17 Burst results for "Kathleen Karen"

"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

01:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"Hey everyone. I am so thrilled that you're here. Welcome to another episode of the wellness. Business podcast. My name is karen pack. And you know i'm hanging out with kathleen legris. Hey kathleen karen you doing so good so good springs on the way. I'm super happy. I love this time of year. I know you do. And that's still for this. He he may not know. Garin has two houses. She has one in michigan burger for the winter and then she gets a limit or other house in arizona. She's a smart cookie. Yeah yeah well. Actually we're in arizona right now. So yeah i've been. I've been pretty snugly warm. But i feel for all my friends and family back in michigan. There's no doubt about it. Yeah so. I don't know if everybody else's but i am originally from new york. I moved out to california ninety-one so now seriously i literally won't even go outside to go a walk if it's below succeeded. Ridiculous photo faces together like literally. She's wearing a winter coat of his below. Sixty history raising. It's like oh my goodness definitely could never move back golden hours. I really do it. I was a kid know things. i think. My daughter's doing fell all right so let's jump into today's episode today. We're bringing back in episode. That will answer a lot of the questions that you have about running facebook ads so whether you're thinking about running ads or you've been running ads for a while now but your results aren't as good as you would like. This is going to be a big help. This is one of our favorite guests. Our guests on this amcor episode. Is rick mall ready and he is one of our top goto experts.

new york arizona kathleen legris california today karen pack kathleen karen Garin facebook two houses michigan one Sixty history ninety-one rick mall favorite amcor
"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:04 min | 2 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good morning. It's a 30. Live from NPR News. I'm Barbara Klein. House Republicans are due to address calls today to remove Cuban on conspiracy promoter Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene from her committee assignments. MPR's cloudy aggress, Ellis says some Republicans aren't waiting. There were reports House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy met with Green behind closed doors last night. As well as the House GOP Steering committee, which can make decisions on whether a member can stay on a panel. McCarthy said last week, Greens comments were deeply disturbing. But he and other House members haven't said much publicly since. So Green is forcing these leaders either to address her claims or risk she becomes the new face for the party. International human rights groups are condemning Pakistan for discriminating against members of a Muslim minority group living in the U. S. NPR's DEA Hadeed Reports from Islamabad Am Adi's have long been persecuted in Pakistan, now a statement by Amnesty International Human Rights Watch on the International Commission of Jurists. Says Pakistan is trying to persecute them abroad. Ah move it described as a dangerous escalation, it says Pakistan's telecommunications authority has threatened the administrators of a website about Amad Islam that's run out of the United States. Theodore Itty warned them they are violating Pakistan's constitution and could be charged with blasphemy, a crime that can carry the death penalty in Pakistan. NPR's DEA Hadeed in Islamabad. This is NPR Lie from KQED News. I'm Brian what President Joe Biden signed several executive orders on immigration Tuesday, including one that creates a task force to reunify migrant families separated by the Trump Administration. KQED is Michelle Wiley reports. Hadn't said he quote condemns the human tragedy of taking Children from their parents at the border and put the force of his government behind reuniting them, and I'm doing some of the harm they suffered. More than 5000 Children were separated from their parents as a result of the Trump administration's immigration policies and more than 600 parents are still unaccounted for. Kathleen Karen is director of Justice in motion a nonprofit that's been tracking down parents in Central America. She emphasized how important it is that the families are consulted in the reunification process. They need to be at the center of this, so the families are unintentionally traumatized, hurt again. Advocates say another way to address the harm is by providing families away to live in the U. S. Building is a professor of law and migration of the University of San Francisco. There are visas in our law already, for example, victims of crime victims of domestic violence that get these asses well. Wang out of these air for Sonny, who's been victimized by the United States government. The task force will be led by the newly confirmed head of homeland security All 100, New York, US Biden also signed orders aimed at addressing the underlying causes of migration.

Pakistan NPR News Kevin McCarthy Joe Biden NPR Islamabad Trump Administration House GOP Steering committee United States Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Green Kathleen Karen International Commission of Ju DEA DEA Hadeed Barbara Klein KQED House Theodore Itty
"kathleen karen" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:20 min | 2 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on KCRW

"This is the California report. Good morning. I'm Luigi Molly. California's covert 19 surge has crested both positive case numbers and hospitalizations are declining. And Dr Mark Galley is making a promising prediction about the state's hospitalization numbers. He's the secretary of the California Health and Human Services Department. We predict that fewer than half the people you have in hospitals today will be in hospitals 30 days from now across the state, though he warned that that could change quickly if people let down their guard. Alley urged residents to avoid Super Bowl gatherings this weekend. The virus is still light spread. Nearly all 54 of 58 counties are in the most restricted status for reopening and the death toll continues to be at an all time high about 540 people are dying in California daily. President Joe Biden signed several executive orders on immigration Tuesday, including one that creates a task force to reunify migrant families separated by the Trump administration. Hey, cuties, Michelle Wiley reports, Biden said he quote condemns the human tragedy of taking Children from their parents of the border and put the force of his government behind reuniting them, and I'm doing some of the harm they suffered. More than 5000 Children were separated from their parents as a result of the Trump administration's immigration policies and more than 600 parents are still unaccounted for. Kathleen Karen is director of Justice in motion a nonprofit that's been tracking down parents in Central America. She emphasized how important it is that the families are consulted in the reunification process. They need to be at the center of this The families are unintentionally traumatized, hurt again. Advocates say another way to address the harm is by providing families away to live in the U. S. Building is a professor of law and migration at the University of San Francisco. There are visas in our law already, for example, victims of crime victims of domestic violence that Get these asses well, one out of these air for Sonny, who's been victimized by the United States government. The task force will be led by the newly confirmed head of homeland security All 100, New York, US. Biden also signed orders aimed at addressing the underlying causes of migration and promoting immigrant integration and citizenship. For the California report. I'm Michelle Wily as we approach the 50th anniversary of the federal Clean Water Act, Hollister Assemblyman Robert Rivas says 95% of the state's waterways are polluted or impaired. He's authored legislation that would reallocate money to start cleaning them up so that our most polluted regions are most polluted. Communities don't have to keep waiting at the back of the line for funding. The bill would also increase enforcement against water polluters. Support for the California report comes from water heaters only specializing in the repair and replacement of water heaters since 1968 Licensed and insured open 24 hours a day every day. Learn Maura water heaters only dot com Eric and Wendy Smith, whose philanthropy includes Schmidt Ocean Institute, working to advance the frontiers of ocean research, sharing the connection between.

California Joe Biden Dr Mark Galley Trump administration Kathleen Karen California Health and Human Se Luigi Molly Assemblyman Robert Rivas New York Michelle Wiley Michelle Wily Alley Schmidt Ocean Institute Sonny Maura President United States
"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 2 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good morning. I'm Lily Jamali, California's Cove in 19 Surge has crested both positive case numbers and hospitalizations are declining. And Dr Mark Galley is making a promising prediction about the state's hospitalization numbers. He's the secretary of the California Health and Human Services Department. We predict that fewer than half the people you have in hospitals today will be in hospitals 30 days from now across the state, though he warned that that could change quickly if people let down their guard. Alley urged residents to avoid Super Bowl gatherings this weekend. The virus is still light spread. Nearly all 54 58 counties are in the most restricted status for reopening and the death toll continues to be at an all time high about 540 people are dying in California daily. President Joe Biden signed several executive orders on immigration Tuesday, including one that creates a task force to reunify migrant families separated by the Trump Administration. KQED is Michelle Wiley reports. Hadn't said he quote condemns the human tragedy of taking Children from their parents of the border and put the force of his government behind reuniting them, and I'm doing some of the harm they suffered. More than 5000 Children were separated from their parents as a result of the Trump administration's immigration policies and more than 600 parents are still unaccounted for. Kathleen Karen is director of Justice in motion a nonprofit that's been tracking down parents in Central America. She emphasized how important it is that the families are consulted in the reunification process. They need to be at the center of this, so the families aren't unintentionally traumatized, hurt again. Advocates say Another way to address the harm is by providing families away to live in the U. S. Building is a professor of law and migration at the University of San Francisco. There are visas in our law already, for example, victims of crime victims of domestic violence that Get these asses well, Wang out of these air for Sonny, who's been victimized by the United States government. The task force will be led by the newly confirmed head of homeland security All 100, New York, US. Biden also signed orders aimed at addressing the underlying causes of migration and promoting immigrant integration and citizenship. For the California report. I'm Michelle Wily as we approach the 50th anniversary of the federal Clean Water Act, Hollister Assemblyman Robert Rivas says 95% of the state's waterways are polluted or impaired. He's authored legislation that would reallocate money to start cleaning them up so that our most polluted regions are most polluted. Communities don't have to keep waiting at the back of the line for funding. The bill would also increase enforcement against water polluters. Support for the California report comes from water heaters only specializing in the repair and replacement of water heaters since 1968 Licensed and insured open 24 hours a day every day. Learn Maura water heaters only dot com Eric and Wendy Schmidt, whose philanthropy includes Schmidt Ocean Institute, working to advance the frontiers of Ocean research, sharing the connection between life on land.

California Joe Biden Dr Mark Galley Trump Administration Kathleen Karen Assemblyman Robert Rivas California Health and Human Se Lily Jamali New York Michelle Wiley KQED Schmidt Ocean Institute Michelle Wily Alley Sonny Maura President
"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 2 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the California report. Good morning. I'm Luigi Molly, California's Cove in 19 Surge has crested both positive case numbers and hospitalizations are declining. And Dr Mark Galley is making a promising prediction about the state's hospitalization numbers. He's the secretary of the California Health and Human Services Department. We predict that fewer than half the people you have in hospitals today will be in hospitals 30 days from now across the state, though he warned that that could change quickly if people let down their guard. Alley urged residents to avoid Super Bowl gatherings this weekend. The virus is still light spread. Nearly all 54 58 counties are in the most restricted status for reopening and the death toll continues to be at an all time high about 540 people are dying in California daily. President Joe Biden signed several executive orders on immigration Tuesday, including one that creates a task force to reunify migrant families separated by the Trump administration. Thank you Ladies. Michelle Wiley reports, Biden said he quote condemns the human tragedy of taking Children from their parents of the border and put the force of his government behind reuniting them, and I'm doing some of the harm they suffered. More than 5000 Children were separated from their parents as a result of the Trump administration's immigration policies and more than 600 parents are still unaccounted for. Kathleen Karen is director of Justice in motion a nonprofit that's been tracking down parents in Central America. She emphasized how important it is that the families are consulted in the reunification process. They need to be at the center of this The families are unintentionally traumatized, hurt again. Advocates say another way to address the harm is by providing families away to live in the U. S Building is a professor of law and migration of the University of San Francisco. There are visas in our law already, for example, victims of crime victims of domestic violence that Get these asses well, Wang out of these air for Sonny, who's been victimized by the United States government. The task force will be led by the newly confirmed head of homeland security, All 100 my or kiss. Biden also signed orders ended addressing the underlying causes of migration and promoting immigrant integration and citizenship for the California report. I'm Michelle Wiley. As we approach the 50th anniversary of the federal Clean Water Act, Hollister Assemblyman Robert Rivas says 95% of the state's waterways are polluted or impaired. He's authored legislation that would reallocate money to start cleaning them up so that our most polluted regions are most polluted. Communities don't have to keep waiting at the back of the line for funding..

California Joe Biden Dr Mark Galley Michelle Wiley Trump administration Kathleen Karen Assemblyman Robert Rivas California Health and Human Se Luigi Molly Alley San Francisco Sonny President United States U. S Building Central America professor of law
"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:35 min | 2 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Actively working. Get them back together. Kathleen Karen is executive director of Justice Motion Group. That is part of that team. Kathleen Welcome. Thank you. And what do you make of Biden's executive orders to create a task force that would reunite more Children with their families? Is that enough? The task force is the very first step, but it needs to take quick, bold action to do the right things to these families that were horrific. Clea affected. By the terrible family separation policy will help us quantify this problem because in the final weeks of the Trump administration last October, we learned that nearly 600 Children were still separated from their families. His there been any progress since then, reuniting those kids. I mean, how how big is the problem? Still, well, the first step is finding the parents were part of the A. C L U lawsuit that was charged with finding the parents as step one through the lawsuit. There was very few families who could return over 1000 were forcibly removed from the United States after they were separated from their Children, so the ones that are in Central America Need to come back to the United States. That is something only President Biden could do because the loss who can't bring all of those 1000 families back to be safely reunited in the United States. I see. So describe that work of finding those families who are now back in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador. How hard is that job to find those families? It's difficult because the Trump Administration had no plan or intention to reunite these families, so they did not set up a database and track and track the families, the ones that were deported. They said. We're categorically ineligible to brew unify with their Children. So the task was really difficult in mountainous communities, rule areas searching for these parents based on very bad data from the U. S government that we're giving to us and drips and drabs. It was almost like slow torture. Over the past 2.5 years to get enough information to have more solid leads to look for these families. Can you describe what it's like when you do find one of these families? And they realize that Perhaps they're at least a step closer to finding their Children. The parents are understandably deeply distrustful because of what they suffered. So we have a defender Network Justice, Emotion Defender network has over 40 organizations that we collaborate with in Mexico and Central America and these air the on the ground experts, human rights lawyers in the field who are part of these communities, so how you search for them? And how you approach someone that's been so deeply pop harmed by the government is something that takes a lot of skill and relying on local partners to do this work and so getting over the distressed to say we can actually help you. So it takes quite a bit to bring up the belief and sometimes we can't find a parent because They don't want to be found Many many were escaping for their lives and seeking safety with their families, United States So upon return there hiding. How are the kids doing here? In the U. S. The Children are either with sponsors, which could be a next ended family, or they're in foster care in the United States, so or so They are still suffering. There's still many of them are still separated from their parents. This is ongoing harm for these families. They need access to mental health services to try to deal with the separation, but they can't even start That process is much harder to start that process. If they don't have legal status in the United States. There are some concerns that the president's orders and the plans to reverse the Trump administration's policies in immigration would create A sense that there's a new opportunity to come to the United States and create a new wave of immigrants here coming to the U. S. What do you think about that? Is that a valid concern? I think the valid concern is that the U. S needs to step up and show that we're civilized country and that that family separation policy was a boring And the President. Biden doesn't do something for those families. He's sending the message that you know what it's all right that that happened to those families. I think what we need to focus is on the harm off. You know, over 5000 families that were deeply deeply injured by one of the most egregious immigration policies in the history of this country. That's what he needs to focus on. There's other ways. To think bigger term about building the rule of law and the countries of origins to ensure that there there's peace, so people feel like they don't have to migrate. That's Kathleen Karen, founder and executive director of Justice Motion, a group that is trying to reunite parents with Children who have been separated at the U. S. And Mexico Border. Kathleen. Thank you so much. Thank you, Peter for the opportunity. Now from immigration to impeachment. House impeachment managers have filed a brief ahead of next week's Senate trial, arguing that former President Donald Trump is singularly responsible for the deadly riot at the U. S Capitol last month. Lawmakers are calling for Trump to be convicted of incitement of insurrection and barred from holding future federal office. Let's bring in NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Domenico. This 80 page pre trial brief from House managers says the capital right wouldn't have happened, quote without President Trump, creating a powder keg, striking a match and then seeking personal advantage from the ensuing havoc. So what Democrats say in the brief to back that up? They point to his statements from that day A and his false claims that there was widespread election fraud. That's what they point to that that created the environment for which the capital was ransacked. And obviously, many of the people who went to the capital were waving trump flags. They were saying that the president sent them that they were trying Tomov turn the results because they felt that it was Uh, you know, falsely conducted and they you know were they were many chanting Stop the steel and at this hashtag that was tweeted around and shared millions of times. On was all stemming from President Trump's false claims that he actually won the election. So there's a lot of substance to debate here. There's also a process debate right because there's some debate about whether this trial can even go on after President Trump has left office and in response, House managers have said there is no January exception that allows the president to incite an insurrection..

President Donald Trump Trump administration United States President Biden president Kathleen Karen Kathleen Welcome Central America A. C L U Justice Motion Group executive director executive founder and executive director Mexico Kathleen U. S fraud Guatemala U. S. And Mexico Border NPR
"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

06:30 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"This podcast getting out there and sharing their message and empowering people with true lasting sustainable health strategies on my gosh i love that story in attention because you do share part of that story at the beginning of your book and one thing that really stood out to me that you said that i really want to highlight is. It's not about attacker a tool. It's about communicating your value. And what you do. And that's what stories do. And i've been learning more about it because this someplace something. I need to improve on. But it's something that excites me because i really see the power of stories and in particular Before we hit record. I was like how you're so amazing. You have this great topic that we're gonna talk about today. That is so specific and a lot of health coaches a lot of our listeners. They either are currently doing webinars that they're not seeing as good a results as they would like or they're planning on doing a webinar and you know they're putting it together and wondering what what should i include. So we're we're excited to dive into this. This this topic about how to use stories in particular on webinars for the sake of the audience. Let me let me give you just a little preview of the three stories. We're going to explore but the first one we're going to dive into the unforgettable origin story. This is a story that you tell at the beginning of a presentation oftentimes when i work with people for the first time. It's the story of. How do i get into the biz but it can just be how you encountered a problem. or the origin of a problem. That you solved. And so we're going to dig into that. And that's that's stories designed to create a deep human connection and build. Trust right away so we're gonna look at success projection stories. These are stories that are gonna balance out your teaching with really powerful sales techniques. That are you're going to be able to talk about your program and get people leaning in and taking notes on the work you do and the results you get instead of leaning back and and being skeptical as common in sales situations finally the third one is ending story. We're going to figure out how to craft story to close your presentations. Close your talks even close out a phone call a sales call and lead the audience to the moral of the story that you want them to have which is obviously in this case it's time to work with kathleen karen and you listener. We know we've talked about it here on the podcast a lot. Our listeners know what a powerful tool webinars are not just for growing your email list but making sales getting people interested in your programs building that know like and trust all along the way so kyle. Can you tell us why stories worked so well and why it's important to use them in webinars particularly great question So stories work well. That stories are the original technology stories. came before fire. Stories came before the wheel and they were an essential way for us to communicate meaning to each other. There's a structure that we follow. That has been wired into our brains for for over you know thousands and thousands of years of evolution to allow us to remember and process stories in a certain way and the power of this. You know there's there's certain myths from thousands and thousands of years ago that we can remember our tell their stories from our childhood that we haven't thought about or recounted in years that can immediately come back and stories you know these were the original structure for building trust society. We understand story. And then we understand each other. And so it's that essential step for creating a true human connection like kathleen you were saying. There's no tools technology that that that can make up for this and so The ability to show our in within a story like hey. I understand exactly what you're going for are going through. And i'm here for you is is very very powerful and then i love webinars and any kind of presentations are speaking because In this day and age where our attention spans are so short. And there's so many blinking shiny objects out there. The opportunity to present in front of somebody for thirty forty minutes. Or so and really be able to share in depth. Who you are and what you're doing can accelerate your results to end your sales cycle in a big big way plus there's tons of opportunities collaborating doing joint ventures with webinars. I find it to be a very natural fund and collaborative way to sell more products. Yeah i think you're i think you're absolutely right. And the fact that if i think about the presentations on stage or the webinars that i've attended as an attendee as participant i can i can actually think of a few where the speaker or the presenter actually started with a story and it immediately like. Put your defenses down. You're not thinking oh is this. Is this really for me. you're not thinking. Is this going to be quality. Time spent Are they going to try to pitch me at the end instead. You immediately immerse yourself in the story which brings down your defenses in actually leading into the rest of the webinar. Is the perfect transition right. It's the perfect way to kick it off and transition into the rest of the content. So why don't we start with the first story since you set us up for success with the three stories. Why don't we start with the first one and then let us know where in a webinar. We might use that absolutely well. The first story starts right in the beginning. You can start off hot in your webinar with a unforgettable origin story. Now the first thing..

kathleen karen kyle
"kathleen karen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

06:01 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"After seeing her own parents deported For years, the future of undocumented immigrants in the United States has been uncertain. New rules issued by the Department of Homeland Security put the majority of the country's 11 million undock. Cemented immigrants at risk of deportation, most recently an announcement that shocked many across the country. A new report shows the parents of more than 500 Children separated at the border. Cannot be found was brought up during the final presidential debate of 2020 a few weeks ago. How will these families ever be reunited? Children are brought here. Like coyotes and lots of bad people, cartels and they're brought here and they used to use them to get into our country. Fingers were pointed who built the cage? That's Joe. Let's talk about well built. The cage is talk about what we're talking about. What happened. Parents was ripped. Their kids were ripped from their arms and promises were made by now President elect Joe Biden. I'm going to send the United States Congress, a pathway to citizenship for over 11, million undocumented people and all of those so called dreamers, those DACA kids, they're going to be immediately certified again to be able to stay in this country. Justice in motion is a nonprofit, which works to reunite parents with their Children after they're separated at the border. When people cross borders, they are Often leave their rights behind. Kathleen Karen is the founder and executive director of Justice in motion with a network of over 44, human rights organizations and individual human rights lawyers in Mexico and Central America. Kathleen says justice been motion works to ensure that those crossing borders have access to justice. Although news broke of the missing parents recently. Justice in motion has been searching door to door for parents separated from their Children at the border since 2018 When the A C L U, filed the lawsuit to stop the zero tolerance policy in June 2018. There was a junction that came down the court gave the U. S government very short. Headlines to find the kids and the parents, and they failed to meet that deadline. The court was really frustrated with the progress, they decided to turn over the job of finding these parents to us, the A CEO you pulled for organizations together Justice and Motion Kind, the Women's Refugee Commission and the law firm Paul Weiss, when the lawsuit first happened. It applied to all the Children who were currently in government custody, so that number ended up being 2000 and 400 well was not revealed to us until January. 2019 through an internal government report was that they had started piloting the program as early as August 2017, and there are an additional 1500 families separated 500 plus missing pairs of parents are actually what's left of the original 4000. Plus that we're missing in 2017 is our job to find the missing parents. Most of those parents are gonna be deported. At this point. Justice and motion has been able to locate thousands of parents. But every union does not mean the story's over and that there's a happy ending their deeply traumatized by the experience and the happy videos don't always tell the Full story and their minds apparent abandoned them. It's too hard for a young child to understand that first, not every missing parent was eligible for reunification. The government's initial reaction to the ones that were deported was that they were categorically Ineligible for reunification because they were deported. That attitude has been just throw them back over the border, and everybody will forget about it. As frustrating as it is to have their goals constantly clashed with the government, Kathleen says. This type of attitude is what drives their work. That's why we have to build up that knowledge and the resource is of advocates of both sides of the border so that Migrants can't just speak for gotten about. So What does this all mean to someone living through the nation's immigration crisis? What happens when someone from one of those families channels trauma into action? Diana Estrada is a Mexican American law student. I just 17 years old. She witnessed her parents being deported. It was a really hard transition for our family that led me to pursue a career in law. I want to introduce her to you The way that I was introduced to her. I was scrolling on Twitter. When I read Who would have thought that the 17 year old girl from Utah? Witnessed her parents being deported would appear before an immigration judge today for her first case as a law student. I couldn't change my parents outcome, but I will do my best to change someone else's immigration is always going to hold a special place in my heart, and I'm always going to be an advocate for immigrants, and that's exactly what Diana is doing. I told myself Take a step back realize what just happened? You just appeared for your first immigration case as a lost student. Estrada stood in the courtroom but two very different experiences. This time, she filed a motion to appear as a law student in order to represent an undocumented immigrant facing deportation. We appeared for the marriage hearing. I was worried but optimistic because asylum cases are very hard to get the relief, Diana Estrada gave someone what she wished her parents had an opportunity to stay in the country that was shocked, happy wanted to cry. I just knew that this meant that he was going to be reunited. With this family, carrying them, like celebrate over the phone was just the best feeling ever. She hopes her journey will show first generation Americans what it's possible. It's challenging, not having as much representation and this field, but it's up to you to let Imposter syndrome. No, you are going to be an amazing future attorney and above all undocumented immigrants holds value because they're human. No one is above another person.

Diana Estrada Kathleen Karen Department of Homeland Securit United States United States Congress Joe Biden Twitter Imposter syndrome Utah President Mexico attorney CEO Central America founder and executive director Women's Refugee Commission
"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

02:39 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"Welcome back. Everyone we are excited to be here with you. We are here for another episode of the wellness business podcast. We can't think of a better place than to hang out with you right now. I'm hanging out with my co host. Kathleen legris in my name is karen paddock. Hey kathleen karen you know what. What on my side about two things. I get to see you in a few days. I now and be. I do wanna find out what you're working on two. I'm getting ready to you. Launch my annual pre holiday flash. They all were all of my done for you. Programs are on sale. So if you're not already on my mela Instagram probably gonna wanna do that so come join the fun. Would you have when you work on care. Yeah i'm so glad you said that because that is i think that is like your best sale all year long. I think the all year. Because it's so god so good. Yeah let's face it. I mean you you know. It's time to get ramp up for january ready. Believe it or not so that way you can get whatever you need. Get your business up and going in the show notes. We have the link to your instagram. So people become following you on instagram. For sure how nba. So let's see what's going on with me. I am in the deep dive right now. With all of my dc a bonus. It's number so tell for those that don't know what is yesterday so dc digital academy. And we he had any porterfield on the podcast Probably couple of months ago now and she talked about creating a digital course and so i put together a bonus experience and was an affiliate for amy and i welcomed thirty clients at into my bonus experience. Meaning thirty people that purchase. Digital course kademi did so through my link and i have the honour and the pleasure of coaching them an a very small intimate group and it has been so good. But we are in the nitty gritty. And for those of you. That don't know. I am actually building a course alongside of them. We'll talk about that. And other day. But i have to just give a shout out to my dca members bonus experienced numbers because they are doing the work they it. This is not. You know you don't build the course and create a webinar and launch it without.

kathleen karen Kathleen legris porterfield karen paddock nba dca amy
"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 6 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Or, more broadly, thousands of Children overall But can you Tell the sister about thie ages because, yes, somewhere as young as four months whether they were part of the 2018 0 tolerance policy. Or not. Yeah, Yeah. No, I mean, I think I think you said it right there. There's Children have you know the A C? L U lawyer Legal earned, has said there were Children in his old babies. Toddlers are being separated, and I think Yeah. I mean, they're sort of was no discussion based on age about that. You know, in the original separations that happened in 2018, the judge ordered that Children under five years of age be the first to be reunified and has really pushed efforts on that. But I think Yeah, It's really difficult to think about Children. That young being separated from their parents any at any age. Really, but especially so young Kathleen Karen, once a parent is located. How often are they able to come to the U S, too? Reunite with their kids, or is it more frequently that they're asked if they want to have the child brought to them in their country? But we had a case in January. We were able to successfully win the right to return of nine families. So that was through the A C L U Miss L lawsuit so because many of these families are seeking asylum in the United States for unlawfully denied the ability to start the process at the border, So it's part of the big lawsuit. The missile lawsuit. So having those families come back, and you know, witnessing that joy of reunification on U. S soil was it was an incredible moment. So there's other families out there like that. And so we're still trying to work on that as well. But they can't just come back mean these parents have been deported. So it's not easy for them to return. Yes. So it sounds like doing it on U. S soil is extremely rare. Yes,.

U. S Kathleen Karen United States
"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:21 min | 6 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Why would we make Children decided to go with that shouldn't be a kid's decision, and it's wrong and unfair to ask them to make it on Ly parents can make that decision. It will harm the kids even more to ask him to do that. Another trauma for them to carry Gladys. Million. All you mentioned that they do sometimes asked the kids in this situation. How often does that happen in at what age You have. It happens fairly. In fact, in our work when we William and best interest. We also asked Children for their wishes. And you know, we look at is the child. There isn't like a magic age. We look at the child's maturity and an expression to weigh that into our best interest recommendations. But the reason why parents have to even Talk to kids about that choices. Going back to the situations that parents maybe end. They may not be safe themselves in their country of origin and Perhaps it's the parent's way off. Making peace with the child being away from them. But safe because the parent doesn't want to make that decision unilaterally by bringing the child back to a situation where the parent knows They're not going to be safe. Mandria rights did no one ever think to use wristband, such as those used in hospitals to identify parents and Children. The wrist bands could have had names and matching ID numbers. It wouldn't have been 100% effective. But it certainly would have given some help in identifying in reuniting families. Kathleen Karen, Can you talk about how the pandemic has affected justice? Emotions? Efforts to find parents? So we headed to suspend the on the ground searches in Central America and March due to the panda Mac. We didn't restart them until late in the summer, when defenders felt although Cove it is still very strong in Central America, that they still wanted to do the work because every day that a child has an uncertain future, they're damaged by that. So there's this this incredible commitment to the work dedication. And urgency to the work to find those parents and to help the parents figure out where their kids are and make the right decisions for their Children. Michelle Wily, Do you want to add to that a little bit about just the effect that the pandemic has had? As I know, you've also done reporting on this as well. Chair. I spoke to one of the justice in motion defenders. Dora Mae Lara, who's in Honduras, and she talked to me about you know some of the public health restrictions that are in place there has really limited and you know, Kathleen could speak more to this has really limited the amount of time that defenders Khun go out, just based on The way that people are restrictive on movement because of the public health order, you know, it's difficult to travel far because they can't really stay overnight in a place that's not their home. On DH. I mean, also just building on that The trust issues that already would have existed are now in the context of a pandemic. So I think that you know the defenders like Kathleen spoke to, You know, they're very seasoned professionals, and they are working diligently to To get people reunified, but it's just a crazy, even more difficult situation. Bill asks, Is the federal government helping to fund the organization's trying to remedy the situation? Gladys Molina. Also I know that the young center for Immigrant Children's Rights works with the Office of Refugee Resettlement, How much of your budget is government support his federal support. It's about a third of 40% of all over your budget, but it's not funding that is given to us for the purpose of I'm doing this harm for the purpose of being appointed to Children, a CZ child advocates and that includes Children that that that have not been separated from family. Yeah, That was my next question whether or not OK of the budget, right? Are they actually putting monies towards specifically your efforts to try to advocate for the Children who are separated and re? Yeah, but to echo Kathleen, I do agree that The consideration of providing families with three sources. And assistance and support because of the trauma that we caused due to this policy. Is key A color had asked earlier. Why was kept a secret and it was kept a secret. I believe, because it is such an awful thing to do. To a child to separate a child from their parents that They knew the public outcry would be good allowed as it wass. And again, Gloria Molina, Gladys Molina. Ault is with the young center and a child advocate and a program director there the young Center for Immigrant Children's Rights Michelle while he's a reporter for Kathleen Karen, founder and executive director. Ofjustice in motion. We're talking about how the parents of 545 Children separated as long as three years ago still have not been found. You're listening to forum. I mean, Achim. Robin writes. There was a report a couple months ago about housing Children of refugees. The reporter noted that there were dirty diapers in the hallways and no one seemed to be in charge. Can you say more about this situation? Gladys Molina, although I know that there have been reports about some continuing very unsanitary situations, potentially in different detention centers, But I think also what Robin's point brings up is what do we know about what's happening at the Southern border now, especially with The way that the Trump Administration has essentially sealed it and isn't taking any more refugees. Well, what we do know about the Southern border is that Asylum seekers aren't being processed there being sent back to Mexico. We do know that thie government is illegally removing or expelling. Unaccompanied Children that should be allowed to enter the care of the officer, refugee resettlement, and we do know that the government continues to find ways to separate families through through means, like MPP. That is, if the government isn't doing it. Actively there doing it by default by putting this policies in place that then forced families to two separate and we do know that they continue. Despite federal district court orders, too. Prevent people from accessing the asylum system, whether the V adult or being unaccompanied minors. That's what we do you know about what's going on in the southern border. With these Children when they're expelled. Gladys million ald. I mean, is the government tracking them at all? Is the U. S tracking them at all? Well, they had their baby. They don't track them the way they don't track him there. We've heard of Of Children being In some sense, kids that are not even Mexican nationals being turned over to Mexico. We've also heard of cases where the government Takes unaccompanied minors and puts them on charter flights and deport them back to Central America. But in terms of tracking them nothing. I don't know for what means that the government where the government is looking at it is we're going to expel them. They're not going to enter there. Not going Teo be put into the care of the officer, refugee resettlement or have access to the immigration chords or the asylum office. So they're tracking their expulsions. But beyond that, I don't know that they're tracking anything else. This is no rights. What are the ages of the kids? I heard summer. Actually, babies. This is so sad. And disturbing me, Michelle. While I'm not sure she's referring to the 545 Children who still for whom their parents have still not been located,.

Gladys Molina Kathleen Karen Michelle Wily young center officer reporter Robin Mexico Central America young Center for Immigrant Chi Gloria Molina Office of Refugee Resettlement Ly William founder and executive director Dora Mae Lara Cove Teo
"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:23 min | 6 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Coming up tomorrow on forum. Julian Castro, former HUD secretary and former Democratic presidential candidate. Joints for him to share his thoughts on the election. President Trump's nomination of Amy Cockney bear it to the Supreme Court, and tonight's final presidential debate will also get his take on the most pressing issues of the day Voting the Southern Border Healthcare and Mar teau, listen to past shows and subscribe to our podcast visit dot org's slash forum and for the latest updates on our programs and guests. Find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter were at the farm. You're listening to far. Um I mean a Kim. We're talking about the separation of families at the southern border and the fact that 545 Children are still Unable to locate their parents. There are extremely difficult efforts underway to try to do so. But they're hampered in large part by the federal government and also by the pandemic. We're talking with Michelle Wiley, Immigration reporter for and Gladys Molina halt with the young center, a child advocate. And you are listeners are with us. 8667336786 is the number to call Security forum is how you could be just on Twitter or Facebook. Email. Us at forum acuity dot or GE. Jennifer Rights. If the goal of this separation policy was deter parents from coming here, why did they keep it a secret during this pilot program? Any reaction to that. Michelle Wiley. I think that's a good question. Andi won that I would also like to know the answer to I u know. I wish I could pride more insight on that. But I think there's just ah lot that We don't know. Frankly, well, Michael tweets. My understanding is that the bulk of those parents were deported, and that is what you also heard. Michelle Wiley, Michael Wright's Should the Children here in the care of relatives or foster parents be likewise deported? Well, I think that was that sort of touches on what we were speaking about before about the considerations of what that could mean for both the Children and the parents. I think that You know the legal situation for each parent is different, based on the conditions of why they were deported, and when so some of them may be able to re apply for asylum in the U. S. Some may be able to apply for asylum in other places. I don't think that Supporting the Children is necessarily the right step. I think that there's and I'm sure class could speak more to this theirs. Each situation is unique, and I don't think we should, you know, painted with a broad brush. This is no rights. Anyone who's a parent or remotely cares about kids should be outraged. We're talking about Children and families. They look like me and my kids. I haven't even spent a night away except when I was in the hospital to deliver the second. The cruelty of these policies is beyond what I can comprehend. We're joined now. By Kathleen Karen founder and executive director of Justice in Motion. Kathleen. Karen. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you for having me So first. Can you talk about the role justice in motion plays in tryingto reunite families and trying to find the parents of these Children? Sure so justice emotion where part of the deal you effort to find and re unify these families. We get assigned the what we call the unreachable parents, So the parents who have been deported and the government records are poor. They've been efforts by other partners on the steering committee through this lawsuit, which include the young Excuse me, which includes kind kids, neither Defense Women's Refugee Commission and Paul Weiss. When they reach a dead end, are unable to find the parents. They're deemed unreachable, and they're assigned to justice, emotion. And so can you talk about what? What the work involves to try to find some of these parents. So the justice emotion defender network that we operate is about 46, human rights organisations and human rights lawyers that we collaborate and partner with in Mexico and Central America, specifically for family unification. We're focusing on Central America. So we provide the information to the defenders who are seasoned human rights lawyers who are from these communities that understand You know how they work and speak. The local language is when there's some. My language is involved in Guatemala, especially and his arduous work. They're going through government records. They are traveling many hours, knocking on doors literally searching for these parents. And yes, as you say, with very sparse information, and Michelle while he was mentioning that it's also even when they do find them hard for some parents who've lived for so long without their kids. To trust the defenders who are coming to them that they will actually reunite their kids or that there will really be any any long term resolution to what they're going through. What do they do in those types of situations? It's a matter building up trust with the parents. It's understandable that the parents feel deceived and abandoned and are deeply traumatized. So it's the skillful work of the defender network. Tio explain to the parents how this is going to go down and that there really could be a solution to their problem. Let me go to collar Phil and Burlingame. Hi, Phil. Join us. Hi, Phil. Are you there? And it looks like we lost Phil, though I think the question was why the government is doing this unification. Why isn't the government doing this reunification work? Why does it fall to so many nonprofit organizations? Kathleen Karen So the government spent a lot of time carefully thinking about how to separate the families. They put no time or effort or thought or even had a plan of had a reunion reunify the families so they never intended for these families to be reunified. They thought this would be a successful deterrence to migration by ripping Children away from their parents. The issue is, it is not a deterrent Tio migration issue that problems are that the countries of origin Are very difficult Situations and administration has essentially banded supporting efforts to make migration, not force from the area. So the rule of law is very much in question. In Central America. People simply can't stay. So they're faced with these horrible choices and risky, risky moves by moving to the United States have protect to protect their kids, but that's why they went in the first place. And I do believe we have fell back with us. Fill in Burlingame, Are you there? I guess we do not let me go. I can now did that. Answer your question, Phil, Phil about the NGOs, or did you have a follow up? Um well, the follow up is the government created the harm and these NGOs or kindly making hole so the government has financial responsibilities. They were explaining very expensive, extensive. Methods required. You know what is the liability and, you know, can't they get some traction against the government on that front, Phil, thanks. And similarly, Susan rights were morally obliges the country to create a fund to deal with the mental health needs of this group of Children. And many others. Kathy Karen, do you have any thoughts on what Phyllis saying Or do you know of any movement around that? Great. That's that is true. They created the harm and they should do something to help these families. These families are deeply traumatised, and it's not going to go away. Even if the families are reunified. They're not magically healed. This's years in years of trauma that they have absorbs and going to deal with for many years in your life, so sure Congress could pass a bill for to compensate these families. There's definitely ways the government could Help these families recover from what they've suffered Latina tweets..

Phil Michelle Wiley Kathleen Karen federal government Twitter Facebook Kathy Karen Central America Julian Castro Burlingame founder and executive director Jennifer Rights Southern Border Healthcare Kim HUD secretary President Trump Michael Wright
"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

04:48 min | 10 months ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"Welcome back, Everyone Karen Paddock and I'm hanging out here with Kathleen legris Hey Kathleen Karen I'm really excited a diamond of this topic today, because let me just say before we get going not only Karen the queen of titles coming up with titles. She is the Queen a workshop. So this is GonNa be good. Yeah! I am excited about this, too. We're GONNA. Be Talking about three reasons. Why workshops help you get clients without feeling sales e. So. If you're like many of the coaches that we work with insider membership program, the wellness insiders club. Then you probably feel hesitation in promoting your program actually selling it. It's the selling part that trips up a lot of coaches, and let's face it as a health coach. You are more heart centered giver, then you are a hard core salesperson eight, so that's okay, because selling actually a learned technique. But what if we told you that you could do both successfully with one simple tool? Would you be excited to learn more? We sure hope so because that's what this episode is about and the tool were referring to is wellness workshops. Wallace workshops all. These can be delivered in person. which right now, a covid nineteen more than likely isn't option, but they also apply to online workshops a pretty much. What we're referring to today is going to be centered around online workshops whether you call them. An online training and online workshop, or a Webinar distinct about that in the context of what we're sharing today so today, WanNa share with you why hosting hosting workshops can be so impactful for your wellness business. They also will turn you into an expert salesperson person without you ever feeling sales or scammy and we know we know this is a big fear for many of you like. Let's face it. We don't want to be like CAIRN's hardcore salesperson. Nobody wants to be that person so with doing any type of online workshop. You don't have to be and that's what's so nice about it. So before we dive into the three main reasons, workshops set you up for increased sales. Let's dive into the premise of workshops as a whole, the dictionary definition of a workshop is a meeting at which a group of people engage in a discussion and activity on a particular subject or project in the marketing. Marketing category of using workshops to attract your ideal clients. You'll be teaching on a particular subject or topic by giving a workshop a client specific title. It will do much of the work for you in weeding out the people who aren't really interested in what you specialize in right, so it's kind of like an automatic. Yep, it's for me or no, it's not right. You don't want your workshop to appeal to everyone and care remember we had. was heather heather. Woodruff back. We had her on the podcast. We did a two part episode with her. Was Episode Seventy, eight and seventy nine, and she made her the title of her talks much more specific I think she was the one that went from. They were kind of general, but then she really honed the men, and made them much more specific, and she ended up. Up Getting so many more clients, yeah, there was a private client of mine when I worked with her. She went from General Wellness Workshop Topics to anchorage her to find one, and she specializes in IB s, and so she created this. She called it her signature talk and it was ibm specific, and she was worried that you know the facilities where she was hosting, these workshops would be. I guess against her just having one signature talk, and so I said well I can do try, and so she did, and they were super excited, and not only did she have a great big reception right to her workshop. Lots of people came. They actually asked her. The audience asked her if she would do more. And so she ended up turning that you know adding to it and turning it into a three part workshop series and she started getting paid for it, so the possibilities are endless here and they're really exciting. Yeah, love that. By now,.

heather heather Kathleen Karen Woodruff Karen Paddock Kathleen legris Wallace ibm
"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"Very casual and normal about it they'll be perfectly understandable because you guys this way actual businesses operate. Is THEY DO use legal documents? And they you do use clients agreements and they do put things in writing and sign and anyone who's been in. The business face knows this. This is not unusual. Sometimes feels weird as a health coach when you're using it for the first time but everyone else does business with contracts out there in the world so you showed also and at level of professionalism. That's right exactly. It does add a level of professionalism and remember like sorry Karen you were saying before. Remember how when you show up feeling confident. Then that gets the best results from your clients as well and so this immediately make some set up a little taller to be like. Oh wait. Why'd she has an agreement. She wants me to sign. I better take a look at this. I better be aware of this. And then I want to bring my a. Game because she's bringing her Gabe lease. I know you have a lot of diy legal documents and templates available. So can you tell our listeners where they can find out more about those and about you and and where they can connect with you up -solutely so my website is Lisa freely dot com and for the DIY legal templates as I mentioned before Kathleen Karen our affiliates. So they will have a link that you can use to be able to access the DIY templates in. They do receive a commission for that..

Kathleen Karen Lisa Gabe
"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"She is uniquely known for aligning legal steps with the shockers. Welcome back to the PODCAST Lisa. Thank you so much Kathleen Karen for having me. It's good to be with you and you guys have such great energy on this podcast so I am thrilled to be back talking about legal topics today. Hey look you know we had you back. I mean it was a wild goes bad episode eight and we had you on and we talked about the musk's no legal tips to stay compliant and avoid fines so be sure to check that out. Yeah that was over two years ago if you can believe it. So we're we were definitely overdue to have you back on Well thank you. I just love that you guys care so much about the legal parts of business and helped so many wellness practitioners understand what to do because the scary for people and and you you both have such an awareness of that in WanNa make it easy and break it down. Step by step so. I'm always happy to be here to help you do that. So thank you for having me back. Awesome Yeah Yeah it's scary and it's changing all the time. So that's why we definitely knew he needed to have back Sali's many of our listeners. Know you and love you already but since some of our listeners may not be familiar with you yet. Can you share a little bit about your journey to becoming an attorney? Who Helps Health coaches what? What's that looks like for you? My Gosh absolutely so you know really now. I was one of those people who sort of had to parts of me right. I had this SORTA Geeky law student side. That loved to learn love books loved reading and did really.

Kathleen Karen Sali WanNa attorney
"kathleen karen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:21 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A good. Thing not a bad. Thing that's a really good Now we're, being hindered by the Russian hoax a hoax okay now just hours before that rally the president's national security team gathered in front of, the podium in the White House briefing room and to a person they, each articulated what they see as a dangerous. And pervasive threat to. Our upcoming elections a. Threat coming from Russia We. Continue to see a, pervasive. Messaging campaign by Russia to try. To. Weaken and divide the United States this week a bipartisan. Group of senators introduced legislation to impose yet another set of sanctions on Russia for interfering. In US elections democratic Senator, Ben Cardin is among the lawmakers who back. This Bill and he joins me now Senator thanks for being, here Rachel it's good to be with you thanks you think more sanctions is going to. Change Russia's behavior I think we have to, send a very strong message Mr Putin that this conduct. Must and what we heard yesterday he's extremely. Active here in the United States the president's language gives. Him. A, green light to move forward. Giving him the oppression that he can get away with these types of invasions in America so we got to send a clear message, the legislation we fault or strong new sanctions against Russia if they continue, to interfere in our elections One of the co-sponsors of this Bill Lindsey, Graham Republican admitted that the, last round of sanctions failed to change Russia's behavior to deter in any way what is, one thing in this current legislation that you think will will actually move the needle here well one. Of the areas that, we. Can really move a lot more. Aggressively. Is to deal with the darts that support the corruption. Mr Putin this legislation reinforces that we will have sanctions against the all the guards stopping. Them from using our banking, system we also have mcnuggets ski sanctions so. They could not come here to America cutting off Mr Putin's, finances is one of the key areas that we can help prevent what he's doing more. Transparency and more sanctions you're Republican co sponsors, are some of the only Republicans on the hill who. Are willing to challenge the president on any Issue can you. Get the rest of the GOP in congress, to, sign on for what amounts to sort of a challenge to the president who continues to talk about how. How high esteem he holds Vladimir Putin in and and does not talk about elections security with any? Urgency, I think we can we saw that last year when the Russia's sanction Bill pay by ninety eight to two vote in the. United States. Senate in a similar margin in the house of representatives I think there is strong unified support in the congress. To stand up to Mr Putin and we were reinforced by Mr. Trump's national security team to. A person they reaffirmed the fact that Mr Putin has been engaged in our country and, our elections to try to. Influence our elections that that conduct is continuing and that it's likely to be involved in the two thousand eighteen election's so So I think we have the information from the Trump administration admittedly we don't have the, president United States and that is a very disheartening we need the president to stand up to Mr Putin he failed in Helsinki in? Congress needs to step in the last time there were sanctions against Russia the president and the White House sort of slow roll dot and. Didn't sign him for. A long time delayed the implementation is that a risk here oh absolutely they have not implemented these are mandatory sanctions these sanctions have yet to be imposed the the new. Bill also spelled out of the energy sector there's things that we can do that can. Really affect the Russian economy the president has not exercised that power and. We think we could even be clear as to oppose those types of actions against Russia as you noted the national security team stood up yesterday we described it in the intro and in all articulated this threat to our. Midterms From from Russia do you think the, federal government is doing enough Well answer is no I think we got to do more we're not doing. Enough, when the president United States is not part of the team he he. Is our key person in this, and he has not been Vogel you. Should have been there yesterday introduces security team the to support them. Instead he was giving a. Speech calling the the Russian involvement hoax so we could do more but clearly the four. Agencies that were gave their. Briefing yesterday are taking the appropriate steps they're getting the intelligence information they're sharing it are the head of the NSA. National security agency said that this is an. Attack on our country we have. All the tools available to respond that's the right. Thing to say so we're. Getting the right message from our agencies they're doing the right thing homeland security's. Working with for states to protect their infrastructure in, the elections itself so I think the. Agencies are taking the step which is the cap The president Senator. Ben Cardin thank you so much for. Your time we. Appreciate it Rachel's good to be with you, this morning The Trump administration submitted a plan yesterday to reunite, hundreds of migrant parents with their children but immigration lawyers say the government expects them to do most of the work and. They worry that many of those, parents are going to, be hard to find because they were deported to Central America, NPR's Joel rose has the story many, of the families the Trump administration separated at the southwest border have been reunited but many have not, earlier this week a federal judge in California ordered the administration to explain how it plans to reunify those remaining families including more than four hundred, children whose parents were deported without them, in a court filing government lawyers promised to hand over information about the parents but mostly they'll rely on, the quote considerable resources of. The American Civil Liberties union and other lawyers and nonprofits to track down the deported parents it's basically a non plan. They're putting the burden on us to. Find these parents. And offering vague promises to help league alert It is. An attorney at the ACLU which. Brought the case against the administration. He says the ACLU and other immigrant rights groups do have resources and wanna play a role in reunification but. He says the, Trump administration is shirking its responsibility it's the government who created, this crisis by separating these families in deporting the parents and now they're shifting the responsibility it's been more than a month. Since the administration abandoned the policy, of separating families that, was aimed at discouraging illegal border crossings then federal judge Dana, Sabrina stepped in and told the government, to reunite those families the administration has reconnected nearly two thousand migrant children with their parents or other, sponsors Jonathan white at the department of health and human services helped organize that effort he testified on Capitol Hill earlier this week the people on, my team were working twenty four seven, it's for thirty days I worked eighteen hours a day we were doing everything that we could you move, these children as quickly as. We could but that was the easy part those parents were in the US most of them in Federal custody there are still more than five hundred and fifty migrant children living in government contract it's shelters or foster homes most of their parents. Have been deported to Guatemala Honduras or El Salvador an immigrant rights advocates say they will not be easy. To find some of these communities are very remote and. If you don't have a good address you could be out for multiple days trying, to figure out where that person. Is that you're trying to find Kathleen Karen is the director of Justice in motion it's a small nonprofit that works with lawyers. And organisations in Central America to defend the rights of migrants and it's one of. Several groups in the US that are scrambling to find these deported parents so they. Can be reconnected with their kids Karen says many of these parents were fleeing. For a reason from gang violence or domestic. Abuse so if they're deported back their concern for, their, own safety in the. Country of origin so who knows. Where they're gonna go because they're gonna. Hide because that was the reason that they left. In the first place once the. Parents are found immigrant rights advocates have a lot of Questions the government insists all of those parents left their children behind in the. US voluntarily some may have wanted their children to stay here and apply for asylum McCarron, thinks some parents may not have understood what they were doing all of them deserve an individualized interview to figure out what happened. To them do they have consent when, their child was taken away You know do they want to be reunified there's a. Whole series of questions that need to be asked to each parents so. That they can make informed decisions but first questions remain about how. To even begin this process who's going to pay for it where will the. Families be reunited and where will they go after that Lawyers for the Trump administration and the will, continue that debate before.

president United States Russia Vladimir Putin Bill Lindsey Ben Cardin White House congress American Civil Liberties union Rachel Senator Central America Mr. Trump America Kathleen Karen Vogel Helsinki department of health Senate
"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"kathleen karen" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"Ooh welcome to the wellness business podcast simple strategies to cut the online noise to fast track the growth of your wellness business with karen paddock and kathleen legris hey everyone here in paddock welcome to another episode of the wellness business podcast i'm hanging out today with my mazing co host kathleen legris hey kathleen karen how are you doing so good i'm excited about our guest today oh my gosh i am and you guys let me tell you you're in for a real treat this is gonna be you know little bit different than a lot of things that we normally have her right more like strategic and taxes that's like this this is gonna be good yeah i totally agree so today we have a topic that we both love kathleen and i talk about this a lot and we find it fascinating but it's it's also directly tied to the level of success that you reach in your business and i have a lot of personal stories that i'm gonna share today that i haven't shared before as we go through this and we know we just know you guys are gonna love this and it's going to be super educational but it's not our typical you know do this strategy marketing strategy it's it's a little less strategic from the standpoint that there are action items but certainly it plays a huge role in you building a business today we're talking about all things mindset and since mindset plays such a huge rule in our business we knew this was going to be a really important topic to cover on the podcast.

karen paddock kathleen legris kathleen karen kathleen