow. Well to be Dr with clouds and sun. Birthday with the high 44 Tuesday sunshine Patchy clouds High 41 for Wednesday, turning out blustery and a chilly day clouds in some sunshine high 35 degrees but accurate. The real fields in the teens and lower twenties currently is 26 36 degrees. Winds out of the West Southwest Gusting now it to 20 MPH, repeating the current temperature is 36 going up to 45 this afternoon in midtown? I mean, they're all this map ends on New York's weather station. Wins wins used time a 13 Hey, it's Matty Steel. Join me for a sip and a chat with some fascinating folks on my podcast News on the rocks looks like hit movie director Derek Board. It's easy to take a great script and make a horrible movie.

Matty Steel Jodi Veil Nasa Matt Bends Chile Martin Luther Kathleen New York Derek Board Director
Kevin Feige's 'Star Wars' Movie to Be Written By 'Doctor Strange 2' and 'Loki' Writer Michael Waldron

Lights Camera Barstool

03:19 min | Last week

Kevin Feige's 'Star Wars' Movie to Be Written By 'Doctor Strange 2' and 'Loki' Writer Michael Waldron

"Kevin feige his star wars stuff he was. You know there's always news about him. Doing star. wars movie was as dream. Kevin feige the the leader of marvel. He will be doing a stars movie and it will be along with doctor. Strange to doctor strange in the multi verse of madness Writer michael waldron who. We found out falls upon us on twitter. I don't know if your listener. Mr waldron who also is doing loki. Assure star wars movie with kevin feige listener. Let's let's get him on the pot did bring him. Dougherty to is a producer. Let's don't take my avatar walden joke either. So we we saw today. I don't know if he's barstool fan but yeah. If you're a listener go please come on. Let's talk about this. We'll talk about anything. But he's a star wars movie tapped to right. He's got a big deal now. Overall deal with disney obviously that's three separate entities for disney awesome. Good for him grads to that And then of course kevon foggy called the see him doing a star wars. Always kinda rumors could kevin feige takeover kathleen kennedy ever step down or she just kind of ran out of interest in doing. It seems it's more fabric baloney thing that's going to happen. Seems as though they're the ones who are going to be kind of leading the charge leading the way though catherine kennedy still there obviously as they've Just completely overhauled. How they're going to look at star wars mostly through series now with some movies And the other star wars news. This this is more of a rumor. It's been shot down that route donor. Junior won't play admiral thron however they've said that robert junior has been looked at for a star wars role in the future which makes sense because now stars and sitting that marvel thing with there's so many future properties they're gonna probably have some actors and actors that people are like. Oh that's that's quite the big name That would be a big one forever. Junior joining star wars would be quite the big name and actually. I don't think he would be a great thrown thrown of an intriguing. I still think. Speaking of the mickelson's i still think wars. Nicholson just play the character. He voiced willie because he was just the perfect of i can't think of another thrown voice But to cool pieces of star wars news here both marvel related. I think we should call them I think what a coin now for. This is the f. Cubed baloney favreau and fi. so the f. cubed alliance i think is gonna make a lot of great stores content in the future and i think that the one thing that Foggy is really going to add to this. As far as the stars movie universe cohesion right. The vendors undertaking is an insane thing. Really in retrospect like we look back on him. Like i made a bunch from the cool right but like to kind of loop together. All his moves into cohesive matter and not only that but like kind of build and make the franchise so much better as went along. I think is extremely impressive. And the fact that he's able to make these movies without feeling superhero fatigue is also even more impressive. And that's where. I think marvel in and star wars are kind of in the same lane as far as like you know when it will. When is it too much like when you down content. I think he he knows what he's doing. In that

Kevin Feige Michael Waldron Mr Waldron Kevon Foggy Catherine Kennedy Disney Robert Junior Kathleen Kennedy Dougherty Twitter Cubed Alliance Mickelson Nicholson Favreau Willie
How the Pandemic Has Highlighted Our Need for Nature

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

02:30 min | Last week

How the Pandemic Has Highlighted Our Need for Nature

"So let's get started. I have ten insights to share with you for the year to come. I'm calling are twenty twenty one. Slow flowers floral insights and industry forecast report in pursuit of nature. A you can understand. Why right as we enter. Twenty twenty one at least in the short term. Not much will feel different from the past months. And if there's anything we've learned since mid march of two thousand twenty. It's the essential and irreplaceable role of flowers and plants for our survival. And that's why. My outlook is deeply connected to humankind's pursuit of nature. And how floral entrepreneurs like you cannons should tap into and enhance that. Through your efforts. I learned about the term biofuel. Iaea in october of two thousand and nineteen when i interviewed tom. Pract and sarah dakin of grateful gardeners. Tom is a big advocate of by affiliate any opened my eyes to its relevance as we make personal and business decisions that impact our planet's survival. He discussed the definition when i interviewed him. But here it is again a to. Miriam webster a hypothetical human tendency to interact or be closely associated with other forms of life in nature by affiliate. Well all you have to do is read the headlines of twenty twenty to see a collective shift toward nature plants the environment and yes flowers. A recent article in the washington post caught my attention. The headline reads the isolation of the pandemic caused her to form a new an intense relationship to nature. She was hardly alone. It went on to say the benefits of being outdoors for your physical. Mental wellbeing are well documented but in this corona virus. They may be immeasurable then. I saw forbes headline reading nature is good for your mental health. Sometimes i'm not sure what that means. The university of washington showed this research dose of nature at home could help mental health wellbeing during covid nineteen. The report stated studies have proven that even the smallest bit of nature a single tree a small patch of flowers a house plant can generate health benefits wrote kathleen wolf a uw research social scientists in the school of environmental and forest sciences. She continues look closely in your neighborhood and the bit of nature. You may have taken for granted up until now may become the focus of your attention and help you feel better.

Pract Sarah Dakin Miriam Webster Iaea TOM The Washington Post University Of Washington Kathleen Wolf School Of Environmental And Fo
House Democrats urge FBI to open criminal investigation into Trump call

Mark and Melynda

00:41 sec | Last week

House Democrats urge FBI to open criminal investigation into Trump call

"To House Democrats are asking the FBI to investigate President Trump's weekend phone call with Georgia's top election official helps Democrats Ted Lieu and Kathleen Rice have sent a criminal referral to FBI director Christopher Wray. Accusing President Trump of soliciting voter fraud in a phone call with George's secretary of state. So far, senior House Democrats have not said whether Congress would attempt to take any action against the president, but not looking backward. We're looking forward. The inauguration of Joe Biden. On January 20th House Democratic Caucus chair Hakeem Jeffries. His actions by President Trump will be evaluated by historians right now, he says the focus remains on the Corona virus Pandemic

President Trump Ted Lieu Kathleen Rice Christopher Wray FBI House Georgia House Democratic Caucus Hakeem Jeffries George Congress Joe Biden
China Charges Hong Kong Activists Caught Fleeing to Taiwan

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:29 sec | Last month

China Charges Hong Kong Activists Caught Fleeing to Taiwan

"Around the world. Certainly in China has it formally charges 10. Hong Kong activists caught fleeing to Taiwan. Ed Baxter nurse San Francisco 9 60 newsroom has this global news story in Morehead. Hi, Kathleen 10 actually caught it see while trying to flee in August now Now Now formally formally formally charged charged charged charged with with with with with illegal illegal illegal illegal illegal boundary boundary boundary boundary boundary crossing crossing crossing crossing crossing offenses offenses offenses offenses offenses put put put put put him him him him him behind behind behind behind behind bars bars bars bars bars for for for for for years, years, years, years, years, the the the the the sea sea sea sea sea patches patches patches patches patches and and and and and now now now now now is is is is is increasingly increasingly increasingly increasingly increasingly being being being being being monitored monitored monitored monitored monitored by by by by by Hong Kong and Chinese authorities.

Ed Baxter Morehead Taiwan Hong Kong Kathleen San Francisco Sea Sea Sea Sea Sea China
Home Alone with Sydney Garrell

Cineflek

04:39 min | Last month

Home Alone with Sydney Garrell

"We are. We alive we are live. we are not live sydney. Welcome back you guessed a high again no way. No i didn't know sidney from the room In some ways these movies could be any more different but You love them both. i suppose. Yeah so we'll own for me was probably going to my honestly. My favorite christmas lee growing up can remember the first year. I watched it but it quickly became a tradition for my dad and i watch it every year when i was little and my mom got so sick of it. She dropped out of that tradition. But i think if it's on tv or you know just count on. The top of our minds will still get watch here there during the holiday season. So it's definitely close to my heart. I could probably quote the whole thing still for sure for sure. I mean it's it's so much a part of the pop culture of everything. I mean just coli called can it. So many conic lines his whole attitude. i mean. He's he's so adorable. It's it's just. It's a truly iconic movie that i have to admit i. I think this may be my second time ever seeing it like i. I think my mom didn't like this movie because i brought it up Like i'm doing homeland. This like home loan. Please please reach out to us. If your mom likes home-loan 'cause i clear moms but yet like i think she didn't like it and somehow it just wasn't in the rotation So yeah. I don't have the childhood memories with this movie but like just watching this around you can kinda see how it's just it's a. It's like a lightning in a bottle kind of movie. Just everything comes together perfectly to got a great childhood actor you've got a great supporting cast and And and like john hughes movie which is awesome. Yeah i loved. I loved john hughes movies growing up as well. I think didn't macaulay culkin start out. And john hughes busy uncle buck is is that it it was. It was macaulay culkin and john. Candy is also in that john candy. Yes yeah wow who plays the polka king polka king of the midwest polka polka. Yeah no so john john. Candy is in this Yeah catherine o'hara catherine are hard. Has she like totally find your. I'm catherine o'hara apparently like a bunch of people it it went viral recently. 'cause catherine o'hara on some special media like was was was quoting her old her old lines from home alone and like all these people online were week catherine o'hara as the mom from home loan. Like what the hell like like people did not connect the to chase had such a crazy couple years with all her like It's creek and stuff that she's shits creek. Yes yes literally just watching that before the mom from cheese mora She's moya. This is what i'm ties on. Say it it's more how to pronounce that name she's war-era for shits creek kathleen high. I would never have guessed. I i mean this was nineteen ninety converted. Two thousand twenty or however long shits creek has been i mean she's an icon like so glad that she's finally getting the recognition that she'd deserves but i'm glad i could break that to you. She is yeah creek. No where near. I've nowhere near the knowledge you do when it comes to movies actors for that matter so

John Hughes Catherine O'hara Macaulay Culkin Sidney Sydney Hara Catherine LEE John Candy John John Cheese Mora Buck Kathleen High John
Driver arrested after car plows into Manhattan protesters

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Driver arrested after car plows into Manhattan protesters

"A woman has been arrested for plowing a car into protesters Friday afternoon in New York City injuring six of them police say fifty two year old Kathleen Castillo who remained at the scene was charged with reckless endangerment and released from custody video from NYC protest coverage shows a black BMW X. celebrating as protesters gathered around the car near thirty ninth street and Third Avenue in Manhattan the fear Vickerman was there I hear people screaming in the front I look behind me the woman is plowing through I run out of the way I see bodies lying I fear police say another woman a protester was arrested for interfering with ambulance workers at the scene Julie Walker in New York

Kathleen Castillo Vickerman New York City NYC BMW Manhattan Julie Walker New York
Driver Arrested, Facing Charges for Plowing Into New York Protesters

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last month

Driver Arrested, Facing Charges for Plowing Into New York Protesters

"Shocking sound of a car plowing of the protesters, injuring six. Now the woman suspected in the incident. Arrested facing charges of reckless endangerment has happened yesterday around four in the afternoon. You're 39th and third here in the city. Police say the injuries not life threatening. The suspect, identified as 52 year old Kathleen Cassio is driving a black BMW at the time, officials say no word. She has legal representation in order to comment. A demonstrator also arrested charged with disorderly conduct. Preventing governmental administration wins

Kathleen Cassio BMW
Is it safe to put kids back in classrooms? Washington DC Auditor issues report

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | Last month

Is it safe to put kids back in classrooms? Washington DC Auditor issues report

"Is still working to bring Mork kids back to the classroom. And now there's a new report focusing on whether the science supports doing that. The report from the office of the D C auditor looked at closing classrooms as a pandemic mitigator so that our council members can be as well informed as possible. Kathleen Patterson is the district's auditor. And, she says, because school shutdowns coincided with other shutdowns in the spring, it's hard to come up with the defense. Of answer. What is possible is to weigh the benefits and risks of what is known about the impacts of school closure policies to assess what risks a community is willing to undertake, the report says. Those assessments need to be guided by what drives community transmission. Other mitigating factors put in place in the weighing of the risks and benefits of in person schooling. John Doman w T. O P News or 13,

Office Of The D C Auditor Kathleen Patterson Mork John Doman
Making ecology studies replicable

Science Magazine Podcast

03:50 min | Last month

Making ecology studies replicable

"Now we have news intern. Kathleen o'grady she wrote a story. This week on efforts to improve the rigor of the field of ecology based on. What's happened in psychology. Hi kathleen hi sarah. Thanks so much for having me sure. Can you give us a quick synopsis. what happened. In the field of psychology things been bubbling below the surface for a very long time in psychology but things really started exploding in about twenty twelve when there was a very famous paper precondition that failed to replicate since then there have been other very famous findings that psychologists have not been able to replicate when they do them with bigger sample sizes. And there's been this movement in psychology to drastically improve the robustness of their research. With a whole lot of different measures. There is now move within ecology. Try and copy some of these tactics. Trying d- beef up the quality of ecology research. Why might feel. It'd be college. Be having some of these issues. What are some of the red flags. They're very similar to the ones in psychology. One of the big things is small sample sizes which essentially means that a lot of the results that you're seeing very erratic either. A small sample size could miss an effect. That's really there. We could find something that looks like an effect but is actually just experience finance just looking at noise and seeing something that isn't really there. There's very little replication going. On in ecology right now there was a study published last year that looked at nearly forty thousand ecology and evolutionary biology papers and ernie found eleven papers that reported replication attempt. An those only four of them reported that the replication had been successful. They repeated the original results and in a survey that was published in plus one researchers found that nearly half of the eight hundred ecologists in evolutionary. Biologists who responded so that they sometimes presented unexpected findings as if they were confirmation of a hypothesis that they'd had all along and around two thirds of them said that sometimes they reported only significant results from their study and left out the negative results in response to some of these issues. A group of scientists are forming a society. Can you talk a little bit about that sure. Yeah it's the society for open reliable and transparent ecology and evolutionary biology for short. it's saudi. it's inspired by a similar society in psychology and their plan is to essentially help to connect ecologists. Who are interested in these issues and bring them together in a way that can kind of ignite collaborations and projects and kind of grassroots efforts to improve the quality of research in ecology. What are some of the basics what what can ecology take from the template set by psychology. One of the big things is actually just bringing people together because right now in ecology there are a lot of people in different silos of sub disciplines. Monico systems are working on different ways to improve resort quality. Bring these people together into one. Movement is one of the things that they've identified. That psychology really has managed to get right and if managed to achieve a lot with that but they can also look at things like collaborating across multiple labs so that all these labs together can have access to much bigger samples than one lab cat. So that's one way to get around the sample size issue. We talked a little bit about bigger sample sizes. There are other things that can be done. There are plenty of things that can be done and it really depends on what exactly the problems are in a particular field of research so beefing up the sample size is one thing but also collaborations across different labs to try and standardize how some things done from one field site to the next is something that ecologists have been trying and it's been yielding great results.

Kathleen O'grady Kathleen Hi Sarah Society For Open Reliable And Ernie Monico Systems Saudi
U.S. hospitals prepare for coronavirus vaccine distribution

Atlanta's Morning News

00:41 sec | Last month

U.S. hospitals prepare for coronavirus vaccine distribution

"On the rise across the state. WSB is Michelle write reports live. The governor's rolling out the distribution plan for vaccines. That's right, according to the Health Department's website. More than 3700 Georgians tested positive for covert Tuesday alone. So the news of the vaccine distribution plan is quite welcome. Dr Kathleen to me, explains who will be getting the first. Wave of vaccinations go immediately to healthcare providers working through the largely through the hospital system, as well as our public health system and long term care facilities, both their staff as well as the residents, assuming the FDA gives emergency use authorization this week, the vaccine should be available here in Georgia in the next 7 to 10 days. Pointing live,

WSB Dr Kathleen Health Department Michelle FDA Georgia
Should You Take Your Company Public Now?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:34 min | Last month

Should You Take Your Company Public Now?

"Might reasonably ask as we're seeing virus counts rise and whatever the economic recovery has been so far. We're seeing it falter. A bid one might reasonably ask. Are you sure you want to take your company. Public now. all year and increasingly here in the waning weeks. The answer has been yes. The meal delivery service door dash start. Trading publicly on wednesday airbnb follows on thursday and the short term rental company is feeling pretty confident looking for a total valuation of something like forty two billion dollars which should be some kind of comeback. I'll tell you what from this spring. When the pandemic up ended airbnb is whole business model. Marketplace's amy scott gets going today. Airbnb was planning an ipo back in march. But we all know what happened. That month has global travel. Ground to a halt bookings fell by eighty percent and the company had to refund a billion dollars here. Ceo brian chessy on bloomberg. This summer i felt like a captain of ship in puteaux. Just hit side of the ship. The company laid off a quarter of its staff. Nearly two thousand people cut executive salaries and marketing and focused on the core short term rental business and by september airbnb was profitable again. Tahreek dough grew teaches hospitality management at florida state university. He says as domestic travel picked up airbnb offered something hotels. Didn't it's all yours. You are not going if you don't want to encounter with the host and some people really shifted. I think too Airbnb not everywhere. Jamie lane tracks the short term rental industry at air. Dna he says in big cities like new york and san francisco. Demand is still down forty to sixty percent from a year ago. But we're demand is up and it's up significantly is in small towns and destination markets throughout the country places in the mountains or at the beach. That are easy to drive to. For metro areas and with more people able to work or go to school remotely. They're staying longer to another reason to go public now. Investors are chasing returns in a hot stock market says kathleen smith with renaissance capital. It may be one of the worst years when comes to the pandemic but has been the one of the best years for ideas so far companies have raised more than one hundred forty billion dollars with several more big. Ipo's to go. I'm amy scott for

Airbnb Amy Scott Brian Chessy Puteaux Jamie Lane Bloomberg Florida State University Kathleen Smith San Francisco New York Renaissance Capital
Young siblings, ages 4 and 6, killed after car drives onto mini golf course in Florida

The Dr. Stephanie Show

00:28 sec | Last month

Young siblings, ages 4 and 6, killed after car drives onto mini golf course in Florida

"Four year old boy and his six year old sister were playing miniature golf at the Coconut Creek Family Fun Park in Panama City. Police say a truck suddenly veered off the road and right onto the course hitting the two kids. The boy died at the scene. His sister passed away later at the hospital, a spokeswoman for Panama City Beach says. Family was visiting from Louisville, Kentucky, when what she called the tragic event happened. The truck drivers identified as got Donaldson, Kathleen Maloney, Fox News

Coconut Creek Family Fun Park Panama City Golf Panama City Beach Louisville Kentucky Kathleen Maloney Donaldson Fox News
U.K. becomes first country to approve Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:44 min | Last month

U.K. becomes first country to approve Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

"The uk government appears to be trying to use the news that a covid vaccination has been licensed for use in this country to create good pr around brexit but england's health minister matt hancock who claimed fast tracking the pfizer vaccine was only possible because the uk was able to act outside of european union. Regulations has been firmly contradicted by the chief executive of the h. r. a. the body that handled the process. Well joint for more. On this by vincent mcilvanney. He's a political reporter and one of monocle twenty four regular contributors. Welcome back to the globalist vinnie. Can you tell us how. The story unfolded i. We had the great news that the vaccine had been licensed then matt. Hancock really dived into controversy. That's i think there was a genuine needle relief and celebration yesterday that the government made this announcement and they'd obviously planned this. Kathleen they have. The scientists going through detail televised press conference yesterday morning just to the public in very layman's terms. How the vaccine had been approved what it would do how it would be rolled out and then we have prime minister's questions where boris johnson and stone had a pretty friendly about They did simply questions about how the rollout would happen. it was. It was quite a public education session then in the afternoon the government seem to trip over itself They started to say. There was a bit of pushback from the germans at the brit. Saying that this was you know a real day for british signs that this was great for. They don't this and then. My ankle comments on braxton. Also jacob re smog sang we could only approved vaccine so quickly because we've left the eu last month we change regulations vaccine didn't need eu approval which has slower and this ready then lead them into problems because that has been debunked has been fact checked by various organizations to say that. That's not the case. It was actually permitted under eu law And that was the point. Made as you mentioned by the head of the ease at medicines regulator on wednesday that this states could act unilaterally and false tracking it. So it's very strange that they have tried to do something which shouldn't be political. Shouldn't be kind of you know doused in one camp or another particular when it comes to leave or remain when it comes to brexit which is still divisive issue here in the uk at a point where we still don't have a brexit deal and then negotiations are ongoing to try and sully it somewhat by putting it in minds of some of the public with brexit is not a good idea and as you say germany took exception to this. Yes they did. They perspective said quite rightly in this european achievements. And perhaps the british government's if they done this. I with the oxford astra zeneca vaccine something which we expect to happen in the next ten days or so then they could claim you know a real big moment for british science and claim that the own but to claim that this landlocked. Because you've fast track vaccine that was developed at the over. The you know in the comfort. And that's gonna be coming from. Belgium is a bit of a strange move by the government. This is the government absolutely desperate for some good news. We have the worst death figures in europe and yesterday was another six hundred forty will so debts in the previous twenty four hours we the west infection rates and so you know they are really desperate now to make sure that they can trump it some of these achievements as their own and i notice. Boris johnson appear to roll back a little bit when he was asked about it later and he talked about international efforts and really quite successfully dodged the question. Yes he did. i think he knows. And perhaps the scientists said got to them that you cannot tie this to to brexit something. That is incredibly divisive and that pass. It wasn't true you know. There's enough missing formation going on about of cave nineteen vaccines that. The government really shouldn't be contributing to it and this something that she came up pm cues and the prime minister sort of echoed that said labour had put out last month and m seems the government will be moving forward that there will be some kind of penalty and fines in put in place to stop the misinformation and the spreading of anti vaccine summation on social media and on the social media platforms themselves. Something that they will have to watch out for. We're waiting for details on that still but it's not a good idea that the government would be putting out false information itself on that same day. Of course this isn't the kind of stuff damaging stuff that we're seeing spreading conspiracies about what the vaccine will do to you. But it's still doesn't help you sell your message somewhat. Absolutely i mean this. I suppose was an attempt just to trumpet. britney's truly global. Yes to trumpet global britain. Something that trying to do. It's also you know the final few days really off. The brexit negotiations going on central london images lost night if boxes and boxes of pizza being delivered to the negotiators so they won't see talking late into the night prisoners facing a real problem and i think part of why the government probably wants pasta quickly. Is that if by the end of this week. We don't have a deal. One becomes very unlikely and so at the end of this month. The uk will leave the european union now. All countries have struggled with their economies. Jerry the pandemic but imagine the double whammy in twenty twenty one of britain also suffering the effects of that no deal brexit. We know that it would be hugely detrimental to the economy and so britain than any country around the world needs to get its workforce vaccinated. Needs to have them feeling confident. Needs the well to think that this is a place that you can come and trade and do business in because it's safe and they need people back out there as much as possible working and so the vaccine really is so critical to be rolled out here to make sure that life can get back to as much as normal as possible because the economy is facing this double threat unlike any others around the well. The yes are repercussions in europe full brexit but not to the extent of the areas here in the uk. I mean the prime minister has warned that there may be logistical problems. Getting the vaccine out particularly to care homes. Yeah that's right. And i think we have to look at the separate vaccine. Say of the fis at biotech. One has very specific needs so has to be stored at just under minus seventy degrees centigrade and has a lifespan of about a month as well and so they don't want basically it cannot be moved again so we're getting the first eight hundred thousand off the forty million order coming from belgium in the next few days. Now that number you have to divide it by two. Because you need to inoculation say britain's ordered forty at that means twenty million people can be vaccinated and the clock is ticking to make the most of that investment in this vaccine to get it to the most critical people but because of the coach storage requirements. It seems that they're going to need to put it into key. Sentences rather than sending out in small batches perhaps to you know local pharmacy. Or a cabaret miss. They thought they would. So what will happen is it will go to places like hospitals where they have that cold storage than going to put it into centers so the nightingale hospitals that have been built and also places like sports stayed the emc. Say think as well in those kind of facilities and instead of bat say you have in town eight also cathodes instead of the vaccine going in small batches of the cabins because of these requirements on the storage. Because it doesn't like they moved too much you will instead means academy ten dis on trips to those senses to the hospital in order for them to get inoculated. Have to do that twice at intervals of two weeks. And after the second vaccine injection seven days later they will then be a not some killer's this they will then not be able to for the effects that there's a slight effects of the vaccine it's being described as a bit like hanging over by some participants in the study. But you will then be guarded against covid nineteen but they used the is one for the most critical people. Nhs staff a care home staff the most elderly in society those most at risk and they need to use as much as possible as quickly as possible at because then what i think will happen is the much cheaper and easier to store and distribute ox sudanic vaccine which is the one that britain has invested. Most in will be the one that most of the population gets

Brexit EU Matt Hancock Vincent Mcilvanney UK Boris Johnson Zeneca Britain Pfizer Braxton Hancock Kathleen British Government Matt England Stone Europe Oxford
Coronavirus vaccine should go to health care workers, long term care facilities first, CDC panel recommends

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

01:28 min | Last month

Coronavirus vaccine should go to health care workers, long term care facilities first, CDC panel recommends

"Month. But U K has approved emergency use of the visor vaccine and is preparing to roll it out next week, becoming the first country in the world to do so. In a statement, UK officials say The coast quote in the the mid government sixties to has mid today seventies accepted the recommendation in the valleys from in the the mid to independent upper seventies medicines. And Health With Care Products San Diego's Regulatory most accurate forecast, Agency, or I maybe. See M H. 10 R news A meteorologist to approve Fizer Meghan Bio Perry in text Covert right now, 19 in vaccine Ramona, for use It is chilly. quote 36 The vaccine degrees. will be made Looks available like Rancho across Bernardo the is UK 46 from next downtown. week. Clear The UK and is already 47 purchased 40 million Cocoa News doses time of the is vaccine, 5 which 32. was shown to be 95% UK. effective Giving in emergency its final approval trials. for Fizer That's Marianne is Corona Rafferty virus reporting Vaccine a Today, covert vaccine UK is Health getting Secretary closer Matt Hancock and explains we now how the government know who will will determine be getting the first who doses. gets the vaccine. Colonel First. Scott has The more Joint on the vote Committee on by an Vaccinations advisory board and Immunization to the CDC. is the clinical The panel committee voted that advises 13 the to government 1 for on health care workers On and long the priority term care facility on residents who gets to the be vaccine. any In vaccines. what order? First recipients. They will be setting out Dr details Kathleen of Dooling that prioritization of the CDC said later Having residents this morning and care facilities along with makes the sense, M H R A. long Who will term set care out facility. the clinical Residents details and staff behind accounted this for vaccine 6% and of why cases they've taken and 40% the decision to of authorize deaths in the it. U. S. Fires was The vaccine committee also will have its heard emergency public use comment authorization that ranged widely hearing with at the the Great FDA first on path December protecting 10th. Americans from San Diego's coded largest allocating health care vaccines provider, asking to states people according to wear to population masks and doesn't take precautions help reduce inequity. after seeing Long 4.5 term studies in monitoring times have not the number been done. of coronavirus A pair of vaccines patients await federal in its hospitals emergency Sharp use approval Healthcare President from and CEO the FDA. Chris Howard Yeah. says their intensive The The care nation's nation's units top top and infectious infectious 86% disease disease experts experts capacity as as herd herd with immunity immunity only 25 from from

UK Fizer Meghan Fizer Matt Hancock Dooling CDC Bernardo San Diego Marianne Perry Kathleen Scott FDA Chris Howard Disease Disease
Moderna to seek FDA emergency authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

What A Day

05:02 min | Last month

Moderna to seek FDA emergency authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

"We're hurtling toward. What may well be a horrible and deadly holiday season as cova cases numbers and hospitalizations. Continue to reach alarming highs over ninety thousand. People are currently hospitalized in the us according to the cova tracking project that's compared to the previous high of about sixty thousand in the spring and summer. So more by half just terrifying. We're also moving quickly towards something that looks like hope to vaccines yesterday. Dern submitted its vaccine for fda authorization aaron. What's the latest on that. Well akilah thanks to the incredible work of scientists and researchers. We've now got to vaccines that. Could start to be distributed to americans within days or weeks maderna's mentioned and pfizer which submitted a couple of weeks ago. As soon as the fda reviews and approves either one for emergency use people can start lining up to get poked. Yeah i am also in line to get poked but as you've been talking about on the show with this first round vaccines were not going to have enough for everybody all at once and we don't have one official plan for who gets to be at the front of the line. That's why the cdc's advisory committee on immunization practices or ac ip is having an emergency meeting today hammer out some guidelines for states on who gets there. Kobe shot i. Yeah so what do we know about their thinking. Well much to the chagrin of the kardashians in everybody who would love to feel just a little more normal by having a massless dance party on a private island. The vaccine will not be distributed based on how many instagram followers. You have or even whether your father invented the toaster strudel I'm really bummed. I that's my dad. I know. I know grudging wieners. The has already decided that the first people in line should be healthcare workers and people who live in long term care facilities like nursing homes according to dr kathleen dueling medical officer at the cdc staff and residents at these facilities have accounted for almost forty percent of all deaths from covid nineteen even though there are less than one percent of the total us population if you add healthcare workers and people who live and work at long term care facilities. That's about twenty four million people even with fda approval and firing on all cylinders. There will only be about forty million vaccine doses available by the end of this godforsaken year and both cohen. Vaccines require two shots. Which means that those forty million doses will be barely enough to meet the needs of the very neediest in this group. Yeah and then. It starts to get a little bit trickier when you get into the other. Essential workers and people with high risk medical conditions. Or you know older people right. So according to the cdc there about eighty seven million essential workers one hundred million high risk adults and fifty three million people sixty five years of age or older. And of course there's some overlap between these categories. These are the people that would be prioritized next but as you can see there are a lot of them if all goes well you could see fifty million more doses ready to go in january another sixty million in february or march doing math divided by to carry the one that means about seventy five million people could be vaccinated against covid nineteen by the end of the first quarter of twenty twenty one which means the more people who are at an elevated risk from covid. Then there will be vaccines and there will not be enough vaccines to reach herd immunity at first and it's going to be a while before we get there and so this is just guidance. According to current lame duck secretary of health and human services. Alex as our love connick guy. Lame duck state governments will ultimately determine how the vaccine will be distributed. But who knows if that assertion will hold after biden takes office on january twentieth knows. Well it's a little bit of an elephant in the room. Here you know. America has a long history of ignoring the needs of and in some cases actively hurting the health of marginalized groups like indigenous americans living on reservations. Black people hello Non native english speakers people experiencing homelessness and the mentally ill among other groups. So how can we be sure that the cova vaccine will just pass them over. That's a really important question akilah. I'm sure there are already rich and powerful people trying to figure out how to skip the line. There's nothing more american than that but the acp seems determined to make sure americans have faith in the fairness of this process. All of their meetings are live streamed. So if you're looking for something to do today you can go ahead and livestream. The meeting in all the votes are public. The fda has also having meetings on vaccines on december tenth and seventeenth. This whole process depends on the public trusting the vaccine enough to let somebody shoot two doses of it into their arms and it seems like so far at least the folks in charge are taking that responsibility seriously and all this is happening with derna advisor will still be gathering more data and monitoring for adverse effects as the first groups of people get vaccinated and then the companies will have to go through the normal. Fda approval process as well. This first round of approval is a fast track process. So getting back to normal isn't site kind of if you squint. It's not that far. It's right there it's kind of kind of. Let's put it this way between now and when everybody who needs to be vaccinated is vaccinated. You'll definitely have time to relearn that foreign language tried to learn in high school and if mostly forgotten about by now

Akilah FDA CDC Maderna Dr Kathleen Cova Dern Pfizer America Instagram Aaron Kobe Cohen Connick Health And Human Services Biden Alex
Third person in a week shoved onto New York City subway tracks

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:08 min | Last month

Third person in a week shoved onto New York City subway tracks

"In in the the subways subways today, today, with with word word of of another another person person being being thrown thrown onto onto the the tracks tracks this this time time in in Brooklyn. Brooklyn. Anyone. Samantha leaving has a story in this live report from the Barclays Center station. Yes and Kathleen the third subway pushing in less than a week. This time, police say, a 29 year old man was pushed onto a south and four train train tracks at the Barclay Center stop after the suspect began yelling at him and followed him off a train. Luckily, the victim was able to climb out. It follows two incidents in Manhattan last week one Thursday in Union Square, where 40 year old woman was pushed as a train approached. She survived survived with with minor minor injuries. injuries. And And as as straphangers straphangers who who spoke spoke with with NBC NBC for for being being extra extra vigilant. vigilant. Well, Well, I'm I'm not not going going to to be be standing standing next next to to the the tracks. tracks. I'm I'm going going to to stay stay in in the the middle. middle. I I ride ride the the trains trains no no late late at at night. night. I I work work overnight, overnight, sometimes. sometimes. Just Just pray pray that that they they put put more more hops hops out out and and way way just just need need to to be be more more aware aware of of my my surroundings. surroundings. No word from the NYPD on whether there be more cops in the transit system, But the Guardian Angels announced this weekend they'll be upping their patrols in subways. Samantha Leap in

Barclays Center Station Barclay Center Brooklyn NBC Samantha Kathleen Union Square Manhattan Nypd Angels Samantha Leap
"kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

04:01 min | Last month

"kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Welcome back. I've got dr kathleen smith on the line. Dr welcome to the show. Thank you you can just call me. Kathleen i'm happy with that quantity at least give you your title and then from there. We'll go from there so that's awesome so great to have you on the show. He wrote a book a little while ago and During this time of this recording we're in the middle of a pandemic and the title of your book and what it's about is amazing and it's the message that i think a lot of people need to hear so sheriff's a little bit about your the book and some things you've discovered after releasing it. Yes so the name of the book is everything isn't terrible conquer your insecurities interrupting zayed's and finally calmed down and came out at the beginning of this year. And little. did i know that. I already seemed. It was going to be an anxious year. But i had no idea how anxious it would be for so many people and you know i'm a therapist i Have a practice in dc. And i am trained in a theory called in theory which is Sort of a family systems way of thinking or a relationship way of thinking about anxiety. And i wanted to write a book that i could give to my therapy clients. You know because i live in. Dc have over achieving clients. They always want homework and things turn. And i wanted a book that kinda summarize the theory. I was trained in in a way that's acceptable in narrative and is not to to academic to it at the same time and so you know. The book is just stories of various clients. That i've worked with obviously details are changed to protect their identity. But just what it looks like to to grow up slowly and calm down slowly over time because that's the only way it happens anxieties Thing that challenges so many people And even in quote unquote normal times anxiety can be really problematic..

dr kathleen smith dc Kathleen zayed
Woman charged with shooting man with BB gun in Hall County, NE of Atlanta

America in the Morning

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Woman charged with shooting man with BB gun in Hall County, NE of Atlanta

"A 61 year old man was seriously injured Saturday afternoon when a brass Wilton woman shot him with a BB gun had a home on day Lily drive. According to Sheriff's Office spokesman Derek Booth 50 year old April Kathleen deals is accused of shooting the man in the chest with a BB gun, and before she shot him, bills hit him in the chest with the actual rifle physically. Following the incident, Hall County Fire Services took the man to northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville. Dills arrested and remains in the whole county jail with no bond booth says that deals in the victim lived together in the home where the incident took

Sheriff's Office Derek Booth Kathleen Deals Wilton Hall County Fire Services Northeast Georgia Medical Cent Dills Gainesville
"kathleen" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

05:26 min | 2 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"And websites she and her husband are the proud parents of four cats thor Hella and foster failures jude and Luke. Kathleen's I review kittens Kathleen I'd like to welcome you to the show. Thank you stacey. Glad to be here. So first and foremost, can you share with us a little bit about how you became passionate about cats will that started when I was a little girl we didn't have pets in our own households, but my aunt and uncle town didn't have human children but they had a dog and two cats and I loved visiting my aunt and uncle because I loved them. But I also loved being with the animals and I was particularly fascinated by the cats because. They're so independent and it was a big honor to get the cats to let me pet them and start purring. So it's been a lifelong fascination with cats and I was finally able to have cats of my own as an adult when I rescued a mother cat and kitten. So with that, you've got exposed to trap neuter return in two thousand ten who showed you or who taught you how to do trap. NEUTER and return, and also where did you become a believer in that practice is being the best practice for cats actually I had known about tr since about nine, hundred, ninety seven when I was working for Med scape dot com and I came across a scientific book about cat behavior, which was really rare in those days. There was very little science available to lay people, and that book taught me about kitten socialization and. So it was on my radar but I didn't need that information really until twenty ten when I found myself feeding a poor little hungry looking cat in front of an abandoned church near my neighborhood and I started feeding her and pretty soon I realized that she had about ten friends who also feeding and I figured none of these guys are spayed or neutered I better go online and find our workshop and I.

Kathleen jude stacey Luke
"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

03:36 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"That my opponent attempts to train reinvent himself for not going to work and that we need to all make sure everyone can see through. Those. Frankly political climber. Antics. So yeah. So appreciate any any help folks can provide. Our voters able to vote by mail in. Montana. So Montana in primary had the best of all possible worlds we voted by mail for longtime a high percentage of Montana NHS have chosen to vote by mail for years myself included. in the primary, the governor gave all the counties, the option to do an all. All Mail ballot election but required them to if they chose to do that to allow for in person voting. An ensure ensure that we still had same day registration. So so people could go to their courthouses. They were encouraged to vote by mail, but they could go they could. In person work through any ballot issues. The that occurred if their mail in ballot had been rejected, they could work through that with with a person. And then we could still you can still go the day off and and and register that day and vote. That's the in my mind the best of all possible worlds. I hope that the general will be the same way that all the counties did decide to to to do that in the primary and. There just been a letter sent by I can't remember how many counties basically asking the governor for the same thing villa general. So I'm hopeful that that's that's what we'll have. Is there anything else that you would like to make sure we talk about today? Just how important this election is it said I. think if I weren't doing this, I'd be wearing a hole in my rug pacing in front of the TV just being so frustrated and. And and terrified for our country. Really. So I'm running to be that that true representative that that cuts through the hyper partisanship and focuses on policy and and solutions and. We need. That's what we need. We need people that are that are not in it for personal gain or or partisan ichthyologist we need. We need solution getters and we need people that are practical and and work well with with others and and know how to find. Common interests in unique areas this country. has is so incredible, my father. Fought for it in. World War. Two. And we need to get back to what makes this country song credible. So I look forward to to during that. Kathleen, thank you so much for speaking with me. Today will put a link to your website and your social media up on our website when we post the episode so that people can find you and I hope that they will help with a campaign like I mentioned at the top yours. So close in two thousand, eighteen, I really think this is the we ran out of time. We'll thank you colleagues, I appreciate the opportunity to be on your show and thanks for thanks for what you do from one garage. I snack you..

Montana Kathleen NHS representative
"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:59 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Their premiums that Congress had committed to under the ACA protecting the affordable care act that has been so important elements that have been so important to people like protection for pre existing conditions and. The ability to do the expanded Medicaid that we did in Montana, I honored to be part of that. Ensuring that mental health is part of any comprehensive policies associated with with healthcare just making sure that we. Fix this inefficient system that we've got there's all kinds of countries that are doing it better than we are, and we need leaders on this topic. So I'm looking forward to being matt. Leader. As Kobe hit Montana very hard You know I live in Chicago where it's very densely populated and a know what the spread of the pandemic looks like here. But what does that look like in a place like Montana so To other states, we are doing fairly well but of course, every illness in every death is. Is a tragedy and we we have a statewide mask order in place. And we took action. Early and then opened up carefully that said, we are a destination for so many people and when you go to trail heads and. Parking lots. There are incredible number of out of state plates. So we're encouraging people to to be smart and protect their neighbors season and And and our campaign has been again providing leadership on this issue from the very beginning and we put up A. Resource page on our website and continue to update that on. You know where you could get help and. Encouraging people to reach out to to those feeling isolated. We continue to update that I was calling for a coordinated testing program between state federal state and local back in near the end of February and early March at as well as p. p and making sure that the. Relief programs for businesses and others have the transparency we needed to make sure that. That tax dollars you know Montana's and others hard earned. Income that they that they provide for the federal government where we're going to the right places that we knew it was going and so again, we've got a guy in the seat that you would. You wouldn't even know was there because we're just not hearing any kind of leadership or any kind of strategy or any kind of. Communication really from the seat warmer in this in this seat that that really Montana's deserve they they deserve. A higher standard for that office and a higher standard for use in it and I look forward to to being that higher standard. Noted that you've worked in resource management, the current administration of course has done a ton to really essentially destroy the environment to roll back protections. What are things that you think the federal government and Congress in particular should be doing could be doing to to protect the environment to make sure that we're protecting that land and scion water in Montana. Well I'll tell you. We need to not elect my opponent. He has advocated for transferring public land that was one of his top priorities when he ran for this office before. So he wants to industrialize are public lands he he's all about. Getting, much income out of them as as possible and. We get a lot of income out of them right now because businesses and people are moving here and spending their dollars here traveling here because of our our public land that are not industrialized. The way we protect them is to is to elect a champion for our outdoor heritage myself and not my opponent and his economic plan involves, which is by the way just pulled off a shelf of one of his right-wing. Funding Groups much of it is also has a significant permanent regulatory rollbacks. So any regulation That doesn't speak. Directly to safety. He thinks should be roll back. And some of those are businesses that are have impact on the environment. You know we've given them discharge permits to to discharge into rivers and streams. They wouldn't have to monitor their their discharges anymore I mean so he would. He would. He would destroy what makes Montana special and and do it in the name of short-term prophets and and that's that's not that's not leadership. That's not what Montana's want is attach. It's A. It's an east coast developer against East Coast. Coming here and and Putting his. Is Values atop estate that he doesn't understand. So that's how. That's the very direct way of how we protect our public lands. If I- listeners would like to help out your campaign, what are some ways they can do that? Well, there's lots of ways said, again, the website is Kathleen. FOUR MONTANA DOT com. In a pandemic like this, it is I can't get out or we're not getting out. So I can't talk to one, hundred, hundred and fifty people all at once I have to check to people one on one by one by one and so. certainly, contributions are helpful. There's a there's a big red donate button am on a on the webpage, but also people that are willing to talk to their networks to encourage additional contributions and spreading the word we have people out of state that are that are making phone calls for us to to Montana's. People that know me that that have moved but you know the more volunteers we have the better and. With everyone going virtual now even volunteers can can be virtual. So as so there's there's lots of ways a to help us spread the word we've got some great videos even my dog has her own ad which has been incredibly popular but but people letting their friends know that Montana is in play and we can. We can win this each if we've got enough people talking it up and.

Montana federal government Congress ACA Kobe Chicago East Coast developer Kathleen
"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

09:00 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"This is Kelly and I'm speaking today with Kathleen Williams who is running for Congress in the at large district in Montana. I Kathleen. Kelly grigsby with you. Yes a great to talk to you. I was really rooting you on in twenty eighteen and you came so close to winning and I think twenty twenty. You're really GONNA get it over the finish line here. So tell me a little bit about your background and while you're running for Congress. So I a three term state legislator I've got a thirty seven year career in Natural Resources Conservation my specialty has been in water, which means that I've spent a really long time bringing really diverse people together on issues that that cut very deeply into culture in economics and. Family and heritage and really finding win win win solutions and that's great background for my legislative work at and also I think for Congress and personally I'm the daughter of a World War Two veteran and my mother was from Blue Jacket Oklahoma, she left there at age eighteen to go west to work in the Navy shipyard sin. and. My upbringing has been about her was about Hard work and making your own way and. And so I've I've to reflect those values in my life in and I. Think I think they've served me well as I built my career and am now turning to seeing if I could be helpful in Congress. So the reason I'm running is Because I think. I think Montana's. Our desire. and. Deserve a true independent Voice Congress. I. Think True Representation is is few and far between it's it's rooted in. Montana's hope struggles and dreams and and someone that will put the hyper partisanship aside and work with people of all political stripes on solutions for Montana and and the country and not not be beholden to special interests. So. It's about results and not playing politics. So I think you're starting to get at the answer to this question, but I find Montana's such an interesting state. Think people think of Montana as a very red republican state, but Montana has a history. Of. has a has a history of supporting Democrats. There's a Democratic senator right now there have been democratic governors. So how you make sure that you are connecting with the people of Montana an hearing what it is that they care about in a place that may be as in so defined by party lines. Montana for many reasons is known as the last best place. Frankly I. Think it's also one of the last best places for politics. I don't know if I'd be in politics if it weren't in Montana. Because people still vote for the person here they vote for someone who they identify with who they think represents values and they don't hours vote straight party line. So they they are notorious ticket splitters and one of the examples of that is in two thousand sixteen when trump won this state by twenty points, we also elected a democratic governor we we have a democratic senior senator. And one of the other aspects about Montana the Montana elected the first. Female member of any LEGIS national legislating body in the entire world in nineteen. Before women. Broadly had even could vote so. So, Montana's a pretty incredible place for lots of reasons. A lot of it is is that the politics are about their about real sayings, not just partisanship and party lines and and partisan game. So so that that's I think part of what makes Montana different and and they're proud I think proud of being ticket splitters and and they've got a strategy in mind when they voted I know I'm one of them so it's it's a great place to run. So we knew something about what the issues are. That are important nationally. But what are the issues that are really driving the people of Montana right now so I've built my platform from listening to Montanes could seventy five thousand miles on my car between the last campaign and when the pandemic took off traveling every corner of of this one, hundred, forty, seven, thousand, square mile stage and what they're telling me. Is that number one a they wanna fix to this patchwork of in healthcare system. We've got it's it's too expensive. It doesn't work hits you complicated they. They also want to make sure that everyone has opportunity to craft and pursue their own American dream, and and then also the third big priority that Montana's tell me is ensuring that we protect our incredible outdoor heritage chart are clean air and water public lands. That is it cuts to the core of Montana's is our ability to get outside and enjoy what makes Montana Montana. So I imagine, Montana's an interesting place to campaign anyway being such an enormous state and the Congressional district taking up the entire state but then. Campaigning right now during a pandemic is is even a different thing altogether. So what what does that look like right now how is campaigning in two thousand and twenty different for you than competing in two thousand eighteen Two thousand eighteen we throughout the playbook that that encourages people to refer candidates to focus on the the big seven, meaning our our our our muster urban areas, and and I just got in my truck camper with my dog and and a staffer, and we drove all over Montana and and talk to people in their communities over. Over their kitchen tables or in their local cafes about what was important to them and and with seventy five thousand miles again on. On the vehicles between that campaign and the beginning of this one. So. So that's how you campaign. It's very different. Now, we're doing a lot of the same things we did last time. So we're being very strategic on social media, and of course, doing television and radio ads and mail and all the normal parts of the campaign. But the real thing that's different is is my inability to get out physically to tack to Montana, and so I am making a lot of phone calls and I'm calling people and asking them what they care about in how I can be helpful and so luckily, we did that traveling in the past because people remember that they're like, Oh yeah. She's the one that will talk to anyone and that that reputation. Persists and precedes me and and and I think I. Think we built a great foundation that we're? That we're sprinting from now and and it's going to serve. US Well. You mentioned healthcare is an important issue. Healthcare was already a very important issue in twenty eighteen. But now in the midst of the pandemic is increasingly important. What are some things that you would like to see Congress doing to improve healthcare in this country? So I mean I just have to start out by saying everyone deserves access to quality affordable healthcare we've. We've been saying that for for years now, and we've got to get there as a country and healthcare. The healthcare issue is is personal for me. When I was eleven, my mother started to lose your memory in turned out that that was early onset Alzheimer's and and my dad, and I became her caregivers for eight years until she passed away and so. I know when a healthcare crisis can do to a family and hand it's tough. So I've worked on healthcare issues. In, the legislature despite having a career in natural resources healthcare was one of my priorities and the economy was where my priorities in the in the legislature because that's what people were telling me. They needed so. So I. AM proud to have advanced and pass legislation that that saving lives that's that's increasing that access and affordability of healthcare. So, we we need a leader that can do that in Congress and has a history of doing that. Now..

Montana Congress senator Kelly grigsby Voice Congress Kathleen Williams Natural Resources Conservation Alzheimer US trump Blue Jacket Oklahoma Montanes
"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:31 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"This should be working toward peace if everyone could understand that in come forward with that and I think we have a good chance but otherwise, we'll just repeat the same mistakes and we've done that in some instances in other ways so. As you say that I'm thinking of the families separated at our southern border, the kids in cages I mean all that's not a was not a war, but it's almost kind of being talked as an invasion right and and so there's there are parallels here that. I think some of the news media have been trying to put the human face, the family's. Not Spin, but but framing on on this issue right and and I think it is important that we see this impacting real people, rural children, real moms, and dads like how would you be thinking feeling? You know if this was this was happening to you and your family so that? Timeless message it's. It's something that always needs to be put out there I think the first. Trick is to dehumanize the opponent the adversary. So. It doesn't register whether it's slave enslaving them or you know genocide or what have you so thank you so much for for taking the time to get your mom to talk about this. Unsure. It was very healing for her before she passed away and for now putting it into this book if People WanNa, get this book. Yes, any any way that they can do that and do you have a website? They can they follow kind of your speech what have you in maybe if you're going to be speaking I, don't know in person virtually in their area that they could find out about these things. Absolutely, I have a website it's www dot kathleen birkenshaw dot com. Also. They'll be linked to my blog post, which also discussed when I'm doing various events Also, if you WANNA purchase my book, it's wherever books are sold right now the hard copy is sold out. So they have the better they are right now and yes and You can also order preorder the paperback which is coming out at August twenty fifth that will be available and what about teachers Teachers out there I'm sure there are who are in our listenership. They're they're now wanting to use this book in a classroom setting. Off. They're also curricular materials that go along with it or is this kind of center? I do have a discussion guide and there are ways that people have used it for language arts as well as social studies. As well, from other schools and you can also get the book through scholastic as well through their we need diverse books club and trying to think. So if they want to go to the website and there's also information about the events, my virtual visits, how those can be set up and to kind of go from there. So. I hope that they'll enjoy if they do pick up the ball. I'm sure that they will thank you again for who you are and what you're doing. Definitely, want to see you get healthier and. You know more Mobile I. Think you shown so much courage and Just, I think brilliants in in doing what you've done in making your mom story. So so accessible to so many people and I share your Ardour to see peacemaking as as definitely an obsession of everybody on this planet. Nobody nobody benefits from war. factly. Exactly. Thank you so very much for your kind words. Thank you. You're welcome and again folks My guess has been Kathleen Birkenshaw and She has written this book that I think a lot of us. Now are GonNa WanNa, get into read and to pass along, and again I want to encourage those in a in a classroom situation This is A. A way to tell this terrible chapter of our our history in a way that I think especially younger people will be able to identify with why this is horrific and should never happen again it's it's horrible that it happened at all but you know, let's let's learn from this and I hope that there are many more trees planted around the world. With little plaques, you know explaining that some things have survived just like your mom and lived to tell the story of learn from our pain learn from our suffering. This should not happen to anybody else. Absolutely absolutely. Well. Thank you again. Kathleen and look forward to seeing the paperback copy of your become out so that even more people can get it. Yes. Thank you. Yes and the United Nations has named it a education resource for teachers and students as well. So. We'll thanks for just inserting that at the very end that that's a great honor. Good for you. All right. Yeah and you you stay safe and rest up and Hopefully, we'll meet in person someday. I would love that. Thank you so very much for all that you do and to get the information for all Asian Americans. Thank you. Oh, you're welcome..

Kathleen Birkenshaw WanNa United Nations
"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

10:01 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Yes end so I became very depressed because my career that I had had in healthcare doing contracts with hospitals and doctors all had to stop. I didn't know if I could still be a good mom my daughter at the time. I could walk by myself. So it, I knew it was going to eventually. Attack my hands in is progressive so I was so despondent I think my mom you know she tried to tell me this story and then she said to me I wanted to kill myself. But I'm so glad that I, didn't because I would never had you at I would never had my granddaughter and she said, I, never thought I could find love again. But I, did and she said I had the strength of you know or Samurai family she said the same lead flows for me. And I would find my own way of living again and so it. It really was an interesting play of events of how she finally told me in. So then when I called. In seventh grade and I can I talk tell your story and I really thought she was going to say now because she was always very private about that and then she said, yes, and the reason why is that the students in that class be close to the age that she was she was. And she figured maybe they can relate to where I was in my family life from I was doing because of the same age and then their future voters. So they'll know leaving that classroom that nuclear weapons should never be used again. and. So that's how I went to the class, and then the following year they invited me back with new seventh graders in schools in the Charlotte area heard about it and invited me to speak and the teachers would start to ask do you have a book that could go with the curriculum? And writing things down just as a member of my daughter to have. So she have the information and I remember calling my mom and saying, you know I think I'm going to do a block and she she just can't believe anyone wanna read about a girl in here's. What happened the now? She just she was really amazed. and and so that's when I also I realized at that point if I'm going to do a book. That, with historical fiction piece, I wanted to also. Talk the culture in Japan during that time, because my mom had this picture that always had a place of honor in our home and it was her in her pop up. and. It's so special to her because. She only has five six photos from her childhood and they were all between the ages of three and five, and they were like at a different house. So they weren't damaged but oliver other pictures were damaged. From the fire the bombing so. In her papa was her favourite. On and so that's when I also knew I need to write about that. So that way the reader can feel for the person realize okay. They had these people I think my big thing is to connect with the humanity that was under the clouds and by doing that starting at months before the bombing I could talk about the mindset of the people, the politics they were so different the way they viewed their leaders and what the allied countries did the propaganda to their own people that the Japanese government gave and just how families were trying to live during that time period. And then be able to talk about what happened. So they could understand what she really lost that day in how quickly it was gone. Yeah I think. You know. Growing up hearing about this story, I was born in fifty four. I remember in elementary school we would have atomic bomb drills. During the Cold War and all. Right. Yeah and and But but at the same time hearing this diatribe that was in our history books and and politicians would say it does like well, you know we had to drop the to bonds. Because otherwise, if we invaded Japan, there'd be such a slaughter right and and so it's kind of I. It's it's worse than ironic to me. You know because this is the mass killing of. Hundreds of thou-. Civilians not not combatants and they had already firebombed, Tokyo. was made out of rice paper and wood right and all this kind of suffering. But but to hear still the justification, I think even today I struggle with okay. You drop one bomb. Why did you have to drop the second bomb Nagasaki I? It's like wasn't an aunt? Anyway, I. I I. Think it's important for. Americans at least because we have international audience to to to at least recognize that even at even today as as we. Are Looking with suspicion of North Korea with their nuclear weapons program and Iran and what have you That we south down very. Very disingenuous. Because we're still. The only country is actually used a weapon like that. And and the fact that we used it, we justified it. Yes and I think you know in the history classes you get that two paragraphs in the mushroom cloud picture and it's supposed to wrap everything up in tidy bow. But it doesn't work that way in and you know more that information that is now released after so many years and they look at diaries of the General Stinson and they look at Truman's diaries. You know it wasn't the only answer to just say we had to do that to save all those lives. There's also a Russia was going to be invading Japan and they. Didn't want them to do that. So they were there are other reasons in play actually Japan was discussing possibly surrendering because they were firebombed I mean they hit Khuda they hit all the different areas there before the atomic bombs were dropped. So I think part of my thing was to also let the students know that you know by the time that sea in nineteen thirty, one, Japan invaded Manchuria my mother was born in Nineteen thirty two. So her whole life was involved with them being at war. So by the time nineteen, forty-five rolled around. hitter Oshima was once a military port. However, by that point, all men the young men were out fighting in the Pacific and there were only a few that were left and a lot of them were training. She said her inner school the boys were being trained to make bullets out of bamboo. I mean, they just didn't have those resources anymore So I I think the by being able to explain that as well so that they can understand on the the prewar population of hitter. Shema was three, hundred, fifty, thousand people. Eighty. Thousand people died immediately or within hours of the bomb being dropped. In over the next five years one, hundred, forty to one, hundred, forty, five, thousand people would be dead as a result of their burns other radiation poisoning that they were exposed to. So. I think it's just so important that when the students walk away, they understand that Oh. That didn't just end the war is that always bothers me when people say that we had to do that to end the war? No, you did not. There was not the only factor and men would have died. Yes. But not as many as what they said would die there were not as many people who could keep fighting on. Japan I mean, you had elderly people and children there really weren't as many. So I think it's important that they hear all these different factors to it and not just to say that it ended the war because then you're not putting human being with that. You know it's so much easier. It makes it like video game like they have today I mean. If, you don't make that connection. We're going to be at risk of repeating the same deadly mistakes and and I, think that's what really got me to want to get this book across to want to speak with our future voters. So that they understand that there's more to it than just ending a war. And I and I think one of the unspoken hugely problematic a pieces of well, it was just any more save American lives. It's it's equating. It's it's valuing American lives far greater than Japanese lives, right? Especially old people and children. So Yeah Yeah you know I and in kind of preparing for this episode, I was reviewing some things about that whole incident and and you mentioned it already Kathleen but I realized that. Russia was kind of chomping at the bit to extend its influence and they if they had kind of joined forces with the. US. To you know bring. Japan to it's knees. They're saying they probably would've wanted to divide Japan like Berlin was divided. Yeah and so there was reasons why the US knowing what the ambitions were Russia they said, okay. Well, you know we don't want to ask them for help you know and hey, look we we have this new weapon A. Very very very well, let's get into your as your has. Now finally, you know told you her story. Teller. Tell us what she went through. I mean she's twelve years old house it that she wasn't part of that eighty thousand that were immediately vaporized. Share..

Japan Russia US Japanese government Charlotte North Korea oliver Pacific Oshima Tokyo. Stinson Shema Berlin Truman Kathleen Khuda Iran Manchuria
"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

08:04 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"It. And then it goes and then it turns itself off. And You know we've been using this now for live in Jersey and now for like three or four times of watering. And I literally have forgotten that I did that but. Why is like magic? It doesn't require me remember it just turns itself off, and so I'm thinking Oh. My Gosh, you know how come I didn't think of this sooner and easy to yourself up, but it's like For less than twenty bucks. You know we. Are I, get control of this thing that has to happen watering the vegetable garden. And it's it's not gonNA. See our water bills like skyrocket because of me forgetting in spite of my best intentions. So I don't know if there's anything like that in your life where. You persist in doing it the same way you've done a long time but. Even though maybe you did it. Okay. Fine in the past for whatever reason it's not working out. Fine. Sometimes it's better to think about find another solution that will actually. Remove the problem eliminate it and. You know sometimes, it is simple as as finding little timer Doo. Hickey that you stick between the Faucet in your hose. Other Times it's it's much more complicated, but you know it's easy to get stuck in our ways and even an especially when some of those old ways are causing problems now and again We shouldn't just keep doing it the same old way. Always I. Don't think so and and off to be honest with you I mean part part of me was feeling very prideful. It's like, no, I'm not I'm not losing it. You know I I don't need to have any gadget I I should be able to do this, and now that I've got this gadget a man like how come I didn't do this sooner. So. Anyway this this should be the this next water bills should be the last gigantic one. and. From this earth from this point forward. s just something I don't have to worry about anymore just remember to turn on the time her because they won't turn on itself. I, didn't I didn't WanNA spend the money for one that would turn on itself. I just needed the turn itself off. And I am so grateful to be married to someone. me. For my mistakes. That's that's worth. More than anything money or otherwise and You know just just really really grateful that she has that kind of temperate. Well. It's a time for us to. Get into this conversation that I had recently with Kathleen Birkenshaw. Talk About having to deal with real problems. It's not about water bills. About your whole world. Blowing up and catching on fire. So I. I know you really enjoy this conversation. Oh. It is. The seventy fifth and I hate using this word anniversary of the first week of August of the dropping of two atomic bombs at the end of the war against Japan in world. War. Two and I was contacted recently by one of our podcast listeners who actually wrote a book called the last Cherry Blossom, which is all about it's kind of a fictionalized historical account. If I understand this correctly of of your mother's own experience of being one of the Hibachi, one of the survivors of the atomic bomb but I just want to welcome you Kathleen. Burke Shaw to Birkenshaw gives me to to our podcast because This is a subject that I think we need to talk about just so that this never happens again. So welcome so much to the podcast Paul. Thank you so much Kenneth. Thank you for having me on I'm really excited to talk with you after listening to your podcasts. It's very nice to meet you this way. Well, you know we encourage a very non-asian thing very non-japanese thing which is ask for people to actually take initiative and promote themselves and the things that they do so. Long been paying attention to you know what happened there? Now seventy five years ago and I've even gone to a lecturer of another Hibakusha years ago, but I'm just really fascinated to talk to you about your mom's own experience. So. When are you kind of tell us? In a way of introducing yourself how you came to write this book. kind of finding out about your mom's own story. Sure sure. Well, the book journey really started about ten years ago when my own daughter was in seventh grade and she had come home from school very upset she had said that they just finished the World War Two section an-and she overheard some kids talking about that really cool mushroom cloud picture and she asked if I would go in and talk to them about the people who were under that cloud like her grandmother and I remember going to call my mom because I. needed to ask permission I had never spoken publicly about what she went through. The interesting thing is too is that I didn't even know she was from until I was eleven years old who really Yeah. She always said she was from Tokyo and the only reason I think I found out that years because it was the beginning of August and she had horrible nightmares and she always wake up screaming and I remember that the summer before it was around the same time and I kept asking why was that in? That's when she finally said that she was actually born in the Shema but she lost her family and her home in. At the atomic bombing and she said I can't really talk about it. It's too painful and then she said, please don't tell anyone so. So nothing was said for a long time I remember she still didn't talk about it until I was in high school and I read the book by John Hersey you Shema and that was the first time. I got any inkling of what she might have lived through and I remember just being horrified in in coming out of my room when I was reading it and asking her you know is this what it was like and she just said that it was hell she didn't WanNa talk about it in don't tell your teacher because I really I'm not able to talk about it to the class. So. She really didn't express too much of what happened until I was around thirty I got very ill and I was in the hospital for over a month and so when I came home I needed help take care of myself taking care of my daughter who was four then while my husband worked during the day. So my parents came and my mom would talk a lot about her childhood but then she slowly started to talk about what happened on August six and the days that followed and that was really the first time that she shared that with me. I don't think she may have shared that with me had I not gone ill. I had been diagnosed fire neurological disease, which is Kinda based from some of the radiation exposure that she had for being in the bombing was wondering. If there was a yeah. Yes. Yes. Sadly..

Kathleen Birkenshaw Cherry Blossom Hickey John Hersey Birkenshaw Japan Burke Shaw lecturer Kenneth Tokyo
"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

09:16 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Greetings everyone. This is Asian America Again Tong podcast and I'm your host Ken phone. Welcome back to the pod, and this is episode number two, hundred and fifty, four our guest. This first week in August is Kathleen Birkenshaw Kathleen. Happens to be inhabited listener to our podcast, and so already she scored big points. But when she reached out a couple of weeks ago, she said would you know her particular life story. May Have. Extra special significance for the first week in August turns out that. This first week is. The I hate calling Culligan Anniversary marked seventy five years since America dropped the first of two atomic bombs in Japan, I on here or Shema, and then on Nagasaki. and. Kathleen is actually the daughter of someone who was twelve years old in here Shema when that first atomic bomb dropped and she is what is known as he box Ya. Which means that she is a survivor of that terrible Holocaust. That was caused by the dropping of this atomic bomb. So Very. Fascinated and she had. Published several years ago a fictionalized history based on her mom's story that is used at various schools of starting from middle school all the way up to college, and so I definitely was very, very keen on getting her onto the pod and so that. At this particular time in history that we can remember. What was what was? Done. during this. War The end of world, War Two and I think it's important as we hit this marker to to reflect a little bit deeply about just how terrible war is and certainly weapons of war and to able to see this through the lens of not only Kathleen. Mom. But the impact it's had on captain's life including her physical health today I. Think. All very, very important reasons for her to be our guest this week. So after my introduction, I knew you really really going to be fascinated with her story. We hear in ceremony A had years and years of drought and So you know there's there's always been extra special attention paid to how often we water and certainly our water bills. Well, on the last couple of years We actually had a lot of rain and a lot of snow pack in in the mountains north of us, and so kind of drought restriction came off and yet you know it still weren't selling California it's a desert You know we have to be mindful of this now we have. A fairly sizable property I mean it's not fancy, but it sizable it's it's almost one hundred feet wide by one hundred, fifty feet deep, and especially since I retired, I'm the one that's kind of patrolling. All of this square footage. To eradicate. Fill bare spots and to. Plant new things and take out dead things and so on and so forth. Well, several years ago my wife had asked me to install a raised garden at the very back part of our property and This is not visible. From the House you because we we have this refurbished used to be a woodshed, and now it's kind of a studio about five hundred square foot studio so. Things that have been planted back there. Easily are ignored and die because. They. They just don't get enough water. Well so you know last year. Miniature go at planting some vegetables and. Nothing really exciting to share and so this year as spring run I just decided to ignore it. You know I'm not GonNa do anything again enough to do and apparently some of the seeds. That it's build out of some of the Japanese pumpkins these culture. They planted themselves in the soil and so as they started to sprout and grow I felt obligated to I actually have to water them now. and. So several plants in particular are doing really well, I mean some of the vines. Probably about ten twelve feet long now and. We're starting to see some of those Japanese Pumpkins. Here's. The problem. I'm a multitasker when I'm out doing yard work. There for several hours, picking up dog poop Hunt and watering the potted plants and pruning and all myriad kind of things and so I'll turn on the water back there and I just have to make a mental note to make sure to go back and turn it off. And a couple of weeks ago. I turned on the water in a win about doing other things and as I was puttering around the various parts of the yard, I would think of some other projects now I start to. Get very focused on that. And I completely forgot that my water still on. And so several hours later as I was going outside I mean son had already said, it was dark I was going outside with the dogs I think for for them to relieve themselves before they come in for the. So this is like ten, ten, thirty I heard this. Kind of hissing sound. Like What that noises and could be our neighbor's pool whatever enough say, Oh, crap of the water still. So I went back there and they turned it off. And you know almost kind of reverted back to small kids. Don't tell mom. Don't tell that. You know just feeling really stupid but it completely. Just dropped out of my consciousness. But. This is not something that a you're literally this is not something you're literally going to have you're going to have to pay for. I when the water bill comes, you're going to see like what's going on and my wife pays those utility bills. So I decided to let her know the next morning because she had already gone to bed and I said, oh brace yourself for the next water bill because I left the. Hose, running back in our raised guard in there and it was on for several hours and so as just. Now to the major credit of this saint I'm married to. She doesn't hardly ever like we just celebrated thirty nine years of marriage. He she ever. Blows her stack aunt. She she's She counts the pennies and as she pinches them, you know and we're retired so but anyway. I apologized and she didn't blame me and As expected. The water bill This past month was several. Well, let's just say. It was big. Okay and as she paid it you know she she's at Oh you know the water bills and she didn't say and that's because you left the water running she just said just just so you know right so it's like okay. I wish I could take back but I can't. Right. So earlier, this week. I noticed that. The chaplains back there needed some water. So I turned on, turned on the hose and one about all my chores. and. Once. Again, completely got distracted. Forgot to turn it off and. This time I found. I. Heard that sound the next morning as as I was. Out Watering. Grass seedlings. and. I'm like, Oh my God who was on all night. And you know again I I, my wife, we haven't got the bill for that yet So finally. I said I I've got to do something that's not GonNa require me to remember to turn off the water after I turned it on because it's just too big of a property and I've I've got bazillion things going on and yeah I'm sixty five and a half so. You know the gray matter is slowly deteriorating. So I searched on Amazon and I found this probably less than twenty dollars little faucet. Timer. Requires. No battery no electricity, and you basically said it like a a timer that you do on your stove just by turning the dial and I said it for like twelve minutes..

Kathleen Birkenshaw Kathleen Shema Ken phone America Japan California Amazon Nagasaki.
"kathleen" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

04:39 min | 6 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Women and Crime

"I can't think of what else the case Lot Kathleen Zellner only represents people she believes are innocent i. Believe that Melanie's and I know that's a great question. I would also like to say for this I know Kathleen I did I reached out. I sent her an email just to see if she would be interested in interviewing I haven't heard back remember but I suspect she's busy. Exonerating people left and right quickly before we get to the end here, but I always wondered. What your opinion of do you have? An opinion of Avery in terms of his innocence or guilt is so the fact that Kathleen Zellner took the case made me believe more strongly in his innocence, because I trust her judgment, but I go back and forth you also I. Don't know if you came across the fact that there. There was like a vial of blood from an earlier case. His blood was on file because he had a prior record. Even before the wrongful conviction, and they found that it had been unsealed and punctured I saw that, too, but then they tested the blood, and they couldn't find a preservative, but then someone said wouldn't necessarily show up, so there's a lot of things that could be shady, but could also be nothing also. Also there's something about the jurors like there were two jurors that had relatives that worked for the county in which she had the lawsuit pending like one was like a sheriff's father and someone else, and I. Don't remember that well. The case is such a rabbit hole I don't know and then there was something not long ago. where like an inmate confessed to killing theresa? How back did you hear that one I heard. Heard that, too, but they they didn't give it much credibility. You know usually you can't give those things much credibility, so I go back and forth I think if I had to say, I would say I think he's innocent. Because I think corruption exists, and as much as I would hate to believe, it could exist at this level I think it..

Kathleen Zellner Melanie Avery theresa
"kathleen" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:35 min | 7 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Can't really show. Can we post you for a few weeks? I broke my hip. You did what? Did I. Mean This is straight finding time for. got. Thanks for clearing this up for us. I'm so I'm so much more comfortable with the situation around be dot net with your explanations really really. Glad End you know. The next thing I wanna get I is like here's how you work with a preview, and so I haven't got anything out. Look, clarify what we said here that we're not giving. We're not. We're not giving up on. V still part of the future. We know we have a lot of using it and we want to give them the option of coming to dot net core, and that is an oxygen. Tank, it may or may not be right for them. But we. And we want to embrace those people that had sharpen vivey shops and not make them translate. Their Levy APPs together dot net courses, one of our scenarios to support so. Rap I love it. Thank you Kathleen. It's great to talk to you always and Richard said. Thanks for clearing things up. It's a lot more sense now. We'll see you next time on dot net rocks..

Kathleen Richard
"kathleen" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen" Discussed on How I Built This

"I mean after matchup of Hartford. who still kind of standoffish right? Because you've just gotten burned really bad I mean were there like trust issues there. No he was great. I was like he felt. I felt to me like a lifeline but it was safe because I could walk away anytime I want. You know. I wasn't bound by any contract or money or anything. I find not trusting people way too to exhausting and it's not the way I want to live my life so I was very very naive and I used to trust blindly now. I still trust everybody but I trust with my eyes. Open all right but now you have to reestablish your brand right as tate. It's the same cookie but you got to reestablish a brand new brand. I had to actually make a better cookie because I had to compete against Kathleen Bake Shop. So there meantime. Those guys are down Virginia with plans to take your brand that you'd spent twenty years building up and really Expanding that to were you did that cause anxiety for you did you think. Oh my God they're gonNa take my name my brand and they're gonna go all over the country people are GonNa think it's me no it because I don't think about what others are doing and I just had to think about what I had to do. And of course my goal was to take them down through goal was to beat them yes to be better. So did you continue on with your previous strategy of baking in the retail shop and baking for wholesale and mainly kind of gourmet shops in in major cities in the US. Yes and when Michael came on board we went through all the products and the products that had the highest margins is the ones we focused on selling so he just kind of really zeroed in on the cookies. You know starting Tate's was about surviving so you know when you're in a survival double mode those things. Those kind of decisions are hard. They just had to be executed. They just have to be done. So where were you guys. I mean. Did you start to expand their distribution. Yeah first of all I had to get. I had to get all of Long Island in New York City back because my whole story was so public. Some stores welcomed with open armed some stores stuck with the Kathleen's brand a lot of stores carried both right and that's how it shook out and then even when I was some vendors I had for twenty years and and when I opened up Tate's they treated me like I was brand new customer. Others were just so helpful and just said okay. I know you uh-huh uh-huh this forty thousand dollars. You know you pay that off when you can and and we're standby you you know it's amazing you know just the difference people it both just amazing so when you re launched the company is Tate. You had wanted to take a break in your life. You knew that was is not gonNA happen anytime soon because all of a sudden you gotta start up again and so were you back at hamster wheel back to those crazy long hours off only for a short time because when I opened tate's then I had a plan and I had a goal. And what was your plan will. What was the goal I? I had to have an exit strategy. My goal is to sell when I was fifty five. So you knew you reconstituted this thing and you relaunched it. There was a time horizon. Yes and you were thinking maybe some local business would put bite or something like that. No I thought I did think bigger than that and I didn't think as big as I went but you know I was going to sell it fifty five so I could retire her. I mean you're still a pretty small shop at this point right it's still forty or so employess When I first open tate's yeah and in those first few years of tastes like annual revenue? I mean I would say.

Tate Long Island Virginia Hartford. US Michael New York City Kathleen
"kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Mean you got Hillary Clinton. Yeah I mean like we pretty much maxed out We madly caffeine's you ever was. We never got. Aw chopped liver who shares maybe a whole nother like avenue for coupling Turner. What's your question? How their hi? My question is Kathleen do you have any memories of working with Ricky Lake Ontario. Mom Yeah Good Pussy. Willow no I I will do the second guy I you know. I think that that's with overdone. Since boring don't he was a good a group. I think the funniest funniest one though sometimes was waterston because he took it all very seriously and he came very earnest. Any any he came over and he said now. Do you think that we might be immortalizing. Glorifying serial killing up DOC. It's a movie John. More specifically that was great Spencer they're from Wisconsin for Alana. What Questions Spencer? Hi Alanna If you could change anything about the series finale abroad city what would you do differently. I honestly wouldn't change a way of the broad city failing. Yeah that was the privilege to end it when we wanted the way we wanted. I would say it ended. I mean you knew it ended before its time but that's the.

Spencer Hillary Clinton caffeine Ricky Lake Ontario Turner Kathleen Willow Wisconsin
"kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Vegas Sue got married Kathleen Kern character had the chance to right the wrongs of her pass. Oh Kathleen. I'm curious if you ever wish you could do the same. I may not be able to create a time warp. I do have a speed round of questions of challenging experiences from your past prior tired acting. What was your worst job my worse up? I was attempt at a Jewish travel agency during Passover season and everyone ruling was talking to me in Yiddish and they were all right What is the most embarrassing thing you've ever been caught hot doing in your trailer? I'm never telling anyone that. Utah The in two thousand twelve on this show. You said that Bill hurt was your her absolute best onscreen kiss. What was your worst onscreen kiss? Burt Reynolds what Phil was Switching channels really it was he sought why he just I rehearse with Michael. Cain yeah I supposed to do with Mike okay good toys yes well McCain got caught on jaws four okay short kept breaking down and so I was pregnant and I had a stop date not right so we got everything we could without him and then finally the producer went and hired and he couldn't kiss. Yes not a good that mustache. Wow Wow what's the dumbest thing you've ever blown a ton of money on his coins. Why would I confess these these? Do you have to worst What's one piece of great advice ice? You regret not taking. I suppose if would be. Don't take these so seriously. Don't take things so seriously. Thank you very much. Second City. Alana's character loves station SUSHI PHONE WIGS and Andy. But there's one thing that fires are up most of all we need so a Lotta as a catalyst store. Here's what I'm going to present various celebrities. Ladies you've worked with you tell us what kind of stone or you think they would be. The I guess yes. Okay what kind of stone or Wood Scarlett.

McCain Kathleen Kern Phil Vegas Sue SUSHI PHONE WIGS Wood Scarlett Burt Reynolds Second City Utah Bill Cain Alana producer Mike Michael Andy
"kathleen" Discussed on Serial Killers

Serial Killers

10:57 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Serial Killers

"The couple fought over Sarah's bedtime to Kathleen who had always been a very regimented person, one of their daughter to sleep at exactly eight thirty pm. This was complicated by Craig's habit of playing with Sarah every night after work, Kathleen felt he was riling her up before bedtime. Kathleen later recalled that Sara was a quote, very loud player. There was lots of screaming and laughing, and they would always be trying to chase each other around and quote after playing with her father, Sarah was nearly impossible to put down to sleep at night in nineteen Ninety-three Sarah was thriving. She had survived for ten and a half months, much longer than her deceased siblings. She was doing well enough that Kathleen successfully lobbied Craig to stop using the sleep apnea monitor. Kathleen was older and better at dealing with her darker moods. She was learning to walk away from the crying baby or to drop her off with a relative when the stress became too great. But Kathleen took to dropping Sarah off with Craig's sister Carol. So frequently that she was spending most of her time away from the baby. When Carol new, it's husband told Kathleen that she was missing out on her daughter's life by pointing are often relatives. Kathleen began to stay home with the girl again. But as nineteen Ninety-three progressed, Kathleen once again, felt overwhelmed by the stresses of motherhood, and Craig began observing signs of Kathleen's dark moods. Kathleen wrote in her diaries that she and Craig were at each other's throats. She was constantly afraid. Craig would leave her. She noticed that he flirted with other women and rejected her advances while she. Was fat with pregnancy weight. She wrote quote, Craig's, roving, I will always be of concern to me, must lose extra weight, or he will be even less in love with me than he is. Now. I know that physical appearance means everything to him and quote, Kathleen resented that the baby ate up all of her time, keeping her away from the gym and the path to repairing her marriage. Kathleen was still just twenty six years old and all of her adult life had been spent with Craig since the falling out with their foster family. Over the wedding, Kathleen had become wrapped up in Craig's family. She relied heavily on his sister Carol for help with the child care and the full bigs spent most of their vacation time with Craig's sisters and brothers to loose Craig would be to lose her entire new family on August twenty. Eighth nineteen ninety three, Kathleen and Craig. Once again fought over Sarah's fussiness an inability to sleep soundly. Her constant crying in the night was taking its toll on Kathleen anxiety and on her relationship with Craig. They needed some time away. So the full bigs brought their little girl to the beach that day Sarah had a cold, but she still enjoyed the waves and the sand. It was a good day out for all of them. But that night Sarah was fussy. She kept Kathleen awake from. Most of the night after they put her to bed hours later at one twenty AM on August twenty. Ninth nineteen Ninety-three Craig was once again awoken in the dead of night by Kathleen screams in what had become a nightmarish routine. Craig found his daughter, Sara cold in her bassinet. Craig notice that Sarah's body was unusually straight her limbs all down by her sides rather than all crooked as they'd usually be. He also noted the time as one twenty AM on August twenty ninth strangely, Kathleen later recorded. One o'clock AM as the time of death in her diary. This discrepancy could simply mean that one of them remembers the time incorrectly or it could mean that Kathleen new Sarah was dead for twenty minutes before alerting. Craig officer. Deborah McDermott responded to the zero zero zero call radioed for backup and took over. The resuscitation efforts for forty minutes before breaking the bad news to the full bigs. Sarah was dead. Sara's. Autopsy showed signs of minor congestion and watery fluid in her lungs. The coroner also noticed tiny abrasions near Sarah's mouth. These symptoms were all consistent with both smothering and SIDS with no other obvious cause of death present in the autopsy, Sarah's death was attributed to SIDS this time, though the police were more wary losing. One child to SIDS was unfortunate, but the full Biggs had now lost three children in a row detective, Stephen Saunders questioned the full Biggs and he was struck by the couple's of this grief and distress at the death of their third child. Craig gave his much information as he could to the detective. But Kathleen was sobbing too hard to answer many of the questions. She said later of that night, the police quote. Sort of came in full force. We were a little intimidated by it and quote, detective Saunders found nothing amiss with the couple since the corner had already diagnosed Sarah with SIDS, the case was closed and the full bigs were given full permission to bury their daughter. One reason for the authorities, initial investigation into Sarah's death was because in the mid nineteen ninety s the medical and law enforcement communities. Attitudes towards SIDS deaths were changing methods for identifying and preventing cid's were being discovered and implemented all over the world. The number of SIDS deaths in the first world countries had dropped drastically and the last several decades and to thirties, began to view multiple SIDS deaths in the same family as highly suspicious earlier in nineteen Ninety-three serve ROY meadow. A British pediatrician testified at trial that Beverley Allitt nurse had smothered four children in her care and that it was statistically impossible for all four deaths to have been caused by SIDS meadows. Famously said that quote, one SIDS case is a tragedy to suspicious and three is murder on. Unless there is proof to the contrary and quote this saying which became known as meadows law was based upon the extreme statistical improbability of SIDS striking multiple children in the same family meadows pointed to forty two cases of SIDS deaths that were later revealed to be homicides saying that quote sits has been used at times as a pathological diagnosis to evade awkward truths and quote meadows. Law was cited by the prosecution in several cases, all over the world in the next decade has caregivers of multiple SIDS cases were convicted. However, it's important to note that metals law was later recognized as nothing more than an unproven assumption. Prosecutors were no longer allowed to cite this assertion in court, but during the time that the full big children were dying. Prosecutors were still applying meadows law to cases where multiple children in one family died of. Sids. After Sarah's death in August of nineteen Ninety-three the full bigs marriage, degraded Craig was the only one still searching for answers. He wanted to know more about what Kathleen had observed the night. Sarah had died, but Kathleen did not want to discuss the tragedy and never spoke to Craig about it. Again in one thousand nine hundred five, two years after Sarah's death, Craig was still not coping well with his grief, but Kathleen was ready to move on with her life. She wrote Craig two page letter of ultimatum. Either he would seek grief counseling or she would leave. This was not the first time she threatened to leave him Craig and Kathleen had separated and reconciled multiple times over the past two years, but Craig could not lift himself out of the fog of grief. So Kathleen moved out, Kathleen foster mother Deirdra helped her rent an apartment and start over without Craig. Kathleen. Noted that ever since their fight over the wedding planning, Deirdre had always been quote, quick to judge and put Craig down with his changing jobs and all that sort of thing, and quote. While Creggan Kathleen were separated. She began to grow closer to Craig's. Other sister, Sherri Sherri brought out the fun side of Kathleen and helped her revert to an easier carefree time before all the tragedies. They went out to bars and clubs together, Sherry got Kathleen into Jenny, Craig, and Kathleen lost a lot of the weight she'd put on in the last few years seeing Kathleen moving on without him finally motivated Craig to seek grief counseling. Kathleen said, quote, he seemed to snap out of its slightly and must have thought my God. She's actually gone. He began calling and visiting Kathleen, they went to couples counseling together by nineteen Ninety-six. They were ready to give the marriage another. Try to help with the fresh start the full Biggs move to hunter valley in the wine country region of New South Wales. They wanted to forget the past. Kathleen didn't tell them all boroughs about her reconcile. Liaisson with Craig, but Deirdra eventually found out through the grapevine. She never forgave Kathleen for it. Kathleen said, quote, my parents pretty much disowned me. Once they discovered that Craig, I hadn't actually truly broken up and deer drill hasn't spoken to be sense and quote, can't leans foster parents moved to a new house and didn't tell Kathleen where they moved, which hurt her deeply. But she blocked out the pain of this loss and tried to forge a new life with Craig, despite all their losses. Everything finally seemed back on track for Kathleen Craig, but tragedy still lurked. And soon the full bigs would experience the untimely death of yet another child. And this time the police wouldn't let it go next week. We'll take a closer look at Laura full big's death and Kathleen's conviction for murder will uncover what five. Finally tipped off the police and earned Kathleen full big her notoriety as one of Australia's. Worst female serial killers. Thanks

Kathleen Craig Creggan Kathleen Sarah SIDS Kathleen foster Sara cold Carol new murder Biggs Beverley Allitt Australia Deborah McDermott Deirdra Sherri Sherri detective Saunders cid officer ROY meadow Laura
"kathleen" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"Crete boundaries around that and then in doing so you're able to protect what's most important to you and keep out everything else and just to give them really practical ways in which this happens because i know that's very broad and adorable in so many ways is think about creating work hours for yourself but maybe it's not even work hours maybe email hours like ours in which you will check an answer emails and outside of those hours maybe you'll look at it if you don't want to draw that boundary but you won't respond i think this is one of the hardest ones for people these days to employ for themselves but it's one that kathleen and i put into place years ago and it allows us to be better people in the whole lot of ways not only are we able to be better at our work because whenever it is time to sit down and replied emails were actually able to focus and give thoughtful and thorough replies but outside of those hours were actually able to spend real time with her our family and friends or with ourselves because we've created a boundary that protects both inside and outside so important of that space how it is that we're going to show up in the world i love sinking about boundaries in terms of fear of missing out because i want to create all the things and i wanna do all of the things but i have chosen to plant rosemary and basil in my garden and i'm gonna do rosemary and basil the best i'm not gonna worry about someone else's flowers that looked pretty over here or someone else's veggie garden because apparently vine bores love my garden like i'm just going to focus on rosemary and basil so that's like a metaphor for me of really just committing to what it is and i'm wanting to create but another thing about boundaries and one of my favorite exercises in the book that we probably need to do ourselves if you've ever worked a day job and if some of your listeners are still in a day job they've probably gotten a handbook from hr that tells them what their workout.

kathleen
"kathleen" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"Kathleen thinks she may have for you may have i think i bring one into this world of boss maybe so maybe maybe it is delegated to some people earlier than others but the whole idea that is that there's it's threefold it's you can define for yourself who you are and what that means is that you're breaking all experts actions that are put upon you and that's that's something that i feel like is talked about significantly more now than ever before and i totally welcome that conversation i think society and family and you know even ourselves or or media put expectations on each of us and i think boss knows how to look through all of those and really into themselves and who it is if they want to be so a boss knows who it is that they are they also know what it is that they want and that's defined i think by who they are and releasing all of those expectations and getting so clear on what it is that you are here to do what it is that you're here to work for that you you can that you can start making it happen which is that last piece where you see the thing you want and you're gonna take the steps to get there and that is the hardest part as if like defining who you are and what you want is difficult enough you also have to get there and that's the work that we talk about all the time you know do the work be bosses how we end all of our podcast because you have to do the work to get there and someone who can show up and do that work all three of those pieces are the people that we see as being bossed they're the people who who own it and who worked for it and who achieve it and it's not easy is not always fun but it is always worth it on my gosh oh my gosh okay so two things i wanna tease out of this and we can go back and forth so one thing that is extremely hard for everybody to do on some level is to own it.

Kathleen