18 Burst results for "Kathleen Blues"

"kathleen blues" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

03:41 min | 3 months ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on Throughline

"Just a few months ago in october the department of homeland security issued a report that said white supremacist. Groups are the most persistent and lethal threat to domestic security and that same month another report this time by the center for strategic and international studies found that forty one of the sixty one terrorist plots and attacks in the first eight months of twenty were connected to white supremacists. It's been nearly twenty years since nine eleven and during that time. Much of the media and government has directed our attention to the threat of radical islamist terrorism. Yet during that time it's been domestic terrorism from groups of armed mostly white american men. This pose the biggest threat. The reality is some of these. Groups are highly organized. They have paramilitary capabilities and they are part of a deeply interconnected movement. I'm running. I'm that fateh. I'm routine out of louis and on this episode of through line from npr. The modern white power movement. The white power movement refers to a new kind of mobilization for white supremacist extremism. In the united states this is kathleen blue. I am a assistant professor of history at the university of chicago. He's also the author of a book that came out this year called bring the war home the white power movement and paramilitary america. What it is is a movement brought together around a common story of government betrayal in the vietnam war. This happened in the late nineteen seventies and the reason that it's important call it. White power is first of all. That's what these activists come in her book. Kathleen says that the post vietnam war years provided a launching point for new white supremacist narrative that could unite bunch of groups and activists that had not been able to get together before these included. People like clansmen neo nazis people who followed white supremacist theological beliefs. Kathleen says it was the birth of a new movement a movement that advocated for new kinds of tactics not just sort of the vigilante violence that clan groups had been operating with earlier in american history but instead in a a project of guerrilla warfare and revolution against the united states. In this episode. We're going to explore the history of the modern white power movement. How was inspired. How would evolve and how it became the greatest domestic terrorist threat in the united states. This is calling from los angeles california. And you're listening to the through line. Podcasts from npr. This is my fourth of doing this. I screwed up every other. What i love your show Keep up the good work. I've been listening for twelve hours by this. Message comes from. Npr sponsor capital one. Welcome to banking reimagined capital. One checking and savings accounts have no fees or minimums and top-rated banking app. That lets you manage your money anytime anywhere. Check on the account. Balance deposit checks pay bills and transfer money on the go. This is banking reimagined. What's in.

kathleen blue center for strategic and inter department of homeland securit united states npr vietnam Kathleen White power university of chicago white louis los angeles california Npr
"kathleen blues" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:57 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Monitoring white power and militia TV, online, and most of hearing this from people who work in de radicalization trying to help people out of the movement everyone is sounding the alarm bell right now, everyone is running up the red flag and I think you know you don't have to listen to me. I'm just a historian, but I think everyone is calling everyone they can think of to to sort of try to get people to pay attention to this very grave situation. Hunch they're bringing an acceleration in the momentum of these groups because of if obviously radically different reasons the last two presidents you had the the fact of a black president of the United States, which clearly a number of people had a significant problem with and he's followed by a president who is to put it charitably equivocal in his condemnation of these groups. Yes. Absolutely and we're seeing a very clear relationship between political rhetoric and extremist action is that to price do you think can be put back in the tube night at all? That's a good metaphor for it. I usually say we can't on ring the bell. Exactly the problem right because you know if you take something like the president's remarks in the first debate about calling the proud boys to quote stand back and stand by even if you take the most generous interpretation of his remarks and say, okay, perhaps perhaps he was fed that group name and he doesn't know who they are perhaps he meant to tell them. To stand down even if we take all of that as given I think that there is a very real problem i. in the fact that it's not just the proud boys who heard that as a paramilitary call to readiness there are many other underground groups like the Bass Lake the guys in Michigan who heard that call as the call to action. And there's another problem of even in the case of activists who right now support the president. There's no indication that he has the power to call these people off. Once he has ignited away of violence as I said, this is a movement that has been expressly anti-government for many many years, and this is a strange thing about the United States that it has since the Vietnam war been. Very possible to hold the position in the United States of being anti government and pro president or pro-military or pro cop at the same time I mean we see Ronald Reagan making statements about how the government is the problem not the solution while he is the head of the government. So that sort of gymnastics act of balancing that since a fracture is not a problem for people here. So, there is a way that you can be pro trump right now and still be dedicated to violent overthrow of the state down the road or at some present moment and another note of caution is just the last time that this movement became very deadly setting off the string of events that led to the Oklahoma City bombing, and you know the the most horrific mass casualty attack for the United States between Pearl Harbor Nine Eleven. The last time that happened was not under a leftist administration it was under Reagan and it was because activists in this movement saw Reagan's perceived moderation as a sign. that. Political means could never deliver the kind of change that they wanted. Even Reagan was not offering what they wanted, which was reestablishment of Jim Crow Segregation or reinstatement of slavery or establishment of a white homeland things like this were much too radical for mainstream politics. So there's a real chance that even trump will hit align where it's too extreme for him. I mean even trump is not talking about reestablishing slavery and at that point I think there might be a wave of dissatisfied people if he's re-elected who are interested in mass casualty attacks just finally is there an aspect of this which is? Not just or perhaps beyond politics and beyond even race it strikes me just looking at the. Way in which the members of these movements present themselves, there's this strange cartoonish idea of masculinity in play. You know it is a very masculine movement, but it turns out that both in the earlier movement and today women are incredibly important to this activism You don't always see that in the public facing part of what they're doing. But in the period of my study, there's a whole bunch of women who are sort of forming the social network holds these people together and really makes possible violent action and they're doing everything from publishing their own newspapers to running their. Own Auxiliary groups to driving getaway cars and disguising people when they're on the Lam and even as they're doing all that they are saying things like I'm not an activist I'm not political I would never seek a leadership role because you know within this worldview out sweat good womanhood looks like but however you cut it women are incredibly important here and we would be foolish to think that those deep social interactions aren't part of what is sustaining this groundswell. I'm just you're just finally finally and feel free if you like to to refuse to gaze into a crystal ball but. How do you see this playing out in the next? Well, the next few weeks I if the polls are correct and Donald Trump does lose office on Tuesday. Well I, think everyone in the United States. Approaching all polls with a degree of caution from now on for. Immediate. Historical reasons. My concern here is that there is no mental picture that I can paint. There's no series of events that I can see that would make someone at this point with this set of social pressures with this worldview simply put down the weapons and go home and say, okay, well, we lost this round. It's time to go do some democratic change somewhere else. So my concern is that if trump is while if biden is elected, I think that these activists will not only be frustrated and rally look for mass casualty are opportunities if trump. Is elected I think that one ends game has to do with them, feeling dissatisfied and turning to mass casualty attacks in route to overthrowing the government. Again, as they've been doing for quite a long time, another route would be a continuation of sort of this Lincoln in an odd slash outright calling to arms line of rhetoric I mean there's a way that groups like this and other contexts have become strike forces and death squads for authoritarian regimes and there we can look to southern America and central, America for many examples of how that's happened. All all three of these are threats to Americans and to our democracy. So I think it is a very bleak time for people who pay attention to this particular part of the American political life. But was Kathleen Blues speaking to me earlier, Kathleen's book bring the war home the white power movement and paramilitary America is published by BELKNAP..

president United States Ronald Reagan Donald Trump America gymnastics Kathleen Blues Oklahoma City Michigan Bass Lake Pearl Harbor Nine Eleven Jim Crow biden BELKNAP
"kathleen blues" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

12:45 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"V Colorado US presidential election campaign which draws to a merciful conclusion. . Four days from now has been such a circus that events which would have defined. . Other contests have been swiftly forgotten among those wells the thwarting earlier this month of an apparent plot by far right still styled militiamen to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the subsequent discovery of links between those alleged conspirators and of the white supremacist groups. . This is a cohort which has been repeatedly. Nodded . and winked at from the highest pulpit in the land. . These last four years. . What happens in the next four? ? Whatever happens on Tuesday well earlier I spoke to Kathleen, , Balu Assistant Professor of US history at the University of Chicago and offer of bringing the war home, , the white power movement and paramilitary America I began by asking Kathleen how the white supremacist movement has changed between the nine, , thousand, nine , hundred, , and now there's two differences in what's happening in the nineteen eighties and forward one is at the violence. . This movement is interested in carrying out is explicitly anti-state they want to overthrow the federal government. . So this is one of the reasons that I think white nationalist as a term can be confusing the nation and white nationalism nineteen eighty-three is not the united. States, . , it is the Irian Nation and they're imagining a fundamental overthrow of the country and all of its democratic practices. . So the other thing that's different is that this movement is bringing together a lot of different people in every way but race, , it is an. . Incredibly, , diverse social movement. . We're talking about a whole bunch of different sub sections of white supremacists thinking. . So this is the first time in the nineteen eighties. . The we see a unification between clansmen, , neo-nazis skinheads, , radical tax resisters, , posse comitatus members, , and then in the early nineteen nineties, , we start to see militia members in these groups as well. . Now, , all of that is emblematic of a movement that has taken a page from earlier. . American. . History. . So it it it borrows from the opportunism of earlier clan mobilizations, , but it's Very different in its deadly intent and in the number of people is able to bring together in this new set of sort of violent belief systems. . If you consider its car numbers and its current firepower, , how is impossible to quantify how dangerous these movements are obviously, , we had seen in recent weeks the apparent thwarting of a plot to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer Michigan but is that an it's a depressing thought but is that likely a straw in the wind will there be more of that sort of thing not. . Only will there be more, , but that story is already proving to be more than it looked at first glance. . There were reports today that members of the base, , which is an underground paramilitary wide power group have been arrested in connection to that plot. . So already, , we're seeing cross group organization and were seeing how this is working in network much the way it did in the nineteen eighties. . So one of the most important things that people can do a to understand what this is an to combat it is simply To connect these stories with one another, , it's very easy especially in a news cycle when people feel so buffeted with information at all times and sort of feel under attack by their own news feeds, , I think <hes> it's very difficult to do the work of paying attention but it it's absolutely critical here because it's not just about the group that tried to kidnap Governor Whitman it's about the the connections between that group. . The proud boy is Adam often in the base boo-boys, , there are many of these groups on. . The scene now now to your question about numbers, , this is a very difficult one I'm not sure we even have an accurate headcount for the earlier movement, , and that's where we have the the most consistent set of archival materials. . As a historian. . I'm very reluctant to make specific claims about the movement right now because I don't have my sources together yet and I won't have them for another ten or twenty years but what we know from reading the history and from reading the news. . So in other words, , what the? ? That history gives us can show us is that we have every reason to be concerned about further activity and escalating violence. . This is a movement that is intent on mass casualty attacks that has used not just voter intimidation, , but all kinds of other violent means over years and that has been organizing in this way quite effectively for decades. . If not generations, , this is not a new problem and it's not something that will go away quickly <hes>, , and the other thing is that this is a movement that is organized around sell style action much. . Like a group <hes> <hes> in in radical Islamic terror would would work mix up that this group has been doing that since nineteen eighty-three, , they're very, , very good at it because they use cell style organization, , there's not a great correlation between rising size of group membership lists and rising capacity for violent action. . Because if you're trying to carry out an act of style terror, , you're not interested in two thousand people who are going to come out on Saturday and March Down Main Street. . You're interested in six people who are willing to detonate a bomb. . So the difference is sometimes what we see is a shrinking of membership before an intense surge and violence <hes>. . I'm very concerned that that's where we are now and I think you know the people who do have archival information for the present day moment are saying the same thing. . So I'm hearing this from people in the FBI people at Department of Homeland Security who have access to surveillance documents. . I'm hearing this from people at the southern poverty law center and other watchdog groups who? ? Spend their time monitoring white power and militia TV, , online, , and most of hearing this from people who work in <hes> de radicalization trying to help people out of the movement everyone is sounding the alarm bell right now, , everyone is running up the red flag and I think you know you don't have to listen to me. . I'm just a historian, but , I think everyone is calling everyone they can think of to to sort of try to get people to pay attention to this very grave situation. . Hunch they're bringing an acceleration in the momentum of these groups because of if obviously radically different reasons the last two presidents you had the the fact of a black president of the United States, , which clearly a number of people had a significant problem with and he's followed by a president who is to put it charitably equivocal in his condemnation of these groups. . Yes. . Absolutely and we're seeing a very clear relationship between political rhetoric and extremist action is that to price do you think can be put back in the tube night at all? ? That's a good metaphor for it. . I usually say we can't on ring the bell. . Exactly the problem right because you know if you take something like the president's remarks in the first debate about calling the proud boys to quote stand back and stand by even if you take the most generous interpretation of his remarks and say, , okay, , perhaps perhaps he was fed that group name and he doesn't know who they are perhaps he meant to tell them. . To stand down even if we take all of that as given I think that there is a very real problem i. in . the fact that it's not just the proud boys who heard that as a paramilitary call to readiness <hes>, , there are many other underground groups like the Bass Lake <hes> the guys in Michigan who heard that call as the call to action. . And there's another problem of even in the case of activists who right now support the president. . There's no indication that he has the power to call these people off. . Once he has ignited away of violence as I said, this , is a movement that has been expressly anti-government for many many years, , and this is a strange thing about the United States that it has since the Vietnam war been. . Very possible to hold the position in the United States of being anti government and pro president or pro-military or pro cop at the same time I mean we see Ronald Reagan making statements about how the government is the problem not the solution while he is the head of the government. . So that sort of gymnastics act of balancing that since a fracture is not a problem for people here. . So, , there is a way that you can be pro trump right now and still be dedicated to violent overthrow of the state down the road or at some present moment and another note of caution is just the last time that this movement became very deadly setting off the string of events that led to the Oklahoma City bombing, , and you know the the most horrific mass casualty attack for the United States between Pearl Harbor Nine Eleven. . The last time that happened was not under a leftist administration it was under Reagan and it was because activists in this movement saw Reagan's perceived moderation as a sign. . that. Political . means could never deliver the kind of change that they wanted. . Even Reagan was not offering what they wanted, , which was reestablishment of Jim Crow Segregation or reinstatement of slavery or establishment of a white homeland things like this were much too radical for mainstream politics. . So there's a real chance that even trump will hit align where it's too extreme for him. I . mean even trump is not talking about reestablishing slavery and at that point I think there might be a wave of dissatisfied people if he's re-elected who are interested in mass casualty attacks just finally is there an aspect of this which is? ? Not just or perhaps beyond politics and beyond even race it strikes me just looking at the. . Way in which the members of these movements present themselves, , there's this strange cartoonish idea of masculinity in play. . You know it is a very masculine movement, , but it turns out that both in the earlier movement and today women are incredibly important to this activism <hes>. . You don't always see that in the public facing part of what they're doing. . But in the period of my study, , there's a whole bunch of women who are sort of forming the social network holds these people together and really makes possible violent action and they're doing everything from publishing their own newspapers to running their. . Own Auxiliary groups to driving getaway cars and disguising people when they're on the Lam and even as they're doing all that they are saying things like I'm not an activist I'm not political I would never seek a leadership role because you know within this worldview out sweat good womanhood looks like but however you cut it women are incredibly important here and we would be foolish to think that those deep social interactions aren't part of what is sustaining this groundswell. . I'm just you're just finally finally and feel free if you like to to refuse to gaze into a crystal ball but. . How do you see this playing out in the next? ? Well, , the next few weeks I if the polls are correct and Donald Trump does lose office on Tuesday. . Well I, , think everyone in the United States. . Approaching all polls with a degree of caution from now on for. . Immediate. . Historical reasons. . My concern here is that there is no mental picture that I can paint. . There's no series of events that I can see that would make someone at this point with this set of social pressures with this worldview simply put down the weapons and go home and say, , okay, , well, , we lost this round. . It's time to go do some democratic change somewhere else. . So my concern is that if trump is while if biden is elected, , I think that these activists will not only be frustrated and rally look for mass casualty are opportunities if trump. . Is elected I think that one ends game has to do with them, feeling , dissatisfied and turning to mass casualty attacks in route to overthrowing the government. . Again, as , they've been doing for quite a long time, , another route would be a continuation of sort of this Lincoln in an odd slash outright calling to arms line of rhetoric I mean there's a way that groups like this and other contexts have become strike forces and death squads for authoritarian regimes and there we can look to southern America and central, , America for many examples of how that's happened. . All all three of these are threats to Americans and to our democracy. . So I think it is a very bleak time for people who pay attention to this particular part of the American political life. . But was Kathleen Blues speaking to me earlier, , Kathleen's book bring the war home the white power movement and paramilitary America is published by BELKNAP.

president United States Ronald Reagan Donald Trump America gymnastics Kathleen Blues Oklahoma City Michigan Bass Lake Pearl Harbor Nine Eleven Jim Crow biden BELKNAP
HOw Has White Supremecy Changed In The US

Monocle 24: The Briefing

12:45 min | 4 months ago

HOw Has White Supremecy Changed In The US

"V Colorado US presidential election campaign which draws to a merciful conclusion. Four days from now has been such a circus that events which would have defined. Other contests have been swiftly forgotten among those wells the thwarting earlier this month of an apparent plot by far right still styled militiamen to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the subsequent discovery of links between those alleged conspirators and of the white supremacist groups. This is a cohort which has been repeatedly. Nodded and winked at from the highest pulpit in the land. These last four years. What happens in the next four? Whatever happens on Tuesday well earlier I spoke to Kathleen, Balu Assistant Professor of US history at the University of Chicago and offer of bringing the war home, the white power movement and paramilitary America I began by asking Kathleen how the white supremacist movement has changed between the nine, thousand, nine hundred, and now there's two differences in what's happening in the nineteen eighties and forward one is at the violence. This movement is interested in carrying out is explicitly anti-state they want to overthrow the federal government. So this is one of the reasons that I think white nationalist as a term can be confusing the nation and white nationalism nineteen eighty-three is not the united. States, it is the Irian Nation and they're imagining a fundamental overthrow of the country and all of its democratic practices. So the other thing that's different is that this movement is bringing together a lot of different people in every way but race, it is an. Incredibly, diverse social movement. We're talking about a whole bunch of different sub sections of white supremacists thinking. So this is the first time in the nineteen eighties. The we see a unification between clansmen, neo-nazis skinheads, radical tax resisters, posse comitatus members, and then in the early nineteen nineties, we start to see militia members in these groups as well. Now, all of that is emblematic of a movement that has taken a page from earlier. American. History. So it it it borrows from the opportunism of earlier clan mobilizations, but it's Very different in its deadly intent and in the number of people is able to bring together in this new set of sort of violent belief systems. If you consider its car numbers and its current firepower, how is impossible to quantify how dangerous these movements are obviously, we had seen in recent weeks the apparent thwarting of a plot to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer Michigan but is that an it's a depressing thought but is that likely a straw in the wind will there be more of that sort of thing not. Only will there be more, but that story is already proving to be more than it looked at first glance. There were reports today that members of the base, which is an underground paramilitary wide power group have been arrested in connection to that plot. So already, we're seeing cross group organization and were seeing how this is working in network much the way it did in the nineteen eighties. So one of the most important things that people can do a to understand what this is an to combat it is simply To connect these stories with one another, it's very easy especially in a news cycle when people feel so buffeted with information at all times and sort of feel under attack by their own news feeds, I think it's very difficult to do the work of paying attention but it it's absolutely critical here because it's not just about the group that tried to kidnap Governor Whitman it's about the the connections between that group. The proud boy is Adam often in the base boo-boys, there are many of these groups on. The scene now now to your question about numbers, this is a very difficult one I'm not sure we even have an accurate headcount for the earlier movement, and that's where we have the the most consistent set of archival materials. As a historian. I'm very reluctant to make specific claims about the movement right now because I don't have my sources together yet and I won't have them for another ten or twenty years but what we know from reading the history and from reading the news. So in other words, what the? That history gives us can show us is that we have every reason to be concerned about further activity and escalating violence. This is a movement that is intent on mass casualty attacks that has used not just voter intimidation, but all kinds of other violent means over years and that has been organizing in this way quite effectively for decades. If not generations, this is not a new problem and it's not something that will go away quickly and the other thing is that this is a movement that is organized around sell style action much. Like a group in in radical Islamic terror would would work mix up that this group has been doing that since nineteen eighty-three, they're very, very good at it because they use cell style organization, there's not a great correlation between rising size of group membership lists and rising capacity for violent action. Because if you're trying to carry out an act of style terror, you're not interested in two thousand people who are going to come out on Saturday and March Down Main Street. You're interested in six people who are willing to detonate a bomb. So the difference is sometimes what we see is a shrinking of membership before an intense surge and violence I'm very concerned that that's where we are now and I think you know the people who do have archival information for the present day moment are saying the same thing. So I'm hearing this from people in the FBI people at Department of Homeland Security who have access to surveillance documents. I'm hearing this from people at the southern poverty law center and other watchdog groups who? Spend their time monitoring white power and militia TV, online, and most of hearing this from people who work in de radicalization trying to help people out of the movement everyone is sounding the alarm bell right now, everyone is running up the red flag and I think you know you don't have to listen to me. I'm just a historian, but I think everyone is calling everyone they can think of to to sort of try to get people to pay attention to this very grave situation. Hunch they're bringing an acceleration in the momentum of these groups because of if obviously radically different reasons the last two presidents you had the the fact of a black president of the United States, which clearly a number of people had a significant problem with and he's followed by a president who is to put it charitably equivocal in his condemnation of these groups. Yes. Absolutely and we're seeing a very clear relationship between political rhetoric and extremist action is that to price do you think can be put back in the tube night at all? That's a good metaphor for it. I usually say we can't on ring the bell. Exactly the problem right because you know if you take something like the president's remarks in the first debate about calling the proud boys to quote stand back and stand by even if you take the most generous interpretation of his remarks and say, okay, perhaps perhaps he was fed that group name and he doesn't know who they are perhaps he meant to tell them. To stand down even if we take all of that as given I think that there is a very real problem i. in the fact that it's not just the proud boys who heard that as a paramilitary call to readiness there are many other underground groups like the Bass Lake the guys in Michigan who heard that call as the call to action. And there's another problem of even in the case of activists who right now support the president. There's no indication that he has the power to call these people off. Once he has ignited away of violence as I said, this is a movement that has been expressly anti-government for many many years, and this is a strange thing about the United States that it has since the Vietnam war been. Very possible to hold the position in the United States of being anti government and pro president or pro-military or pro cop at the same time I mean we see Ronald Reagan making statements about how the government is the problem not the solution while he is the head of the government. So that sort of gymnastics act of balancing that since a fracture is not a problem for people here. So, there is a way that you can be pro trump right now and still be dedicated to violent overthrow of the state down the road or at some present moment and another note of caution is just the last time that this movement became very deadly setting off the string of events that led to the Oklahoma City bombing, and you know the the most horrific mass casualty attack for the United States between Pearl Harbor Nine Eleven. The last time that happened was not under a leftist administration it was under Reagan and it was because activists in this movement saw Reagan's perceived moderation as a sign. that. Political means could never deliver the kind of change that they wanted. Even Reagan was not offering what they wanted, which was reestablishment of Jim Crow Segregation or reinstatement of slavery or establishment of a white homeland things like this were much too radical for mainstream politics. So there's a real chance that even trump will hit align where it's too extreme for him. I mean even trump is not talking about reestablishing slavery and at that point I think there might be a wave of dissatisfied people if he's re-elected who are interested in mass casualty attacks just finally is there an aspect of this which is? Not just or perhaps beyond politics and beyond even race it strikes me just looking at the. Way in which the members of these movements present themselves, there's this strange cartoonish idea of masculinity in play. You know it is a very masculine movement, but it turns out that both in the earlier movement and today women are incredibly important to this activism You don't always see that in the public facing part of what they're doing. But in the period of my study, there's a whole bunch of women who are sort of forming the social network holds these people together and really makes possible violent action and they're doing everything from publishing their own newspapers to running their. Own Auxiliary groups to driving getaway cars and disguising people when they're on the Lam and even as they're doing all that they are saying things like I'm not an activist I'm not political I would never seek a leadership role because you know within this worldview out sweat good womanhood looks like but however you cut it women are incredibly important here and we would be foolish to think that those deep social interactions aren't part of what is sustaining this groundswell. I'm just you're just finally finally and feel free if you like to to refuse to gaze into a crystal ball but. How do you see this playing out in the next? Well, the next few weeks I if the polls are correct and Donald Trump does lose office on Tuesday. Well I, think everyone in the United States. Approaching all polls with a degree of caution from now on for. Immediate. Historical reasons. My concern here is that there is no mental picture that I can paint. There's no series of events that I can see that would make someone at this point with this set of social pressures with this worldview simply put down the weapons and go home and say, okay, well, we lost this round. It's time to go do some democratic change somewhere else. So my concern is that if trump is while if biden is elected, I think that these activists will not only be frustrated and rally look for mass casualty are opportunities if trump. Is elected I think that one ends game has to do with them, feeling dissatisfied and turning to mass casualty attacks in route to overthrowing the government. Again, as they've been doing for quite a long time, another route would be a continuation of sort of this Lincoln in an odd slash outright calling to arms line of rhetoric I mean there's a way that groups like this and other contexts have become strike forces and death squads for authoritarian regimes and there we can look to southern America and central, America for many examples of how that's happened. All all three of these are threats to Americans and to our democracy. So I think it is a very bleak time for people who pay attention to this particular part of the American political life. But was Kathleen Blues speaking to me earlier, Kathleen's book bring the war home the white power movement and paramilitary America is published by BELKNAP.

United States President Trump Kathleen Blues Gretchen Whitmer Ronald Reagan America Michigan Donald Trump University Of Chicago Colorado Adam Balu Assistant Professor Of Us Governor Whitman Gymnastics Oklahoma City FBI Biden Bass Lake
"kathleen blues" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on KOMO

"Doctor Kathleen blue for the university of Chicago wrote a book recently exploring the white supremacy movement she says it isn't just a product of recent years rather it's gotten to where it is now after many decades of organizing she talked in depth about it with ABC's bread milky that's a blue when the shooting happened you immediately said ISIS always gets treated like the some worldwide organization that's the way we should be treating these white supremacist but in a lot of these attacks are often just one guy with a gun in and an internet connection right that the more or less isolated from each other the first thing I would say is that's exactly what they would like you to think what I study is a social movement they came together and the aftermath of the Vietnam War and brought together a bunch of different groups of people including Klansmen neo **** skinheads radical tax resisters militiamen and more into a coordinated the white power movement that ended up turning against the federal government in the early nineteen eighties and became very very radical much more than before we must to radicalize the American yeomanry one of the things that happens when it made that change is that a doctor strategy called leaderless resistance now this is basically a self styled terror it's it's very much what you think of when you think of it now outside or ISIS cell Robert Jay Matthews founder of the neo **** group the order now that's a strategy was implemented in order to foil government surveillance and in order to make it difficult to prosecute people in court but it's had a much bigger legacy on the way that this movement has been understood because of what it is done is disguise it as a movement what it does instead is present as everywhere from journalistic accounts up through criminal prosecution and policy making with a series of acts that look like they are disconnected so when you hear about lone wolf violence this is what they mean by lone wolf is a phrase that's brought out through this movement in order precisely to make it confusing to understand how disaster interconnected into muddy the fact that what we're talking about is a social movement get there were similarities between some of the views of Timothy McVeigh and maybe one of these more recent attackers but it's not like these guys have ever been saying to each other hate you shoot up this church in June and then all should up the garlic festival in July looks nothing organized is it well they don't say it quite like that but they're saying precisely that and a lot of these manifestos so in many cases we see people creating armories underneath pictures of Timothy McVeigh online writings believed to be from the gunmen references shooter in New Zealand from several weeks ago when you send an expert looks at the person who opened fire in el Paso one of the things that he's doing in that document is giving very explicit instructions and advice to other people who might become shooters he has informations about ballistics about equipment about what kind of targets he's the selecting and why those are just sort of like a diary and they're also supposed to believe the information for other people who might like to carry out similar action can these types of people be affected by the public discourse these people are not just mad men when we just missed them is crazy what we're doing is completely ABS all thing ourselves of the responsibility of understanding what this is and other forces in our society that are involved.

Kathleen blue university of Chicago
"kathleen blues" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on KOMO

"Doctor Kathleen blue for the university of Chicago wrote a book recently exploring the white supremacy movement she says it isn't just a product of recent years rather it's gotten to where it is now after many decades of organizing she talked in depth about it with ABC's bread milky that's a blue when the shooting happened you immediately said ISIS always gets treated like the some worldwide organization that's the way we should be treating these white supremacist but in a lot of these attacks are often just one guy with a gun and then an internet connection right that the more or less isolated from each other the first thing I would say is that's exactly what they would like you to think what I study is a social movement they came together and the aftermath of the Vietnam War and brought together a bunch of different groups of people including Klansmen neo **** skinheads radical tax resisters militiamen and more into a coordinated white power movement that ended up turning against the federal government in the early nineteen eighties and became very very radical much more than before we must to radicalize the American yeomanry one of the things that happens when it made that change is that a doctor strategy called leaderless resistance now this is basically a self styled terror it's it's very much what you think of when you think of it now outside or ISIS cell Robert Jay Matthews founder of the neo **** group the order now that's a strategy was implemented in order to foil government surveillance and in order to make it difficult to prosecute people in court but it's had a much bigger legacy on the way that this movement has been understood because of what it is done is disguised it as a movement what it does instead is present as everywhere from journalistic accounts up through criminal prosecution and policy making with a series of acts that look like they are disconnected so when you hear about loan will violence this is what they mean by lone wolf is a phrase that's brought out through this movement in order precisely to make it confusing to understand how these ads are interconnected into muddy the fact that what we're talking about is a social movement get there were similarities between some of the views of Timothy McVeigh and maybe one of these more recent attackers but it's not like these guys have ever been saying to each other hate you shoot up this church in June and then all should up the garlic festival in July looks nothing organized is it well they don't say it quite like that but they're saying precisely that and a lot of these manifestos so in many cases we see people creating armories underneath pictures of Timothy McVeigh online writings believed to be from the gunmen references shooter in New Zealand from several weeks ago he signed an expert looks at the person who opened fire in el Paso one of the things that he's doing in that document is giving very explicit instructions and advice to other people who might become shooters he has informations about ballistics about equipment about what kind of targets he's the selecting and why those are just sort of like a diary they're also supposed to believe the information for other people who might like to carry out similar action can these types of people be affected by the public discourse these people are not just mad men when we just missed them this crazy what we're doing is completely ABS all thing ourselves of the responsibility of understanding what this is and other forces in our society that are involved.

Kathleen blue university of Chicago
"kathleen blues" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Clouds in Boston seventy six degrees at ten o'clock good morning I'm Nicole Davis and here's what's happening Boston police are investigating two shootings in the city overnight one in Dorchester the other in Mattapan victims are brought to the hospital after the shooting on blue hill lab in Dorchester and at this point we don't have any word on their conditions also on the way to the scene four people were hurt when the ambulance responding to that call was involved in a crash three of the people hurt were EMS employees as for the shooting in Mattapan one man suffered life threatening injuries in that attack which took place around one thirty AM a wild wood street no arrests at this point in either of those shootings and also no word on any motives ten a one the investigation continues into this weekend's shootings in Texas and Ohio that left more than thirty people dead dozens injured now the feds are concerned that these attacks could lead to even more bloodshed one in law enforcement now other extremists could be inspired to do the same thing that the official said they're always looking for more support and tools and they're emphasizing right now that all of law enforcement needs to be sharing more information about domestic terror but a number retired law enforcement officials say that the mesenteric like the KKK and neo **** needs to be put on the same footing as foreign terrorist threats so they can be dealt with the way we deal with prices and okay and that is ABC's Pierre Thomas reporting as for the shooter in el Paso Texas shortly before he walked into that Walmart and opened fire he published a hate filled manifesto online calling his attack a response to the Hispanic invasion of Texas Kathleen blues a historian and author who recently wrote a book on white supremacy one of the things that he's doing in that document is giving very explicit instructions and advice to other people who might become shooters he has informations about ballistics about equipment about what kind of targets he's the selecting and why those are just sort of like a diary meant to illuminate his reasons for action they're also supposed to believe information for other people who might like to carry out similar action the president's counselor kellyanne Conway appearing last night on CNN and anchor Christiane almond poor played her back a clip of the president's rally on may eighth what she calls a group of migrants headed for the southern border an invasion com I touched on a possible motive from the shooter in Dayton Ohio in response been.

el Paso Texas Dayton Christiane almond kellyanne Conway Kathleen blues Ohio CNN president Walmart Boston Pierre Thomas ABC official Texas Mattapan Dorchester Nicole Davis seventy six degrees
"kathleen blues" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Kathleen balu. We are back. Sam cedar on the majority report on the phone pleasure. To welcome to the program assistant, professor of US history at university of Chicago and author of bring the war home, the white power movement and paramilitary America. Kathleen, blue welcome to the program. Thank you very much for having me. Okay. Let's start. I wanna start in in nineteen seventy nine in Greensboro, North Carolina. And and then I wanna go backwards, you know, to to maybe a little bit before where you're the main thesis of your book lies. But just so that we get a sense of the sort of disparate, I guess factions elements movements that make up organized racism, I guess in the country. I don't know how else to say that. But tell us about this. Event in in Greensboro, North Carolina, nineteen Seventy-nine because I don't I don't think it's really remains in the popular consciousness very much. You're right. I think it's a great place to start to because I think that the Greensboro shooting which I'll describe in a moment is important both because it represents the formal beginning of what I call the white power movement, which is a alliance between different elements of white supremacist and far right groups that had before that been disproved. So I'm talking about Clinton and the Neo Nazis. Radical tax protesters later raises skinhead groups and others who are kind of brought into this wide broad based social movement that I think is best thought of as the white power movement. So Greensboro is also important because it is the closest historical cognate to a lot of what has brought this movement back into our public discourse. So for instance, when we think about the altercation altercations Charlottesville Virginia that. Garnered headlines, very recently, the clearest historical cognate event is Greensboro. So what happened is on November? Third nineteen seventy nine eight organized group of white power demonstra white power gunman including both Clinton Neo Nazis opened fire on a leftist death to the clan March in Greensboro, they killed five people including four white men and one African American woman and also injured several other people, and they immediately escapes the scene police were not on the scene and in three subsequent trials the judicial system. Kind of broadly failed to do anything meaningful about that violence. Well, okay. So we have that event. And this notion of of the white power. Movement essentially being an umbrella movement..

Greensboro Kathleen balu North Carolina Clinton Sam cedar professor America university of Chicago Charlottesville Virginia
"kathleen blues" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Important to remember too. That returning veterans that join this movement and active duty troops. We're talking about a tiny not even statistically significant percentage of veterans, but within this movement, those people who did serve are playing an enormously important role in instruction of weapons in creating paramilitary activist mentality and training when we speak to people involved in in this movement today, they talk about leaderless resistance. Can you explain that to me sheriff leaderless resistance is basically what we would understand today as cell style terrorism? The idea that you can recruit a small number of committed activists organize them. And then they will behave on their own in a cell without direct ties with leadership if we think, for instance, about the Oklahoma City bombing Timothy McVeigh as sort of the ideal soldier of leaderless resistance. He's an infantry unit and serves and the Gulf and is involved in white power groups volleys on post is consistently involved in this movement right up to the moment of the Oklahoma City bombing. We know that this is part of the white power movement and an octave leaderless resistance. But we have this memory of that as an act of one person. And as a result. I think we've never really delivered a decisive stop to this activism that because we don't understand Oklahoma City as being outgrowth of an organized movement that has been around for decades that is modeling the military that is involving military members that the authorities have never really been able to put a stop to it. That's right. The military response to white power activism lake the court response to white power activism, and the police response to I power activism reflects the many ways that our society has not been prepared to deal with this kind of of movement. Was professor Kathleen, blue speaking with Thompson AC what why is it then that the the military and the in the federal government, it's counterterrorism efforts. Places such so little attention of all of the billions of dollars that they spent on counter-terrorism dealing with homegrown right wing extremist terrorists. That's a great question. And I don't think anybody really knows the full answer to that. I think one thing that we should say is that there have been more aggressive action from the FBI and the department of Justice recently on this front. So we saw eight white supremacists. Involved in the rise above movement who were active in Charlottesville, and at other protests recently, get arrested on rioting charges we see the FBI looking at this connection between Adam Kaufman and the Pittsburgh massacre. But I think in general there has been this massive turn towards. Focusing on nine eleven style terrorism. And this sort of like sense that the white supremacist anti-government terrorism embodied by people like Tim McVeigh embodied by people like Wade page who was a Neo Nazi who went into a Sikh temple in Wisconsin and killed six worshippers that that is not that important. And I think that there's been a sort of loss of the expertise on white supremacists terrorism with in the federal government that everything now is jihadi style terrorism. And that's what people focus on. And so so people don't remember don't have the institutional knowledge to go after the white supremacists. AC Thomson for this report, you interviewed a member of Adam Watson, well named you. Call him, John you disguise his voice his face is blurred. This is a club. Back in New York..

Oklahoma City Timothy McVeigh FBI Adam Watson Gulf Adam Kaufman New York professor Kathleen Wisconsin Thompson Charlottesville department of Justice Wade Pittsburgh John
"kathleen blues" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"They were motivated often by what they call busyness occupational government or Zog, which is a conspiracy theory that alleges that Jews are secretly controlling a will internationalised Jews are controlling the banks the UN the United States government at the federal level at cetera and this met with several religious ideologies that were white supremacist in the nineteen eighties as well, including Christian identity, which is one of the themes also that appears in the Pittsburgh shooter social media that holds that quite are the true lost tribe of Israel, while people of color and Jewish people are supposed to be descended from Satan or from animals. This is important not only because the rhetoric it presents a so totally dehumanizing. But also because Christian identity for tells a coming apocalyptic end of the world where white people are supposed to take up arms and clear the world of non white populations before Christ can return. So it turns racial violence into a holy war these ideologies, and how they rise and fall within the white power movement are always sort of flexible and interchangeable, and you see a great degree of opportunistic activism across the life of this movement. Where people move between belief systems between groups over the course of their time in the movement. And also as I said that is referring really to the post Vietnam war period. I think that to look at what's happening now, we'll take a larger archival study that won't be possible until we get the documents released in in in another several decades. Yes. Which of course, begs the following question. Do you think that? The current political environment encourages the spread or dimension of the white power movement. He no, I it's an interesting question for many, different reasons. Not least because the last time white power turned revolutionary was during a time of conservative executive power. They made that turn in nineteen eighty three in the second term of the Reagan administration when they arguably had a lot to gain from state and from kind of mainstream activism, but because activists saw a gap between what the state had promised them. And what the state could in fact deliver base. Aw, Reagan's moderation as a piece of evidence that they couldn't achieve what they wanted through electoral politics. And instead they needed to declare race war. Now when we look at again, the social media feed the alleged Pittsburgh shooter one of the things that stood out to me. Me is his sort of disavowal of Trump, and his ridicule of people who believed that Trump would be sufficient to bring around the kind of changes that they wanted. So I see some corollaries there that are very concerning. And I think the historical archive has a lot to teach us about how society can better confront this kind of violence. The hopeful thing, I think is that in the wake of these events. I do think there is a difference in the kind of conversation. The American public is having about this. Then at any other point in history be events that I talk about in bring the war home. We're all reported at the time they appeared on the front pages of major newspapers, they appeared on morning news magazine shows and even in one memorable case Saturday Night Live sketch. So they were known. But there wasn't this. This sense of conversation about white power as an organized social movement that we've begun to have in the aftermath of Charlottesville and other acts of violence in the recent past I find that to be a hopeful thing because I do think that. Understanding Dir education investigative education and simply people having an awareness of what this is would represent a fundamental change to how this movement is able to operate and carry out and planned violent events historian and author Kathleen, blue people's international tribunal put the United States government on trial for crimes against the people of Puerto Rico an islands countries seized by the US one hundred and twenty years ago, which was recently ravaged by a deadly hurricane the people's tribunal..

US Pittsburgh Trump UN Zog Reagan administration Israel Reagan executive Charlottesville morning news Kathleen Puerto Rico twenty years
"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest is kathleen blue we're talking about her new book bring the war home the white power movement and paramilitary america and it's a history of how the white power movement changed after the war in vietnam so you know we've been talking about how some of these white power groups declared war on america so this starts happening in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s during the reagan presidency so how did the white power groups see themselves in relationship to president reagan because president reagan kind of declared war on the government in his own way i mean he he's famous for saying government isn't the solution to the problem it is the problem and he tried to limit the power of agencies and decrease their budgets he named as the head of agencies people who were opposed to some of the work the agencies were doing so i'm not saying that he was at all down with the white power movement but i'm just wondering how the white power movement so itself in relationship to president reagan because he marked a turning point in government's relationship to itself certainly he did and that the white power movement saw the second reagan term as a moment when electoral politics was no longer an option is really important to understand context for our present moment so the white power movement turned against the state in nineteen eighty three partly because they saw reagan as too moderate compared to his campaign promises and white power activists saw this as the moment when electoral politics would no longer be a avenue to action this is significant not only because it reflects a larger sort of dissatisfaction with reagan that was expressed all through the right but particularly among evangelicals in nineteen eightythree nineteen eightyfour but also because this happened at a moment when you know to an outsider white power activists seemed to have you know the ear of the executive in some important ways they seemed to to stand to gain a lot from the reagan presidency so as the white power movement turns like antigovernment you start seeing these conspiracy theories about like zog design est occupied government tell us about zog so zog refers to the occupational government and it's a conspiracy theory that imagines that not only the.

america vietnam executive kathleen blue president reagan president
"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bring the war home the white power movement and paramilitary america we'll be right back this is fresh air this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest is kathleen blue we're talking about her new book bring the war home the white power movement and paramilitary america and it's a history of how the white power movement changed after the war in vietnam so you know we've been talking about how some of these white power groups declared war on america so this starts happening in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s during the reagan presidency so how did the white power groups see themselves in relationship to president reagan because president reagan kind of declared war on the government in his own way i mean he he's famous for saying government isn't the solution to the problem it is the problem and he tried to limit the power of agencies and decrease their budgets he named as the head of agencies people who were opposed to some of the work the agencies were doing so i'm not saying that he was you know at all down with the white power movement but i'm just wondering how the white power movement so itself in relationship to president reagan kaz he marked a turning point in government's relationship to itself certainly he did and that the white power movement saw the second reagan term as a moment win electoral politics was no longer an option is really important to understand context for our present moment so the white power movement turned against the state in nineteen eighty three partly because they saw reagan as too moderate compared to his campaign promises and white power activists saw this as the moment when electoral politics would no longer be a avenue to action this is significant not only because it reflects a larger sort of dissatisfaction with reagan that was expressed all through the right but particularly among evangelicals in nineteen eightythree nineteen eightyfour but also because this happened at a moment when.

america vietnam reagan kaz kathleen blue president reagan president
"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of first person narratives tend to lose their focus martell ingeniously forges her own point of view she doesn't just march through a series of humiliations she strategically undermines his position in every shot often placing him off to the side or warping him visually barely a scene goes by in which we aren't made aware of the indigenous slaves employed by zomba and his cohorts going about their business in the background or foreground looking on in judgmental silence these visual strategies may seem odd at first but they have a real sense of purpose in refusing to make zama the center of the frame the movie reminds us that this man whatever he makes think is not the hero of his own story that becomes increasingly apparent in the movie second half as the desperate and disenfranchised zama ventures into the swampy wilderness joining a dangerous mission to capture an enemy of the empire the story ends it must in a whirlwind of violence and martel precisely controlled imagery turns actress almost in spite of itself it's terrifying vision worthy of verna herzog and joseph conrad the grand dream human conquest becomes a nightmarish descent into madness justin chang as film critic for the l a times tomorrow on fresh air we'll talk about the white power and paramilitary movements in america i guess we'll be kathleen blue author of the new book bring the war home which traces these movements from the seventies through the oklahoma city bombing in one thousand nine hundred five she writes about their vision of a white nation their declaration of war against the government and their preparations for the apocalypse i hope you'll join us.

martell zomba martel verna herzog justin chang america joseph conrad kathleen blue oklahoma
"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Situation because of the calls for restraint coming out him from all ends npr's carrie kahn kerry thank you so much last year when neo nazis and members of the socalled altright demonstrated in charlottesville virginia many americans evinced shock that such a thing could happen in twenty seventeen but charlottesville is only the latest in a history of white power activism that goes back decades and as kathleen balu argues in her new book bring the war home we ignore that history at our peril in cheeks planes what many disparate events have in common from ruby ridge to the oklahoma city bombing many of those threats go back to the vietnam war covering the war home because that provided the clearest way of thinking about a problem i ran into in the archive which was that klansmen and neo nazis committing violence in the united states ranging from veterans to those who didn't serve in the war commonly understood the vietnam war and invoked the war to describe why they chose the activism they did and to frame their tactics and their uses of violence in many different contexts kathleen blue says the terrorism that arose in the nineteen eighties within the white power movement came in the form of small cells of just a half a dozen men creating what she calls a leaderless resistance leaderless resistance first of all made it less important to recruit large numbers of people because now the movement was focused on smaller totally committed activists rather than turning out a bunch of weekend activists for a rally it made it really important for the activists to have enough in common culturally to understand their shared goals and that's another place where the narrative of the vietnam war became very important to them and it also made it very difficult to prosecute white power violence or to understand it as a social movement because it's actions could be more readily understood and dismissed in both courts and in media portrayals as the act of one or a few individuals yeah i'd like to touch on that last thing that you just spoke about you write about this particular period where there was a huge increase in domestic terrorism and the media law enforcement government agencies kept on portraying these acts as isolated as as the.

virginia charlottesville ruby ridge united states npr carrie kahn kathleen balu oklahoma kathleen blue
"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Deal with this situation because of the calls for restraint coming at him from all ends npr's carrie kahn kerry thank you so much last year when neo nazis and members of the socalled altright demonstrated in charlottesville virginia many americans evinced shock that such a thing could happen in twenty seventeen but charlottesville is only the latest in a history of white power activism that goes back decades and as kathleen balu argues in her new book bring the war home we ignore that history at our peril ina cheeks planes what many disparate events have in common from ruby ridge to the oklahoma city bombing many of those threads go back to the vietnam war covering bring the war home because that provided the clearest way of thinking about a problem i ran into in the archive which was that klansmen and neo nazis committing violence in the united states ranging from veterans to those who didn't serve in the war commonly understood the vietnam war and invoked the war to describe why they chose the activism they did and to frame their tactics in their uses of violence in many different contexts kathleen blue says the terrorism that arose in the nineteen eighties within the white power movement came in the form of small cells of just a half a dozen men creating what she calls a leaderless resistance leaderless resistance first of all made it less important to recruit large numbers of people because now the movement was focused on smaller totally committed activists rather than turning out a bunch of weekend activists for a rally it made it really important for the activists have enough in common culturally to understand their shared goals and that's another place where the narrative of the vietnam war became very important to them and it also made it very difficult to prosecute white power violence or to understand it as a social movement because it's actions could be more readily understood and dismissed in both courts and in media portrayals as the act of one or a few individuals.

virginia charlottesville ruby ridge united states npr carrie kahn kathleen balu oklahoma kathleen blue
"kathleen blues" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is widely considered to be heavy handed with calls for restraint coming from the business community which is very powerful in nicaragua to the catholic church to the un into the organization of american states so he's really going to have to deal with the situation because of the calls for restraint coming at him from all ends npr's carrie kahn kerry thank you so much last year when neo nazis and members of the socalled altright demonstrated in charlottesville virginia many americans evinced shock that such a thing could happen in two thousand seventeen but charlottesville is only the latest in a history of white power activism that goes back decades and as catherine balu argues in her new book bring the war home we ignore that history at our peril in it she explains what many disparate events have in common from ruby ridge to the oklahoma city bombing many of those threats go back to the vietnam war it's called bring the war home because that provided the clearest way of thinking about a problem i ran into in the archive which was that klansmen and neo nazis committing violence in the united states ranging from veterans to those who didn't serve in the war commonly understood the vietnam war and invoked the war to describe why they chose the activism they did and to frame their tactics and their uses of violence in many different contexts kathleen blue says the terrorism that arose in the nineteen eighties within the white power movement came in the form of small cells of just a half a dozen men creating what she calls a leaderless resistance leaderless resistance first of all made it less important to recruit large numbers of people because now the movement was focused on smaller totally committed activists rather than turning out a bunch of weekend activists for a rally it made it really important for the activists have enough in common culturally to understand their shared goals and that's another place where the narrative of the vietnam war became very important to them and it also made it very difficult to prosecute white power violence or to understand it as a social movement because it's actions could be more readily understood and dismissed in both courts and in media portrayals as the act of one or a few individuals.

nicaragua catholic church un virginia charlottesville catherine balu ruby ridge united states npr carrie kahn oklahoma kathleen blue
"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Deal with this situation because of the calls for restraint coming in from all ends npr's carrie kahn kerry thank you so much last year when neo nazis and members of the socalled altright demonstrated in charlottesville virginia many americans evinced shock that such a thing could happen in twenty seventeen but charles will is only the latest in a history of white power activism that goes back decades and as catherine balu are us in her new book bring the war home we ignore that history at our peril in it she explains what many disparate events have in common from ruby ridge to the oklahoma city bombing many of those threats go back to the vietnam war covering the war home because that provided the clearest way of thinking about a problem i ran into in the archive which was that klansmen and neo nazis committing violence in the united states ranging from veterans to those who didn't serve in the war commonly understood the vietnam war and invoked the war to describe why they chose the activism they did and to frame their tactics and their uses of violence in many different contexts kathleen blue says the terrorism that arose in the nineteen eighties within the white power movement came in the form of small cells just a half a dozen men creating what she calls a leaderless resistance leaderless resistance first of all made it less important to recruit large numbers of people because now the movement was focused on smaller totally committed activists rather than turning out a bunch of weekend activists for a rally it made it really important for the activists to have enough in common culturally to understand their shared goals and that's another place where the narrative of the vietnam war became very important to them and it also made it very difficult to prosecute white power violence or to understand it as a social movement because it's actions could be more readily understood and dismissed in both courts and in media portrayals as the act of one or a few individuals yeah i'd like to touch on that last thing that you just spoke about you write about this particular period where there was a huge increase in domestic terrorism and the media law enforcement government agencies kept on portraying these acts as isolated as as the.

virginia charles catherine balu ruby ridge united states npr carrie kahn charlottesville oklahoma kathleen blue
"kathleen blues" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"kathleen blues" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of others overlapping groups much charlottesville if as he mix of outright and outlaid and all the others that were there and how people who say that they are not racists and not white supremacists that ended up in a melting pot with people who who are one of the things that we wondered here in a show after show as well as why are there so many of these little groups like wires at a lot of them why are they small like why isn't there some big umbrella organization to advance their interests and and lewis to joined that for decades in the way power movement this was a strategy lagos an actual strategy and was pretty place in the 1980s the strategy was cud leaderless resistance and white power movement adopted it because the fbi and federal law enforcement where successfully planting informants and covert agents inside the ranks so leaderless resistance is a model of cell terrorism in which each activist and sell is has to act without direct communication with any other cell or with movement leadership kathleen blue is historian at the university of chicago and she's written about this period and '70s and '80s in the white power movement for buckets coming up next here she says with leaderless resistance people all over the country we're reading the saint propaganda the same kind of playbook if you will but they are acted on their own there were coordinated she's the idea for lewis resistance was popularized by amending lewis bean who's in the clan and in the group aryan nations in 1983 this is we know how he sent out the memo to the rest of the movement on this there's an essay called leaderless resistance that's published an a collection of essays called essays of a clansman so it's it printed an eighty three eighty nine so say publishes it in a book is rosso like a meeting where they all come together and discuss no like they take a vote and they're like yes that's what we're gonna do so whether there is a vote is not clear um but there is a meeting there is a meeting called the aryan portions world congress and this had been happening on since the 1970s at the hate in lake compound in idaho which is where eighty area nations is located in the world congress is both a political meeting and a.

fbi federal law enforcement congress lake compound idaho charlottesville lewis kathleen blue university of chicago