18 Burst results for "Katherine Dunn"

"katherine dunn" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

09:04 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"The vanishing half probably the biggest book of last year the basic novel last year. I don't think brooke bennett to them. No she's released two hits. I don't think she's in them. She's literary it truly. Is it's like stephen king like ellen hildebrandt you know like james patterson the people who are constantly turning out these books you also have to play the game of being kind of an offer you also have to like play the game right. You also have to kind of like be this personality in a way me this brand or else your book will be louder than you which i think a lot of authors prefer. You're at bennett. Might prefer that her books are louder than her. Like personal brand or whatever. Yeah yeah and the only success that a book write it really wants. Is the opportunity another book right now. Like they don't give shit at the time i just. I think that there are that many literary them's especially ones who are alive and working like the literary them's are dead honey. Like also don't read. It sucks right and like even even just because you're on a bestseller doesn't mean you sold them out like you sold a million copies like well. That's the other trick trick. But yeah i mean you know. It's like people don't read books. It's just hard to be them outside of an industry. That isn't that big to begin. But that's why like little fires everywhere the hulu show kind of reflects back so so so big on the book because it's such a big ego. That book was big. This show is always going to be bigger right there. This story era in the middle of the pandemic and they were talking about. how like. yeah this is a great year for publishing. People are buying a lot of books this year. But they're buying like they're all buying the same books it's not like they're trying new writers there. I like to kill a mockingbird. They're buying like you know like what's the huge book from years ago. Where the crawdads saying. They're buying the same book so it's not like they're even that many contemporary them to choose from and speaking the credits saying can you name. Who wrote that was her name. I don't even know. And i've read that book and i couldn't tell you where the grata delia owens knowing it's a who sorry you've sold one hundred million copies of this book and no one's your is its authors are more behind. Writers are can be more behind the scenes unless they're not you know like unless there not unless they're not but it's very easy for them to remain that's why literary who's that's why literally who is a conversation that you're having with your friends. It's tough halen. She bobby I was just disgusted. With my wife and night tron We both agree on us as a millennial and then an older millennial and the younger millennial and she's older she's Eighty four and ninety one but we both agree that he's then but we also think that he's kind of on the mind net for the younger generation he might be a who Yeah so we'd love to hear your thoughts hashtag grateful for shaina. Hashtag women in the live grudge. Well an eighty four year old and a ninety one year old calling and love to hear it I thought that's how they wow our audience iconic it won't be old. I love it. Okay and trauma on. We talked about old earlier. There is something wrong. there's something wrong with. There's something wrong with this. Beat wrong with this speech. M night shyamalan. Who were them one two three then m night shyamalan who went from film darling to butt of a joke to misunderstood legend. The reason why. I think he's a them is because he really cam continued to make movies. Based on his name synonymous with a certain type of movie that people like to see but it is but it's not like his movies are necessarily good anymore or even critically reviewed or even necessarily that popular always like middling -ly popular middling middling popular. I think he's a workhorse. Though i think he like is a really good record movie. Right sheet fast moving. I think he is a good guy and people like working with them which is why he constantly gets good. Cast right like bad things about single. He's movies are disappointing in many ways. Although i liked split. I never saw the second one but i like i because i love i love unbreakable. Gotta tell you. I love him saying i think he is. His name sells a movie in a very specific way that not a lot of Directors named sell movies like the way. His name sells a movie. And i mean this guy made what is considered by many to be one of the worst movies of all time avatars. Last air vendor is is when the last of all time and then guess what. He's still making movies after that he still making movies right. I mean he makes. He makes a good amount of terrible movies. But i usually happening. That are fun. What movie of his was one of those like a perfect bad good the visit the one with katherine dunn and like the old lady like the kids who go to grandma's house and cheese and it's like don't leave your after night. Nine movie the great. The i saw that movie in theaters. Ice scary oh lady lady scary all lady movie very hansel and gretel lee weird vibes of that movie anyways. Yes i mean he can turn. I mean we've probably probably cost five dollars and ask for three of it. You know three of the five anyway shovel on them and there's something wrong with this each if you want to know what's wrong with this beach will reveal it in the patriots around the patriot. Yeah and then. So you can pay the spoiler. Hi this is caroline. I'm sitting with my friends in brooklyn and we're debating. What is the who is subway line. We think it might be the w dot. Did someone say brooklyn someone. I have an answer. Okay you know what the who he is. Train really is the one that got canceled. The nine the nine doesn't even exist anymore. We're so who. He cancelled it fully off the map. The nine train it's over nine is dead. Okay benign ever existed. Since i lived in new york which is crazy because i wrote the nine in college all the time. Yeah no more always on the nine was it on the one-two-three line. Yeah was the one two three nine which is crazy. Rabid one. Two three nine was read. It was read. Where did it stop. Was it express no quite local okay. It was quite little. I think the who he is trained is the answer. This is not the w. I think the answer is clear. It's fucking shuttle. It's the shuttle shops will. There are any shuttle ray and nobody knows it. And the s. There are two shuttles though will end the tea which i think is what makes it so confusing. The tea is pretty. Who too i was gonna say the z. Is the who he is because the is like every time you see the z. It's z. no. I think you're right the stephanie mills. It's the s. And the tea which i've never even heard of existing. Have you ever taken the t-. I've never taken the t. It's the new one. They just built the second avenue shuttle ryan right. They just built which is what they would. They just spent a good jillion dollars on building. I gotta go right it. I guess. I guess i gotta get on the two. I don't take too but anyways the s. Which is very useful. But for some reason like google has the most random i mean shuttle in brooklyn shuttle in manhattan is pretty vami because it goes from times square. But they're both s. I think that's what it goes from time square to grand central station. It just goes back and forth from times grants station right. It's literally the airtran of manhattan brooklyn s though is one of my favorite trains. Which again will show you that. Who them not a valiant the s. is the who he is train and it's the best train. No i understand. But i just but i do think it's who because it's like some people. Don't even know that trainings this. So it's a lifeline. It's a crucial train. I love bs. If you never go take the it's beautiful train. We tell them where to take the us to pick it up at franklin take it all the way prospect park we're done here are ip to the nine train. I can't believe it was one two three nine. That is the most ridiculous thing i've ever heard. We will see you next tuesday but at the representative who weekly. Keep calling it. Six one nine who them to leave questions. Comments and concerns supports on puttering on comes slash weekly for bonus episodes and extra content and weekend. Bye.

brooke bennett ellen hildebrandt delia owens shyamalan james patterson stephen king katherine dunn shaina bennett hulu brooklyn bobby grandma patriots caroline stephanie mills manhattan new york grand central station
"katherine dunn" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"A bunch of new directives coming out of the Biden White House. And if you read him I mean, really read him, not just the subject line in the first paragraph, You realize pretty quickly. They are mostly instructions for various federal agencies to do specific things change policy research, an issue come up with a strategy or Looking at it another way. The president's creating a pretty long to do list for a federal bureaucracy that, according to the experts, is kind of low on staff marketplace to Kimberly Adams explains what that might mean. The United States is a little weird compared to other developed countries in terms of how we hand over control of the government even before the challenging to put it mildly transition we had this year. We do this odd thing of basically lopping off the top of the pyramid of our senior employees across the federal government. And asking presidents to make roughly 4000 political appointments. Katherine Dunn Tempus is a senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center, and of the 4000 roughly 1300 or so require Senate confirmation, so that's an arduous task. Especially if the opposing party in the Senate decides to slow things down. Paul Light is a professor of public service at N Y u and says Even the appointments that don't require Senate approval may take a while. She got background reviews. You got clearances. You got hearings. You've got litmus tests, you name it. Additionally says light former President Trump's efforts to downsize the federal bureaucracy mean agencies have fewer people in career civil service rules to do the work. In the meantime, David Lewis teaches political science at Vanderbilt University and says all this has policy implications when there are vacancies at the top of these administrative agencies. That leads to delay in rollout. Lewis says One of the challenges for the Biden administration is not just coming up with new policies but also coming up with.

Senate Katherine Dunn Tempus Biden White House David Lewis President Trump Biden Paul Light president Vanderbilt University United States Kimberly Adams senior fellow University of Virginia Miller Center professor
"katherine dunn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"White House. And if you read them I mean, really read him, not just the subject line in the first paragraph. You realize pretty quickly. They are mostly instructions for various federal agencies to do specific things change policy research, an issue come up with a strategy or looking at it another way. President's creating a pretty long to do list for a federal bureaucracy that, according to the experts, is kind of low on staff marketplace to Kimberly Adams explains what that might mean. The United States is a little weird compared to other developed countries in terms of how we hand over control of the government even before the challenging to put it mildly transition we had this year. We do this odd thing of basically lopping off the top of the pyramid of our senior employees across the federal government. And asking presidents to make roughly 4000 political appointments. Katherine Dunn Tempus is a senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center, and of the 4000 roughly 1300 or so requires Senate confirmation. So that's an arduous task, especially if the opposing party in the Senate decides to slow things down. Paul Light is a professor of public service at N. Y U And says Even the appointments that don't require Senate approval may take a while because you got background reviews. You got clearances. You got hearings. You got litmus tests, you name it. Additionally says Light. Former President Trump's efforts to downsize the federal bureaucracy mean agencies have fewer people in career civil service rules to do the work In the meantime, David Lewis teaches political science at Vanderbilt University and says all this has policy implications when there are vacancies at the top of these administrative agencies that leads to delay n roll out. Lewis says One of the challenges for the Biden administration is not just coming up with new policies but also coming up with enough people to implement them in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. One of the big problems with the vaccine rollout, even apart from manufacturing and the supply chain and the just overwhelming demand. Is what's known as the last mile in e commerce. It's literally the last mile all the stuff that has to happen just before that package lands on your doorstep. In the vaccine realm. It's the part just before the needle gets jabbed in your arm gently. Of course, the logistics are unbelievably difficult and nobody is really happy with how things have been going so far, and big companies Amazon and Wal Mart, Starbucks and Honeywell among them. Are stepping up to help marketplaces. Mariel Cigar has that one. The Trump administration left the vaccine rollout for the most part to state and local governments. So right now it's literally the Wild West and on a gurney teaches operations management at U Mass. Amherst..

Senate Kimberly Adams Paul Light President David Lewis Katherine Dunn Tempus White House Mariel Cigar United States University of Virginia senior fellow Trump Vanderbilt University Washington U Mass Biden Amazon Miller Center
"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A bunch as Sudeep in Heather and I were talking about a bunch of new directives coming out of the Biden White House. And if you read him I mean, really read him, not just the subject line in the first paragraph, You realize pretty quickly. They are mostly instructions for various federal agencies to do specific things change policy research, an issue come up with a strategy or Looking at it another way. The president's creating a pretty long to do list for a federal bureaucracy that, according to the experts, is kind of low on staff marketplace to Kimberly Adams explains what that might mean. The United States is a little weird compared to other developed countries in terms of how we hand over control of the government even before the challenging to put it mildly transition we had this year. We do this odd thing of basically lopping off the top of the pyramid of our senior employees across the federal government. And asking presidents to make roughly 4000 political appointments. Katherine Dunn Tempus is a senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center, and of the 4000 roughly 1300 or so require Senate confirmation, so that's an arduous task. Especially if the opposing party in the Senate decides to slow things down. Paul Light is a professor of public service at N Y u and says Even the appointments that don't require Senate approval may take a while. She got background reviews. You got clearances. You got hearings. You got litmus tests, you name it. Additionally says light former President Trump's efforts to downsize the federal bureaucracy mean agencies have fewer people in career civil service rules to do the work. In the meantime, David Lewis teaches political science at Vanderbilt University and says all this has policy implications when there are vacancies at the top of these administrative agencies. That leads to delay in rollout. Lewis says One of the challenges for the Biden administration is not just coming up with new policies but also coming up with enough people to implement them. In Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace, one of the big problems with the vaccine rollout, even apart from manufacturing and the supply chain and the just overwhelming demand. Is what's known as the last mile in e commerce. It's literally the last mile all the stuff that has to happen just before that package lands on your doorstep in the vaccine realm. It's the part just before the needle gets jabbed into your arm gently. Of course, the logistics are unbelievably difficult and nobody is really happy with how things have been going so far, and big companies Amazon and Wal Mart, Starbucks and honey Wall among them. Are stepping up to help marketplaces. Marielle Segarra has that one. The Trump Administration left the vaccine rollout for the most part to state and local governments. So right now it's literally the Wild West and on a gurney teaches operations.

Senate Sudeep Kimberly Adams Katherine Dunn Tempus David Lewis Biden White House President Trump Trump Administration Marielle Segarra United States Paul Light president University of Virginia Biden Vanderbilt University Washington senior fellow Heather Amazon
"katherine dunn" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on KCRW

"Of new directives coming out of the Biden White House. And if you read him I mean, really read him, not just the subject line in the first paragraph, You realize pretty quickly. They are mostly instructions for various federal agencies to do specific things change policy research, an issue come up with a strategy or Looking at it another way. The president's creating a pretty long to do list for a federal bureaucracy that, according to the experts, is kind of low on staff marketplace to Kimberly Adams explains what that might mean. The United States is a little weird compared to other developed countries in terms of how we hand over control of the government even before the challenging to put it mildly transition we had this year. We do this odd thing of basically lopping off the top of the pyramid of our senior employees across the federal government. And asking presidents to make roughly 4000 political appointments. Katherine Dunn Tempus is a senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center, and of the 4000 roughly 1300 or so requires Senate confirmation. So that's an arduous task, especially if the opposing party in the Senate decides to slow things down. Paul Light is a professor of public service at N. Y U And says Even the appointments that don't require Senate approval may take a while. She got background reviews. You got clearances. You got hearings. You've got litmus tests, you name it. Additionally says Light. Former President Trump's efforts to downsize the federal bureaucracy mean agencies have fewer people in career civil service rules to do the work In the meantime, David Lewis teaches political science at Vanderbilt University and says all this has policy implications when there are vacancies at the top of these administrative agencies that leads to delay in rollout. Lewis says One of the challenges for the Biden administration is not just coming up with new policies but also coming up with enough people to implement.

Senate Katherine Dunn Tempus Biden White House president Paul Light David Lewis Biden United States Kimberly Adams University of Virginia Vanderbilt University senior fellow Trump Miller Center professor
"katherine dunn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is all things considered. I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro as President elect Joe Biden crafts his first Cabinet. Many of the people he has chosen have something in common. The 13 he's named so far, nine served in the Obama administration when Biden was vice president and on his team of White House advisers. Many others have Obama White House experience on their resumes to joining us to talk about this is NPR. White House correspondent Frank Ordonez. Hi, Franco. Hey, all right. A couple new names today confirmed that this is a real trend. Tell us about these latest announcements. Yeah, I did surprise people today with two of these pics. They were people who were not in the rumor mill for these jobs. The first is Denis McDonough, the former chief of staff for President Obama. He will be nominated for Veterans affairs. He was a close adviser to Obama during some of his key foreign policy decisions. Now the second is Susan Rice, Biden picked her to lead the domestic Policy Council at the White House. Rights actually is also closely tied to Obama's foreign policy. She was the national security advisor for Obama and earlier was his ambassador to the United Nations. So it's kind of surprising that she was picked for this domestic role and buy and formally announced that Tom Vilsack will be his agriculture secretary named to be his agricultural secretary. He was actually Obama's agricultural secretary for eight years of the administration. Now, there shouldn't be that surprising since Biden was Obama's vice president, but how unusual is it to draw from the same well in the new administration four years later? Right, You know, Historically speaking, it's not that unusual. I did talk to Katherine Dunn Tempus, who has studied administrations back to President Reagan. She's with the University of Virginia's Miller Center. And she says traditionally the best source of employees is from previous administrations, because, frankly, they know the ropes. And she also says that this bunch here is coming back to a completely different situation than their first go around. What is the status quo? We're certainly not in an era right now where it's status quo. We have a pandemic on our hands. The economy is faltering. We have really high racial tension in our country. I don't think it was like that in 2000 and eight But there is something that has changed and that is the demand from progressives. And let's talk about that. Because the president elect has said he plans to assemble the most diverse Cabinet in U. S history. He's been under a lot of pressure to make good on that promise. Is he getting pushback on the fact that so many of these people are from the Obama administration? Yeah, There has been a lot of pressure and you know, I talked to someone who called this Obama 3.0. They're concerned that this new administration is too wedded to the same people and progressives. They've been disappointed as well. Cori Bush. She's an incoming freshmen in Congress from Missouri. She told reporters today. That cabin the Cabinet so far is a missed opportunity for fresh faces. We have some amazing people that are doing wonderful working this all across the country and bring some of those things that they've been working on in their organizations in their communities in their business. Um Of this place because we have to do a lot of Ah, lot of work. We weren't in the greatest place them when before Donald Trump took office. Yeah, you know, in the Biden team? Well, they're very aware of the criticism as well. And they're pushing back transition spokesperson Sean Slavitt told me that the president elect Biden is picking people who are quote Crisis tested and experienced and who know how to use the tools of government to advance his agenda. Well, how far along is Biden In this process? Many nominations left to go well. Most of the top White House positions are now filled. There are about 10 Cabinet positions left. The biggest portfolio, of course, is attorney general. And then there are the positions associated with climate. Talking about interior. The P A energy And we'll see how many more of these remaining positions have ties to Obama. NPR White House correspondent Franco or don't? Yes, thanks. Thank you. For more than 50 years. The NC Double A has imposed academic rules to make sure college athletes are not just athletes. And it has generated plenty of controversy. Critics claim the academic standard and the penalties for not meeting them discriminate against black athletes and historically black colleges and universities. Today, Lawyers filed a class action civil rights lawsuit demanding the NC double A's current system, called the Academic Performance Program be thrown out. NPR's Tom Goldman reports. The academic Performance program, a PP requires college teams to hit certain academic benchmarks, miss them and your team's punishment can range from having practice time cut. To a ban on postseason play. The benchmarks are based on team members grades eligibility, whether they're graduating or staying in school, and they put historically black colleges and universities HBC use at a disadvantage because, says Attorney Beth Fagan, part of HBC use mission has always been to enroll low income, first generation and at risk students. And so it's VCU's are already starting at lower graduation Successful Ates lower academic progress rates, and yet they're being held to the same benchmarks as predominantly white institutions who don't have the mission that they do, and the incidentally should be supporting the mission of HBC use, not penalizing them for it. The discrimination lawsuit, Fagan and other attorneys filed today in federal District Court zeroes in on those penalties. A decade's worth that Fagan says Excuse dramatically toward HBC use. Well, only 6.5% of division. One schools are HBC Use 72% of the teams that have been banned from postseason competition or HBC use the postseason bands on those 114 hbcu teens meant less money for schools that aren't rich to start with. Meant college athletes lives were.

President Obama Joe Biden Obama administration Cabinet President NPR White House White House correspondent vice president HBC Franco Beth Fagan President Reagan attorney secretary Denis McDonough Tom Vilsack Ailsa Chang
"katherine dunn" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on KCRW

"By Goetzman Group. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro as President elect Joe Biden crafts his first Cabinet. Many of the people he has chosen have something in common. The 13 he's named so far, nine served in the Obama administration when Biden was vice president and on his team of White House advisers. Many others have Obama White House experience on their resumes to joining us to talk about this is NPR. White House correspondent Frank Ordonez. Hi, Franco. Hey, all right. Couple. New names today confirmed that this is a real trend. Tell us about these latest announcements. Yeah, but I did surprise people today with two of these pics. They were people who were not in the rumor mill for these jobs. The first is Denis McDonough, the former chief of staff for President Obama. He will be nominated for veterans affairs. He was a close adviser to Obama during some of his key foreign policy decisions. Now. The second is Susan Rice. Biden picked her to lead the domestic policy council at the White House. Rice actually has also closely tied to Obama's foreign policy. She was the national security advisor for Obama and earlier was his ambassador to the United Nations. So it's kind of surprising that she was picked for this domestic role and buy and formally announced that Tom Vilsack will be His agriculture secretary named to be his agricultural secretary. He was actually Obama's agricultural secretary for eight years of the administration. Now, there shouldn't be that surprising since Biden was Obama's vice president, but how unusual is it to draw from the same well in the new administration four years later? Right, You know, Historically speaking, it's not that unusual. I did talk to Katherine Dunn Tempus, who has studied administrations back to President Reagan. She's with the University of Virginia's Miller Center. And she says traditionally the best source of employees is from previous administrations, because, frankly, they know the ropes. And she also says that this bunch here is coming back to a completely different situation than their first go around. What is the status quo? We're certainly got in an era right now where it's status quo. We have a pandemic on our hands. The economy is faltering. We have really high racial tension in our country. I don't think it was like that in 2000 and eight But there is something that has changed and that is the demand from progressives. And let's talk about that. Because the president elect has said he plans to assemble the most diverse Cabinet in U. S history. He's been under a lot of pressure to make good on that promise. Is he getting pushback on the fact that so many of these people are from the Obama administration? Yeah, There has been a lot of pressure and you know, I talked to someone who called this Obama 3.0. They're concerned that this new administration is too wedded to the same people and progressives. They've been disappointed as well. Cori Bush. She's an incoming freshmen in Congress from Missouri. She told reporters today. That cabin the Cabinet so far is a missed opportunity for fresh faces. We have some amazing people that are doing wonderful work in this all across the country and bring some of those things that they've been working on in their organizations in their communities in their business. Um Of this place because we have to do a lot of Ah lot of word. We weren't in the greatest place them when before Donald Trump took office. Yeah, you know, in the Biden team? Well, they're very aware of the criticism as well. And they're pushing back transition spokesperson Sean Slavitt told me that the president elect Biden is picking people who are quote crisis tested and experienced. And who know how to use the tools of government to advance his agenda. Well, how far along is Biden. In this process, many nominations left to go well. Most of the top White house positions are now filled. There are about 10 Cabinet positions left. The biggest portfolio, of course, is attorney general. And then there are the positions associated with climate. Talking about interior. The P A energy And we'll see how many more of these remaining positions have ties to Obama. NPR. White House correspondent Franco Or don't? Yes, Thanks. Thank you. For more than 50 years. The NC double A has imposed academic rules to make sure college athletes are not just athletes, and it has generated plenty of controversy. Critics claim the academic standard and the penalties for not meeting them discriminate against black athletes and historically black colleges and universities. Today, Lawyers filed a class action civil rights lawsuit demanding the NC double A's current system, called the Academic Performance Program be thrown out. NPR's Tom Goldman reports. The academic Performance program, a PP requires college teams to hit certain academic benchmarks, miss them and your team's punishment can range from having practice time cut. To a ban on postseason play. The benchmarks are based on team members grades eligibility, whether they're graduating or staying in school, and they put historically black colleges and universities HBC use at a disadvantage because, says Attorney Beth Fagan, part of HBC use mission has always been to enroll low income, first generation and at risk students. And so it's VCU's are already starting at lower graduation Successful Ates lower academic progress rates, and yet they're being held to the same benchmarks as predominantly white institutions who don't have the mission that they do and the NC double. I should be supporting the mission of HBC use, not penalizing them for it. The discrimination lawsuit, Fagan and other attorneys filed today in federal District Court zeroes in on those penalties. A decade's worth that Fagan says excuse dramatically toward HBC use while only 6.5% of division One schools are HBC Use 72% of the teams that have been banned from postseason competition or HBC use the postseason bands on those 114 hbcu teens meant less money for schools that aren't rich to start with. And it meant college athletes.

President Obama Joe Biden Obama administration Cabinet President White House correspondent vice president NPR HBC White House Susan Rice Franco Or President Reagan Beth Fagan attorney secretary
"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All things considered. I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro as President elect Joe Biden crafts his first Cabinet. Many of the people he has chosen have something in common. The 13 he's named so far, nine served in the Obama administration when Biden was vice president and on his team of White House advisers. Many others have Obama White House experience on their resumes to joining us to talk about this is NPR. White House correspondent Frank Ordonez. Hi, Franco. Hey, all right. A couple new names today confirmed that this is a real trend. Tell us about these latest announcements. Yeah, but I did surprise people today with two of these pics. They were people who were not in the rumor mill for these jobs. The first is Denis McDonough, the former chief of staff for President Obama. He will be nominated for veterans affairs. He was a close adviser to Obama during some of his key foreign policy decisions. Now. The second is Susan Rice. Biden picked her to lead the domestic policy council at the White House. Rice actually has also closely tied to Obama's foreign policy. She was the national security advisor for Obama and earlier was his ambassador to the United Nations. So it's kind of surprising that she was picked for this domestic role and buy and formally announced that Tom Vilsack will be His agriculture secretary named to be his agricultural secretary. He was actually Obama's agricultural secretary for eight years of the administration. Now, there shouldn't be that surprising since Biden was Obama's vice president, but how unusual is it to draw from the same well in the new administration four years later? Right, You know, Historically speaking, it's not that unusual. I did talk to Katherine Dunn Tempus, who has studied administrations back to President Reagan. She's with the University of Virginia's Miller Center. And she says traditionally the best source of employees is from previous administrations, because, frankly, they know the ropes. And she also says that this bunch here is coming back to a completely different situation than their first go around. What is the status quo? We're certainly done in an era right now where it's status quo. We have a pandemic on our hands. The economy is faltering. We have really high racial tension in our country. I don't think it was like that in 2000 and eight But there is something that has changed and that is the demand from progressives. And let's talk about that. Because the president elect has said he plans to assemble the most diverse Cabinet in U. S history. He's been under a lot of pressure to make good on that promise. Is he getting pushback on the fact that so many of these people are from the Obama administration? Yeah, There has been a lot of pressure and you know, I talked to someone who called this Obama 3.0. They're concerned that this new administration is too wedded to the same people and progressives. They've been disappointed as well. Cori Bush. She's an incoming freshmen in Congress from Missouri. She told reporters today. That cab the Cabinet so far is a missed opportunity for fresh faces. We have some amazing people that are doing wonderful work in this all across the country and bring some of those things that they've been working on in their organizations in their communities in their business. Um This place because we have to do a lot of Ah, lot of work. We weren't in the greatest place them when before Donald Trump took office. Yeah, you know, in the Biden team? Well, they're very aware of the criticism as well. And they're pushing back transition spokesperson Sean Slavitt told me that the president elect Biden is picking people who are quote crisis tested and experienced. And who know how to use the tools of government to advance his agenda. Well, how far along is Biden In this process, many nominations left to go. Well, most of the top White House positions are now filled. There are about 10 Cabinet positions left. The biggest portfolio, of course, is attorney general. And then there are the positions associated with climate. Talking about interior. The P A energy And we'll see how many more of these remaining positions have ties to Obama. NPR White House correspondent Franco Ordonez. Thanks. Thank you. For more than 50 years. The NC double A has imposed academic rules to make sure college athletes are not just athletes, and it has generated plenty of controversy. Critics claim the academic standard and the penalties for not meeting them discriminate against black athletes and historically black colleges and universities. Today, Lawyers filed a class action civil rights lawsuit demanding the NC double A's current system, called the Academic Performance Program be thrown out. NPR's Tom Goldman reports. The Economic Performance program, a PP requires college teams to hit certain academic benchmarks, miss them and your team's punishment can range from having practice time cut. To a ban on postseason play. The benchmarks are based on team members grades eligibility, whether they're graduating or staying in school, and they put historically black colleges and universities HBC use at a disadvantage because, says Attorney Beth Fagan, part of HBC use mission has always been to enroll low income, first generation and at risk students. And so it's VCU's are already starting at lower graduation Successful Ates lower academic progress rates, and yet they're being held to the same benchmarks as predominantly white institutions who don't have the mission that they do, and the incidentally should be supporting the mission of HBC use, not penalizing them for it. The discrimination lawsuit, Fagan and other attorneys filed today in federal District Court zeroes in on those penalties. A decade's worth that Fagan says excuse dramatically toward HBC use while only 6.5% of division One schools are HBC Use 72% of the teams that have been banned from postseason competition or HBC use the postseason bands on those 114 hbcu teens meant less money for schools that aren't rich to start with. And it meant college athletes.

President Obama Joe Biden Obama administration Cabinet President NPR White House White House correspondent vice president HBC Franco Ordonez secretary President Reagan Beth Fagan attorney Susan Rice Denis McDonough Frank Ordonez
"katherine dunn" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on KCRW

"You're slow from Vineyard Avenue right now. Not 61 degrees in Long Beach. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro as President elect Joe Biden crafts his first Cabinet. Many of the people he has chosen have something in common. The 13 he's named so far, nine served in the Obama administration when Biden was vice president and on his team of White House advisers. Many others have Obama White House experience on their resumes to joining us to talk about this is NPR. White House correspondent Frank Ordonez. Hi, Franco. Hey, all right. A couple new names today confirmed that this is a real trend. Tell us about these latest announcements. Yeah, but I did surprise people today with two of these pics. They were people who were not in the rumor mill for these jobs. The first is Denis McDonough, the former chief of staff for President Obama. He will be nominated for veterans affairs. He was a close adviser to Obama during some of his key foreign policy decisions. Now. The second is Susan Rice. Biden picked her to lead the domestic policy council at the White House. Rice actually has also closely tied to Obama's foreign policy. She was the national security advisor for Obama and earlier was his ambassador to the United Nations. So it's kind of surprising that she was picked for this domestic role and buy and formally announced that Tom Vilsack will be His agriculture secretary named to be his agricultural secretary. He was actually Obama's agricultural secretary for eight years of the administration. Now, there shouldn't be that surprising since Biden was Obama's vice president, but how unusual is it to draw from the same well in the new administration four years later? Right, You know, Historically speaking, it's not that unusual. I did talk to Katherine Dunn Tempus, who has studied administrations back to President Reagan. She's with the University of Virginia's Miller Center. And she says traditionally the best source of employees is from previous administrations, because, frankly, they know the ropes. And she also says that this bunch here is coming back to a completely different situation than their first go around. What is the status quo? We're certainly got in an era right now where it's status quo. We have a pandemic on our hands. The economy is faltering. We have really high racial tension in our country. I don't think it was like that in 2009. But there is something that has changed and that is the demand from progressives. And let's talk about that. Because the president elect has said he plans to assemble the most diverse Cabinet in U. S history. He's been under a lot of pressure to make good on that promise. Is he getting pushback on the fact that so many of these people are from the Obama administration? Yeah, There has been a lot of pressure and you know, I talked to someone who called this Obama 3.0. They're concerned that this new administration is too wedded to the same people and progressives. They've been disappointed as well. Cori Bush. She's an incoming freshmen in Congress from Missouri. She told reporters today. That cabin the Cabinet so far is a missed opportunity for fresh faces. We have some amazing people that are doing wonderful working this all across the country and bring some of those things that they've been working on in their organizations in their communities in their business. Um Of this place because we have to do a lot of Ah lot of word. We weren't in the greatest place them when before Donald Trump took office. Yeah, you know, in the Biden team? Well, they're very aware of the criticism as well. And they're pushing back transition spokesperson Sean Slavitt told me that the president elect Biden is picking people who are quote crisis tested and experienced. And who know how to use the tools of government to advance his agenda? Well, how far along is Biden In this process? Many nominations left to go well. Most of the top White House positions are now filled. There are about 10 Cabinet positions, laughed. The biggest portfolio, of course, is attorney general. And then there are the positions associated with climate. Talking about interior. The P A energy And we'll see how many more of these remaining positions have ties to Obama. NPR. White House correspondent Franco Or don't? Yes, Thanks. Thank you. For more than 50 years. The NC double A has imposed academic rules to make sure college athletes are not just athletes, and it has generated plenty of controversy. Critics claim the academic standard and the penalties for not meeting them. Discriminate against black athletes and historically black colleges and universities. Today, lawyers filed a class action civil rights lawsuit demanding the NC double A's current system, called the Academic Performance Program be thrown out. NPR's Tom Goldman reports. The academic Performance program, a PP requires college teams to hit certain academic benchmarks, miss them and your team's punishment can range from having practice time cut. To a ban on postseason play. The benchmarks are based on team members grades eligibility, whether they're graduating or staying in school, and they put historically black colleges and universities HBC use at a disadvantage because, says Attorney Beth Fagan, part of HBC use mission has always been to enroll low income, first generation and at risk students. And so it's VCU's are already starting at lower graduation Successful Ates lower academic progress rates, And yet they're being held to the same benchmarks as predominantly white institutions who don't have the mission that they do, and the NC double A should be supporting the mission of HBC use, not penalizing them for it. The discrimination lawsuit, Fagan and other attorneys filed today in federal District Court zeroes in on those penalties. A decade's worth that Fagan says excuse dramatically toward HBC use while only 6.5% of division One schools are HBC Use 72% of the teams that have been banned from postseason competition or HBC use the postseason bands on those 114 hbcu teens meant less money for schools that aren't rich to start with. And it meant college athletes lives.

President Obama Joe Biden Obama administration Cabinet NPR President White House White House correspondent vice president HBC secretary Franco Or President Reagan Beth Fagan attorney Susan Rice Long Beach
"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro as President elect Joe Biden crafts his first Cabinet. Many of the people he has chosen have something in common. The 13 he's named so far, nine served in the Obama administration when Biden was vice president and on his team of White House advisers. Many others have Obama White House experience on their resumes to joining us to talk about this is NPR. White House correspondent Frank Ordonez. Hi, Franco. Hey, all right. A couple new names today confirmed that this is a real trend. Tell us about these latest announcements. Yeah, but I did surprise people today with two of these pics. They were people who were not in the rumor mill for these jobs. The first is Denis McDonough, the former chief of staff for President Obama. He will be nominated for veterans affairs. He was a close adviser to Obama during some of his key foreign policy decisions. Now the second is Susan Rice, Biden picked her to lead the domestic Policy Council at the White House. Rice actually has also closely tied to Obama's foreign policy. She was the national security advisor for Obama and earlier was his ambassador to the United Nations. So it's kind of surprising that she was picked for this domestic role and buy and formally announced that Tom Vilsack will be his agriculture secretary named to be his agricultural secretary. He was actually Obama's agricultural secretary. For eight years of the administration. Now, there shouldn't be that surprising since Biden was Obama's vice president, but how unusual is it to draw from the same well in the new administration four years later? Right, You know, Historically speaking, it's not that unusual. I did talk to Katherine Dunn Tempus, who has studied administrations back to President Reagan. She's with the University of Virginia's Miller Center. And she says traditionally the best source of employees is from previous administrations, because, frankly, they know the ropes. And she also says that this bunch here is coming back to a completely different situation than their first go around. What is the status quo? We're certainly not in an era right now where it's status quo. We have a pandemic on our hands. The economy is faltering. We have really high racial tension in our country. I don't think it was like that in 2009. But there is something that has changed and that is the demand from progressives. And let's talk about that. Because the president elect has said he plans to assemble the most diverse Cabinet in U. S history. He's been under a lot of pressure to make good on that promise. Is he getting pushback on the fact that so many of these people are from the Obama administration? Yeah, There has been a lot of pressure and you know, I talked to someone who called this Obama 3.0. They're concerned that this new administration is too wedded to the same people and progressives. They've been disappointed as well. Cori Bush. She's an incoming freshmen in Congress from Missouri. She told reporters today. That cab the Cabinet so far is a missed opportunity for fresh faces. We have some amazing people that are doing wonderful working this all across the country and bring some of those things that they've been working on in their organizations in their communities in their business. Um This place because we have to do a lot of Ah, lot of work. We weren't in the greatest place when before Donald Trump took office. Yeah, you know, in the Biden team? Well, they're very aware of the criticism as well. And they're pushing back transition spokesperson Sean Slavitt told me that the president elect Biden is picking people who are quote crisis tested and experienced. And who know how to use the tools of government to advance his agenda? Well, how far along is Biden In this process? Many nominations left to go well. Most of the top White House positions are now filled. There are about 10 Cabinet positions left. The biggest portfolio, of course, is attorney general. And then there are the positions associated with climate. Talking about interior. The P A energy And we'll see how many more of these remaining positions have ties to Obama. NPR. White House correspondent Franco Or don't? Yes, Thanks. Thank you. For more than 50 years. The NC double A has imposed academic rules to make sure college athletes are not just athletes, and it has generated plenty of controversy. Critics claim the academic standard and the penalties for not meeting them. Discriminate against black athletes and historically black colleges and universities. Today, lawyers filed a class action civil rights lawsuit demanding the NC double A's current system, called the Academic Performance Program be thrown out. NPR's Tom Goldman reports The Economic Performance program, a PP requires college teams to hit certain academic benchmarks. Missed them, and your team's punishment can range from having practice time cut to a ban on postseason play. The benchmarks are based on team members grades eligibility, whether they're graduating or staying in school, and they put historically black colleges and universities HBC use at a disadvantage because, says Attorney Beth Fagan Part of HBC use mission has always been to enroll low income, first generation and at risk students, and so it VCU's are already starting at lower graduation. Success rates, lower academic progress rates, and yet they're being held to the same benchmarks as predominantly white institutions who don't have the mission that they do, and the NC double A should be supporting the mission of HBC use, not penalizing them for it. The discrimination lawsuit. Fagan and other attorneys filed today in federal District Court zeroes in on those penalties. A decade's worth that Fagan says excuse dramatically toward HBC use. While only 6.5% of Division One schools are HBC use. 72% of the teams that have been banned from postseason competition on HBC use the postseason bands on those 114 hbcu teens meant less money for schools that aren't rich.

President Obama Joe Biden Obama administration Cabinet NPR President White House correspondent White House vice president HBC Franco Or President Reagan Beth Fagan attorney secretary Denis McDonough Susan Rice Tom Vilsack
"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy, and that has long term implications. And we are already at important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. The pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How much can the Biden incoming bided administration do Catherine with the outgoing administration, sort of informally? In other words? What's stopping, say folks from calling up Anthony Fauci and saying, Can you kind of run us through what's going on over there or You know other other folks in within the administration to at least have Get a download. That's not official but is still you know, going to give them some information, so I don't think there's anything that is stopping. The current political appointees and the current civil servant servants from reaching out to some extent to the Biden people. I think the biggest issue is that the Biden people cannot have access to top secret and classified material. And I think the levels of classifications in this country are such that often. Things that are really mundane are classified. So I suspect that that means they don't have access to very much material all because so much of it in our system is classified. And that's a big problem. Thea other thing is that the transitions because of the law, the agencies are required early in January February to start to put together. And a comprehensive report about the state of the budget about the staffing about very everything that has to do with that particular agency or department. So these reports are ready. They had to be ready by November, 1st. And I don't know whether those can be handed over. I suspect that they are part of the formal transition because legislation requires that they prepare these reports. That's another thing that's being held up. I mean, they've already been prepared. These people have been laboring over these For months, They can speak to former White House staff members who have departed and maybe have worked. Either in the executive office of the president or in the various departments again. They can get information that way. But I suspect that some of these people are bound to keep the classified information classified at this point. And I think nobody wants to run the risk of violating those laws. So to me, that's a huge impediment, right? And especially, as you pointed out, we're in the middle of a pandemic, and I assume a lot of Important information there. Do we think that any of that could be considered in sort of the top secret? Section, or it's just more about Being able to access the real information the data that is not public. Yeah, all the data that I think about the Labor Department and the Bureau of Labor statistics that has all that information about joblessness. I mean, there's important problems in this country. And where, Where is the most joblessness occurring and what sectors of the economy are likely to rebound first, and you know which ones are, but we have to bail out There's just a laundry list. Of information that you would like to have going into accepting the biggest job in the world. You know, The other side of this coin, too, is that it's not just you know the practical purposes out and all that sort of road blocks its input. It's posing for the Bud campaign to stand up a government and be ready to hit the ground running on January 20th. It's that the world is watching. And we are supposed to be kind of this flagship of democracy and fairness and openness and participation, and we're kind of flailing right now we're in disarray. And our enemies can see that. And Even those who aren't our enemies are friends. It doesn't make us look good on the world stage, and it's not necessary. This is sort of a self inflicted with that. We don't need to be doing Katherine Dunn Tempus. I appreciate you coming on. Helping us understand this process. We're probably going to be talking to you a lot more in these next few days. So thank you so much. You're very welcome. It was my pleasure..

Biden president fraud Anthony Fauci Katherine Dunn Tempus Trump official White House Catherine Labor Department Bureau of Labor executive
US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

The Takeaway

05:49 min | 1 year ago

US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

"Peaceful. Transfer of power is a cornerstone of american democracy. Right now president. Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming biden administration access to key documents funding information. They need to ensure a safe and smooth transition now. The formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the presidential transition act just over fifty years ago. Em things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until two thousand versus the mission of george. Bush is not up for me to accept or reject the legal process. You know. let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon. We'll be ready for transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill clinton cabinet meeting december twelve thirty five days after the election that george w bush was officially declared the winner that gave then president elect bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration course nine months later the september eleventh terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and a relatively new president off guard when the nine eleven commission report came out in two thousand four. It pointed to this truncated transition as a weakness and recommended a more formalized process katherine dunn tempests at senior fellow at the university of virginia's miller center the senior research director at the white house transition project so laws were passed in the two thousands or spin sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kinda they keep refining it and keep refining it but what they did primarily is that they enable the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formerly so that meant that once biden was the democratic nominee. He was eight. He was provided with all space some funding for salaries and the ability to start planning ahead. Talked to us a little bit. About how worried you are or how worried we should be as americans about this as you pointed out the attacks on nine eleven happened not that long after president bush took office. If something happens january or february of this coming year would the biden administration be potentially a unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. Let me back up. Just a bit to point out that There are basically two important phases of the transition. The i i pointed out was after the nominee has been formally nominated by the party and they received some resources the next big transfer resources comes after the head of the gsa has ascertained the next president united states and they use that verbiage. Esser that verb. I'm not really sure why but And that's the point at which the president the incoming president can start to have access to classified material that can start to be part of the president's daily brief with Tells them all the national security issues. It enables the biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now. Is they are preventing the biden from moving to the next phase. And what i would argue is the most important phase at the transition. It's critically important that the biden staff members be able to go to the department of justice francis and to be able to interview. Fbi director the head of the criminal division the head of the national security division to try to get a sense since of. What's the lay of the land where the priorities. What are the crises. That might be boiling over by the time we get here. And that's what they're being denied so. I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The the inability to advance to the next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crises that but we want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as were basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason and were inhibiting our ability to be in the best possible situation. We can be on january twentieth. And there's no reason for that. We have the resources we have the capacity. So why so. Let's talk about the. Why and and the who so. Emily murphy is a name that most of us probably weren't familiar with until now she is a person who is at the head of the. Gsa can you talk a little bit about how her role what her role is. And how much leeway. She has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow the biden team to start integrating with the outgoing trump administration. So emily murphy is the administrator of the gsa. It's a political appointment in the gsa. It's office is largely responsible for all the government real estate so they helped provide office space and oversee office space You know in in most situations would never even hear of the essay in this particular case because the legislation housed it in the gsa. She has the capacity to release the funding and the resources to the party. Nominees and then eventually to the president-elect by law she is the one that has to ascertain the election so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands. I mean she is a by president trump. She must be a republican. Who has some loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably for mark meadows. Probably the chief-of-staff sues weighing on her.

Biden Nine Eleven Commission Katherine Dunn University Of Virginia's Mille Biden Administration George W Bush Bush GSA Donald Trump Bill Clinton Emily Murphy National Security Division Esser Congress White House George
"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. Pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How much can the Biden incoming bided administration do Catherine with the outgoing administration, sort of informally? In other words? What's stopping, say folks from calling up Anthony Fauci and saying, Can you kind of run us through what's going on over there or You know other other folks in within the administration to at least have Get a download. That's not official but is still you know, going to give them some information, so I don't think there's anything that is stopping. The current political appointees and the current civil servants from reaching out to some extent to the Biden people. I think the biggest issue is that the Biden people cannot have access to top secret and classified material. And I think the levels of classifications in this country are such that often. Things that are really mundane are classified. So I suspect that that means they don't have access to very much material all because so much of it in our system is classified. And that's a big problem. Thea other thing is that the transitions because of the law, the agencies are required early in January February to start to put together. And a comprehensive report about the state of the budget about staffing about very everything that has to do with that particular agency or department. So these reports are ready. They had to be ready by November, 1st. And I don't know whether those can be handed over. I suspect that they are part of the formal transition because legislation requires that they prepare these reports. That's another thing that's being held up. I mean, they've already been prepared. These people have been laboring over these For months, They can speak to former White House staff members who have departed and maybe have worked. Either in the executive office of the president or in the various departments again. They can get information that way. But I suspect that some of these people are bound to keep the classified information classified at this point. And I think nobody wants to run the risk of violating those laws. So to me, that's a huge impediment, right? And especially, as you pointed out, we're in the middle of a pandemic, and I assume a lot of Important information there. Do we think that any of that could be considered in sort of the top secret? Section, or it's just more about Being able to access the real information the data that is not public. Yeah, all the data that I think about the Labor Department and the Bureau of Labor statistics that has all that information about joblessness. I mean, there's important problems in this country. And where, Where is the most joblessness occurring and what sectors of the economy are likely to rebound first, and you know which ones are, but we have to bail out There's just a laundry list. Of information that you would like to have going into accepting the biggest job in the world. You know, The other side of this coin, too, is that it's not just you know the practical purposes out and all that sort of road blocks its input. It's posing for the Biden campaign to stand up a government and be ready to hit the ground running on January 20th. It's that the world is watching. And we are supposed to be kind of this flagship of democracy and fairness and openness and participation. And we're kind of flailing right now We're in disarray. And our enemies can see that. And even those who aren't our enemies are friends. It It doesn't make us look good on the world stage, and it's not necessary. This is sort of a self inflicted with that. We don't need to be doing Katherine Dunn Tempus. I appreciate you coming on. Helping us understand this process. We're probably going to be talking to you a lot more in these next few days. So thank you so much. You guys welcome. It was my pleasure. Thank.

Biden Anthony Fauci Catherine Katherine Dunn Tempus official White House Labor Department Bureau of Labor executive president
"katherine dunn" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:58 min | 3 years ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"As president trump tries to distance himself from the racist chance of send her back about Congress member Ilhan Omar that he paused for thirteen seconds to let ring out at his campaign rally this week we'll speak with Professor Abor Mex- candy a descendant into slaves who asks am I in American then is the British government says it's identified the person who leaked cables forcing out the British Ambassador for calling trump inept we look at the real life political thriller of a British British intelligence specialists who risked everything to blow the whistle on U._S.. Dirty tricks at the United Nations in the lead up to the Iraq invasion of two thousand three to keep him as the Americans want us to help them get a U._N.. Resolution fool you work for the British government. This propose world historically on I worked British intelligence government can nigh to the British people. Catherine gun worked for British intelligence when she opened a top secret N._S._A.. Memo that reveal the U._S. was spying lying on U._N.. Security Council members in order to pressure them into supporting the Iraq invasion. She leaked the memo to the press which began a chain of events that opened the door to putting the entire Iraq invasion on trial Katherine Dunn Joins US Live and Studio to tell her story along with the reporters from the observer who she turned to with her leak. A new dramatic film is out. It's called offical secrets all that and more coming up welcome to democracy now democracy now dot Org the Warren.

British government Iraq trump Catherine gun Ilhan Omar Professor Abor Mex United Nations Katherine Dunn president Security Council Congress thirteen seconds
"katherine dunn" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on WJR 760

"Albom show. Hi, thanks for taking my call. I I have a lot of experience with doctors and hospitals. I think what that person went through in California. When I read about it, it just broke, my heart. But I'm seeing it when I'm in the hospital. You don't even see your own doctor anymore. You see a hospitalised that works for your doctors. So they don't know you from anybody else. I was in short time ago had to have open heart surgery, and on my way to I have the cardiac catheterization my, quote, unquote, hospitalised come running by and said, wait, I didn't authorize this I wouldn't authorize this. But that point it was too late for him to stop it which turned out in my benefit because the next day. I was having an emergency triple bypass. Okay. One word. You don't wanna hear when you go to a hospital. Wait. Especially uttered by anybody in an official position. But a hospitalised that's. The hospital list. Well, yes, that is the new thing and afterwards, he said, oh, that's a good thing. You have that Katherine Dunn. Wow. Which wasn't going to be authorized which wasn't gonna be authorized, right? Well, I want to again, thank you for calling echo that the experience. I just went through with Gilson at children's hospital was nothing like this. In fact, the doctors were terrific, and I was always able to reach them. And they were human beings is why it stands in contrast to what we're talking about here. Wow. Hospitalised? We'll see that the general practitioners on leave. Admit some of you talk to them if they go through medical pay all that money. They gotta get into a field where they can make money back. God like, the family doctors that was the thing of the past where you have a everybody knows and you go to them, and I got a cold, and you bring them in, you know, now the family doctors now called an internist. And and basically is a bit of a portal for all the other specialists, you get sent off to somebody else in specialists, sometimes depending on your insurance, you just have to see them in order to get the recommendation. That's all they really are. I've got this pain in my back. Okay. Well, what is it? Why? I don't know what it is. But I'm gonna send you back. Dr. I came to you. Thanks for coming to me. And now, I'm going to send you the back down to you. April seven of two thousand twenty. Boy. Well, again, I want to reiterate that we had a we had a remarkable experience at children's hospital that finally ended today after one stay of thirty three days, another stay at fourteen before that and little Gehlsen is happy and home, and they did a great job on him. And he's going to have a healthy life, which is all you can really ask for when you're talking about for a kid that they are going to have all the things. In life that they deserve to be able to see, you know, you don't always get to say that and. It means a lot. So thank you. Thank you. Everybody children's hospital for being human that. With more on the other side of this seven sixty WJR. Seven sixty WJR news. Marie osborne. A team of American experts arriving at the crash site where an Ethiopian Airlines plane hit the ground taking all one hundred and fifty seven lives on board. Correspondent Tom foreman says investigators are likely to be examining a possible cause for an Indonesian air crash last year that also involved the very same type of plane a Boeing seven thirty seven maxi jetliner in simple terms, analysts say this new plane this model because of its design and the engine placement has a tendency to tilt upward in flight. So they have software board that when that happens. It pushes the nose automatically back down. But if it gets a false reading from a bad sensor, it can actually make the plane start diving directly toward the ground democratic Senator in two thousand twenty presidential candidate Kristen gillibrand responded to claims that she mishandled the investigation of sexual harassment allegations in her office. By releasing a statement that said when allegations are made in the workplace, we have to believe women. So that serious investigations can take place. Here's correspondent our lap sans. The senator's office recently began another investigation after learning of never before reported and deeply troubling comments allegedly made by me he was fired from the office last week. And that is a statement from Senator Kristen gillibrand, the personal information of more than six hundred thousand.

Senator Kristen gillibrand Senator Gehlsen WJR Albom Tom foreman Katherine Dunn California Marie osborne Ethiopian Airlines Gilson official harassment Dr. I thirty three days
"katherine dunn" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:58 min | 3 years ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"But maybe in the future because I think transparency is very important. Yes. And then also the other part of it is that on the hill. There's this huge movement to increase diversity under staff is that something that any of our any of our past presidents has done. And I think I have the answer for this president, do you think that's something that we should focus on going forward? Okay. Let me take the first question. I that's a really good question. So there's something on there's also something on. The hill outside the he'll call the congressional management foundation. That does a tremendous job of collecting all kinds of statistics demographic statistics about the people who work for members of congress and probably their length of stay in their jobs as well. I'm sure there's some of that as well that does not exist for the presidency. In fact, one day, I got a call on this. And the reporter on the other end said so so are you kind of like the congressional management foundation? Well, mine is the fact that there's probably thirty staff members in a budget and things like that. I guess I end the parallel. We don't have that. I'll tell you one thing you can look at is every June at the end of June, President the president and his team have to submit a list of their staff to congress. It's a report to congress on their staff. And so it does include the salary you can see salary and you can see the title. The problem is sometimes after that's transmitted to congress. There's even staff changes. And so it's not completely up-to-date. It also includes the personal White House staff. It doesn't include staff. Ownby NFC any of the very important parts of the executive office of the president. So to me, it's not comprehensive not nearly as comprehensive as it should be. So as I pointed out at the beginning. I I struggle to come up with people ask me sometimes, well, how many people work for the president? I don't know. You know, I think it's grown tremendously since Eisenhower. I would say and mostly since Nixon ever since president Nixon has become much more of a communications PR that's been beefed up tremendously. But I don't have an accurate figure. So I think that's something we need to work toward actually occasionally work with the partnership for public service. But we really need to brainstorm to figure out how we can either foia. This kind of information or create some sort of website or database that has the list of White House staffers. How much they're getting paid? How long they stayed in their jobs. I think it's really important transparency in our government is really important. So we should do whatever we can to promote that on the issue of diversity. I not sure that the White House has much of a I guess, you would say an HR human resources office within it. And I'm not sure that they have any deliberate efforts to achieve diversity if so they're not really publicly available or a transparent, I know that when President Clinton became president. He said he wanted to create a cabinet that looks like America. So he had one of the most diverse cabinet is back in nineteen Ninety-three. And I think successor presidents have tried to follow suit, more or less. Trump sort of took a little bit of a different tack. But I think that one thing that's interesting is that as I told you before this whole issue of presidential staff really didn't start 'til FDR. So it's a relatively new phenomenon. And generally speaking, congress has been hands off about the staff, they send out their budget about how much they need to pay their staff and congress just sorta signs it and moves on it's as though the two branches don't want to micromanage each other. And they worry that if they start to micromanage the president's staff, and maybe the same would happen to them. I think and so because of that we have little information. So I don't know about any particular diversity programs or things like that. But I think it's really important. Thank you. Thank you. Amanda, Hurley also Harvard extension school and two questions for you. The first one is in response to who we may have noticed the president's hired and also fired he tends to rely more on loyalty than qualifications as voters. Desires stability. How do you think? This will affect. His voter turnout in twenty twenty and the second question is. On compromise within. Within the government shutdown right now. Do you believe that they'll come to some form of compromise? And what do you think it will look like, right? Okay. Tell me your first question again, I got distracted by the budget shutdown. Oh my gosh. So long. The first question was about voter turnout. Oh, yeah. Okay. So yes. So your question is basically because of all this instability will that affect voters perception of the Trump administration and possibly make them either not turn out or vote for the other candidate. Under normal circumstances would think that's the case. But I think in this administration what you've seen over time is that he has this block of supporters that is staying strong, despite all kinds of setbacks. So it's roughly like thirty five to thirty eight percent when you look at polls support him, and that has not shifted a lot. I was reading an article the other day, and it was referring to Gallup poll, saying President Trump has one of the most stable approval ratings of prior compared to prior presidents. And that's because he has a block of supporters that no matter what happens they are still with him through thick and thin. So I don't think the instability. Maybe there's people on the margins who say all the staff turnover is reflective of a disorganized president. And I want somebody who's better than that. Maybe. But I actually think that I'm not sure what would sort of unsettled. Some of the thirty four percent that really are strong supporters. I'm not sure, and I don't think it would be White House staff turnover. And in fact, I sort of think that my topic in my research interest is a little bit inside the beltway or people who are political scientists or political science majors who care about this and are reading the newspapers daily, and and understand the importance of staffing governing. But I would say most Americans probably don't care about either of those things. With the shutdown. I would love to see a compromise. One of the things that I think is essential in a president is that they understand that there's a campaign mode, and there's a governing mode and in governing you have to be skilled in negotiation. You have to be willing to compromise. And I haven't really seen those features or characteristics emerging from this administration. So to date. It's it's a stalemate. And I don't see him changing. I think maybe what will happen is they'll be some sort of hybrid. So there'll be something about like Lindsey Graham was was suggesting I think yesterday that maybe what should happen. Is you open up the government you reopen the government the then you declared national emergency two weeks from now. And that's when you get your wall money. So maybe they'll come up with some. Kind of hybrid approach to reopening the government. But whatever it is. It's not going to be something that upsets his base who really wants to the wall. Because I think that's as we've seen. He was all set to sign the Bill and then Laura Ingraham, Ann Coulter and a few other conservative. Television people came out strongly against him signing it, and he changed his mind. So it seems to me that now he's focused on how does he appease those people? So he doesn't so he doesn't have to endure that criticism again. And so that strikes me as it's not going to be a compromise. There's no way you can't back down. If you've said that you're not going to do that. So there might be some sort of hybrid deal where he can kind of still say face. And that's what I think the Democrats need to start to think about it. Because where we are. Now, it's not gonna change. Unfortunately, Katherine Dunn tempests of the Brookings Institution. If you. Hi, my name's Hannah. I go to Drake university. And I was wondering since Donald Trump got his start on reality television. What your opinion on the fact that a lot of staffers are now turning to reality television has to say about his administration. Oh, tell me about something examples to returning to only Rosa was on seventy last season and yesterday, it was an outstanding Scaramucci will be returning. She's in two of seventy big brother. Right. Are there any is there? Anyone else? I know of but like considering that that's not really something that's happened before. No. That's unique for sure there's a lot of unique features too. I mean. The huge number of people that have never worked for in government before having your daughter in law in senior White House positions has not been I can't recall. I think David Eisenhower worked for that was his son. And there have been some examples, but not in this extraordinarily extraordinarily senior level. There's a lot of I in this administration. So everybody really needs to be studying this everybody needs to document, it people need to publish because this is truly a unique time in American politics. I would say I'm not surprised about the Marotta Anthony Scaramucci who he lasted eleven days in the White House. I think who knows. Yeah. Jeez. A little comic relief. I think is what it is. But thank you. Hi bet breath from hostile university. I know this is a bit beyond your purview of your studies. But I was interested in maybe just anecdotally, how do you feel that consistency? And Steph opens the staff up to like reach from constituents, and how do you feel that such consistent turnover especially in like, the really essential positions affects how constituents are able to interact with people in the executive branch. Right. Well, it makes it difficult because as I said at the start personal relationships are the corner of the realm in Washington DC. And so let's say you're working in the office of public liaison. That's the office that reaches out to interest groups and tries to have this reciprocal relationship where the interest groups have access to them and can tell them about their preferred policy and the White House has access to them to say, listen, we're about to nominate Brad Kavanagh or Neal Gorsuch, what will your organization think about that nomination. Can you help support us with that? Can you get a groundswell of support for it? So they have this symbiotic relate. Ship. But again, if the staff keep turning over, and they don't have their contact point in the White House. It makes it very difficult for constituents to reach out. It's similar to the question on congress and congressional offices that constituents that's their access point to the legislative branch are the people who do the case work for those members of congress. And when they're not there when there's a lot of turnover it makes it very difficult for the people to feel like it's their democracy. It's their government. I would say for the presidency. There's fewer sort of points of personal contact like I couldn't call and say, hey, there's this road. That's being built in my neighborhood that I really don't want to be built know. Can you do anything about it? They would refer me to the governor or what have you? So it's a little bit less constituency base a lot less constituency based in congress, but nevertheless, people who work at advocacy organizations people who work agencies people who are state governors or party leaders across the country have access points in the White House. And I'm sure there has become more complicated because people aren't staying in positions long. Yeah. You're welcome. Hello. Josh Cooke, Drake university, you drew some hair lows between the corporate business world and the White House staff. I was just wondering what this on boarding process. 'cause I know a lot of corporate companies are starting to be more open about what their on boarding Costas. And know, I was just wondering you had any. Yeah. That's that's a tough question it again, and it gets back to the transparency. It's so hard to find anything about the inner workings like the way, I find about out about presidential turnover is not through reporters asking Sarah Sanders has so and so left has so and so come on board. It's because politico is able to get some anonymous source to tell them. Oh, yeah. Rick Dearborn left in March or so. And so Andrew Bromberg is leaving in the spring. They are not transparent about it. And so if I can't even get names of people, there's no way I can find out how much time and effort, the office of presidential personnel is spending recruiting training et cetera..

president White House congress President Trump President Clinton David Eisenhower reporter Drake university executive Andrew Bromberg Lindsey Graham Josh Cooke Nixon America Washington DC Katherine Dunn Anthony Scaramucci Harvard extension school
"katherine dunn" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:39 min | 3 years ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Hi, my name's Samantha Bain. And I'm from Drake university. Thank you so much for being here. I just was wondering about the number of agencies the positions that were never even filled by the Trump administration is that also abnormal. And then what are the long term consequences of positions just being left unfilled? Right. Okay. So you talking about the vacancies. And I would say that's largely the vacancies in the executive branch where they need Senate confirmation. So the people who are under secretaries the secretaries are various departments. There's a wonderful organization called the partnership for public service and max Dyer runs the partnership for public service. And he in the Washington Post have a running tally of the appointments process. And how many people have confirmed and how President Trump compares to his predecessors? It's not good. You know, it's another example where they're way behind the staffing curve, and I can say even in my small sample of White House staffing, the president still. Does not have after two full years. He does not have a director of Owen Owen DC, which is the office of national drug control policy. And if you think about the opioid crisis that the country is currently experiencing you would have thought that would have been a position that was filled in the first six months. He did nominate somebody in March of two thousand eighteen that person did not get confirmed. So has to be renominated. So that's a vacancy that still exists. So I talk about the Trump administration in terms of their vacancies on top of vacancies on top of vacancies because we've had multiple turnover. But I think it's worthwhile to go to the partnership for public service, the White House Transition Project also Teri Sullivan, professor Teri Sullivan, also has a different way of looking at how Trump has performed in terms of filling vacancies in the executive branch. But I think again as I mentioned before I think he's undermining his own efforts to achieve his goals. If you don't have people in the departments in the agencies, you have people who are considered acting individuals, and they simply don't have all the power that confirmed individual would have. So therefore, they can't implement the policies and the programs that the president wants one other point to pay to make that I think is important that a lot of people don't understand. And I didn't for many years is that the White House it self can't. Really do anything they can promote they can coordinate, but they can't implement policy. It has to be done in the agencies and the departments. So what the White House is. What is really good at has become really good at is having people in the agencies in the departments that work together in synchrony, synchronized with the White House in order to implement policy. So if you have vacancies that just limits your ability to pursue your goals. Thank you. Thank you. Honolulu harbor exemption. Things are coming today. So the pres prejudice presidencies, look, I'm assuming when White House Jeffers were fired. Negative impact on like the career after the White House. But. Under the Trump presidency since he's so like prone to firing people is it not as bad. This is a good question. We've been trying to examine where they go after and sort of tried to assess the quality of the jobs because in prior administrations if you could say that you worked for the White House for one or two years, and you had this expertise, and you understood how it works. You could really parlay that into an important job. You could be sort of the general counsel at PepsiCo or something really tremendous. And I'm not really seeing that as much in this administration. I'm seeing that people are oftentimes going back to their old law firms. They're going back to their old think tanks where they were before their universities instead of sort of moving onto other things. And then there's even more unique circumstances like I think Ryan's previous now is joining the navy which is something unique. I haven't really seen that kind of that's not a typical career path. I'm actually in the midst of another study about career paths where people have before where people have been before they work in the White House within certain offices and where. They go after because I think that will be enlightening. So I would say that generally speaking working in the White House was a ticket to success, and you can get a great job. I think in this case it's a little bit. It's a little bit more of a risk. I think because you don't know if you're going to be publicly criticized I think also that some organizations and law firms might be a little bit leery of people who will work for the Trump administration for fear that their clients will care. So that could be another issue that limits people's employment options, there was another good part to your question. Do you? Remember what that was? There was something else that you wanted to know I was asking because the Trump presidency desert-like negatively impact negatively, or does it not matter. It depends. What you're go. A lot of the people who are leaving the White House. Now, we're going to the reelection campaign. So that's that's an easy job to get. I'm not really sure I don't have comprehensive data that is comparative, but I can say anecdotally, I've heard that some of the junior staffer having trouble a harder time finding jobs the other point that you sort of. Have drawn attention to for me is that this is a small subset of individuals. Like, I say sixty to sixty five of the team, but it's also important to note that in some ways my data actually understate turnover because when rights previous John Kelly leave they take several of their deputies with him because the incoming person in this case, Mick Mulvaney, wants to be able to staff a chief of staff office the way they want it with the people that they want. So I'm only tracking sort of the top tier turnover. But there's also when a principal leaves. There's also even more turnover than those junior people have to find jobs as well. Katherine Dunn tempests of the Brookings Institution times. There's a lot of vibration between Capitol Hill and the White House Republicans staff members, but because of the elections in November those options have decreased to some extent as well. I think it's a tough. It's a tough time. And it's I think people now have to think one of my examples of how I think that there might be a problem with recruiting in this administration is that in the past. If there had been a chief of staff position open people would have been jumping for that job. I mean who wouldn't want to be the chief of staff to the prince of the United States. But I don't know if you noticed in this most recent episode, there was a lot of stop and start. You know, maybe Nick Ayers. We'll take it. Oh, he's not gonna take it. Oh now, what are we do? There was a few days in. There was nobody. And then the person who ultimately took it, Mick Mulvaney, took it on an acting basis, which is very it's striking to me because if you could fill it with somebody who really wanted the job there would be no acting print parenthetical around their name. So that also makes me a little bit weary. Yeah. Thank you. Good questions. Lazy from Harvard extension. You've talked a little bit about the impact of turnover on the implementation of policy goals. I was interested. Whether and to what extent not actually spreads out to the agencies because policy stalling Marshall might not be a bad thing, depending on your point of view. But in terms of the running of the country, and the running of those agencies is there a sense of lead listeners about them old or do they function almost automatically right? I would say I hope you have the chance this week to talk to somebody who's worked at an agency or department for many many years, but what you'll find some of them will tell you that it doesn't matter who's president that my job doesn't change that. I keep doing what I do day after day after day year after year after year, and sometimes they'll be small policy changes at the top. But generally speaking, it doesn't, but where it matters is sort of program radically. And if you think about what a president can do it's hard to make dramatic changes in this country. We're very much prone to the status quo very conservative type of government. So all the president can really do is sort of shift in steer the ship of state. In a slightly different direction. And so that's what the secretaries and the undersecretaries in the political appointees are sort of charged with doing at the various departments and agencies. The problem is there's not a lot of them. There's lots of vacancies there's lots of agencies even within the realm of ambassadors. US ambassador across the country. So I think that there are some jobs in the government that will not change a lot with President Trump has president. But then there are some that are affected a great deal. So for instance, if you think about the civil rights division of the department of Justice, or if you think about homeland security with the whole immigration they are. So I would say it kind of depends where you work in the government how much you're affected by the Trump presidency. It also depends how many vacancies there are at the top levels. In terms of how much that will affect your job. Thank you. This is air. She's brand radio programming from Monday WCBS from Washington. Hello, Dr Tampa's. Thank you for being here today. I have a very simple question. I appreciate your research model. My question is more. So it's the. The way you define pressure for resigned under pressure. If you could briefly explain to me, how you define and if possible how you measure it, right? So I defined resigned under pressure if the individual appears to have left the White House, not on their own volition. So for instance, rides Priebus, I think was left on a tarmac somewhere and had to get a ride home. That may have also something like that may have happened to Sean Spicer. I'm not sure clearly John Kelly didn't really leave on his own terms. And so I basically look at news articles context, what is the context in which they depart. There's a man by the name of Andrew Bromberg who's the head of the domestic policy council who is. Has been nominated for you in job. So I mean, that's it's a promotion. He's leaving for a promotion reason. There have been some individuals who have left on their own volition, probably for other opportunities deputy D staff member named Paul Winfrey left and went back to the Heritage Foundation in the first year. So yes. So I basically look at news articles at the time. Twitter feeds. And that's how I determine it. It's pretty pretty conservative with it though. There has to be kind of a blatant. In a short period between the tweet in the departure things like that. The thank you. That's a good question. Hi. My name is Jocelyn McGrath student from Harvard extension school. I advocate question about staffing in general, not necessarily hiring firing process. But I know on the hill we have this thing called legis forum where we keep track of all the staffers know their salary how much we're making which offices. We're working for. And so on is that something that the White House could potentially half maybe in the future. Maybe not as this..

White House president President Trump Mick Mulvaney chief of staff White House Transition Project executive United States Washington Post Drake university John Kelly Samantha Bain Senate Trump max Dyer Twitter Nick Ayers Katherine Dunn
"katherine dunn" Discussed on This is Actually Happening

This is Actually Happening

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"katherine dunn" Discussed on This is Actually Happening

"And I would leave them around bus stops. And I did this for a long time. I ended up getting involved in the turn of music scene as the young person, which is a whole story in of itself and actually saying for some punk bands and worked in a punk club alternative. Club in one. I was in my early twenties, and I was still riding at the time and leaving these around these poems stapled poems around town. So one day, I was tending burners punk club in this woman comes in and she had this kind of sandy blond hair that came to her shoulders, and she was wearing these really gigantic sunglasses and she lowered her sunglasses, and she had this most astonishingly beautiful low kind of husky voice. And she had one of these these poems. I had written. And she said, did you write this? I heard that. This was you and I said, yes. And she said, I'm Katherine Dunn. And she said, I think you have talent. Katherine Dunn, very famous author of the book geek love, which is considered a minor classic. If not a classic says two huge huge book. And so, you know, she says considered very much just in con- just an amazing writer. So when my early twenties we just got to be really good buddies in. A lot of people know, Catherine is super famous writer less people know her that she was actually really well known boxing writer, a boxing, journalist and boxing critic, and she would write she covered boxing for all these newspapers, and magazines and one of the things we had in common was in nineteen ninety five I had taken a boxing, and the idea of earning how to fight back was just intoxicating to me. So four or five times a week in this one on for years. I would go pick up Katherine Dunn at her house, and we would drive to the boxing gym together where I was training and sparring and working out and Catherine was hanging out talking to other fighters and writing about boxing for different newspapers. But she would give me a sinement in one of her assignments she made me read all these classics. She said you can't be a writer unless you read all the classics. So I would go to the boxing gym true story. It'd be hanging out in the boxing gym with Katherine Dunn, and she would be grilling the about the classics that she made me read in between rounds, which is I'll never forget that stuff. This is remarkable. She she she became kind of the mother figure in ever had. And we became lifelong friends. She was the anti to my kids from foster care. My writing mentor, always encouraged me. So I was very lucky. I. I met riders locally that were very encouraging. And so starting in my twenties. I started writing freelancing in and writing little alternative newspapers don't have my formal education had had ended my freshman year of high school. I have about a ninth grade for more education. But I joked that I got my free MFA at the public library. I was a Spiring writer at the time and just riding little things for alternative newspapers and getting paid ten dollars. But the career that I had that was actually taking off was my boxing. And I actually was the first woman to win a Tacoma, golden gloves title. And so the actually vogue magazine actually had you know, wrote a story about it. So, you know, Catherine, I just thought that was.

Katherine Dunn boxing writer Catherine vogue magazine Tacoma ten dollars one day