35 Burst results for "Kathleen"

Third person in a week shoved onto New York City subway tracks

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:08 min | 6 d ago

Third person in a week shoved onto New York City subway tracks

"In in the the subways subways today, today, with with word word of of another another person person being being thrown thrown onto onto the the tracks tracks this this time time in in Brooklyn. Brooklyn. Anyone. Samantha leaving has a story in this live report from the Barclays Center station. Yes and Kathleen the third subway pushing in less than a week. This time, police say, a 29 year old man was pushed onto a south and four train train tracks at the Barclay Center stop after the suspect began yelling at him and followed him off a train. Luckily, the victim was able to climb out. It follows two incidents in Manhattan last week one Thursday in Union Square, where 40 year old woman was pushed as a train approached. She survived survived with with minor minor injuries. injuries. And And as as straphangers straphangers who who spoke spoke with with NBC NBC for for being being extra extra vigilant. vigilant. Well, Well, I'm I'm not not going going to to be be standing standing next next to to the the tracks. tracks. I'm I'm going going to to stay stay in in the the middle. middle. I I ride ride the the trains trains no no late late at at night. night. I I work work overnight, overnight, sometimes. sometimes. Just Just pray pray that that they they put put more more hops hops out out and and way way just just need need to to be be more more aware aware of of my my surroundings. surroundings. No word from the NYPD on whether there be more cops in the transit system, But the Guardian Angels announced this weekend they'll be upping their patrols in subways. Samantha Leap in

Barclays Center Station Barclay Center Brooklyn NBC Samantha Kathleen Union Square Manhattan Nypd Angels Samantha Leap
"kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

04:01 min | 6 d ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Welcome back. I've got dr kathleen smith on the line. Dr welcome to the show. Thank you you can just call me. Kathleen i'm happy with that quantity at least give you your title and then from there. We'll go from there so that's awesome so great to have you on the show. He wrote a book a little while ago and During this time of this recording we're in the middle of a pandemic and the title of your book and what it's about is amazing and it's the message that i think a lot of people need to hear so sheriff's a little bit about your the book and some things you've discovered after releasing it. Yes so the name of the book is everything isn't terrible conquer your insecurities interrupting zayed's and finally calmed down and came out at the beginning of this year. And little. did i know that. I already seemed. It was going to be an anxious year. But i had no idea how anxious it would be for so many people and you know i'm a therapist i Have a practice in dc. And i am trained in a theory called in theory which is Sort of a family systems way of thinking or a relationship way of thinking about anxiety. And i wanted to write a book that i could give to my therapy clients. You know because i live in. Dc have over achieving clients. They always want homework and things turn. And i wanted a book that kinda summarize the theory. I was trained in in a way that's acceptable in narrative and is not to to academic to it at the same time and so you know. The book is just stories of various clients. That i've worked with obviously details are changed to protect their identity. But just what it looks like to to grow up slowly and calm down slowly over time because that's the only way it happens anxieties Thing that challenges so many people And even in quote unquote normal times anxiety can be really problematic..

dr kathleen smith dc Kathleen zayed
Woman charged with shooting man with BB gun in Hall County, NE of Atlanta

America in the Morning

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Woman charged with shooting man with BB gun in Hall County, NE of Atlanta

"A 61 year old man was seriously injured Saturday afternoon when a brass Wilton woman shot him with a BB gun had a home on day Lily drive. According to Sheriff's Office spokesman Derek Booth 50 year old April Kathleen deals is accused of shooting the man in the chest with a BB gun, and before she shot him, bills hit him in the chest with the actual rifle physically. Following the incident, Hall County Fire Services took the man to northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville. Dills arrested and remains in the whole county jail with no bond booth says that deals in the victim lived together in the home where the incident took

Sheriff's Office Derek Booth Kathleen Deals Wilton Hall County Fire Services Northeast Georgia Medical Cent Dills Gainesville
Making A Murderer: The key piece of evidence in the case of Steven Avery

Podcast Central

05:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Making A Murderer: The key piece of evidence in the case of Steven Avery

"Of every criminal case, every case in the law, really? There is a key. There is a piece of evidence so critical that the case itself turns on it. In the case of Theresa Holbox murder, the key is literally the key and the key to understanding it is to understand that everything making a murderer has told you about it. Is wrong. I'm Dan O'Donnell and this is rebutting a murderer. The most vulnerable piece of evidence to attack is the key. And that's because of the evidence the state presented so the key isn't found until they're been repeated searches of Avery's trailer off that was highly suspicious. But overriding that is the DNA of Steven Avery on the key. First of all, Avery's attorney, Kathleen Zellner, isn't telling the truth about how the key was found. There weren't repeated searches of Avery's trailer at all. There was one and the key was found during the first search of the bookcase next to Avery's bed. The key was found in on November. 5th 2005. The day that Theresa Hall box wrapped for was found in the Avery Scrapyard on investigative team began searching the Avery property for Hall box body. Yet, as the Wisconsin Court of Appeals noted in its decision against Avery, investigators never performed a full search of Avery's trailer that day. Special investigator Tom Foss. Bender testified that most of the investigators in the trailer had already been working for 12 hours or more and exhaustion and safety issues were becoming factors that could affect the searchers ability to locate and collect evidence. In addition, there was a horrendous rain storm going on that created a risk of evidence being destroyed or lost as officers went in and out of the trailer to get equipment. Thus, the officers were focused on looking for the type of evidence that would be most at risk of being destroyed under those conditions. Boss Bender testified that in debriefing the officers that night, he was telling people we are not done in that house. Boss, Bender testified. As of Saturday night, the trailer was still part of my scene. This is an ongoing search. The search, however, was suspended that night. Next day. Investigators did indeed enter Avery's trailer, but not to search on Ly to obtain items that they had noticed the night before and listed in reports, most notably Avery's guns. Technicians from the Wisconsin State crime lab, then went in to swab for DNA but did not perform any sort of search of the trailer. The following day. Investigators entered the trailer again but never entered Avery's bedroom at all. They went in, only to get the serial number from Avery's computer. Only the next day November, 8th did the search that was suspended on November 5th resume, and it was during that search of Avery's bedroom, the first search of Avery's bedroom. That the key was found the officer who found it, Sergeant Andrew Colburn testified that this was the first time any investigators had gone room by room through the trailer looking for evidence. And that they were instructed specifically to collect the large number of pornographic photos of Avery's ex wife and girlfriend that he had kept in his bookcase. Colburn said he was frustrated and disgusted and having to sort through all of those pornographic pictures, and he slammed other items He found in the bookcase back into it while he was searching it. Because he had pulled the bookcase out from the wall to get better access to its contents. He picked it up to move it back when he was finished. At that point, the key fell out of the back. Photos of the bookcase submitted as evidence showed that the back panel was loose from the interior, making it easy for a key concealed in the bookcase toe fall out onto the floor when the bookcase was moved. Making a murderer has claimed for three years now that the key was found on Lee after repeated intense searches of the bedroom acclaim it has Zellner make again but it simply isn't true. It was found during the first search of the bedroom and the first search of the bookcase. Elders claim that Steven Avery's DNA a found on that key was planted is equally dubious. To test this theory. She hires forensic consultant Dr Karl Reich, who naturally immediately suspects that the evidence is planted. The thing that suspicious about the DNA is the quantity of it because she said it was touch DNA. And Dr Reich felt just looking at it that there was too much DNA on the key to have just been the result of handling yet again. Zellner conducts a rather unscientific scientific experiment to show that it would be impossible for the amount of DNA the state says Avery left on the key to be left by mere touch, eh? Identical vehicle was obtained. And an identical key was obtained to try and reproduce what the state came up with in terms

Avery Steven Avery Theresa Holbox Dan O'donnell Kathleen Zellner Theresa Hall Avery Scrapyard Wisconsin Court Of Appeals Tom Foss Bender Boss Bender Wisconsin State Crime Lab Andrew Colburn Zellner Colburn Dr Karl Reich Dr Reich LEE
U.S. stocks close sharply higher as markets look beyond Election Day

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

02:04 min | 3 weeks ago

U.S. stocks close sharply higher as markets look beyond Election Day

"This election that is going down to the wire with Joe Biden looking like he may be just about ready to pick up that that victory. Or ring that victory bell. I guess I'm trying to say Doug is really affecting the markets. I wanna get right back to you to talk about stocks today and we're seeing now is this carries over to Asia right? And the fact that this blue wave that everybody was talking about last week failed to materialize, and it looks as though it least at this point that we're going to get A Democrat, Republican controlled Senate. And if you're right, Kathleen, and at this point, you're probably close to being right. If you look at what the data is saying so far on a Biden presidency It yields divided government right and that's a good scenario for the market is one thing that it does. It's reduces the chance that we're going to get any rollback in corporate taxes. At the same time, it kind of reduces the bet for a massive stimulus program. And if you're a fiscal hawk, this is good for you. And if you're the bond market than you have to take out that reflation trade, which is what we saw today, the yield on the 10 year falling 12 basis points and if you go back to, I think where we were in the last 24 hours on the 10 year. A 20 basis point moved from the high to the low. That's like the Fed cutting rates by a quarter point nearly right now in the Tokyo session where it's 75 basis points, we had a rally in US equities today, the S and P up 2.2%. Let's pivot to Asia very quickly. The Nikkei higher by 1%. Right now, we are also seeing much stronger. Japanese CNET 10 for 30 against the dollar The G bone bank Japan, October Services. PM I above the number that we saw in September. The current reading 47.7 and you look at the composite PM I also up from the September reading. The current reading at 48 W T I crude oil showing some weakness here at 38 70. So Kathleen, There is a lot going on my favorite

Joe Biden Asia Doug Kathleen Biden Senate FED Tokyo Cnet Japan United States
Vienna terror attack: Gunmen open fire on people, several injured

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Vienna terror attack: Gunmen open fire on people, several injured

"Officials are saying there are casualties and what they're calling a terrorist attack in Vienna and bastard here with more details from our San Francisco newsroom, Ed. Yeah, Kathleen. They say multiple gunmen in a hail of gunfire left at least one person dead and the mayor says 15, others wounded. One attacker was killed the scene, a city centre in six different shooting locations. One witness said. There were at least 100 rounds fired area around the center is cordoned off. Manhunt on this is the last day before a month long shutdown for bars and restaurants. A

Vienna Kathleen San Francisco ED
Space station marking 20 years of people living in orbit

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Space station marking 20 years of people living in orbit

"The International. Space Station Marks Twenty Years in orbit a Monday when the first crew including American. Bill. Shepherd and Russians Sergei Krikalev, and you're a Zenko I moved in on November second of two thousand. The space station consisted of only three small rooms and one toilet. The complex is now. Almost, a football field long with a lookout tower and three toilets over the past twenty years two, hundred, forty, one visitors from nineteen countries have floated through the space hatches, including astronauts, construction workers, and several tourists paid their own way. The current crew like the I includes an American and two Russians marking the two decade milestone by sharing a special dinner and enjoying the amazing views of Earth Kathleen Maloney Fox

Sergei Krikalev Zenko Shepherd Bill Football Kathleen Maloney Fox
Space station marking 20 years of people living in orbit

Kim Komando

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Space station marking 20 years of people living in orbit

"Space Station marks 20 years in orbit on Monday, when the first crew, including American Bill Shepherd and Russian Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko, first moved in. On November 2nd of 2000 Space Station consisted of only three small rooms and one Oil it. The complex is now almost a football field long with a lookout tower and three toilets. Over the past 20 years, 241 visitors from 19 countries have floated through the space station hatches, including astronauts, construction workers and several tourists who pay their own way. The current crew, like the first includes an American and two Russians, marking the two decade milestone by sharing a special dinner and enjoying the amazing views of Earth. Kathleen Maloney, Fox News I'm

Space Station Kathleen Maloney Yuri Gidzenko Bill Shepherd Sergei Krikalev Football
HOw Has White Supremecy Changed In The US

Monocle 24: The Briefing

12:45 min | Last month

HOw Has White Supremecy Changed In The US

"V Colorado US presidential election campaign which draws to a merciful conclusion. Four days from now has been such a circus that events which would have defined. Other contests have been swiftly forgotten among those wells the thwarting earlier this month of an apparent plot by far right still styled militiamen to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the subsequent discovery of links between those alleged conspirators and of the white supremacist groups. This is a cohort which has been repeatedly. Nodded and winked at from the highest pulpit in the land. These last four years. What happens in the next four? Whatever happens on Tuesday well earlier I spoke to Kathleen, Balu Assistant Professor of US history at the University of Chicago and offer of bringing the war home, the white power movement and paramilitary America I began by asking Kathleen how the white supremacist movement has changed between the nine, thousand, nine hundred, and now there's two differences in what's happening in the nineteen eighties and forward one is at the violence. This movement is interested in carrying out is explicitly anti-state they want to overthrow the federal government. So this is one of the reasons that I think white nationalist as a term can be confusing the nation and white nationalism nineteen eighty-three is not the united. States, it is the Irian Nation and they're imagining a fundamental overthrow of the country and all of its democratic practices. So the other thing that's different is that this movement is bringing together a lot of different people in every way but race, it is an. Incredibly, diverse social movement. We're talking about a whole bunch of different sub sections of white supremacists thinking. So this is the first time in the nineteen eighties. The we see a unification between clansmen, neo-nazis skinheads, radical tax resisters, posse comitatus members, and then in the early nineteen nineties, we start to see militia members in these groups as well. Now, all of that is emblematic of a movement that has taken a page from earlier. American. History. So it it it borrows from the opportunism of earlier clan mobilizations, but it's Very different in its deadly intent and in the number of people is able to bring together in this new set of sort of violent belief systems. If you consider its car numbers and its current firepower, how is impossible to quantify how dangerous these movements are obviously, we had seen in recent weeks the apparent thwarting of a plot to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer Michigan but is that an it's a depressing thought but is that likely a straw in the wind will there be more of that sort of thing not. Only will there be more, but that story is already proving to be more than it looked at first glance. There were reports today that members of the base, which is an underground paramilitary wide power group have been arrested in connection to that plot. So already, we're seeing cross group organization and were seeing how this is working in network much the way it did in the nineteen eighties. So one of the most important things that people can do a to understand what this is an to combat it is simply To connect these stories with one another, it's very easy especially in a news cycle when people feel so buffeted with information at all times and sort of feel under attack by their own news feeds, I think it's very difficult to do the work of paying attention but it it's absolutely critical here because it's not just about the group that tried to kidnap Governor Whitman it's about the the connections between that group. The proud boy is Adam often in the base boo-boys, there are many of these groups on. The scene now now to your question about numbers, this is a very difficult one I'm not sure we even have an accurate headcount for the earlier movement, and that's where we have the the most consistent set of archival materials. As a historian. I'm very reluctant to make specific claims about the movement right now because I don't have my sources together yet and I won't have them for another ten or twenty years but what we know from reading the history and from reading the news. So in other words, what the? That history gives us can show us is that we have every reason to be concerned about further activity and escalating violence. This is a movement that is intent on mass casualty attacks that has used not just voter intimidation, but all kinds of other violent means over years and that has been organizing in this way quite effectively for decades. If not generations, this is not a new problem and it's not something that will go away quickly and the other thing is that this is a movement that is organized around sell style action much. Like a group in in radical Islamic terror would would work mix up that this group has been doing that since nineteen eighty-three, they're very, very good at it because they use cell style organization, there's not a great correlation between rising size of group membership lists and rising capacity for violent action. Because if you're trying to carry out an act of style terror, you're not interested in two thousand people who are going to come out on Saturday and March Down Main Street. You're interested in six people who are willing to detonate a bomb. So the difference is sometimes what we see is a shrinking of membership before an intense surge and violence I'm very concerned that that's where we are now and I think you know the people who do have archival information for the present day moment are saying the same thing. So I'm hearing this from people in the FBI people at Department of Homeland Security who have access to surveillance documents. I'm hearing this from people at the southern poverty law center and other watchdog groups who? Spend their time monitoring white power and militia TV, online, and most of hearing this from people who work in de radicalization trying to help people out of the movement everyone is sounding the alarm bell right now, everyone is running up the red flag and I think you know you don't have to listen to me. I'm just a historian, but I think everyone is calling everyone they can think of to to sort of try to get people to pay attention to this very grave situation. Hunch they're bringing an acceleration in the momentum of these groups because of if obviously radically different reasons the last two presidents you had the the fact of a black president of the United States, which clearly a number of people had a significant problem with and he's followed by a president who is to put it charitably equivocal in his condemnation of these groups. Yes. Absolutely and we're seeing a very clear relationship between political rhetoric and extremist action is that to price do you think can be put back in the tube night at all? That's a good metaphor for it. I usually say we can't on ring the bell. Exactly the problem right because you know if you take something like the president's remarks in the first debate about calling the proud boys to quote stand back and stand by even if you take the most generous interpretation of his remarks and say, okay, perhaps perhaps he was fed that group name and he doesn't know who they are perhaps he meant to tell them. To stand down even if we take all of that as given I think that there is a very real problem i. in the fact that it's not just the proud boys who heard that as a paramilitary call to readiness there are many other underground groups like the Bass Lake the guys in Michigan who heard that call as the call to action. And there's another problem of even in the case of activists who right now support the president. There's no indication that he has the power to call these people off. Once he has ignited away of violence as I said, this is a movement that has been expressly anti-government for many many years, and this is a strange thing about the United States that it has since the Vietnam war been. Very possible to hold the position in the United States of being anti government and pro president or pro-military or pro cop at the same time I mean we see Ronald Reagan making statements about how the government is the problem not the solution while he is the head of the government. So that sort of gymnastics act of balancing that since a fracture is not a problem for people here. So, there is a way that you can be pro trump right now and still be dedicated to violent overthrow of the state down the road or at some present moment and another note of caution is just the last time that this movement became very deadly setting off the string of events that led to the Oklahoma City bombing, and you know the the most horrific mass casualty attack for the United States between Pearl Harbor Nine Eleven. The last time that happened was not under a leftist administration it was under Reagan and it was because activists in this movement saw Reagan's perceived moderation as a sign. that. Political means could never deliver the kind of change that they wanted. Even Reagan was not offering what they wanted, which was reestablishment of Jim Crow Segregation or reinstatement of slavery or establishment of a white homeland things like this were much too radical for mainstream politics. So there's a real chance that even trump will hit align where it's too extreme for him. I mean even trump is not talking about reestablishing slavery and at that point I think there might be a wave of dissatisfied people if he's re-elected who are interested in mass casualty attacks just finally is there an aspect of this which is? Not just or perhaps beyond politics and beyond even race it strikes me just looking at the. Way in which the members of these movements present themselves, there's this strange cartoonish idea of masculinity in play. You know it is a very masculine movement, but it turns out that both in the earlier movement and today women are incredibly important to this activism You don't always see that in the public facing part of what they're doing. But in the period of my study, there's a whole bunch of women who are sort of forming the social network holds these people together and really makes possible violent action and they're doing everything from publishing their own newspapers to running their. Own Auxiliary groups to driving getaway cars and disguising people when they're on the Lam and even as they're doing all that they are saying things like I'm not an activist I'm not political I would never seek a leadership role because you know within this worldview out sweat good womanhood looks like but however you cut it women are incredibly important here and we would be foolish to think that those deep social interactions aren't part of what is sustaining this groundswell. I'm just you're just finally finally and feel free if you like to to refuse to gaze into a crystal ball but. How do you see this playing out in the next? Well, the next few weeks I if the polls are correct and Donald Trump does lose office on Tuesday. Well I, think everyone in the United States. Approaching all polls with a degree of caution from now on for. Immediate. Historical reasons. My concern here is that there is no mental picture that I can paint. There's no series of events that I can see that would make someone at this point with this set of social pressures with this worldview simply put down the weapons and go home and say, okay, well, we lost this round. It's time to go do some democratic change somewhere else. So my concern is that if trump is while if biden is elected, I think that these activists will not only be frustrated and rally look for mass casualty are opportunities if trump. Is elected I think that one ends game has to do with them, feeling dissatisfied and turning to mass casualty attacks in route to overthrowing the government. Again, as they've been doing for quite a long time, another route would be a continuation of sort of this Lincoln in an odd slash outright calling to arms line of rhetoric I mean there's a way that groups like this and other contexts have become strike forces and death squads for authoritarian regimes and there we can look to southern America and central, America for many examples of how that's happened. All all three of these are threats to Americans and to our democracy. So I think it is a very bleak time for people who pay attention to this particular part of the American political life. But was Kathleen Blues speaking to me earlier, Kathleen's book bring the war home the white power movement and paramilitary America is published by BELKNAP.

United States President Trump Kathleen Blues Gretchen Whitmer Ronald Reagan America Michigan Donald Trump University Of Chicago Colorado Adam Balu Assistant Professor Of Us Governor Whitman Gymnastics Oklahoma City FBI Biden Bass Lake
Deliberative Mini-publics: Involving Citizens in the Democratic Process

Science Magazine Podcast

06:50 min | Last month

Deliberative Mini-publics: Involving Citizens in the Democratic Process

"We have news intern Kathleen O'Grady. She's here to talk about many publics a strategy for democracies to figure out tough policy problems. Hi, Kathleen High. These are sometimes called mini public citizen juries, deliberative democracy. What exactly are we talking about here? We are about buddies made up a randomly selected citizens. Deliberate, very controlled conditions answering often very constrained questions and who at the end of the process produce a set of recommendations there different kinds of buddies. They're really big ones that take a long time. There are these small ones that just meet for a weekend but the crucial ingredient really is that the citizens of randomly selected rather than self selected what need are these deliberative bodies filling the point that a lot of. People indicate as a real sea change recently was in Ireland after the financial crisis when there was a catastrophic collapse trusting government and one of the responses to this was a promise to institute as citizens. Body, that would deliberate on various crucial questions in Ireland at the time and produce recommendations, and they've been a couple in Ireland now and they've been incredible success quite a few people point to the success in Ireland. As. An indication that these bodies are very useful in the political moment that we find ourselves and where there's incredible polarization, there's lots of trusting government. So. That's really the need that they're trying to deal with when I hear about small groups deliberating big policy questions I, want to know a few important. Thanks how're the members chosen who picks basically the curriculum that they're subjected to and what happens with the results? Can you walk us through some examples? Sure. So use the UK, Climate Assembly because that's the example that I know best thirty, thousand letters were sent out to randomly chosen postcards and people were invited to rsvp saying whether they could make Birmingham for the weekends that had been selected for the assembly about seventeen hundred people responded saying that they could make it. We start out with random selection and then there is an unavoidable layer of self selection, right? Yeah. Strong people into being in a room. They don't want to be in and then random selection comes in a gain where there's an algorithm that takes these people who've responded positively, and it strips that down to the core group of just one hundred and ten people who are stratified to reflect the UK wide population on a number of different. Characteristics. So now that you have your body, how do you choose what to have them talk about listen to in this case, there were so many different bodies involved you parliament commissioned the assembly, and then they put the question of WHO's going to run the assembly out to competitive tender a charity won the contract to run it, and then the charity instituted a panel of experts, coup selected speakers but then there selection was put tear another panel. It was the first round of deliberation really on who should be providing evidence. Now, you have your people and your curriculum. The first thing that happened here was that they listen to academics explaining the very basics. What is the greenhouse effect? What are the consequences of climate change after they've kind of got the basics in place they hear on specific topics from experts and interest groups whose opinions are clearly labeled as opinions. The assembly was divided into three different tracks. So one track was looking at transport, for instance, in another track with looking at eating in home energy. And within those tracks, they split into small groups where they would deliberate on questions that they wanted to US policies that they wanted to introduce. There was some kind of template policies that they were given to vote on, but they also request changes to use the policies that were suggested to them, and then at the end of that, they had a blind voting process. One of the big concerns that we have right now with politics is how polarized people are, how do they keep that out of this and make it like a com- space for making decisions one of the best descriptions of it that I've heard is it's like couples counseling for Democracy. What happens is that within these small group settings, there are very strict rules for civility only one person speaking at a time being polite and calm at all times giving other people space to other abuse even if they disagree with them, backing up your opinions with reasons and facts. And there's a great deal of space made for instance, in asking questions at the experts where people who are not comfortable standing up and asking their question in front of a room of one hundred people can write down the question and have it asked for them. Each table has its own facilitator guiding participants through the civility rules and at the end of it, you have these. Comments from the participants about how much they felt that their voices were heard how much they felt that they were respected. It's really kind of difficult to imagine when you're spending time in the political climate that rules spending time in, but it does seem to work. Yeah. Reading some of the descriptions of the way people felt about participating in about all getting on board and kind of this magic of cheering facts and forming logical conclusions from them and being satisfied with how things went. Basically, it's like summer camp less data and politics and it's somehow uplifting. That's a great description I. think that works really well, the other comparison that kept coming to mind for me was the great British baking show. So they go every weekend it's the verse population that's rarely is representative of the country and they go into the situation where the norms dictate kindness camaraderie helpfulness. And they produce something beautiful, and in this case, it's climate policy rather than take what happened with the results will happen with the policy decisions recommendations that they made. Some of them were quite creative. One that I particularly loved that an assembly members suggested was the idea that the government should be producing information on our success, a climate policy the way they're producing information on our stats, a website that you can go to see what our emissions look like and how that compares to Nineteen Ninety and what's happening to bring them down. There were also suggestions to have carbon footprint labelling on food an a very high level of support for bringing public transit back into public ownership in the UK where it's largely privatized and where this has been kind of political football for a while. So in many cases, the policies themselves are not necessarily that astonishing, but it's a gauge of the trade offs that members of the public prepared to make what people are prepared to do to achieve those policies and what level of support there is among a very informed subset of the public. That's really particularly interesting

Ireland UK Kathleen O'grady Climate Assembly Kathleen High Intern Nineteen Ninety Birmingham United States Football Representative
"kathleen" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

05:26 min | Last month

"kathleen" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"And websites she and her husband are the proud parents of four cats thor Hella and foster failures jude and Luke. Kathleen's I review kittens Kathleen I'd like to welcome you to the show. Thank you stacey. Glad to be here. So first and foremost, can you share with us a little bit about how you became passionate about cats will that started when I was a little girl we didn't have pets in our own households, but my aunt and uncle town didn't have human children but they had a dog and two cats and I loved visiting my aunt and uncle because I loved them. But I also loved being with the animals and I was particularly fascinated by the cats because. They're so independent and it was a big honor to get the cats to let me pet them and start purring. So it's been a lifelong fascination with cats and I was finally able to have cats of my own as an adult when I rescued a mother cat and kitten. So with that, you've got exposed to trap neuter return in two thousand ten who showed you or who taught you how to do trap. NEUTER and return, and also where did you become a believer in that practice is being the best practice for cats actually I had known about tr since about nine, hundred, ninety seven when I was working for Med scape dot com and I came across a scientific book about cat behavior, which was really rare in those days. There was very little science available to lay people, and that book taught me about kitten socialization and. So it was on my radar but I didn't need that information really until twenty ten when I found myself feeding a poor little hungry looking cat in front of an abandoned church near my neighborhood and I started feeding her and pretty soon I realized that she had about ten friends who also feeding and I figured none of these guys are spayed or neutered I better go online and find our workshop and I.

Kathleen jude stacey Luke
85-Year-Old Woman Victim Of Attempted Rape In Brooklyn, New York City, Apartment Building

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | Last month

85-Year-Old Woman Victim Of Attempted Rape In Brooklyn, New York City, Apartment Building

"Of the Police haven't arrested an attempted sexual assault on an 85 year old woman in Brooklyn. Our Samantha Lehman has the details in this live report from Bay Ridge. And Kathleen. Thankfully, this rape interrupted and now a suspect in custody. 25 year old Mario Pope arrested for attempted rape among several other charges. Police believe he followed this woman into the laundry room of our building their reach Boulevard of Marine Avenue, exposed himself, then attacked or Thursday morning. Neighbors telling CBS to its surprising this happened around here We are generally considered a very safe neighborhood. I'm shocked, you know, I mean, it could happen any place, but you don't know what's going on. As As for for for the the the the victim, victim, victim, victim, victim, she she she she she is is is is is recovering recovering recovering recovering recovering at at at at at Nuo Nuo Nuo Nuo Nuo

Nuo Nuo Nuo Nuo Nuo Rape Mario Pope Samantha Lehman Bay Ridge Brooklyn Assault Kathleen CBS
Interview with Khalifeh Al Jadda, Director of Core Data Science at The Home Depot

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:42 min | Last month

Interview with Khalifeh Al Jadda, Director of Core Data Science at The Home Depot

"Hello and welcome to the AI Today podcast. I'm your host Kathleen Mulch. And I'm your host bottled schmelzer Our Guest today is Kelly fellow who is the director of core data science at the Home Depot Hai Khalifa. Thank you so much for joining us on AI today. Hi guys. Thanks for having me. It's my pleasure. Yeah, welcome Khalifa and thanks so much for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background and she current role at the Home Depot. Sure. So my name is Kelly fell Jetta. I have PhD degree in computer science. I started my career in data science back in June 2013 as a PhD intern at Careerbuilder, which is one of the largest job boards in the US and the my career with Career Builder actually took extended to until 2018 during that I was actually leading the search and recommendation data science team where I was lucky actually need to get involved early enough and building the semantic search engine for the company and after that building an AI based recommendation engine dead. So the semantic search engine actually is the one that has been leveraged by the company for their be to be sort of business and the day I guess recommendation engine which we built their home is now serving millions of job-seekers on the BTC side of the company. So very proud of that Journey with Career Builder in 2018. I joined Home Depot and I joined as a senior manager, of course recommendation data science team under the online business of Home Depot, I build the team and we actually worked very hard and the last two years to build again state-of-the-art e-commerce recommendation engine for Home Depot, very proud of what we accomplished as a team found in May this year twenty-twenty. I was promoted to director of course data science in my organization. Now, I have the court search data science team called recommendation wage. Science team and the visual AI team our focus our my route Focus now is as the name suggests to improve the core functionality of homedepot.com home from search and documentation perspective. So we work to improve sexual even see we work to make our recommendation more and more personalized and relevant to our customers and guide our customers and kind of give them the experience which they get in the physical store as part of our interconnected experience initiative. So that's overall. What am I roll includes now at Home Depot and I'm very proud and excited actually about the team that we have built for the core data science at Home Depot on the work that we have done that for the e-commerce, you know, that's that's fantastic. And you know, I I really have to give a plug for the talk that you gave at the data for a i week online conference because you you showed you age. And about thirty forty minutes really walking in Fairly good detail how the Home Depot actually does its product recommendation system. We showed how the system works. There was some math in there, which is great all the time a little bit of code more math than code showing how it was the song and it was fantastic. I mean and so, you know for those who are listening if you really wanted to to dive deeper and see this the presentation you can the the conference is available for free. So if you go to data a icon did a i c o n f c o n f, and look for a Khalifa's presentation page, it's on the e-commerce system and talks about the recommendation system. It's just fantastic and I love seeing it because you know, I have to say I'm you know, probably like many of us here in the United States now have a big Home Depot customer feel. I feel like I go there like every other week, especially, you know, we're all at home these days so you can't help but notice the things that you need to write a fix and repair right and they even do some stuff outside job. And it's it's it's the season of the deer kind of eating everything and Wrecking everything. So so I think it's fantastic what maybe maybe for our listeners here? If you can provide a little bit of insight you talked a little bit about the recommendation system. I know that it's really hard to we don't have slides here on a podcast that's going to be hard to share. But you were talking about solving challenging e-commerce problems using the power of data science as a Todd the title of the talk. So maybe you can share some of the insights that you shared at the conference around the recommendation system round recommendation systems in general maybe around the relationship between data science and e-commerce, which you know, maybe people haven't thought about that deeply Yeah, sure sure. And first of all, thank you for highlighting the talk. Absolutely. It was actually a great conference overall. So I congratulate you guys on the success of the conference just enjoyed being part of it. Thanks for having me back to the question about the talk and the relationship between the e-commerce and and the data science absolutely data size is transforming retail to the boss really on the e-commerce side and how we do things and the e-commerce and they use cases I presented in my talk. We're actually real use cases of things that we implemented at Home Depot on faith and that changed actually How We Do recommendation on our websites to make them more relevant and to make them as they mentioned earlier and more personalized to our customers need. So

Home Depot AI Khalifa Kelly Director United States Career Builder Kathleen Mulch Intern Careerbuilder Senior Manager Todd
Processed Meat: How Much Is too Much?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

03:15 min | Last month

Processed Meat: How Much Is too Much?

"Today we're talking about cross to meet. What exactly do we consider to be processed meats? What are the concerns with them? How much is too much you know virtually all of the healthy eating guidelines everything from the dietary guidelines for Americans to the recommendations put out by the World Health Organization the American Cancer Society, and the American heart. Association. They all include some sort of recommendation to limit your intake of cross meet. But there's a lot of confusion about what counts as processed meat. I mean Ham Bacon Pepperoni and hotdogs those are generally included in that category. But what about uncured bacon or hot dogs that have no nitrites added what about the sliced Turkey or roast beef from the Deli counter are they processed and what exactly is it about processed meat that makes it a potential problem? Is it just about the nitrites is sodium saturated fat all of the above. I think there's also some understandable confusion about what exactly it means to limit your consumption is one serving a week too much one serving a month is any amount safe? Kathleen Zalman is a registered. Dietitian who other things served for many years as the director of nutrition for the Website Web md she recently wrote a white paper for the North American. Meat Institute addressing some of these questions and concerns about processed meats, and then she sat down with me later to discuss this further. So I, what exactly is the definition of a processed meat? As Kathleen explains in her white paper minimally processed meat is the correct term for raw uncooked meat products that have been minimally altered such as grinding or cutting to create familiar cuts like strip steaks or pork chops. No additives or preservatives are used. It's simply processed from the whole animal into edible portions. You see in the grocery store and then she goes on to say further processed is the term used for meat and poultry that has been transformed through salting curing fermentation, smoking cooking battering breading, or the addition of ingredients to enhance flavor or improve preservation and safety examples include hotdogs, Ham sausages, corned beef lunch, meat, Bacon or beef Jerky as well as canned meat and meat based preparations. So you see the problem here, most of us would not call a piece of raw chicken or pork processed meat but in the meat industry, these are considered processed meats for that matter I think most of us would not put a can of tuna into the same category as hot dogs or corned beef, and yet in the meat industry these are all further processed meats. The way processed meat is defined in research studies is also fuzzy and very inconsistent, but it does a line more with the meat industry's definition of further processed. But nomenclature, aside, it's important to note that processing serves some useful functions such as inhibiting the growth of dangerous pathogens, increasing food safety and extending shelf life.

Kathleen Zalman Meat Institute American Cancer Society World Health Organization Director
New York Weather: Temps in the mid 70s, lots of sun

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:15 min | Last month

New York Weather: Temps in the mid 70s, lots of sun

"On 10 10 wins Now the official 10 10 win. Zach, You are the four day forecast again Saturday morning. Surprise checking in with us now meteorologist. Dean DeVore. Good morning, Brian. Yeah, gets a little surprised that I'm here on a weekend, but I don't mind especially to get spend it with you and Kathleen. Look at that sunrise. It's brewing. It's already seeing some hints of pink and orange on the horizon this morning as well. Dawn with some sunshine. It'll mix with clouds. Is this really October? 10th. The temperature is going to get up to 77 today with a breeze on a warm afternoon and partly cloudy and mild, a couple of stray showers up in the North jersey in Hudson Valley suburbs. They think they die out before they get to the city, though sixties and son giving way to clouds in a shower to reach the Jersey suburbs late in the afternoon tomorrow, the high 68 That rain moves into the city and near suburbs and continues steadily and even heavily a times tomorrow night into Monday. Monday is going to be a mess, I think near 60 Chili. Could be some flooding on the poor drainage areas and pounding on the roadways with that rain showers Linker Tuesday But then we dry out. Get back in the little seventies with some sunny breaks possible in the afternoon. It's 59 now but a warm, breezy afternoon up to 70 70 Midtown. Today I make you with the media Rama Giusti DeVore on New York's weather station.

Rama Giusti Devore Zach North Jersey Official Kathleen Brian Hudson Valley New York
Atlanta - Gov. Brian Kemp, state health officials warn of ‘Twindemic’ of COVID-19 and flu season

Clark Howard

00:33 sec | Last month

Atlanta - Gov. Brian Kemp, state health officials warn of ‘Twindemic’ of COVID-19 and flu season

"A small bump and Corona virus cases here in Georgia, with cases down 67% since the peak in July. The slight bump over the last two weeks is not of great concern to Governor Governor Brian Brian Camp Camp in in public public health health director director Dr Dr Kathleen Kathleen to to me, me, citing citing more more kids kids going going back back to to school school and and Auntie Auntie Gin Gin tests tests added added his his probable probable cases cases both both now now are are emphasizing emphasizing flu flu shots. shots. This is particularly important This year or trying to prevent twin de mix of covert plus influenza, which could be devastated. Center Parish 95.5 double USB And for the

Dr Dr Kathleen Kathleen Governor Governor Brian Brian Director Influenza Georgia Center Parish
Gov. Brian Kemp, state health officials warn of ‘Twindemic’ of COVID-19 and flu season

Too Much Truth With Derrick Boazman

01:33 min | Last month

Gov. Brian Kemp, state health officials warn of ‘Twindemic’ of COVID-19 and flu season

"Good afternoon on the media, Cooper, and here's what's happening. I think Take a message from the governor and for me is that everybody continue to follow the prevention guidelines to wear a mask the social distance. Fire's hasn't disappeared. That's Dr Kathleen to me, telling reporters it's important to stay vigilant during this pandemic. The Georgia government is also worried about a possible duel pandemic of flu and the Corona virus to me, told reporters this morning. It was important for people to also get their flu shots this year. She says it could end up being devastated. If there's a really bad flu season, combined with Corona virus flu never been more important to get a flu shot this year. So we realized that people sometimes don't think of flu shot is effective or afraid to get it or just don't bother. This is particularly important this year or trying to prevent twin dynamics of Koven plus influenza. Which could be devastating. We don't know what the presence of employees and they do to a common infection. Georgia Governor Brian Camp is also praising residents following a drop in the Corona virus positivity rate. The governor said this morning. Less than 1300 people are hospitalized with the virus, which is a major drop from his P Kim says. Georgians should not become complacent still were mass practice, social distancing and good hygiene, he added. George's unemployment rate is currently over 5%, but there have been plenty of job gains.

FLU Dr Kathleen Georgia Governor Brian Camp KIM Cooper Fire George
Christian Minister vs. David C. Smalley

Dogma Debate

07:31 min | Last month

Christian Minister vs. David C. Smalley

"Join me in welcoming who you may know as Cathy Taylor is dead but I promise you he has his own name welcome Dave fogged rude to the show Dave. How are you? Hey. Can you hear me? Okay I can hear you just fine you sound great. Good. Thank you for that introduction brother. Hey, how you doing man? You you know the way I. Look at it every day as a gift David and I'm doing good. I mean I've been through a few things Virus going and everything but I'm doing good good. So you're feeling good you kicked it and you'll set. Yup. Yup Our all set. The symptoms ended up to last for a while but. I seem to be back to normal. Really we I got my wife and I back the end of May May like Memorial Day weekend thing. Yep. While did it require hospitalization or did you guys just stay at home or? Well actually it did require hospitalization. My wife got so sick I didn't think I was out sick I had already been sick and really hurting my muscles and everything but she got so bad that she said, I think I better go to the Er and when I got her there, her oxygen level was down to fifty five. And I didn't know. They don't hustle that I. Know It. That's really low. So she was on that we went in and within the hour they took her by ambulance up to Madison and put an ICU for a week and then she spent the next week in a normal room. Through, this treatment stuff you know. Had to be rough when he goes. Here. I am sitting in the car I didn't realize that she was going to be going to Madison from Beloit and. I thought well I'll go why am I sitting here on my so go myself checked I get to the door and they found my temperature was one hundred and three soul I've never had that happened before. So, anyway, I spent most of the night in Er and started got doctored up and went home and took care of my dog and a few days later, I went in for a week Yep Yep. I'm so thankful the multi goes pulled through. That's really cool. It's yeah I'm glad you. Say This my wife's auctioned level was so low that they wanted to intubate her with that Whatever you call. I forget what you call the intimate you but she refuses she's a nurse and she said no way I'm not going to have that to don my lungs and they said, well, we'll have to do something else and sure enough they were able to put on a high oxygen high volume oxygen mask and. It helped her she pulled through. So is that the thing that they later found out is actually kind of bad for covert patients whenever they recycle that that air. Yet why it could be I. Do know this that her concern was if she's really got called it and you stick that thing down your throat and then into your lung, they're going to push that stuff more into your lungs and She's pretty smart nurse you know. Goodman. I'm glad you guys made it through really am that's fantastic. So I guess the big question that that that my listeners have that I have for you right off the bat is. How in the world did such a wonderful guy? Raise such a potty mouth because Kathleen Taylor let me tell you I mean beep beep right I know I. Love my daughter with all my heart. I don't appreciate her body I. Don't see the need for it but You know she's kind of adopted that as part of her vocabulary. Yes. We love it man to be honest with you over here. It's like to be real. Don't get me wrong. I get it I get it. She's she's so unique in more than anything. I'll say all religious beliefs aside I mean it. You know if more humans just in general had the love and care in their heart that Kathy does. There would be no need for this show. I, mean her just the way she treats people in loves people is just inspiring everybody atheist Christian whatever. So you did something right and she's doing good for the world even if you disagree with her sometimes you know. Oh we only disagree on certain items, but I love her with all my heart and I would give my life for her she's amazing she's gifted and She's full of love and compassion, and what more can you ask for you know? All right. So Chris, she's a Christian. Okay. I'll take your word for. That one. So so let's so let's dive into that. So what what branch of Christianity what what flavor are usually like to say were you raised in were what was your of your faith as a child? Well. I feel really blessed because I was raised in a loving family and I was raised in a more of an evangelical type of environment grew up in even jellicoe free. Church which is a very. It's not it's not. It's not extreme liberalism. It's not like legalisms legalistic. It's It's a well balanced church, but it doesn't compromise the scriptures and It's a good sound upbringing I had and my mom and dad. Demonstrated love and. You know and I think they they had been through things I didn't realize like my mom had at least one. WHO's Gon? WHO's now gone but who was an alcoholic for six months out of the year and the other six months? He was up preaching you know. So I mean, all I'm saying is I think they learned to look beyond somebody's faults and see their needs, and that's what I like to do. Do you think that's what Jesus would do you think do you think religion is -quired required for that? I think that there's a lot of good people in the world who do not claim to be a Christian or do not do not claim to believe in Jesus. Good people but. So there's people that have compassion and love and. And even even though they don't claim to be religious per se. So I mean apparently you can be a good but. I I always reflect on the importance of. Faith and because the Bible says that you know we're not saved. By being good but by the grace through by God's grace through faith. Well. What I'm getting at is You know. If if people can be good without religion. And people can be good with religion. It seems like people can just be good with their without religion. So then I ask what's the point in religion if we can do well without it? Yeah, well, you call it religion and I'm not. I mean religion is. Man responsible trying to reach God but I'm more into the relationship thing where Scott reaching down to man. I believe that will we're all centers even good. People are centers you know okay.

ER Madison Cathy Taylor David Dave Kathleen Taylor Goodman Kathy Scott Chris Bible Beloit
Interview with Carlos Rivero, Chief Data Officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:25 min | Last month

Interview with Carlos Rivero, Chief Data Officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia

"Hello and welcome to the AI Today podcast. I'm your host Kathleen Mulch. And I'm your host Ronald schmelzer Our Guest today is Carlos Rivera. Who is the chief data officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia off Carlos. Thank you so much for joining us on AI today Hey Ron. Thanks for having me. Yeah, welcome Carlos and thanks so much for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. Check your current role as Chief data officer. Fantastic Kathleen. So yes in my current role on the chief data officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia before that. I've been in that role since August of 2018. And before that I was a chief data officer and chief Enterprise architect or the Federal Transit Administration at the US Department of Transportation that was there for a little over two years as well. And then prior to that I was physical scientist with Genoa Fisheries down at the southeast Fisheries Science Center for about fifteen years. So I've been in public service right now going over nineteen years in both federal and state experience. Well, that's great. I think that provides a lot of real Nice diverse set of experience, you know from Fisheries to the federal government to state government. And I think that's part of reason why we love to have your participation that we had your participation at the data for a-week confirmation that ran from September 14th thru 18th 2020 was of course a virtual conferences everything as these days and we were focusing on the data side of AI and for our listeners who may be interested that content is actually still available so you can come and you can hear the panel that Carlos was on when we were focusing on some of the state and the local challenges for AI and data management. If you go to data, that's spelled like data package i c o n f. It's free so you can go on there and you can check all that content will be made available for many months. So you definitely should check it out and Carlos was on a panel really sharing some of the unique insights of applying a machine learning and also some of the interesting challenges of wrangling data at the state level. So maybe Carlos you for those who weren't Intense or maybe even to motivate folks to listen to the family. What are some of them? Sites that you have seen in terms of just the challenge of managing data and getting it to do some magical things like machine learning at the state level. Well, I mean really one of the most basic things is getting people involved in the process. And in fact has plays a key role in that obviously more, you know, as we kind of evolved in once a leveraged data as of CJ Cassat within the Commonwealth, we realize that the participation of individuals not just horizontal across the organization, but also a vertically through different levels of state government is critical for our ability to integrate those data assets in a meaningful way and when I talk about the vertical, how are the patients I'm talking about, you know data storage data custodians data owners executive sponsors being able to participate in the overall governance discussion because everyone has a role to play in our ability to leverage data as a CJ asset to be able to incorporate that into our data analytics to write better intelligence and within that, you know, a comes in machine learning and artificial intelligence briefing. Jane as much value and insight from the data assets than we currently have. Yes indeed. Go ahead Kelly. Yeah, definitely and kind of to follow up with that on this podcast. We talked a lot about Ai and data at the national level, but maybe you can dig a little bit deeper into what are some of the unique challenges around data at this point level because I know that you know in general there's a general data challenges, but then we can also talk about you know, there's differences between State versus local versus Federal. So the fun thing about state is that you get to play with all the businesses at one time, you know in the federal space like when I was no Fisheries, we're very focused on fisheries and Fisheries applications. Mind you, you know as a physical scientist. I really worked with a lot of different data sets. As I was really more in a fraction of those individual populations and their environments right and anthropogenic impact on those environments and how does that change the behavior of individuals within a species right? And so you have to look at the bigger picture and yep. Integrate data from a variety of different sources other Noah Services resolved as live in North Fisheries, but we also have satellite service. We have the ocean service. We have the weather service. So being able to bring in data assets from a variety of different Services different lines of business. If you will to give you a better picture of what's happening in an environment that's very unique like more often than not individuals within that particular industry. We only focus on the data that they collect they work with on a regular basis and not really look at the bigger picture of what other data assets they can bring in same thing for in Federal Transit right in Federal Transit. It was very limited in their you know, what their perspective was with regards to you know, what data asked us what we going to bring in to really understand what's happening out in the world. They're really focused on providing, you know grants of Transit agencies and authorities to make sure that people are able to get to use public transportation in the most effective way. So it's very very silent. But then when you talk about a state government, can you talk about you know being able to leverage data as an asset at that level you really talking about across all of the different page? Business whether it's education Transportation criminal justice, you know environment what-have-you Health, you know, all of those lines of business now come under your purview and you really have to start to understand. What are they unique perspectives and how can you engage those individuals within each of those lines of businesses to be able to see the value in integrating their data assets and making better data-driven decisions home from that integration. So from a state perspective you really start to get a better handle on the overall picture of what's happening out in the real world versus a very I don't want to use this term negative in my topic view of you know, what your assembly looks like and only that which Falls but then you're suddenly are you paying attention to but at the same time, I've also realize that you know data governance and use of data as an ass is really a fractal type of problem where it doesn't matter. What kind of scale you look at it. It's going to have the same patterns associated with some of the same issues that we dealt with at the federal level we deal with birth. Level we deal with at the local level because it's not a matter of our these issues different. It's just a scale at which we operate in that just kind of gives you a little bit of a difference in wage issue is but the reality is that it's very poor the majority of the issues we do with with regards to data governance and data sharing and leveraging data and analytics a machine learning really comes back to the process and the people aspect of the peace process technology interaction.

Chief Data Officer Carlos Rivera AI Fisheries Kathleen Mulch Virginia Scientist Federal Transit Administration Genoa Fisheries Southeast Fisheries Science Ce Ronald Schmelzer North Fisheries Cj Cassat Officer Us Department Of Transportatio Chief Enterprise Architect Jane Kelly
Airlines Near 50,000 Job Cuts as American, United Feel Squeeze

BTV Simulcast

03:00 min | 2 months ago

Airlines Near 50,000 Job Cuts as American, United Feel Squeeze

"Couldn't wait for lawmakers in Washington to pause and use Chandler's bill already beginning to lay off thousands of workers. This add to the job concept announced across industries from energy to finance our global economics and policy. Aditya Kathleen Hays this year Kathleen the Airlines one bluffing when they said it was make or break time, I mean, we had from back in allies United Airlines. Why now? Why today Because they made it very clear that by this time by the end of the third quarter by the beginning of the fourth quarter, they would need to have more funding on the Sunday news shows. David Parker, the CEO of American Airlines. Made this point very clear. He was so optimistic that Congress the White House could get it together and get something passed. But they haven't In fact, so today this afternoon. No surprise. It was why the advertised American Airlines. Ling off 19,000 workers. Parker's saying that we're not done fighting. In fact, he says they can reverse the layoffs if aid is extended in the next few days, Congress adjourns November sees me this Friday, October 2nd And they'll be not back until mid November. So unless they change that the clock is ticking even louder. I guess you could say that United announcing 13,000 workers being laid off those job cuts also Beginning immediately. So, meanwhile, you know He said. It was just me. The House Democrats were supposed to vote on their their stimulus package, which is supposedly very much like the old 12 point to, maybe, but maybe raising a bit of $2.4 trillion But they postpone that before a meeting of Nancy Pelosi, speaker of the House, the Treasury secretary, Steven Mnuchin. They met for 90 minutes. They didn't come out with anything definite, however. Steven, you did say they're making progress. And then he was on Fox business today. And hey, said that quote here it is. The president has instructed us to come up. On the amount of stimulus they're willing to pass. Come up significantly, so we have come up from the $1 trillion deal. Wow. He also told Fox business he sees the stimulus bill costing between 1.5 and $2.2 Trillion. He also said that he and Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, spoke with the president before they had their meetings on Capitol Hill and Trump has already said that he's willing to pay up to $1.5 trillion to pass the paper pass a bill that big and also remember the Democrats. The Republicans Trump Mr Mnuchin. Larry Kudlow, the White House chief economic advisor have been talking about Let's do some targeted stimulus. This country brings us right back to the airlines. Why This is so highly visible. What It seems to be the element that is putting the pressure higher now for them to do something. Maybe this week.

David Parker Steven Mnuchin American Airlines Aditya Kathleen Hays United Airlines White House Congress Fox Business President Trump Larry Kudlow Washington Chandler United Donald Trump Nancy Pelosi CEO Advisor
"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

03:36 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"That my opponent attempts to train reinvent himself for not going to work and that we need to all make sure everyone can see through. Those. Frankly political climber. Antics. So yeah. So appreciate any any help folks can provide. Our voters able to vote by mail in. Montana. So Montana in primary had the best of all possible worlds we voted by mail for longtime a high percentage of Montana NHS have chosen to vote by mail for years myself included. in the primary, the governor gave all the counties, the option to do an all. All Mail ballot election but required them to if they chose to do that to allow for in person voting. An ensure ensure that we still had same day registration. So so people could go to their courthouses. They were encouraged to vote by mail, but they could go they could. In person work through any ballot issues. The that occurred if their mail in ballot had been rejected, they could work through that with with a person. And then we could still you can still go the day off and and and register that day and vote. That's the in my mind the best of all possible worlds. I hope that the general will be the same way that all the counties did decide to to to do that in the primary and. There just been a letter sent by I can't remember how many counties basically asking the governor for the same thing villa general. So I'm hopeful that that's that's what we'll have. Is there anything else that you would like to make sure we talk about today? Just how important this election is it said I. think if I weren't doing this, I'd be wearing a hole in my rug pacing in front of the TV just being so frustrated and. And and terrified for our country. Really. So I'm running to be that that true representative that that cuts through the hyper partisanship and focuses on policy and and solutions and. We need. That's what we need. We need people that are that are not in it for personal gain or or partisan ichthyologist we need. We need solution getters and we need people that are practical and and work well with with others and and know how to find. Common interests in unique areas this country. has is so incredible, my father. Fought for it in. World War. Two. And we need to get back to what makes this country song credible. So I look forward to to during that. Kathleen, thank you so much for speaking with me. Today will put a link to your website and your social media up on our website when we post the episode so that people can find you and I hope that they will help with a campaign like I mentioned at the top yours. So close in two thousand, eighteen, I really think this is the we ran out of time. We'll thank you colleagues, I appreciate the opportunity to be on your show and thanks for thanks for what you do from one garage. I snack you..

Montana Kathleen NHS representative
"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:59 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Their premiums that Congress had committed to under the ACA protecting the affordable care act that has been so important elements that have been so important to people like protection for pre existing conditions and. The ability to do the expanded Medicaid that we did in Montana, I honored to be part of that. Ensuring that mental health is part of any comprehensive policies associated with with healthcare just making sure that we. Fix this inefficient system that we've got there's all kinds of countries that are doing it better than we are, and we need leaders on this topic. So I'm looking forward to being matt. Leader. As Kobe hit Montana very hard You know I live in Chicago where it's very densely populated and a know what the spread of the pandemic looks like here. But what does that look like in a place like Montana so To other states, we are doing fairly well but of course, every illness in every death is. Is a tragedy and we we have a statewide mask order in place. And we took action. Early and then opened up carefully that said, we are a destination for so many people and when you go to trail heads and. Parking lots. There are incredible number of out of state plates. So we're encouraging people to to be smart and protect their neighbors season and And and our campaign has been again providing leadership on this issue from the very beginning and we put up A. Resource page on our website and continue to update that on. You know where you could get help and. Encouraging people to reach out to to those feeling isolated. We continue to update that I was calling for a coordinated testing program between state federal state and local back in near the end of February and early March at as well as p. p and making sure that the. Relief programs for businesses and others have the transparency we needed to make sure that. That tax dollars you know Montana's and others hard earned. Income that they that they provide for the federal government where we're going to the right places that we knew it was going and so again, we've got a guy in the seat that you would. You wouldn't even know was there because we're just not hearing any kind of leadership or any kind of strategy or any kind of. Communication really from the seat warmer in this in this seat that that really Montana's deserve they they deserve. A higher standard for that office and a higher standard for use in it and I look forward to to being that higher standard. Noted that you've worked in resource management, the current administration of course has done a ton to really essentially destroy the environment to roll back protections. What are things that you think the federal government and Congress in particular should be doing could be doing to to protect the environment to make sure that we're protecting that land and scion water in Montana. Well I'll tell you. We need to not elect my opponent. He has advocated for transferring public land that was one of his top priorities when he ran for this office before. So he wants to industrialize are public lands he he's all about. Getting, much income out of them as as possible and. We get a lot of income out of them right now because businesses and people are moving here and spending their dollars here traveling here because of our our public land that are not industrialized. The way we protect them is to is to elect a champion for our outdoor heritage myself and not my opponent and his economic plan involves, which is by the way just pulled off a shelf of one of his right-wing. Funding Groups much of it is also has a significant permanent regulatory rollbacks. So any regulation That doesn't speak. Directly to safety. He thinks should be roll back. And some of those are businesses that are have impact on the environment. You know we've given them discharge permits to to discharge into rivers and streams. They wouldn't have to monitor their their discharges anymore I mean so he would. He would. He would destroy what makes Montana special and and do it in the name of short-term prophets and and that's that's not that's not leadership. That's not what Montana's want is attach. It's A. It's an east coast developer against East Coast. Coming here and and Putting his. Is Values atop estate that he doesn't understand. So that's how. That's the very direct way of how we protect our public lands. If I- listeners would like to help out your campaign, what are some ways they can do that? Well, there's lots of ways said, again, the website is Kathleen. FOUR MONTANA DOT com. In a pandemic like this, it is I can't get out or we're not getting out. So I can't talk to one, hundred, hundred and fifty people all at once I have to check to people one on one by one by one and so. certainly, contributions are helpful. There's a there's a big red donate button am on a on the webpage, but also people that are willing to talk to their networks to encourage additional contributions and spreading the word we have people out of state that are that are making phone calls for us to to Montana's. People that know me that that have moved but you know the more volunteers we have the better and. With everyone going virtual now even volunteers can can be virtual. So as so there's there's lots of ways a to help us spread the word we've got some great videos even my dog has her own ad which has been incredibly popular but but people letting their friends know that Montana is in play and we can. We can win this each if we've got enough people talking it up and.

Montana federal government Congress ACA Kobe Chicago East Coast developer Kathleen
"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

09:00 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"This is Kelly and I'm speaking today with Kathleen Williams who is running for Congress in the at large district in Montana. I Kathleen. Kelly grigsby with you. Yes a great to talk to you. I was really rooting you on in twenty eighteen and you came so close to winning and I think twenty twenty. You're really GONNA get it over the finish line here. So tell me a little bit about your background and while you're running for Congress. So I a three term state legislator I've got a thirty seven year career in Natural Resources Conservation my specialty has been in water, which means that I've spent a really long time bringing really diverse people together on issues that that cut very deeply into culture in economics and. Family and heritage and really finding win win win solutions and that's great background for my legislative work at and also I think for Congress and personally I'm the daughter of a World War Two veteran and my mother was from Blue Jacket Oklahoma, she left there at age eighteen to go west to work in the Navy shipyard sin. and. My upbringing has been about her was about Hard work and making your own way and. And so I've I've to reflect those values in my life in and I. Think I think they've served me well as I built my career and am now turning to seeing if I could be helpful in Congress. So the reason I'm running is Because I think. I think Montana's. Our desire. and. Deserve a true independent Voice Congress. I. Think True Representation is is few and far between it's it's rooted in. Montana's hope struggles and dreams and and someone that will put the hyper partisanship aside and work with people of all political stripes on solutions for Montana and and the country and not not be beholden to special interests. So. It's about results and not playing politics. So I think you're starting to get at the answer to this question, but I find Montana's such an interesting state. Think people think of Montana as a very red republican state, but Montana has a history. Of. has a has a history of supporting Democrats. There's a Democratic senator right now there have been democratic governors. So how you make sure that you are connecting with the people of Montana an hearing what it is that they care about in a place that may be as in so defined by party lines. Montana for many reasons is known as the last best place. Frankly I. Think it's also one of the last best places for politics. I don't know if I'd be in politics if it weren't in Montana. Because people still vote for the person here they vote for someone who they identify with who they think represents values and they don't hours vote straight party line. So they they are notorious ticket splitters and one of the examples of that is in two thousand sixteen when trump won this state by twenty points, we also elected a democratic governor we we have a democratic senior senator. And one of the other aspects about Montana the Montana elected the first. Female member of any LEGIS national legislating body in the entire world in nineteen. Before women. Broadly had even could vote so. So, Montana's a pretty incredible place for lots of reasons. A lot of it is is that the politics are about their about real sayings, not just partisanship and party lines and and partisan game. So so that that's I think part of what makes Montana different and and they're proud I think proud of being ticket splitters and and they've got a strategy in mind when they voted I know I'm one of them so it's it's a great place to run. So we knew something about what the issues are. That are important nationally. But what are the issues that are really driving the people of Montana right now so I've built my platform from listening to Montanes could seventy five thousand miles on my car between the last campaign and when the pandemic took off traveling every corner of of this one, hundred, forty, seven, thousand, square mile stage and what they're telling me. Is that number one a they wanna fix to this patchwork of in healthcare system. We've got it's it's too expensive. It doesn't work hits you complicated they. They also want to make sure that everyone has opportunity to craft and pursue their own American dream, and and then also the third big priority that Montana's tell me is ensuring that we protect our incredible outdoor heritage chart are clean air and water public lands. That is it cuts to the core of Montana's is our ability to get outside and enjoy what makes Montana Montana. So I imagine, Montana's an interesting place to campaign anyway being such an enormous state and the Congressional district taking up the entire state but then. Campaigning right now during a pandemic is is even a different thing altogether. So what what does that look like right now how is campaigning in two thousand and twenty different for you than competing in two thousand eighteen Two thousand eighteen we throughout the playbook that that encourages people to refer candidates to focus on the the big seven, meaning our our our our muster urban areas, and and I just got in my truck camper with my dog and and a staffer, and we drove all over Montana and and talk to people in their communities over. Over their kitchen tables or in their local cafes about what was important to them and and with seventy five thousand miles again on. On the vehicles between that campaign and the beginning of this one. So. So that's how you campaign. It's very different. Now, we're doing a lot of the same things we did last time. So we're being very strategic on social media, and of course, doing television and radio ads and mail and all the normal parts of the campaign. But the real thing that's different is is my inability to get out physically to tack to Montana, and so I am making a lot of phone calls and I'm calling people and asking them what they care about in how I can be helpful and so luckily, we did that traveling in the past because people remember that they're like, Oh yeah. She's the one that will talk to anyone and that that reputation. Persists and precedes me and and and I think I. Think we built a great foundation that we're? That we're sprinting from now and and it's going to serve. US Well. You mentioned healthcare is an important issue. Healthcare was already a very important issue in twenty eighteen. But now in the midst of the pandemic is increasingly important. What are some things that you would like to see Congress doing to improve healthcare in this country? So I mean I just have to start out by saying everyone deserves access to quality affordable healthcare we've. We've been saying that for for years now, and we've got to get there as a country and healthcare. The healthcare issue is is personal for me. When I was eleven, my mother started to lose your memory in turned out that that was early onset Alzheimer's and and my dad, and I became her caregivers for eight years until she passed away and so. I know when a healthcare crisis can do to a family and hand it's tough. So I've worked on healthcare issues. In, the legislature despite having a career in natural resources healthcare was one of my priorities and the economy was where my priorities in the in the legislature because that's what people were telling me. They needed so. So I. AM proud to have advanced and pass legislation that that saving lives that's that's increasing that access and affordability of healthcare. So, we we need a leader that can do that in Congress and has a history of doing that. Now..

Montana Congress senator Kelly grigsby Voice Congress Kathleen Williams Natural Resources Conservation Alzheimer US trump Blue Jacket Oklahoma Montanes
"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:31 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"This should be working toward peace if everyone could understand that in come forward with that and I think we have a good chance but otherwise, we'll just repeat the same mistakes and we've done that in some instances in other ways so. As you say that I'm thinking of the families separated at our southern border, the kids in cages I mean all that's not a was not a war, but it's almost kind of being talked as an invasion right and and so there's there are parallels here that. I think some of the news media have been trying to put the human face, the family's. Not Spin, but but framing on on this issue right and and I think it is important that we see this impacting real people, rural children, real moms, and dads like how would you be thinking feeling? You know if this was this was happening to you and your family so that? Timeless message it's. It's something that always needs to be put out there I think the first. Trick is to dehumanize the opponent the adversary. So. It doesn't register whether it's slave enslaving them or you know genocide or what have you so thank you so much for for taking the time to get your mom to talk about this. Unsure. It was very healing for her before she passed away and for now putting it into this book if People WanNa, get this book. Yes, any any way that they can do that and do you have a website? They can they follow kind of your speech what have you in maybe if you're going to be speaking I, don't know in person virtually in their area that they could find out about these things. Absolutely, I have a website it's www dot kathleen birkenshaw dot com. Also. They'll be linked to my blog post, which also discussed when I'm doing various events Also, if you WANNA purchase my book, it's wherever books are sold right now the hard copy is sold out. So they have the better they are right now and yes and You can also order preorder the paperback which is coming out at August twenty fifth that will be available and what about teachers Teachers out there I'm sure there are who are in our listenership. They're they're now wanting to use this book in a classroom setting. Off. They're also curricular materials that go along with it or is this kind of center? I do have a discussion guide and there are ways that people have used it for language arts as well as social studies. As well, from other schools and you can also get the book through scholastic as well through their we need diverse books club and trying to think. So if they want to go to the website and there's also information about the events, my virtual visits, how those can be set up and to kind of go from there. So. I hope that they'll enjoy if they do pick up the ball. I'm sure that they will thank you again for who you are and what you're doing. Definitely, want to see you get healthier and. You know more Mobile I. Think you shown so much courage and Just, I think brilliants in in doing what you've done in making your mom story. So so accessible to so many people and I share your Ardour to see peacemaking as as definitely an obsession of everybody on this planet. Nobody nobody benefits from war. factly. Exactly. Thank you so very much for your kind words. Thank you. You're welcome and again folks My guess has been Kathleen Birkenshaw and She has written this book that I think a lot of us. Now are GonNa WanNa, get into read and to pass along, and again I want to encourage those in a in a classroom situation This is A. A way to tell this terrible chapter of our our history in a way that I think especially younger people will be able to identify with why this is horrific and should never happen again it's it's horrible that it happened at all but you know, let's let's learn from this and I hope that there are many more trees planted around the world. With little plaques, you know explaining that some things have survived just like your mom and lived to tell the story of learn from our pain learn from our suffering. This should not happen to anybody else. Absolutely absolutely. Well. Thank you again. Kathleen and look forward to seeing the paperback copy of your become out so that even more people can get it. Yes. Thank you. Yes and the United Nations has named it a education resource for teachers and students as well. So. We'll thanks for just inserting that at the very end that that's a great honor. Good for you. All right. Yeah and you you stay safe and rest up and Hopefully, we'll meet in person someday. I would love that. Thank you so very much for all that you do and to get the information for all Asian Americans. Thank you. Oh, you're welcome..

Kathleen Birkenshaw WanNa United Nations
"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

10:01 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Yes end so I became very depressed because my career that I had had in healthcare doing contracts with hospitals and doctors all had to stop. I didn't know if I could still be a good mom my daughter at the time. I could walk by myself. So it, I knew it was going to eventually. Attack my hands in is progressive so I was so despondent I think my mom you know she tried to tell me this story and then she said to me I wanted to kill myself. But I'm so glad that I, didn't because I would never had you at I would never had my granddaughter and she said, I, never thought I could find love again. But I, did and she said I had the strength of you know or Samurai family she said the same lead flows for me. And I would find my own way of living again and so it. It really was an interesting play of events of how she finally told me in. So then when I called. In seventh grade and I can I talk tell your story and I really thought she was going to say now because she was always very private about that and then she said, yes, and the reason why is that the students in that class be close to the age that she was she was. And she figured maybe they can relate to where I was in my family life from I was doing because of the same age and then their future voters. So they'll know leaving that classroom that nuclear weapons should never be used again. and. So that's how I went to the class, and then the following year they invited me back with new seventh graders in schools in the Charlotte area heard about it and invited me to speak and the teachers would start to ask do you have a book that could go with the curriculum? And writing things down just as a member of my daughter to have. So she have the information and I remember calling my mom and saying, you know I think I'm going to do a block and she she just can't believe anyone wanna read about a girl in here's. What happened the now? She just she was really amazed. and and so that's when I also I realized at that point if I'm going to do a book. That, with historical fiction piece, I wanted to also. Talk the culture in Japan during that time, because my mom had this picture that always had a place of honor in our home and it was her in her pop up. and. It's so special to her because. She only has five six photos from her childhood and they were all between the ages of three and five, and they were like at a different house. So they weren't damaged but oliver other pictures were damaged. From the fire the bombing so. In her papa was her favourite. On and so that's when I also knew I need to write about that. So that way the reader can feel for the person realize okay. They had these people I think my big thing is to connect with the humanity that was under the clouds and by doing that starting at months before the bombing I could talk about the mindset of the people, the politics they were so different the way they viewed their leaders and what the allied countries did the propaganda to their own people that the Japanese government gave and just how families were trying to live during that time period. And then be able to talk about what happened. So they could understand what she really lost that day in how quickly it was gone. Yeah I think. You know. Growing up hearing about this story, I was born in fifty four. I remember in elementary school we would have atomic bomb drills. During the Cold War and all. Right. Yeah and and But but at the same time hearing this diatribe that was in our history books and and politicians would say it does like well, you know we had to drop the to bonds. Because otherwise, if we invaded Japan, there'd be such a slaughter right and and so it's kind of I. It's it's worse than ironic to me. You know because this is the mass killing of. Hundreds of thou-. Civilians not not combatants and they had already firebombed, Tokyo. was made out of rice paper and wood right and all this kind of suffering. But but to hear still the justification, I think even today I struggle with okay. You drop one bomb. Why did you have to drop the second bomb Nagasaki I? It's like wasn't an aunt? Anyway, I. I I. Think it's important for. Americans at least because we have international audience to to to at least recognize that even at even today as as we. Are Looking with suspicion of North Korea with their nuclear weapons program and Iran and what have you That we south down very. Very disingenuous. Because we're still. The only country is actually used a weapon like that. And and the fact that we used it, we justified it. Yes and I think you know in the history classes you get that two paragraphs in the mushroom cloud picture and it's supposed to wrap everything up in tidy bow. But it doesn't work that way in and you know more that information that is now released after so many years and they look at diaries of the General Stinson and they look at Truman's diaries. You know it wasn't the only answer to just say we had to do that to save all those lives. There's also a Russia was going to be invading Japan and they. Didn't want them to do that. So they were there are other reasons in play actually Japan was discussing possibly surrendering because they were firebombed I mean they hit Khuda they hit all the different areas there before the atomic bombs were dropped. So I think part of my thing was to also let the students know that you know by the time that sea in nineteen thirty, one, Japan invaded Manchuria my mother was born in Nineteen thirty two. So her whole life was involved with them being at war. So by the time nineteen, forty-five rolled around. hitter Oshima was once a military port. However, by that point, all men the young men were out fighting in the Pacific and there were only a few that were left and a lot of them were training. She said her inner school the boys were being trained to make bullets out of bamboo. I mean, they just didn't have those resources anymore So I I think the by being able to explain that as well so that they can understand on the the prewar population of hitter. Shema was three, hundred, fifty, thousand people. Eighty. Thousand people died immediately or within hours of the bomb being dropped. In over the next five years one, hundred, forty to one, hundred, forty, five, thousand people would be dead as a result of their burns other radiation poisoning that they were exposed to. So. I think it's just so important that when the students walk away, they understand that Oh. That didn't just end the war is that always bothers me when people say that we had to do that to end the war? No, you did not. There was not the only factor and men would have died. Yes. But not as many as what they said would die there were not as many people who could keep fighting on. Japan I mean, you had elderly people and children there really weren't as many. So I think it's important that they hear all these different factors to it and not just to say that it ended the war because then you're not putting human being with that. You know it's so much easier. It makes it like video game like they have today I mean. If, you don't make that connection. We're going to be at risk of repeating the same deadly mistakes and and I, think that's what really got me to want to get this book across to want to speak with our future voters. So that they understand that there's more to it than just ending a war. And I and I think one of the unspoken hugely problematic a pieces of well, it was just any more save American lives. It's it's equating. It's it's valuing American lives far greater than Japanese lives, right? Especially old people and children. So Yeah Yeah you know I and in kind of preparing for this episode, I was reviewing some things about that whole incident and and you mentioned it already Kathleen but I realized that. Russia was kind of chomping at the bit to extend its influence and they if they had kind of joined forces with the. US. To you know bring. Japan to it's knees. They're saying they probably would've wanted to divide Japan like Berlin was divided. Yeah and so there was reasons why the US knowing what the ambitions were Russia they said, okay. Well, you know we don't want to ask them for help you know and hey, look we we have this new weapon A. Very very very well, let's get into your as your has. Now finally, you know told you her story. Teller. Tell us what she went through. I mean she's twelve years old house it that she wasn't part of that eighty thousand that were immediately vaporized. Share..

Japan Russia US Japanese government Charlotte North Korea oliver Pacific Oshima Tokyo. Stinson Shema Berlin Truman Kathleen Khuda Iran Manchuria
"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

08:04 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"It. And then it goes and then it turns itself off. And You know we've been using this now for live in Jersey and now for like three or four times of watering. And I literally have forgotten that I did that but. Why is like magic? It doesn't require me remember it just turns itself off, and so I'm thinking Oh. My Gosh, you know how come I didn't think of this sooner and easy to yourself up, but it's like For less than twenty bucks. You know we. Are I, get control of this thing that has to happen watering the vegetable garden. And it's it's not gonNA. See our water bills like skyrocket because of me forgetting in spite of my best intentions. So I don't know if there's anything like that in your life where. You persist in doing it the same way you've done a long time but. Even though maybe you did it. Okay. Fine in the past for whatever reason it's not working out. Fine. Sometimes it's better to think about find another solution that will actually. Remove the problem eliminate it and. You know sometimes, it is simple as as finding little timer Doo. Hickey that you stick between the Faucet in your hose. Other Times it's it's much more complicated, but you know it's easy to get stuck in our ways and even an especially when some of those old ways are causing problems now and again We shouldn't just keep doing it the same old way. Always I. Don't think so and and off to be honest with you I mean part part of me was feeling very prideful. It's like, no, I'm not I'm not losing it. You know I I don't need to have any gadget I I should be able to do this, and now that I've got this gadget a man like how come I didn't do this sooner. So. Anyway this this should be the this next water bills should be the last gigantic one. and. From this earth from this point forward. s just something I don't have to worry about anymore just remember to turn on the time her because they won't turn on itself. I, didn't I didn't WanNA spend the money for one that would turn on itself. I just needed the turn itself off. And I am so grateful to be married to someone. me. For my mistakes. That's that's worth. More than anything money or otherwise and You know just just really really grateful that she has that kind of temperate. Well. It's a time for us to. Get into this conversation that I had recently with Kathleen Birkenshaw. Talk About having to deal with real problems. It's not about water bills. About your whole world. Blowing up and catching on fire. So I. I know you really enjoy this conversation. Oh. It is. The seventy fifth and I hate using this word anniversary of the first week of August of the dropping of two atomic bombs at the end of the war against Japan in world. War. Two and I was contacted recently by one of our podcast listeners who actually wrote a book called the last Cherry Blossom, which is all about it's kind of a fictionalized historical account. If I understand this correctly of of your mother's own experience of being one of the Hibachi, one of the survivors of the atomic bomb but I just want to welcome you Kathleen. Burke Shaw to Birkenshaw gives me to to our podcast because This is a subject that I think we need to talk about just so that this never happens again. So welcome so much to the podcast Paul. Thank you so much Kenneth. Thank you for having me on I'm really excited to talk with you after listening to your podcasts. It's very nice to meet you this way. Well, you know we encourage a very non-asian thing very non-japanese thing which is ask for people to actually take initiative and promote themselves and the things that they do so. Long been paying attention to you know what happened there? Now seventy five years ago and I've even gone to a lecturer of another Hibakusha years ago, but I'm just really fascinated to talk to you about your mom's own experience. So. When are you kind of tell us? In a way of introducing yourself how you came to write this book. kind of finding out about your mom's own story. Sure sure. Well, the book journey really started about ten years ago when my own daughter was in seventh grade and she had come home from school very upset she had said that they just finished the World War Two section an-and she overheard some kids talking about that really cool mushroom cloud picture and she asked if I would go in and talk to them about the people who were under that cloud like her grandmother and I remember going to call my mom because I. needed to ask permission I had never spoken publicly about what she went through. The interesting thing is too is that I didn't even know she was from until I was eleven years old who really Yeah. She always said she was from Tokyo and the only reason I think I found out that years because it was the beginning of August and she had horrible nightmares and she always wake up screaming and I remember that the summer before it was around the same time and I kept asking why was that in? That's when she finally said that she was actually born in the Shema but she lost her family and her home in. At the atomic bombing and she said I can't really talk about it. It's too painful and then she said, please don't tell anyone so. So nothing was said for a long time I remember she still didn't talk about it until I was in high school and I read the book by John Hersey you Shema and that was the first time. I got any inkling of what she might have lived through and I remember just being horrified in in coming out of my room when I was reading it and asking her you know is this what it was like and she just said that it was hell she didn't WanNa talk about it in don't tell your teacher because I really I'm not able to talk about it to the class. So. She really didn't express too much of what happened until I was around thirty I got very ill and I was in the hospital for over a month and so when I came home I needed help take care of myself taking care of my daughter who was four then while my husband worked during the day. So my parents came and my mom would talk a lot about her childhood but then she slowly started to talk about what happened on August six and the days that followed and that was really the first time that she shared that with me. I don't think she may have shared that with me had I not gone ill. I had been diagnosed fire neurological disease, which is Kinda based from some of the radiation exposure that she had for being in the bombing was wondering. If there was a yeah. Yes. Yes. Sadly..

Kathleen Birkenshaw Cherry Blossom Hickey John Hersey Birkenshaw Japan Burke Shaw lecturer Kenneth Tokyo
"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

09:16 min | 4 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Greetings everyone. This is Asian America Again Tong podcast and I'm your host Ken phone. Welcome back to the pod, and this is episode number two, hundred and fifty, four our guest. This first week in August is Kathleen Birkenshaw Kathleen. Happens to be inhabited listener to our podcast, and so already she scored big points. But when she reached out a couple of weeks ago, she said would you know her particular life story. May Have. Extra special significance for the first week in August turns out that. This first week is. The I hate calling Culligan Anniversary marked seventy five years since America dropped the first of two atomic bombs in Japan, I on here or Shema, and then on Nagasaki. and. Kathleen is actually the daughter of someone who was twelve years old in here Shema when that first atomic bomb dropped and she is what is known as he box Ya. Which means that she is a survivor of that terrible Holocaust. That was caused by the dropping of this atomic bomb. So Very. Fascinated and she had. Published several years ago a fictionalized history based on her mom's story that is used at various schools of starting from middle school all the way up to college, and so I definitely was very, very keen on getting her onto the pod and so that. At this particular time in history that we can remember. What was what was? Done. during this. War The end of world, War Two and I think it's important as we hit this marker to to reflect a little bit deeply about just how terrible war is and certainly weapons of war and to able to see this through the lens of not only Kathleen. Mom. But the impact it's had on captain's life including her physical health today I. Think. All very, very important reasons for her to be our guest this week. So after my introduction, I knew you really really going to be fascinated with her story. We hear in ceremony A had years and years of drought and So you know there's there's always been extra special attention paid to how often we water and certainly our water bills. Well, on the last couple of years We actually had a lot of rain and a lot of snow pack in in the mountains north of us, and so kind of drought restriction came off and yet you know it still weren't selling California it's a desert You know we have to be mindful of this now we have. A fairly sizable property I mean it's not fancy, but it sizable it's it's almost one hundred feet wide by one hundred, fifty feet deep, and especially since I retired, I'm the one that's kind of patrolling. All of this square footage. To eradicate. Fill bare spots and to. Plant new things and take out dead things and so on and so forth. Well, several years ago my wife had asked me to install a raised garden at the very back part of our property and This is not visible. From the House you because we we have this refurbished used to be a woodshed, and now it's kind of a studio about five hundred square foot studio so. Things that have been planted back there. Easily are ignored and die because. They. They just don't get enough water. Well so you know last year. Miniature go at planting some vegetables and. Nothing really exciting to share and so this year as spring run I just decided to ignore it. You know I'm not GonNa do anything again enough to do and apparently some of the seeds. That it's build out of some of the Japanese pumpkins these culture. They planted themselves in the soil and so as they started to sprout and grow I felt obligated to I actually have to water them now. and. So several plants in particular are doing really well, I mean some of the vines. Probably about ten twelve feet long now and. We're starting to see some of those Japanese Pumpkins. Here's. The problem. I'm a multitasker when I'm out doing yard work. There for several hours, picking up dog poop Hunt and watering the potted plants and pruning and all myriad kind of things and so I'll turn on the water back there and I just have to make a mental note to make sure to go back and turn it off. And a couple of weeks ago. I turned on the water in a win about doing other things and as I was puttering around the various parts of the yard, I would think of some other projects now I start to. Get very focused on that. And I completely forgot that my water still on. And so several hours later as I was going outside I mean son had already said, it was dark I was going outside with the dogs I think for for them to relieve themselves before they come in for the. So this is like ten, ten, thirty I heard this. Kind of hissing sound. Like What that noises and could be our neighbor's pool whatever enough say, Oh, crap of the water still. So I went back there and they turned it off. And you know almost kind of reverted back to small kids. Don't tell mom. Don't tell that. You know just feeling really stupid but it completely. Just dropped out of my consciousness. But. This is not something that a you're literally this is not something you're literally going to have you're going to have to pay for. I when the water bill comes, you're going to see like what's going on and my wife pays those utility bills. So I decided to let her know the next morning because she had already gone to bed and I said, oh brace yourself for the next water bill because I left the. Hose, running back in our raised guard in there and it was on for several hours and so as just. Now to the major credit of this saint I'm married to. She doesn't hardly ever like we just celebrated thirty nine years of marriage. He she ever. Blows her stack aunt. She she's She counts the pennies and as she pinches them, you know and we're retired so but anyway. I apologized and she didn't blame me and As expected. The water bill This past month was several. Well, let's just say. It was big. Okay and as she paid it you know she she's at Oh you know the water bills and she didn't say and that's because you left the water running she just said just just so you know right so it's like okay. I wish I could take back but I can't. Right. So earlier, this week. I noticed that. The chaplains back there needed some water. So I turned on, turned on the hose and one about all my chores. and. Once. Again, completely got distracted. Forgot to turn it off and. This time I found. I. Heard that sound the next morning as as I was. Out Watering. Grass seedlings. and. I'm like, Oh my God who was on all night. And you know again I I, my wife, we haven't got the bill for that yet So finally. I said I I've got to do something that's not GonNa require me to remember to turn off the water after I turned it on because it's just too big of a property and I've I've got bazillion things going on and yeah I'm sixty five and a half so. You know the gray matter is slowly deteriorating. So I searched on Amazon and I found this probably less than twenty dollars little faucet. Timer. Requires. No battery no electricity, and you basically said it like a a timer that you do on your stove just by turning the dial and I said it for like twelve minutes..

Kathleen Birkenshaw Kathleen Shema Ken phone America Japan California Amazon Nagasaki.
"kathleen" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Women and Crime

"I can't think of what else the case Lot Kathleen Zellner only represents people she believes are innocent i. Believe that Melanie's and I know that's a great question. I would also like to say for this I know Kathleen I did I reached out. I sent her an email just to see if she would be interested in interviewing I haven't heard back remember but I suspect she's busy. Exonerating people left and right quickly before we get to the end here, but I always wondered. What your opinion of do you have? An opinion of Avery in terms of his innocence or guilt is so the fact that Kathleen Zellner took the case made me believe more strongly in his innocence, because I trust her judgment, but I go back and forth you also I. Don't know if you came across the fact that there. There was like a vial of blood from an earlier case. His blood was on file because he had a prior record. Even before the wrongful conviction, and they found that it had been unsealed and punctured I saw that, too, but then they tested the blood, and they couldn't find a preservative, but then someone said wouldn't necessarily show up, so there's a lot of things that could be shady, but could also be nothing also. Also there's something about the jurors like there were two jurors that had relatives that worked for the county in which she had the lawsuit pending like one was like a sheriff's father and someone else, and I. Don't remember that well. The case is such a rabbit hole I don't know and then there was something not long ago. where like an inmate confessed to killing theresa? How back did you hear that one I heard. Heard that, too, but they they didn't give it much credibility. You know usually you can't give those things much credibility, so I go back and forth I think if I had to say, I would say I think he's innocent. Because I think corruption exists, and as much as I would hate to believe, it could exist at this level I think it..

Kathleen Zellner Melanie Avery theresa
"kathleen" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"kathleen" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Can't really show. Can we post you for a few weeks? I broke my hip. You did what? Did I. Mean This is straight finding time for. got. Thanks for clearing this up for us. I'm so I'm so much more comfortable with the situation around be dot net with your explanations really really. Glad End you know. The next thing I wanna get I is like here's how you work with a preview, and so I haven't got anything out. Look, clarify what we said here that we're not giving. We're not. We're not giving up on. V still part of the future. We know we have a lot of using it and we want to give them the option of coming to dot net core, and that is an oxygen. Tank, it may or may not be right for them. But we. And we want to embrace those people that had sharpen vivey shops and not make them translate. Their Levy APPs together dot net courses, one of our scenarios to support so. Rap I love it. Thank you Kathleen. It's great to talk to you always and Richard said. Thanks for clearing things up. It's a lot more sense now. We'll see you next time on dot net rocks..

Kathleen Richard
"kathleen" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen" Discussed on How I Built This

"I mean after matchup of Hartford. who still kind of standoffish right? Because you've just gotten burned really bad I mean were there like trust issues there. No he was great. I was like he felt. I felt to me like a lifeline but it was safe because I could walk away anytime I want. You know. I wasn't bound by any contract or money or anything. I find not trusting people way too to exhausting and it's not the way I want to live my life so I was very very naive and I used to trust blindly now. I still trust everybody but I trust with my eyes. Open all right but now you have to reestablish your brand right as tate. It's the same cookie but you got to reestablish a brand new brand. I had to actually make a better cookie because I had to compete against Kathleen Bake Shop. So there meantime. Those guys are down Virginia with plans to take your brand that you'd spent twenty years building up and really Expanding that to were you did that cause anxiety for you did you think. Oh my God they're gonNa take my name my brand and they're gonna go all over the country people are GonNa think it's me no it because I don't think about what others are doing and I just had to think about what I had to do. And of course my goal was to take them down through goal was to beat them yes to be better. So did you continue on with your previous strategy of baking in the retail shop and baking for wholesale and mainly kind of gourmet shops in in major cities in the US. Yes and when Michael came on board we went through all the products and the products that had the highest margins is the ones we focused on selling so he just kind of really zeroed in on the cookies. You know starting Tate's was about surviving so you know when you're in a survival double mode those things. Those kind of decisions are hard. They just had to be executed. They just have to be done. So where were you guys. I mean. Did you start to expand their distribution. Yeah first of all I had to get. I had to get all of Long Island in New York City back because my whole story was so public. Some stores welcomed with open armed some stores stuck with the Kathleen's brand a lot of stores carried both right and that's how it shook out and then even when I was some vendors I had for twenty years and and when I opened up Tate's they treated me like I was brand new customer. Others were just so helpful and just said okay. I know you uh-huh uh-huh this forty thousand dollars. You know you pay that off when you can and and we're standby you you know it's amazing you know just the difference people it both just amazing so when you re launched the company is Tate. You had wanted to take a break in your life. You knew that was is not gonNA happen anytime soon because all of a sudden you gotta start up again and so were you back at hamster wheel back to those crazy long hours off only for a short time because when I opened tate's then I had a plan and I had a goal. And what was your plan will. What was the goal I? I had to have an exit strategy. My goal is to sell when I was fifty five. So you knew you reconstituted this thing and you relaunched it. There was a time horizon. Yes and you were thinking maybe some local business would put bite or something like that. No I thought I did think bigger than that and I didn't think as big as I went but you know I was going to sell it fifty five so I could retire her. I mean you're still a pretty small shop at this point right it's still forty or so employess When I first open tate's yeah and in those first few years of tastes like annual revenue? I mean I would say.

Tate Long Island Virginia Hartford. US Michael New York City Kathleen
"kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Mean you got Hillary Clinton. Yeah I mean like we pretty much maxed out We madly caffeine's you ever was. We never got. Aw chopped liver who shares maybe a whole nother like avenue for coupling Turner. What's your question? How their hi? My question is Kathleen do you have any memories of working with Ricky Lake Ontario. Mom Yeah Good Pussy. Willow no I I will do the second guy I you know. I think that that's with overdone. Since boring don't he was a good a group. I think the funniest funniest one though sometimes was waterston because he took it all very seriously and he came very earnest. Any any he came over and he said now. Do you think that we might be immortalizing. Glorifying serial killing up DOC. It's a movie John. More specifically that was great Spencer they're from Wisconsin for Alana. What Questions Spencer? Hi Alanna If you could change anything about the series finale abroad city what would you do differently. I honestly wouldn't change a way of the broad city failing. Yeah that was the privilege to end it when we wanted the way we wanted. I would say it ended. I mean you knew it ended before its time but that's the.

Spencer Hillary Clinton caffeine Ricky Lake Ontario Turner Kathleen Willow Wisconsin
"kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Vegas Sue got married Kathleen Kern character had the chance to right the wrongs of her pass. Oh Kathleen. I'm curious if you ever wish you could do the same. I may not be able to create a time warp. I do have a speed round of questions of challenging experiences from your past prior tired acting. What was your worst job my worse up? I was attempt at a Jewish travel agency during Passover season and everyone ruling was talking to me in Yiddish and they were all right What is the most embarrassing thing you've ever been caught hot doing in your trailer? I'm never telling anyone that. Utah The in two thousand twelve on this show. You said that Bill hurt was your her absolute best onscreen kiss. What was your worst onscreen kiss? Burt Reynolds what Phil was Switching channels really it was he sought why he just I rehearse with Michael. Cain yeah I supposed to do with Mike okay good toys yes well McCain got caught on jaws four okay short kept breaking down and so I was pregnant and I had a stop date not right so we got everything we could without him and then finally the producer went and hired and he couldn't kiss. Yes not a good that mustache. Wow Wow what's the dumbest thing you've ever blown a ton of money on his coins. Why would I confess these these? Do you have to worst What's one piece of great advice ice? You regret not taking. I suppose if would be. Don't take these so seriously. Don't take things so seriously. Thank you very much. Second City. Alana's character loves station SUSHI PHONE WIGS and Andy. But there's one thing that fires are up most of all we need so a Lotta as a catalyst store. Here's what I'm going to present various celebrities. Ladies you've worked with you tell us what kind of stone or you think they would be. The I guess yes. Okay what kind of stone or Wood Scarlett.

McCain Kathleen Kern Phil Vegas Sue SUSHI PHONE WIGS Wood Scarlett Burt Reynolds Second City Utah Bill Cain Alana producer Mike Michael Andy
"kathleen" Discussed on Serial Killers

Serial Killers

10:57 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Serial Killers

"The couple fought over Sarah's bedtime to Kathleen who had always been a very regimented person, one of their daughter to sleep at exactly eight thirty pm. This was complicated by Craig's habit of playing with Sarah every night after work, Kathleen felt he was riling her up before bedtime. Kathleen later recalled that Sara was a quote, very loud player. There was lots of screaming and laughing, and they would always be trying to chase each other around and quote after playing with her father, Sarah was nearly impossible to put down to sleep at night in nineteen Ninety-three Sarah was thriving. She had survived for ten and a half months, much longer than her deceased siblings. She was doing well enough that Kathleen successfully lobbied Craig to stop using the sleep apnea monitor. Kathleen was older and better at dealing with her darker moods. She was learning to walk away from the crying baby or to drop her off with a relative when the stress became too great. But Kathleen took to dropping Sarah off with Craig's sister Carol. So frequently that she was spending most of her time away from the baby. When Carol new, it's husband told Kathleen that she was missing out on her daughter's life by pointing are often relatives. Kathleen began to stay home with the girl again. But as nineteen Ninety-three progressed, Kathleen once again, felt overwhelmed by the stresses of motherhood, and Craig began observing signs of Kathleen's dark moods. Kathleen wrote in her diaries that she and Craig were at each other's throats. She was constantly afraid. Craig would leave her. She noticed that he flirted with other women and rejected her advances while she. Was fat with pregnancy weight. She wrote quote, Craig's, roving, I will always be of concern to me, must lose extra weight, or he will be even less in love with me than he is. Now. I know that physical appearance means everything to him and quote, Kathleen resented that the baby ate up all of her time, keeping her away from the gym and the path to repairing her marriage. Kathleen was still just twenty six years old and all of her adult life had been spent with Craig since the falling out with their foster family. Over the wedding, Kathleen had become wrapped up in Craig's family. She relied heavily on his sister Carol for help with the child care and the full bigs spent most of their vacation time with Craig's sisters and brothers to loose Craig would be to lose her entire new family on August twenty. Eighth nineteen ninety three, Kathleen and Craig. Once again fought over Sarah's fussiness an inability to sleep soundly. Her constant crying in the night was taking its toll on Kathleen anxiety and on her relationship with Craig. They needed some time away. So the full bigs brought their little girl to the beach that day Sarah had a cold, but she still enjoyed the waves and the sand. It was a good day out for all of them. But that night Sarah was fussy. She kept Kathleen awake from. Most of the night after they put her to bed hours later at one twenty AM on August twenty. Ninth nineteen Ninety-three Craig was once again awoken in the dead of night by Kathleen screams in what had become a nightmarish routine. Craig found his daughter, Sara cold in her bassinet. Craig notice that Sarah's body was unusually straight her limbs all down by her sides rather than all crooked as they'd usually be. He also noted the time as one twenty AM on August twenty ninth strangely, Kathleen later recorded. One o'clock AM as the time of death in her diary. This discrepancy could simply mean that one of them remembers the time incorrectly or it could mean that Kathleen new Sarah was dead for twenty minutes before alerting. Craig officer. Deborah McDermott responded to the zero zero zero call radioed for backup and took over. The resuscitation efforts for forty minutes before breaking the bad news to the full bigs. Sarah was dead. Sara's. Autopsy showed signs of minor congestion and watery fluid in her lungs. The coroner also noticed tiny abrasions near Sarah's mouth. These symptoms were all consistent with both smothering and SIDS with no other obvious cause of death present in the autopsy, Sarah's death was attributed to SIDS this time, though the police were more wary losing. One child to SIDS was unfortunate, but the full Biggs had now lost three children in a row detective, Stephen Saunders questioned the full Biggs and he was struck by the couple's of this grief and distress at the death of their third child. Craig gave his much information as he could to the detective. But Kathleen was sobbing too hard to answer many of the questions. She said later of that night, the police quote. Sort of came in full force. We were a little intimidated by it and quote, detective Saunders found nothing amiss with the couple since the corner had already diagnosed Sarah with SIDS, the case was closed and the full bigs were given full permission to bury their daughter. One reason for the authorities, initial investigation into Sarah's death was because in the mid nineteen ninety s the medical and law enforcement communities. Attitudes towards SIDS deaths were changing methods for identifying and preventing cid's were being discovered and implemented all over the world. The number of SIDS deaths in the first world countries had dropped drastically and the last several decades and to thirties, began to view multiple SIDS deaths in the same family as highly suspicious earlier in nineteen Ninety-three serve ROY meadow. A British pediatrician testified at trial that Beverley Allitt nurse had smothered four children in her care and that it was statistically impossible for all four deaths to have been caused by SIDS meadows. Famously said that quote, one SIDS case is a tragedy to suspicious and three is murder on. Unless there is proof to the contrary and quote this saying which became known as meadows law was based upon the extreme statistical improbability of SIDS striking multiple children in the same family meadows pointed to forty two cases of SIDS deaths that were later revealed to be homicides saying that quote sits has been used at times as a pathological diagnosis to evade awkward truths and quote meadows. Law was cited by the prosecution in several cases, all over the world in the next decade has caregivers of multiple SIDS cases were convicted. However, it's important to note that metals law was later recognized as nothing more than an unproven assumption. Prosecutors were no longer allowed to cite this assertion in court, but during the time that the full big children were dying. Prosecutors were still applying meadows law to cases where multiple children in one family died of. Sids. After Sarah's death in August of nineteen Ninety-three the full bigs marriage, degraded Craig was the only one still searching for answers. He wanted to know more about what Kathleen had observed the night. Sarah had died, but Kathleen did not want to discuss the tragedy and never spoke to Craig about it. Again in one thousand nine hundred five, two years after Sarah's death, Craig was still not coping well with his grief, but Kathleen was ready to move on with her life. She wrote Craig two page letter of ultimatum. Either he would seek grief counseling or she would leave. This was not the first time she threatened to leave him Craig and Kathleen had separated and reconciled multiple times over the past two years, but Craig could not lift himself out of the fog of grief. So Kathleen moved out, Kathleen foster mother Deirdra helped her rent an apartment and start over without Craig. Kathleen. Noted that ever since their fight over the wedding planning, Deirdre had always been quote, quick to judge and put Craig down with his changing jobs and all that sort of thing, and quote. While Creggan Kathleen were separated. She began to grow closer to Craig's. Other sister, Sherri Sherri brought out the fun side of Kathleen and helped her revert to an easier carefree time before all the tragedies. They went out to bars and clubs together, Sherry got Kathleen into Jenny, Craig, and Kathleen lost a lot of the weight she'd put on in the last few years seeing Kathleen moving on without him finally motivated Craig to seek grief counseling. Kathleen said, quote, he seemed to snap out of its slightly and must have thought my God. She's actually gone. He began calling and visiting Kathleen, they went to couples counseling together by nineteen Ninety-six. They were ready to give the marriage another. Try to help with the fresh start the full Biggs move to hunter valley in the wine country region of New South Wales. They wanted to forget the past. Kathleen didn't tell them all boroughs about her reconcile. Liaisson with Craig, but Deirdra eventually found out through the grapevine. She never forgave Kathleen for it. Kathleen said, quote, my parents pretty much disowned me. Once they discovered that Craig, I hadn't actually truly broken up and deer drill hasn't spoken to be sense and quote, can't leans foster parents moved to a new house and didn't tell Kathleen where they moved, which hurt her deeply. But she blocked out the pain of this loss and tried to forge a new life with Craig, despite all their losses. Everything finally seemed back on track for Kathleen Craig, but tragedy still lurked. And soon the full bigs would experience the untimely death of yet another child. And this time the police wouldn't let it go next week. We'll take a closer look at Laura full big's death and Kathleen's conviction for murder will uncover what five. Finally tipped off the police and earned Kathleen full big her notoriety as one of Australia's. Worst female serial killers. Thanks

Kathleen Craig Creggan Kathleen Sarah SIDS Kathleen foster Sara cold Carol new murder Biggs Beverley Allitt Australia Deborah McDermott Deirdra Sherri Sherri detective Saunders cid officer ROY meadow Laura
"kathleen" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"Crete boundaries around that and then in doing so you're able to protect what's most important to you and keep out everything else and just to give them really practical ways in which this happens because i know that's very broad and adorable in so many ways is think about creating work hours for yourself but maybe it's not even work hours maybe email hours like ours in which you will check an answer emails and outside of those hours maybe you'll look at it if you don't want to draw that boundary but you won't respond i think this is one of the hardest ones for people these days to employ for themselves but it's one that kathleen and i put into place years ago and it allows us to be better people in the whole lot of ways not only are we able to be better at our work because whenever it is time to sit down and replied emails were actually able to focus and give thoughtful and thorough replies but outside of those hours were actually able to spend real time with her our family and friends or with ourselves because we've created a boundary that protects both inside and outside so important of that space how it is that we're going to show up in the world i love sinking about boundaries in terms of fear of missing out because i want to create all the things and i wanna do all of the things but i have chosen to plant rosemary and basil in my garden and i'm gonna do rosemary and basil the best i'm not gonna worry about someone else's flowers that looked pretty over here or someone else's veggie garden because apparently vine bores love my garden like i'm just going to focus on rosemary and basil so that's like a metaphor for me of really just committing to what it is and i'm wanting to create but another thing about boundaries and one of my favorite exercises in the book that we probably need to do ourselves if you've ever worked a day job and if some of your listeners are still in a day job they've probably gotten a handbook from hr that tells them what their workout.

kathleen
"kathleen" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"kathleen" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"Kathleen thinks she may have for you may have i think i bring one into this world of boss maybe so maybe maybe it is delegated to some people earlier than others but the whole idea that is that there's it's threefold it's you can define for yourself who you are and what that means is that you're breaking all experts actions that are put upon you and that's that's something that i feel like is talked about significantly more now than ever before and i totally welcome that conversation i think society and family and you know even ourselves or or media put expectations on each of us and i think boss knows how to look through all of those and really into themselves and who it is if they want to be so a boss knows who it is that they are they also know what it is that they want and that's defined i think by who they are and releasing all of those expectations and getting so clear on what it is that you are here to do what it is that you're here to work for that you you can that you can start making it happen which is that last piece where you see the thing you want and you're gonna take the steps to get there and that is the hardest part as if like defining who you are and what you want is difficult enough you also have to get there and that's the work that we talk about all the time you know do the work be bosses how we end all of our podcast because you have to do the work to get there and someone who can show up and do that work all three of those pieces are the people that we see as being bossed they're the people who who own it and who worked for it and who achieve it and it's not easy is not always fun but it is always worth it on my gosh oh my gosh okay so two things i wanna tease out of this and we can go back and forth so one thing that is extremely hard for everybody to do on some level is to own it.

Kathleen