25 Burst results for "Kathleen Hayes"

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:57 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We've got the yen, something like nearly 4% up from where it was yesterday we got at the moment also bonds under pressure. The U.S. ten year yielding 3.68%. This is Bloomberg. On the latest edition of the tape podcast, a conversation with Kathleen Hayes of Bloomberg television on the bank of Japan. Kathleen, I came in here and listened to the energy John farrow and Tom Keane have about the BOJ. I'm like, I don't know. Can you tell me why this is important? Why is this important? Oh my God. First of all, being surprised, I was sitting on the 6th floor in front of our camera up there, getting ready to react to this with our team in Tokyo and Asia. And when I saw the headline come across, widening yield curve control. I was shocked. Everyone was shot. All the signals coming out of the bank of Japan, including governor kuroda, repeatedly was no we're not ready. And the expectation has been, not ready to start making this move. Even with inflation rising, Corona kept saying, well, we don't know if it's sustainable. You know what? There might be a global recession. Bring down prices. That's we need the stimulus. And then we're getting a new governor. The new governor is going to be in place in April. And at that point, that's been the expectation when it would start. But the BOJ has been insisting even when the shift away from extraordinary stimulus started, it would be gradual. And when koda had his press conference last night, one of the things he stressed was we haven't changed our forward guidance and we're still concerned that inflation may not be sustainable, we just have to rise. The spring negotiations start off to the first year probably in late February early March, that it was about financial stability, keeping and there's a big concern about the weekend, right? That's been something that very unpopular with the public. So this is a step. But one thing to say, it's not clear that the regime shift has fully begun, but at the door is definitely wide open. It's clear that's where the BOJ

BOJ Kathleen Hayes John farrow Tom Keane governor kuroda Bloomberg television Bloomberg Kathleen Tokyo U.S. Asia koda
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:47 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is boulder. On the latest edition of the Tate podcast, a conversation with Kathleen Hayes of Bloomberg television on the bank of Japan. Kathleen, I came in here and listened to the energy John farrow and Tom Keane have about the BOJ. I'm like, I don't know. Can you tell me why this is important? Why is this important? Oh my God. First of all, big surprise. I was sitting on the 6th floor in front of our camera up there, getting ready to react to this with our team in Tokyo and Asia. And when I saw the headline come across, widening yield curve control. I was shocked. Everyone was shocked. All the signals coming out of the bank of Japan, including governor kroda, repeatedly was no we're not ready. And the expectation has been, not ready to start making this move. Even with inflation rising, Corona kept saying, well, we don't know if it's sustainable. You know what? There might be a global recession, bring down prices. That's we need the stimulus. And then we're getting a new governor. The new governor is going to be in place in April. And at that point, that's been the expectation when it would start. But BOJ has been insisting even when the shift away from extraordinary stimulus started, it would be gradual. And when koda had his press conference last night, one of the things he stressed was, we haven't changed our forward guidance. We're still concerned that inflation may not be sustainable. We just have to rise. The spring negotiations start off to the first year probably in late February early March, that it was about financial stability, keeping and there's a big concern about the weekend, right? That that's been something that very unpopular with the public. So this is a step. But one thing to say, it's not clear that the regime shift has fully begun, but at the door is definitely wide open. It's clear that's where the BOJ is going

BOJ Kathleen Hayes John farrow Tom Keane governor kroda Bloomberg television boulder Kathleen Tokyo Asia koda
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:36 min | 6 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It's 7 30 a.m. in Hong Kong. I'm Kathleen Hayes here at Bloomberg world headquarters in New York City. And I'm Doug prisoner. We are coming to you from the Bloomberg interactive broker studio. It is kind of a down day. I'm afraid for risk assets in the states, it was a put it in past tense because obviously the session has finished. We are trading U.S. sovereign debt right now in the Tokyo session, yields hanging in after quite a bit of a spike, I would say, in the U.S. session, we had a services PMI that beat forecast and that sent yields up across the curve by well in the case of the two year 12 basis points. That's a pretty sizable move, and in turn, equities were weak. I'll go into that more deeply momentarily. Right now, Kat and I want to get you caught up on a few of the showers top business stories. Well, I think in getting back into stocks, maybe think again, market as Stanley's strategist, Michael Wilson, is returning to the bear camp. The strategist who is one of the U.S. stock market's most vocal skeptics has seen enough of the recent rally that he'd actually predicted and he now says investors are better off at least for now booking profits. This differs from Wilson's view last week, he had said the tactical recovery could continue into December before coming under pressure from weaker corporate earnings next year, with both economic growth and inflation cooling next year, Wilson recommends retaining a defensive positioning in healthcare, utilities, and consumer staple stocks. Yeah, he was focused on the 200 day moving average to and I think we closed below that level today. Some people were a little enthusiastic last week when we kind of broke above that 200 day and stayed there. So it's a lot about the interest rate environment, I think it's fair to stay, and it's not just the U.S. and the fed. We've got a rate decision today from the reserve bank of Australia. We have that from Bloomberg's annabelle drew's. There was a bank of Australia is likely to hike rates by 25 basis points in today's meeting. October inflation was weaker than expected and economic data has softened. But Bloomberg economics says that's unlikely to get in the way of the potential rate hike. Looking beyond we're told that the RBA's next move will be a smaller 15 basis point increase in February. That'll take the cash rate to a peak of 3.25%, but there's another chance that another hike may not be necessary even inflation risks continue to ease. We get the RBA decision later at 1130 a.m., Hong Kong time. I'm annabelle drawers, Bloomberg daybreak, Asia. Moving on to another big Central Bank, the ECB, European Central Bank will probably lift borrowing costs by a half point this month, and that's according to governing council member Gabriel makov. This comes after inflation moderated for the first time in one and a half years. Now he didn't rule out a bigger increment, depending on what fresh quarterly economic projections show this month, and he told us the Eurozone will likely endure a technical recession in the near term. I suspect that Q four this year, the one that were in now, we'll see a very slightly negative GDP number. And we're likely to see that for Q one next year. On the other hand, my expectations were not going to see 2023 as a year of recession. The ECB's final gathering of the year is on December 14th, the same day as the fed is going to give its rate decision. Well, in Asia, we know the COVID story in China is one of the big stories and other big story today is around Taiwan and the country going to be receiving and increasing number of U.S. patriot missiles that tops global news

Kathleen Hayes Bloomberg world headquarters U.S. RBA Hong Kong Michael Wilson Wilson annabelle drew Bloomberg Doug Kat Tokyo New York City ECB Stanley bank of Australia Gabriel makov fed Central Bank
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:59 min | 6 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It's 7 30 a.m. in Hong Kong. I'm Kathleen Hayes. And I'm Doug prisoner we're coming to from the Bloomberg interactive, broke a studio in New York at the top of the hour, we'll have trading in a Tokyo and in Seoul and in about two hours time, the action will begin in Hong Kong and Shanghai right now. We've got trading in Australia, a little bit of weakness, but there was a big downdraft in equity prices today in the states. I'll take a closer look at that after Kathleen and I update you on a few of the Sarah's top business stories. And a very big story in the next few hours, a decision today from the reserve bank of Australia, Doug and I have just weighed in on what we think it's all about. So now let's listen to Bloomberg's annabelle jewelers. See what she has to say. There was a bank of Australia is likely to hike rates by 25 basis points in today's meeting. October inflation was weaker than expected and economic data has softened. But Bloomberg economics says that's unlikely to get in the way of the potential rate hike. Looking beyond we're told that the RBA's next move will be a smaller 15 basis point increase in February. That'll take the cash rate to a peak of 3.25%, but there's another chance that another hike may not be necessary even inflation risks continue to ease. We get the RBA decision later at 1130 a.m., Hong Kong time. I'm annabelle drawers, Bloomberg daybreak, Asia. And I'm seeing a little bit of weakness now in the Aussie dollar against the green back down about 1.3%, 67 zero two U.S. cents. Let's move to the trade war story, the U.S. and the European union are weighing new tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminum. The aim here is to help fight carbon emissions and global over capacity. Now we are told this idea is at an initial phase. It's not yet been formally proposed. The tariff plan would likely deepen divisions between Beijing and Washington. These two sides have been working as we know together on climate change. The question is, could this be the flying in the ointment? It's unclear what legal authority the Biden administration would use to implement these new tariffs. We are hearing that the question is still being worked out internally and in talks with the European Union as well. Well, here's another story with China and its links to Brazil. China ramping up imports of Brazilian corn to replace imports of the more expensive U.S. grain, four vessels loaded with Brazilian corn are currently on its way to China, according to shipping agency alfama agencia maritima, we're told that 5 more should sail to China soon. Ship us to date already exceed 280,000 tons just a month after the first cargo Brazilian corn headed to China. Brazilia, Brazil, exported a record 6 million tons of corn in November, bringing the year to date total to 38 million tons, almost twice as much as Brazil's ship last year in paddock. Maybe it's kind of good to see some global trade that still happening and growing. Definitely, and particularly as it relates to agricultural commodities. Let's check global news here on DBA. Taiwan is going to be receiving and increasing number of U.S. patriot missiles at Baxter with more from the Bloomberg newsroom in San Francisco, Eddie. Yeah, and it's intriguing Doug on how they're working this. These are the new ones and the package looks to be $882 million for potentially 100 patriots. The State Department says the proposal was made under the provisions of a 2010 sail to the island, so technically it is not new, but it's classified as an enhancement to the earlier deal. At the time of that deal, infuriated Beijing and the U.S. pulled back. Well, the deal is due to be published in the congressional record tomorrow and looks very much to be moving forward. China's president Xi Jinping appears to have confirmed the pivot away from COVID zero while not directly addressing it. He says the protests were basically young, frustrated, young people, and then said the omicron variant is more mild, so Bloomberg cherry on says the pattern here is very clear. Well, we're seeing now is more of these local governments trying to adhere to COVID restrictions being rolled back. So we saw some of the biggest cities like Shanghai which remember had a two month grueling lockdown actually scrapping PCR testing requirements to enter most public venues. Same thing for Hangzhou, which is home to Alibaba, same thing for Shenzhen Dahlia and some of those big names in big cities. Now sherry says probably no formal rollback until April though, U.S. CDC is seeing triple democ, it calls it CDC director doctor Rochelle Walensky says people are getting fewer flu vaccines. Internally, for some of these higher risk groups like children and adults over 65 and pregnant people, we are seeing lower rates of vaccination compared to this time last year. Yeah, she says shot fatigue is real, but this could be a very bad year. India's prime minister Narendra Modi's party looks set to retain power in a key state of Gujarat, exit polls indicate strong support that could have returned him to office for a third term. Asian and European carmakers expressing concern about the Biden inflation reduction axe elimination of the 7500 tax credit for cars whose batteries are made outside the U.S., EU commission president Ursula van der leyen says strong reaction, but does this mean that we will engage in a costly trade war with the United States in the middle of an actual war? This is not in our interest. And nor in the interest of the Americans, and it would harm global innovation too. This comes at a time when President Biden as well is trying to encourage EV purchase but definitely favors Asian or European manufactured. Donald Trump plans to hold a so called tella rally this evening for Herschel Walker in Georgia, party leaders there and asked him to stay away from in person events, fearing it would hurt walker's chances. Walker's four Senate seems to have lost some steam and the thinking may have changed to one of, well, let's see how this thing works. In San Francisco, I'm Ed Baxter, this is Bloomberg, Kathleen. Well, thank you so much. That's going to be a very interesting election result. An important perhaps for the political balance in the United States coming up on the show. We're going to be talking macro Federal Reserve. What is coming up just week after next for that rate decision? And we're going to be watching for the reserve bank of Australia's decision as well. Keep it right here. This is daybreak Asia and this is Bloomberg. Next week, inflation and the fed are front and center. Something for Wall Street to talk about. Tune in for the latest read on inflation. Tuesday the 13th at 8 30. How does this report change the fed speak and join us for coverage of the fed decision? Wednesday the 14th starting at one 30. It seems like a 50 basis point rate hike is being locked in. Inflation in focus. Look at this move in the

United States China Hong Kong Kathleen Hayes Bloomberg interactive Doug RBA annabelle jewelers Bloomberg Brazil Biden administration Brazilia reserve bank of Australia European Union Shanghai
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:10 min | 8 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is supply maybe picking up and our price pressure is coming down. And that will be the job as we go forward in this challenging time. Well, you know, the message from the fed seems to be all the comments lately that the idea is to move quickly, front row of the rate hikes, get to four and a half to four and three quarters. And then see how that's affecting inflation. But to clarify, does this mean that once you get to that point when you think you're at neutral when it's four and a half to four and three quarters that you're going to pause even with the funds rate well below the rate of inflation because that's where it's likely going to be. Right. Well, I think we're going to see inflation come down next year. So when I'm thinking about how far above a neutral rate do we have to go. And I do think we're going to have to be in restricted territory. Remember, as inflation comes down, we're becoming more restrictive. So again, this is the assessment we have to do. So I think the appropriate path is we continue to raise rates a bit more so we get it up to that level where we're positive in terms of the real funds rate. Based on expected inflation over the next year, then we wait and assess data coming in, but not only the backward looking data and the lag data, but also the information we're getting from the street in terms of Main Street, right? Real consumers, real households, real businesses telling us how they're thinking about the economy. And that was Cleveland fed president Loretta master, speaking with Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes, and the fed gets more data to digest this week starting today with inflation data. That's actually today and tomorrow. We get ratings on producer prices. Today, then the key data on consumer prices Thursday, then the week wraps up with retail sales and the University of Michigan sentiment index. Those both come out on Friday. Looking ahead to the market open this morning, futures are moving higher. We have S&P futures up 29 points staff futures up a 197, and NASDAQ futures are higher by a 109 points, the ten year treasury is up 6 30 seconds. The yield 3.92%. You're listening to Bloomberg daybreak

fed Loretta master Kathleen Hayes Bloomberg Cleveland University of Michigan treasury
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:13 min | 9 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In the world of sports. I'm Michael Barnes. I'm scarlet fu. Coming up on the show, we're going to be talking with legendary media executive dick Emerson. He is the former head of NBC sports co creator of Saturday Night Live and creator of Sunday Night football. We're going to talk about his incredible career and his new book from Saturday night to Sunday Night. Straight ahead on the Bloomberg business of sports show, but first, let's look at some of the top stories of the week starting with the U.S. open wrapping up. And there is so much excitement around this U.S. open because it was Serena Williams last U.S. open, given that she's retiring. And we have two new champions. Unfortunately, neither of them are Serena. Number one seated ika Xian tech took home the women's championship and number three, Carlos alcaraz won the men's final. Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes caught up with former tennis pro and broadcaster Patrick McEnroe to talk about some of their favorite moments of this year's open. Going into this, the story was, oh, Serena's retiring, a new era, one year is ending another one starting what's going to happen with Novak Rafa Federer, they're closer to the twilights of their career. Looks like maybe the new era has started. What does it look like to you? It looks unbelievably exciting, athletic, inspiring, charismatic would be a few words that would come to mind. Serena has done so much for tennis, obviously, and for a lot of other things as well. So it was fitting the way she went out. She went out swinging as she has done throughout her career. But to see the young players step up, obviously on the men's side, Carlos alcaraz and Yannick center played one of the greatest matches I've ever seen that ended at about three in the morning. Just a shot making the athleticism from those players was off the charts. And then you've got obviously Francis tiafoe, the first black American player to get this far at the U.S. open since Arthur Ashe and just to first American period since Andy Roddick. So the Friends at tiafoe store is an incredible one. It's like an American fairytale, really. That was Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes with former tennis pro and broadcaster, Patrick McEnroe. Yeah, you heard right. He's one of the Mac and rose. And of course you can take a look back at all our coverage of this year's U.S. open, including a great conversation

Carlos alcaraz scarlet fu dick Emerson Serena Kathleen Hayes Patrick McEnroe ika Xian tech U.S. Michael Barnes Novak Rafa Federer Saturday Night Live Serena Williams tennis NBC Bloomberg Yannick center football Francis tiafoe tiafoe store Arthur Ashe
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:08 min | 9 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That official speaking to us from the annual symposium in Wyoming hosted by the Kansas City fed, and Esther George president of the Kansas City fed among those we had a chance to hear from. And here she is with Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes and Michael McKee. At that August symposium, let's listen in. Your descent in June was based in part on concern about the lagged effects of rate moves on the economy. How long do you think lags are? Have they gotten shorter over the years? And if so, then when do you think they're going to really hit the rate moves, hit the economy, and what do you think happens? So I think it's been a long-standing premise, right? That there are long and variable lags with interest rate adjustments. So we have seen pretty quickly that those rate increases have transmitted to the housing market, for example, and mortgage rates pretty quickly. The question is, what else is in the pipeline? And I think we should expect while we may see some shorter transmission in certain sectors. We are going to have to really see how it affects other things. For example, we know that there's still a lot of excess savings sitting out there. Well, that make it more difficult for consumption for that demand to come off is the fact that we pivoted to more goods purchases. We still have people purchasing goods some 20% higher than they were pre-pandemic. Maybe it goes more quickly. So my thoughts at the time of June was, we will have to be mindful that we are moving quickly. Also in conjunction with a balance sheet coming down and we'll just need to be watching for all the signs that the economy is beginning to respond. Well, the general consensus among you and your colleagues seems to be you raise rates to a restrictive level and you leave them there for a while. Rather than start to bring them back down again. So what's your level and how long do you think that they would have to stay there? So I think knowing the exact level knowing the exact number is really going to be a process. I couldn't tell you today where we are today is not restrictive, I would argue yet. We still have high inflation. So I think it tells us we have more room to go. That we would bring those rates down quickly and I've seen that in some of the forecasts seems a bit remarkable to me. I think he will have to hold. Over 4%. It could be well over. It could be over 4%. I don't think that's out of the question. But again, you won't know that, I think, until you begin to watch the data signs. And I think for me, one of the early indicators that you get as a regional fed president are talking to people in your region. And hearing on the ground what they're experiencing today because, you know, that won't show up in the data for a while after we begin to get some of those early signs. How are you looking to find financial conditions lately? And what they've been doing. We've seen them tighten, and then an inflation number looks not quite as strong, and they loosen again. Is this a transmission problem? Does it make it harder for you to do what you're trying to achieve? Is it effect communication problem? So I do think it's important that we be clear in our communications. The markets are volatile right now. There

Esther George Kathleen Hayes Michael McKee Kansas City Wyoming Bloomberg
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:07 min | 9 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Annual symposium in Wyoming hosted by the Kansas City fed, and Esther George president of the Kansas City fed among those we had a chance to hear from. And here she is with Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes and Michael McKee. At that August symposium, let's listen in. Your descent in June was based in part on concern about the lagged effects of rate moves on the economy. How long do you think lags are? Have they gotten shorter over the years? And if so, then when do you think they're going to really hit the rate moves, hit the economy, and what do you think happens? So I think it's been a long-standing premise, right? That there are long and variable lags with interest rate adjustments. So we have seen pretty quickly that those rate increases have transmitted to the housing market, for example, and mortgage rates pretty quickly. The question is, what else is in the pipeline? And I think we should expect while we may see some shorter transmission in certain sectors. We are going to have to really see how it affects other things. For example, we know that there's still a lot of excess savings sitting out there. Well, that make it more difficult for consumption for that demand to come off is the fact that we pivoted to more goods purchases. We still have people purchasing goods some 20% higher than they were pre-pandemic. Maybe it goes more quickly. So my thoughts at the time of June was, we will have to be mindful that we are moving quickly. Also in conjunction with a balance sheet coming down and we'll just need to be watching for all the signs that the economy is beginning to respond. Well, the general consensus among you and your colleagues seems to be you raise rates to a restrictive level and you leave them there for a while. Rather than start to bring them back down again. So what's your level and how long do you think that they would have to stay there? So I think knowing the exact level knowing the exact number is really going to be a process. I couldn't tell you today where we are today is not restrictive, I would argue yet. We still have high inflation. So I think it tells us we have more room to go. That we would bring those rates down quickly and I've seen that in some of the forecasts seems a bit remarkable to me. I think he will have to hold. Over 4%. It could be well over. It could be over 4%. I don't think that's out of the question. But again, you won't know that, I think, until you begin to watch the data signs. And I think for me, one of the early indicators that you get as a regional fed president are talking to people in your region. And hearing on the ground what they're experiencing today because, you know, that won't show up in the data for a while after we begin to get some of those early signs. How are you looking to find financial conditions lately? And what they've been doing. We've seen them tighten, and then an inflation number looks not quite as strong, and they loosen again. Is this a transmission problem? Does it make it harder for you to do what you're trying to achieve? Is it effect communication problem? So I do think it's important that we be clear in our communications. The markets are volatile right now. There is a lot of uncertainty

Esther George Kathleen Hayes Michael McKee Kansas City Wyoming Bloomberg
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Euro area. He told Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes that it's important for policymakers to continue with a consistent and orderly normalization of monetary policy. The reality is that we have an excessively high inflation globally also in Europe and that's not to now conserve caused by the war in Ukraine, Russia's illegal brutal war in Ukraine. And the subsequent anti crisis we are suffering from. That's why it's action time and our mandate is price stability and we will work accordingly. Action time. Does that mean step on the gas? Does it mean accelerate speed up a bit? It means that we will have to take into account the excessively high inflation which is clearly exceeding our target it's largely energy inflation. Roughly half but it's spreading to the rest of the economy. And that's why it's important that we have to now and we will contain inflation expectations rising so that we can keep them anchored. In fact, we started our normalization of monetary policy already in December and we are continuing consistent and orderly monetary policy monetary policy normalization. What do you stand or sit right now on the question of 50 or 75 basis points on that September meeting? Do you see more pressure there? Or maybe not just more pressure but maybe more need to do something like that, or at least consider it. We raised rates in July by 50 basis points. So the next step will be a significant move in September. Depending on the incoming data on the economic inflation outlook. It would be the number one thing to tilt your position to say, well, maybe it's time to go for 75. I think it's important not to jump the gun and let's see the figures in September. We will get the next economic projects on exercise in front of us prior to the meeting. And we will have the latest incoming data in September, then we will see, as I said, we have a clearly accessibly high inflation in Europe now and this means that according to our mandate, which is price stability, we have to act now and to monetary policies now facing the dilemma of one hand maintaining inflation expectations, uncut and on the other hand, avoiding that we will push the economy unnecessarily to a resistance because of monetary policy. There are other reasons to be made. We may have a we may have to face a resistance at monetary policy. That was Ali ran ECB governing council member talking to Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes in Wyoming at the Jackson hole meeting, interesting to hear the other ECB governing council members who were also speaking at that meeting Isabel schnabel, who's a member of the executive board as well. And Francois villa de Gallo, the governor of the bank of France saying on Saturday that European monetary policy would have to remain tight for an extended period of time. This, of course, as we see the Euro remaining weaker against the dollar, one of the side effects of Jerome Powell's speech was the renewed strength in the dollar, which is hovering near record highs in the Bloomberg dollar spot index up by half of 1%, whereas the Euro is back below parity down two tenths against the dollar 99 44 the level of trading at the moment, coming up next on Bloomberg daybreak, Europe as energy prices skyrocket here in the UK. What does the future hold for a nuclear power will be hearing from the CEO of the nuclear industry

Kathleen Hayes Ukraine Bloomberg ECB governing council Europe Russia Isabel schnabel Francois villa de Gallo bank of France Jerome Powell Ali Wyoming Jackson UK
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:15 min | 10 months ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Period will extend. But if inflation goes down as we expect at this moment, we are expecting that inflation will go down to below 3% at the end of next year. If that happens then who knows? Okay, looks like the door's open anyway. So chip exports falling, exports of weakened, is that any kind of red flag on the economy at this point? In the chip prices and but in the medium term, we are very much concerned on the restructuring of this global value chain. And especially China because they are advancing their technologies is becoming our competitor too. So I think the period that we really benefit from the China is a factory with the world is coming to an end. And we have to definitely adapt ourselves to the new subgroup of supply chains. And on top of that though, that's kind of been a broader trend. But right now, China is growth forecast has been downgraded a couple of times. The COVID outbreak, the insistence on COVID zero, what does that mean for Korea? You are a very strong exporting nation in one of the 25% of your trade. Right. So slow down on China is definitely one of the important negative factors for us. And we were really seeing what will happen to the general COVID policy. After the October November party Congress. And then also the recently announced stimulus packages, and now we want to see how that will alleviate this slowdown. And that is bank of Korea governor richang Yong speaking with Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes at Jackson hole. But watching movies in the South Korean won leading drops in Asian currencies following those hawkish comments from the fed chair Jerome Powell at Jackson hole. Symposium Friday, remember we have the Korean one trading around this 13 year low, the dollar. Against the one rising almost 1% to 1344, there was quite a bit of jaw bone in coming through from officials last week in Korea to try and stem the decline in that currency, but overall the Bloomberg dollar spot index certainly on the front foot today rising about .4 of 1% after Friday's

China COVID richang Yong Kathleen Hayes Jackson hole Korea bank of Korea Jerome Powell Bloomberg Congress fed
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Agenda on this Wednesday Kathleen Hayes go back economics and policy editor pouring over those FOMC minutes She's back in her interactive broker studio so too is created Gupta markets correspondent at Bloomberg will get to market reaction in just a moment Kathleen what is significant from those minutes First of all I think it's significant Carol that everything's certainly with regard to interest rate hikes that we're seeing from these minutes was well telegraphed by Jay Powell the press conference on May 4th when they finished up this meeting by subsequent fed speakers everyone from Rafael bostic to Esther George who we just learned is going to retire by January of next year Suggesting that yeah they all are behind these 50 basis point rate hikes at the next two meetings very very clear in the minutes And I think importantly they figure that if they do this expedited faster removal the policy accommodation bigger faster rate hikes means that gives them that chance later in the year and as bostick has said maybe even in September he's president of the Atlanta fed to maybe pause and assess what they're doing Certainly maybe revert to 25 basis point hikes That's it hit it hard hit it fast and see if you can change things The other thing that to me is very important Is there acknowledging very clearly also their realization if not concerned that once they start really running off the balance sheet there could be liquidity issues And I spoke to at least one official recently who said that once it gets going that is going to be a bigger risk to certainly to the bond market Maybe to the market's more broadly because the bulls are.

Kathleen Hayes Jay Powell Rafael bostic Esther George FOMC Bloomberg Kathleen Carol bostick Atlanta bulls
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In New York I'm Kathleen Hayes And I'm Brian Curtis lots coming up in the next hour and about 50 minutes will get the China ML F one year lending rate and also in about an hour and a half we'll get the high frequency data for the prior month That should be interesting And we had such a big rally in the NASDAQ on Friday and the futures are up to half a percent or so So it'd be interesting to see how tech fairs in Asia will get an update on all of this with Doug prisoner in a few moments For now Kathleen and I will look at some of the top stories of this hour Well for anybody who invested any kind of crypto vehicle important news Bitcoin staged a modest recovery to around $30,000 on Sunday and as you may recall last week the largest cryptocurrency slumped after the stablecoin Terry USD absolutely collapsed Bloomberg zucchini says the recovery shows Bitcoin's resiliency Past crashes notably the crypto winter back in 2018 saw Bitcoin taking months if not years to see a bounce back And yet now we're already back in the green and market observers say a big difference we're seeing in this brisk bounce back if you want to call it Is that there are a lot more institutional investors and they see this pullback as a buying opportunity Bitcoin bouncing back managing trying to go up to 31,000 We'll see how that goes Brian Yeah we've spent some good time over 31,000 this morning in Asia And in a new perk meant to retain talent in a hot job market Goldman Sachs will allow its senior staff to take an unlimited name and a.

Kathleen Hayes Brian Curtis Bitcoin Bloomberg zucchini Kathleen Asia Doug New York China Brian Yeah Goldman Sachs
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is with me and Katie Charlie breaking down that headline fed officials weighing shrieking the balance sheet by 95 billion a month Signaling it will reduce those massive bond holdings and further tightening credit across the economy also as Charlie mentioned many fed officials saying one or more 50 basis points hikes may be warranted It feels like the bond market knew this was coming but it feels like the equity market did not Not at all If you look at the S&P 500 right now sharply pairing loss is still negative on the day but direction travel definitely higher All right so let's get to it with our team We've got Kathleen Hayes global economics and policy editor at Bloomberg news She's in her interactive broker studio so too is kree Gupta Marcus correspondent at Bloomberg Kathleen let's get to you what jumps out Well first of all let's start with the not so obvious but important line that fed officials say one or more 50 basis point hikes may be warranted are Bloomberg write up suggests that at the last meeting there were many Now many I don't know if that's half but that's a lot of what is many means Well look a few honestly a few which means just a couple maybe three that's my guess I think many in several several maybe more than half but many is a substantial number So there are people saying no I'm ready for 50 basis points That really should well besides me a little because I know subsequently everyone's kind of freaking out about inflation But that's important So that means okay the May 50 basis point hike has got to be a done deal Besides that though the roll off cap phase is going to take is going to phase in three months or modestly lower modestly fewer They want to get to $95 billion a month pretty quickly at the past So is that more aggressive than what everybody was expecting Well it's more aggressive than I expected People were figuring the ultimately get to a hundred a month or a 120 a month But to get there in three months or less I think is pretty aggressive One more thing that lael brainer the fed vice chair touched on yesterday in her prepared remarks not just an off the cuff answer to something Esther George exclusive interview on liberty television touched on Once you start reducing the balance sheet and you're reducing stimulus right Is the opposite of buying bonds And when you're raising rates and even do 50 basis point hikes you're moving fairly aggressively on rates So how are you going to calibrate that How much is a month's worth or three months worth of about 300 that we've got 300 billion of that How does that equate to rate hikes That's the question they're going to have to work on And that's what markets Katie have to figure out Absolutely I mean creedy come in here How do you explain the market reaction that we're seeing Because it is kind of weird to see the S&P 500 jumping right now The NASDAQ two that had been the big underperformer on the day pairing losses quite significantly Yeah well back up for just a second and I want to follow what Kathleen said here on the 95 billion because we talked about what the expectation was You said one 20 on the higher end the lower end of that was 80 billion per month So it's interesting that it came out at 95 from what I'm seeing here The range was 80 to a 100 billion People were thinking a 100 billion a month As much as a 120 like you said so on the surface it kind of seems like because it's less than perhaps that a 100 billion not by much but still that perhaps could be a reason to stocks are moving higher but still look we're down over 1% on the S&P 500 still still almost 2% on the NASDAQ So this does seem like a knee jerk reaction even as worse Did we dip down a second then bounce back Even as we're speaking we are now back to exactly where we were before the minutes came out So once again seeing knee jerk reactions it doesn't look like a ton has changed when it comes to exactly what people are thinking One of the headlines that struck out to me though was the fact that they said and I'm just going to find this really quickly that if it weren't for the war more officials would talk about a 50 basis point march hike And they made it very clear if not for the war What's interesting here is that the conversation was very often been that perhaps the war would accelerate the rate hikes or make them bigger So to see them say well actually maybe this is kind of something that we should be a little bit cautious and maybe a little bit more dovish on instead of because of the war That's new Well we know that it's going to hit everyone says it will hit Europe hardest Those economies they are a big a big purchaser of certainly exports from China China is dropping with these lockdowns that are spreading so quickly in Shanghai The global forces that the fed has to watch are something potentially that could temper but you get the feeling it's like Bill Dudley hit his piece today saying the fed is going to have to actually shock the stock market They're really going to have to show an aggressive move to start changing expectations so they can get financial conditions to tighten And that's part of the balancing act as well And also likely is that though that the fed's appetite would be to actually cause that to happen Because you have seen calls for it but among current FOMC members I would say this Jim bullard who is frequently a leader a thought leader at the fed said what two months ago he wanted to see a hundred basis points in rate hikes by July 1st okay That would mean in the next three.

fed Katie Charlie Kathleen Hayes kree Gupta Marcus Bloomberg Kathleen Bloomberg news lael Esther George creedy S Charlie Katie Kathleen Bill Dudley China Shanghai Europe
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Stake in Twitter that makes him the biggest shareholder in the social media platform Bloomberg's Ed ludlow tells us what mask might be up to You know the consensus is split really across cell site analysts at least on Wall Street but probably on balance that he's trying to affect some kind of change on the platform because you'll remember on March 25th he tweeted a poll asking whether Twitter did or did not adhere to the principles of free speech and the majority of respondents said it did not So that's where we stand right now And we also had Elon Musk tweeting this morning asking whether Twitter needs an edit button and we heard as well from Twitter CEO Parag agro or commenting on Musk's poll saying that consequences of the poll will be important Twitter shares surging about 27% after we heard Elon Musk took that 9.2% stake in Twitter We have crude oil prices pushing higher right now with WTI north of a $105 a barrel we're up about 1.7 right now at 1.7% I should say we have the details on what's driving this price section from Bloomberg's zukin The European Union announces it is looking at imposing new sanctions on Russia and at the same time Saudi Arabia's state owned oil companies Saudi Aramco Hiking its prices for all its buyers All regions the U.S. and Europe as well as Asia For instance the price for one grade called Arab light is now $4 and 40 cents a barrel higher than a month ago It is a massive increase All right so I mentioned WTI at a $105 right now the Brent contract is above a 109 Well the reserve bank of Australia not expected to make any policy changes at today's meeting this even as pressure to boost its key rate grows Here's Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes The headline rate for inflation in March up 4% year over year That's the highest in September 2008 They also have to look at the core rate Two and a half percent year over year in the month of March is not so bad but it's moved up to the midpoint of the RBA's two to 3% target So the pressures are there not just commodity prices the pre election budget which gave financial boosts to help compensate people for these commodity prices The labor market is full employment now All this is expected to continue to boost prices And all economists surveyed by Bloomberg expect the cash rate to stay at .1 of a percent we will get the RBA's decision at two 30 p.m. Sydney time 33 passed the hours we crossed two Los Angeles Brian Curtis is looking at markets tough to get a sense of where things may be had given a number of holidays that we've got today kind of a mixed picture right now wouldn't you say Yeah definitely mixed and as you say three big markets on holiday today And we had some headwinds move in on us with some of these prospective sanctions on Russia and oil prices rising as much as we've mentioned up 1.7% from the New York close all the way up to one O 5 O three Shares are up in Australia with about a half a percent gain but down in Tokyo but just a scant tenth of 1% down about two tenths of a percent in cost In Seoul for the cost speed The yen hit an intraday high against the dollar following some comments from the bank of Japan governor or he could corrode a Corona commented on the speed of the ends moves here of late And so we saw dollar yen move to one 22 53 We were a lot stronger than that but we've kind of come back the other direction but still the yen picked up strength of about two tenths of 1% The bank of Korea sees inflation holding up around the 4% range and we did have inflation in March above 4% to 4.1%.

Twitter Bloomberg Elon Musk Ed ludlow Parag agro Kathleen Hayes RBA Musk Saudi Aramco reserve bank of Australia Brian Curtis
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We've got a couple of reasons why it's debatable how sustainable this will be but the gains are there today Investors taking hearts from reports that the omicron variant has been relatively mild for patients or is it taking heart They're encouraged by that somewhat And also China cut the reserve ratio requirements for its banks and this is right across the board not targeted It should affect just about everybody and should eventually mean lower interest rates there So that could be seen as a positive some stimulus for the economy And even more important than that Paul it could be a change of thinking for the PBOC and for policymakers to be a little less tight going forward And we're also wondering whether that extends to the all the regulatory changes that have been made We had a guest earlier this morning who told us she felt that the changes would be put on hold now and then they would let things kind of simmer down a little bit We'll have to wait and see the hexing index is rallied about 1.1% the Hanks and tech index up 1.8% We've seen a big rally in the developers today and a couple of key points there Kaiser group holdings bondholders have given the company a little leeway with a letter they wrote That's designed to buy some time to avoid default And China evergrande which will tell you more about in a moment to include all of its offshore public bonds and private debt obligations in a restructuring So both of those stocks are up pretty handsomely We also have China merchant sheko up as much as 6% and in the Hong Kong market in addition to China evergreens 8% game We've got country garden of 5% Kaiser about 4% And soon at China with a gain of 12% So heady day indeed Yield on the ten year treasury at 1.44% WTI crude back up over $70 a barrel $70 20 cents Paul As you mentioned Brian China's policymakers adding support to the nation's economy the PBOC said on Monday it'll cut the triple out for most banks by half a percentage point next week and that's going to release a $188 billion of liquidity Meantime president Xi oversaw a meeting of the Communist Party's Politburo on Monday Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes tells us what that meeting concludes They are ready to stabilize the economy as well They're talking about supporting the housing market building more subsidized housing to facilitate healthy development of the property industry It seems like a shift of tone now where they're not trying to push so hard on the developers but acknowledge that there has been a slowdown There are some problems now And they've got to counteract it Leadership panel also pledged to ensure the economy grows in a reasonable range and the society remains orderly Brian Yeah and Paul I mentioned a few moments ago that we're hearing that China evergreen is planning to include all in the restructuring that's now being planned Bloomberg Steven engel tells us what else is there All of ever grands offshore public bonds and also private debt offerings including from the units such as scenery journey which was on the hook for about 83 and a half million U.S. dollar coupon payment as the 30 day grace period ended yesterday No word on whether that was actually paid but also would include a bonds of that joint venture jumbo fortune enterprises All of these offshore bonds would be included in this debt restructuring which would make it perhaps one of the biggest debt restructurings ever in China According to Bloomberg data evergrande has about $19 billion in outstanding offshore public bonds and around 8 billion in local notes.

China PBOC Kaiser group Brian China Politburo on Monday Bloomberg Kathleen Hayes Paul Kaiser Brian Yeah
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"With supply chain issues And if you've been holiday shopping you're probably struggling with it too Yeah right And we asked Cleveland fed president Loretta master what companies are telling the fed about the problem And here's muster with Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes and Heidi starred watts Well I would say that the views of businesses have changed over time as well When we do talk to a lot of businesses I'm glad you brought that up because that's one of the things that we've been doing throughout the pandemic And even before the pandemic it's part of what we part of the information we use to make policy decisions Right They early on thought that supply chain conditions would ease up relatively quickly themselves And so we were basing some of our interpretation of what was happening on what we were getting and the feedback we were getting from actual businesses dealing with those issues As the pandemic a lot of those supply chain issues were exacerbated and lingered longer than Nathan And so they've been extending their time dimension around the supply chain issues as well But on the other hand one thing that I think is striking about this whole pandemic situation is that firms are learning to cope with it And they're figuring out different ways of dealing with some of those daunting tasks of how do you get inputs How do you get product from a to B And so there is a sense of there's some resiliency here And that's why I think activity is staying strong despite all the problems that businesses are facing and that households are facing because of the pandemic And I think that's something we have to take on board too is that the economy has been given how big a shock this was an exogenous shotgun No one anticipated how well it's been able to come back Now for policy purposes we just have to make sure that we're doing all we can To keep the economy on that solid ground And that means making sure that inflation doesn't get out of hand and becoming endemic And that also means making sure that we're supporting the economy as it gets back to a more normal pace after the pandemic is under more under control President master you did say you can see the possibility of a couple of rate hikes next year With inflation doing what it's doing And even if it starts coming down a lot of people think it may not get quickly back to 2% and with the labor market looking tight the labor shortages are maybe keeping the unemployment rate from not getting to that pre-pandemic level Jay Powell in fact mentioned that in his testimony So why would there be any hesitancy to raise rates at least a couple of times next year when you have the key rate still pretty much at zero And at a time when the economy is strong and there's no doubt that you've met your inflation mandate Well I mean we look at both of our goals and we have to make that assessment and we have to wait and see how the economy is going to evolve But I take your point in the sense of at the moment right If you were just talking about today it looks like very strong labor markets And very strong inflation numbers But remember two things to remember One policy works with a lag So you want to have some notion of the outlook going forward before you decide today that we're going to be raising rates 6 months or 8 months or whatever at the time period So again there is risk out there We have Elmer crime We'll have to see I think the first step is really quickening that taper which I think is appropriate And then we can look at being that position then to start raising rates if it turns out that the inflation numbers don't come back down next year as many forecasters now say in the second half of the next year we'll keep the place coming back down So I think that's kind of the policy process that we have to go through Quick follow on being open to the taper Many economists suggest the fed should double the size of the taper So it can wrap it up by March instead of June Would you be in favor of this Well we're gonna start that I'm sure what the appropriate pace is But anything that purchases in the first quarter or maybe early in the second quarter right now I would support that Given what we know about the economy Well no one two weeks more about Elmer cron And then we can talk about what they appropriate paces But right now I would support that I want to ask you I want to put a shine a spotlight I should say on the Cleveland feds simple policy rule gauge It looks at 7 policy rules including something like John Taylor's rule of where the funds rate should be based on the state of the economy And on three economic forecasts it says that signals that the funds rate the median projection would be that it should be something like 2.7% at the end of this year and about three and a half percent by the end of next year How are we supposed to understand that And what does that inform you about what the fed will or should be doing with the funds rate They don't really apply to this situation Because the pandemic and what's happened in the economy is very very different than earlier right So I think we have to use that as information when form us But I wouldn't necessarily not necessarily I don't ascribe to the fact that we should use those rules in particular to guide our decisions today I think this is a very different situation than we've ever faced in the past And I think that that has been I think very good about really facing the situation that we have And then being resilient and agile enough If the data change or outworks change we are using our tools in the most appropriate way And so I think that's the path that we have to do going forward This is the seasonal question that we have to ask every year But I suppose more this year than the most What are the biggest risks that you see going into 2022 And I suppose it's very difficult to be able to predict some of them given the curve balls of the pandemic have thrown at us so far Well I mean from the policy point of view it is the inflation numbers I think the upside risks are there I think they're ones we really have to take on board And we want to make sure.

Loretta master Kathleen Hayes Jay Powell fed Cleveland Heidi Bloomberg Nathan Elmer cron Elmer John Taylor
"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen hayes" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Law professor Sarah bloom Raskin to be the fed's top banking regulator and that's something that will take a closer look out there a few other names in the fray as well The former consumer financial protection bureau director Richard cordray So it should be a very interesting discussion coming up This is a radio and television simulcast Bloomberg's Kathleen Hayes speaks with Loretta Esther the Cleveland fed bank president He crossed out to Bloomberg television and Kathleen Hayes I'm Kathleen Hayes in New York We'd like to welcome you and our Bloomberg radio listeners around the world for our next interview We're joining exclusively by Loretta master She's president of the Federal Reserve bank of Cleveland discuss the economy inflation the path forward for fed policy and more Welcome It's great to have you back Thanks very much Kathleen It's very nice to be with you Well I want to start with fed chair Powell Two days of testimony to Congress made it pretty clear He is definitely ready to discuss speeding up the fed taper Are you ready to discuss it Is it something that you are going to be in favor of Well you know actually going into the September meeting I thought there was a strong case for tapering at a faster pace than what we had actually announced And since that time of the day I would come in and supportive of that case So I'm very open to considering a faster pace of tapering Always with the focus on what's best for substantially achieving our goals of price stability and maximum employment And making sure that we're incorporating the data that comes in So we have a couple more weeks before that meeting But I'm certainly open to discussing it How close are you What do you need to see then I mean are you like well I just need a little confirmation to make sure I'm making the right decision Is there something you're really doubtful about making the case and actually say yes go ahead to do that speed it up taper No I mean the momentum in the economy is clear We've seen very strong labor markets We've seen very strong price pressures and high inflation rates I think the new issue is the risk of a Macron And frankly we just don't have enough information yet We need the healthcare scientists to tell us more about whether this is a variant that's going to be like delta where our vaccinations actually work against it or is it going to be a different kind of mutation that or variants that may be much more virulent and much spread more quickly and we'll have to develop vaccination So that's a new risk I haven't changed my outlook The economy is going to be you know it's just coming in very strong the momentum and the economy is coming in very strong And if the owner crime variant turns out to be like delta one thing we've learned over time is that with each new area there is some divination and activity That's sure But each time it's less because the economy is learn and households and businesses have learned how to cope with the uptick in cases in the downturn And we've had a higher vaccination rate over time as well So it really is going to depend on how what the real risk is there But in terms of the underlying economy there's a lot of momentum You know firms are trying to persevere in the wake of labor market supply issues Product market supply issues and they've been able to sort of cope with it so far But that's put application pressure on prices You know and it's really important for the fed to do what it can to ensure that those pandemic related price increases A more persistent Well so you read my mind Because I wanted to ask you two months ago you said that the risks upside risk on inflation outweigh the downside risk So are you now in the campus that say this isn't transitory There's a risk this becomes entrenched Does this become now the bigger risk to the economy which would again justify necessitate a faster taper and speeding up so you can get to rate hikes quicker if you need them Well I think that fast making that taper faster is definitely buying insurance and optionality so that if inflation doesn't move back down significantly next year we're in a position to be able to look where we are and then hike if we have to My base case still is an inflation will come down but with the incoming data and the momentum and the lasting of this supply chain issues I think it will be higher than I'd like to see it in the first half of the year And we're just kind of waiting to see how things came out Overcrowded may delay the supply chain issues made They take longer to resolve And so those are the kinds of things that we have to see going forward to be able to determine where we want to be But the taper quicking the taper just puts us in a better position to have that optionality if we if indeed we need to use it A month ago you said rate hikes were still quote a long way off Would you still say that today Well for a while I've been sort of thinking that we need to have a rate hike next year but towards the end of the year Right now with the inflation data the way it is and with the job market as strong as it is in many dimensions I do think that we have to be in a position that if we need to raise rates a couple of times next year we're able to do that So again quickening the tapering gives us that optionality We're going to have to observe what's going on But you know the one thing I like to say is that the act quicken the tapering is not a tightening of monetary policy And even the first rate hike monetary policy whenever that comes whenever it's appropriate monetary policy will still be very accommodative So sometimes I think people think that if we change the pace of the tapering we're tightening policy And that's just not the case There's a lot of liquidity a lot of accommodation out there How about the risk of falling behind the curve There's a lot of economists out there who think maybe that already has Well I mean I know there's a view out there and as I've said I think the risks are to the upside and inflation But a lot of the readings that we've done on inflation have been related to the pandemic Now the risk of it persisting longer and then leading to something more persistent and the underlying inflation rate is there And that's why I think we need to sort of buy some of that insurance against it I don't think we're behind the curve yet but we certainly are going to do all we can with the tools we have to make sure that we're going to sustainably achieve our goal over time and not allow inflation to be higher than we'd like it to be So the president is Heidi here in Sydney President had to hear in Sydney I am just wondering I'm very curious about the references to the supply chain and how the fed sort of I guess underestimated the pressures in the supply chain and the logistics side of the piece.

Kathleen Hayes Bloomberg Sarah bloom Raskin consumer financial protection Loretta Esther Cleveland fed Richard cordray Federal Reserve bank Loretta Kathleen Powell fed Cleveland Congress New York Sydney Heidi
Saint Louis, President And Kathleen Hayes discussed on Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

01:36 min | 4 years ago

Saint Louis, President And Kathleen Hayes discussed on Bloomberg Best

"Federal reserve bank of saint louis president james bullard says an insurance cut of twenty five basis points to interest rates would be enough to protect against a sharper than expected slowdown in economic growth bullard spoke exclusively to bloomberg's kathleen hayes and explained why he dissented from the fed's decision to keep interest rates level at the last meeting of the policy-setting federal open market committee for the first time was twenty thirteen descended on fed policy decision it was the first ascent in the era of fed chair jay powell i think a lot of people are wondering why now speech on june thirty said a rate cut might be warranted inflation expectations continue to fall if you know if it looked like the weakness could be even bigger from the trade center than thought but why did you say what you really have to draw a line in the sand and say we can't wait gotta cut twenty five basis points today well inflation's running below target which is surprising given that the economy has surprised the upside over the last two years really growth has been higher than most people had expected labor markets have been very strong unemployment at a fifty year low and still we're looking at inflation running below target by preferred measure inflation expectations deteriorating growth still okay looking backward but looking forward looks like a slowdown with some downside risk you've got an inverted yield curve seemed to me like this is a good chance to make us insurance rate cut and try to recenter inflation and inflation expectations back at the two percent

Saint Louis President Trump Kathleen Hayes FED Jay Powell James Bullard Bloomberg Two Percent Fifty Year Two Years
Emerging market woes weigh on stocks, China deadline looms

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:35 min | 5 years ago

Emerging market woes weigh on stocks, China deadline looms

"It's time for Kathleen Hayes, global economics and policy editor for Bloomberg news in our Bloomberg eleven three s studio here in midtown Manhattan. I love animals too. They say animal prints are going to be in in style is season. I say what are they saying? Is it always in style? Mom, raising her, right? Always. Carol master, you raising that girl, right? All right. The bond market the bond market is not wild today. Okay. Despite prints that we're all discussing up, but there's so much going on. I think if you're you're just sitting tight. What are you waiting for come on? You've got emerging markets to decline so much though. The Bloomberg news is now writing stories about developed economies with emerging market characteristics. Italy's? This just continues and continues Argentina's supposedly is best bet to get out of its mess is this know this expert on taxes on farm exports thirty year bonds down a quarter point heels at three point seven ten year note, flat two point nine zero right in the middle of the range. Trade huge deficit big with China. Canada's is trying to negotiate this intense deal with the US trade surplus with US widens to the most since two thousand eight that's the headline on Bloomberg news Jim Bullard in town, saying something he's been saying for a while. He thinks the flat yield curve is a signal that that that may be too restrictive. He said this over and over and over again, he's a guy who says, you know, we really don't need to do much more about where we

Bloomberg Bloomberg Economics Jim Bullard Tim Wahidi Kathleen Hayes FBI Manhattan Wall Street Journal American Express Italy Carol Master China Editor United States Kp Morgan Argentina Canada Treasury
Asia slips after U.S.-China trade talks end without progress

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:52 sec | 5 years ago

Asia slips after U.S.-China trade talks end without progress

"In London I'm Markus Karlsson with, this Bloomberg radio business flash the lack of progress in US China trade talks weighed, on Wall Street last night's and that sentiment has been spilling over, into Asian, equities this morning the dollar meanwhile rebounding after the ousting of, Markham Turnbull as prime minister Scott Morrison is in. Instead And we. Are as I say, seeing the alsi arising on the back of that. Australia's Hsieh's also went from. Negative into positive territory on that news with the ASX two hundred in Sydney gaining about a third of one percent we've. Also seen Asian shares overall go from negative into positive territory the. Asia Pacific index now higher by about eight tenths of one. Percent back trade issue as I was saying audio sort of set. The, tone in the morning part of the Asian session we. Are still seeing some losses though for, the Hang Seng

Bloomberg Jay Powell Federal Reserve Wyoming United States Kathleen Hayes Bloomberg Tv Sandra Kilhof Jackson Hole ASX Scottish Government Australia Google Official Sydney Scott Morrison Asia Pacific Caterpillar Markus Karlsson
Susan Rice slams Trump for 'disgraceful statement' about Russia at G7

The Spud Goodman Show

02:16 min | 5 years ago

Susan Rice slams Trump for 'disgraceful statement' about Russia at G7

"Former australian prime minister kevin rudd i think the chinese are very keen to continue to reinforce a message through the symbols to the international diplomatic community under the americans that kim jong un union is their ally and nobody else's and therefore he arrived out of the air china charter jet meanwhile the us senator lindsey graham says he's asking democrats will support us efforts to use force as a last resort against north korea what i do expect to be done in a year from now is that does dismantle their nuclear weapons programs missiles off with tony manure raynham anytime anywhere inspections and we're not going to let them run out the clock again graham on abc and back to the fallout from the g seven president trump is suggesting that g seven g eight eight being russia on cbs national security adviser in the obama administration susan rice says the pattern here is very wrong the president of the united states to walk into that session and to essentially blow it up and disrespect our allies while embracing russia and and giving benefits to china but canada's prime minister justin trudeau the new trump target says the road forward is what it's most important all of us pulling together and doing things that matter for citizens and for the world and on that this was certainly a success and one more note here of latimer putin is repeated his desire to meet with donald trump a lot of moving parts global news twenty four hours a day on aaron a tick talk on twitter power by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries in san francisco i'm ed baxter this is bloomberg brian ed thank you so much eight minutes now past the hour and it's a big week for central banks we certainly been squawking about that a lot here over the past couple of weeks policy decisions coming from the federal reserve european central bank and the bank of japan joining us now to talk more about it bloomberg's global economics and policy editor kathleen hayes kathleen too many of us the may be the most interesting i could lose it it why but i know you can do it better because there's this whole draw about whether or not.

Aaron Kathleen Hayes Editor Japan Twitter Barack Obama Kim Jong Un Prime Minister Bloomberg Ed Baxter San Francisco Kevin Rudd Donald Trump Latimer Putin Justin Trudeau Canada China
Malaysia: Markets closed on Thursday and Friday

02:17 min | 5 years ago

Malaysia: Markets closed on Thursday and Friday

"One eight six six sectoretf we're at forty seven past the hour we're gonna be talking with bloomberg's global economics and policy editor kathleen hayes coming up about what's going on with em particularly given the fact that the bank of indonesia has signaled for the second time in two weeks it may hike interest rates we've got a weaker currency on that front not gonna steal her thunder we'll have details on that coming up we've got a weaker yen against the dollar here at one zero nine ninety and higher oil prices the combination i guess you could say is helping to send the nikkei up by about three tenths of one percent in seoul the kospi had one half of one percent and in sydney now the asx two hundred is better by about three tenths of one percent now markets in malaysia will be closed thursday and friday we had a stunning victory in the election in malaysia mahathir mohamed defeating the current prime minister do brazil created a bit of nervousness in the space during the new york session the ice shares msci malaysia etf down about six percents so we're not going to be able to get market reaction in malaysia until the monday session intraday in the bond market stateside we had the ten year above three percent we close new york trading right around two three percent yield we've given back just about two basis points right now in the tokyo session yielding two point nine eight percent let's get an update on global news now mark mills is in the global bloomberg newsroom with these headlines mark douglas state department says three americans held in north korean labor camps were free and back in the us wednesday afternoon they landed in anchorage alaska and route to joint base andrews near washington president trump said that he's looking forward to greeting the hostages when they arrive cnn reports that singapore has been chosen as the host city for the planned summit between president trump and kim jong un no comment from the white house on that report ninety two year old malaysian leader mahathir mohamad scores a shocking victory in national elections promising a return to the rule of law the israeli military says iranian forces based in syria fired twenty rockets at israeli frontline military positions in the golan heights early thursday triggering an israeli reprisal and further escalating heightened tensions global news twenty four hours a day on air an tick tock on.

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Roy Moore, Doug and President discussed on

02:15 min | 5 years ago

Roy Moore, Doug and President discussed on

"Brian all right let's get to the news desk thanks very much doug thirty five minutes now past the hour and we're looking at this president trump's popularity facing a test with the tuesday primaries with that and the rest of the global news here's mark mills in the bloomberg newsroom mark brian thanks the race for control of congress kicks into high gear with primaries in four key states on tuesday that will test whether democrats can turn trump's low approval ratings to their advantage democrats and republicans in indiana west virginia ohio and north caroli china will pick candidates for congress governor and state legislatures president trump employed republicans in west virginia not to vote for us senate candidate donald blankenship in the gop primary saying the candidate a coal executive who served prison time for a safety violation that killed twenty nine miners can't win the general election trump wants to avoid a replay of the roy moore defeat in alabama the trump administration has shown in america i vibe that has many allies worried that the us is withdrawing from its traditional international engagement bloomberg's kathleen hayes asked about that in a conversation with former secretary of state george shultz a trend pulling back from asia to you've seen for a while is it is it a mistake the us is making there's been a lot of rhetoric like that but we seem to be preoccupied with china japan north korea so we're not we're engaged heavily should be trade talks with mexico and canada continue following the decision last month to postpone tariffs on us imports of steel and aluminum from the european union canada and mexico secretary of state mike pompeo meeting with his mexican counterpart at the white house monday so how did optimistic on nafta mexico as our second largest export market third largest trading partner the importance of modernizing nafta cannot be overstated and we'll continue to work towards an agreement with mexico and with canada the trump administration will ask congress to cancel fifteen billion dollars in unspent government funds including seven billion from the children's health insurance program according to people familiar with the plan the move would cancel unspent money from previous years of children's health insurance but would have no effect.

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US-China trade talks center on rivalry over technology

02:02 min | 5 years ago

US-China trade talks center on rivalry over technology

"Special tomorrow five o'clock eastern carol i'll be thinking with robert kaplan from the dallas fed wanna talk to you about the international aspects of fed policy and also about the us economy good stuff as always kathleen hayes global economics and policy editor at bloomberg news there at on the west coast attending the hoover institution monetary policy conference at stanford and of course our thanks to philippi hernandez latin america economist bloomberg economics inner bloomberg eleven three studio let's get back to world and national news headlines and it's ever to nathan hager bloomberg newsroom in washington dc nathan carol president trump didn't know about the payment to stormy daniels when he said he didn't know about it that's what white house spokeswoman sarah sanders just said at the daily press briefing in the west wing after the president's lawyer rudy giuliani revealed last night that the president has in fact reimbursed his personal lawyer michael cohen for that hundred thirty grand stated and i'll refer you back to his comments this was information that the president didn't know at the time but eventually learn reports that federal authorities wiretapped cohen before the fbi raid on his home and office sanders is deferring questions on that to the president's lawyers and the justice department says the us cannot confirm reports that north korea's releasing three americans ahead of the president's plan to summit with kim jong un but she says if it's true the administration would see it as a sign of goodwill so far so little to say from president trump's economic team when it comes to trade talks with china the latest from bloomberg's irv chapman in washington china's economic policies plus geopolitical ambitions make the negotiations a tough slog elizabeth konami of the council on foreign relations said in a bloomberg interview superpower they want to reclaim the centrality of china on the global stage they want write the rules of the game they're made in china twenty twentyfive program to protect the chinese economy and chinese industry in ten cutting edge technologies is antithetical to getting the us companies in their opening market access and getting a fair deal economy says the administration would have a better shot against chinese cheating if it worked in concert with allies who have the.

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Trump looking to re-enter TPP, says Sens. Pat Roberts, Ben Sasse

02:04 min | 5 years ago

Trump looking to re-enter TPP, says Sens. Pat Roberts, Ben Sasse

"Whole lot of change although the end did weaken lot in in new york session and looking at oil prices vary strong dwi crude was up over sixty seven dollars a barrel for much of the morning now at sixty six eighty five doug back to us all right brian well as you mentioned president trump making some comments on teepee he told lawmakers he's considering rejoining the transpacific partnership now you might recall that he withdrew from tree tpp shortly after taking office republican senator ben sasse of nebraska was part of the group that met with the president china cheats and lots and lots of ways their theft of intellectual property they're made in china twenty twentyfive initiative are a whole bunch of bad actions and that cheating needs to be countered but the single best way we can counter that is by leading all the rule of law nations in the pacific would rather be aligned with the us then be aligned with china well the president's news on tv p comes ahead of next week's visit to the us by japanese prime minister shinzo obey bloomberg's global economics and policy editor is kathleen hayes she tells us president trump's move will be welcomed by japan it seems to me that he may be also getting ready to take steps that are so important for asia ex china this again is something that japan and other nations want in place because they to want to counter china's rising power in the region particularly when it comes to trade trump and albay will also likely discuss the us tariffs on steel and aluminum and the possibility of japan being granted an exemption from these levees and on sunday japan and china will begin their first highlevel economic dialogue nearly eight years we have more from bloomberg's ramy inocencio chinese foreign minister wong e will visit japan for three days to meet as counterpart taro kono bilateral trade and investment is strong but the relationship has been plagued by problems in recent years including territorial dispute in the south china sea one topic that may be discussed is japan filing to join a us complaint to the.

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