24 Burst results for "Katelyn"

Interview with Tuvia Tenenbom

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

08:51 min | Last month

Interview with Tuvia Tenenbom

"He's my absolute pleasure to welcome back to johnny gould's jewish state to via tenenbaum. Absolute pleasure to be with you again. You know you are a true free speech. Doyenne and for this particular podcast. I think it's the first thing verson ground rules as you can smoke. That's the first thing eight you're wanting to billion and the second thing is you truly opened my eyes to my own. I think tolerance of jew hate when we first met two years ago thinking because before that time you know. I've been conditioned i think in growing up in the uk in school where they're only three jewish kids to tolerate the what they call politely banter works erm you would call anti semitism and it did overstretched itself from time to time and i think that is a sort of shall we say looking for a better word but would have jimmy cued. I think from a lot of british people. And i think that's what you sean likes this book. Which is finally out in english. That's why it's called the tame taming of the ju. it's not just a take on shakespeare. It's the taming of the jewel. I mean giuseppe. Funding indicated biden. Own amazing to me edo deny or tolerate and sometimes joined together. Fox's would there accuse us we'd the hate us. That was shocking. I mean the fell. Shocking was citizen. This admit is imminent burden. I didn't expect it. I went to britain. Because i'm a tinto naomi's love english data. I said okay. My published opportunity mean sister. Go anywhere you want whatever you would like to go is i like to go to britain. I like to go. i like to see did out. I mean zane ought to do it better than anybody else. That's what i remember. And then the was black seed said. Okay i'll see you two belting stone which one stone i didn't expect anti-semitism and i didn't expect such a contaminating such a contagious. Such deepen. they semitism so deeply rooted. You know it on an island katelyn or in england which is the most important of course a bit of the uk but it was a frightening to sit and what is more fighting. Wants to see the basically. I'll kind of collaborating. Sometimes they had to fight jewish lead. Doesn't seem like law. Your people told me this and that your people told me i interviewed. People not told me are available. The life is a horrible thing so this is the common people and it took time. Tim's admitted but one that gate open has had them open and started talking. Honestly say to me you know. How many times have been told delta jew oh you know let us all kinds of dips and it's like amazing much so and little kits in manchester of hasidic. The auto talks kits in manchester and london will have had acts pelted them only storm so whatever it is i mean is a big addictiveness and we talked to jewish leaders saying even when the time used to say anything against wirelessly well owning two positions if to say one wowed against jimmy coleman only now's opt in the position you know as it became hewison you wayne saying that a one is easy allies. That are not going to be selected you know in a volume label for example district. Tina zero willing to say it was piping to see that one of the most disturbing rates. I think of british antisemitism and this might go around the world as well is. There is a sort of dog whistle so that someone can maintain that they're not anti semitic so someone who is an influence on me. Extreme left and concise something assiduously continuously hard left without. Referencing jews but then. His followers commend dog whistle a really serious anti semitic sort of betrayal of what they think themselves. I'm using an example of a very powerful voice. Which is john bishop. Who has who has three and a half million followers. He prostrate himself in front of ken loach on twitter. He said all this great interpreted it was as though he transferred the word. A jeremy corbyn for ken loach. I would kneel before him. And then if i couldn't anymore i prostrate myself in front of him which set off a huge torrent of jew hate and of course he a month ago on holocaust memorial day. Couldn't believe the terrible tragedies and then this is where the problems lie and that's an eye opener i think for british choosier surprising the anti-semites i mean disgust for britain and coastal are the places. You know that they took very nicely. Buddy dead jews in world war cho- you knows such nice people bubble and so bad and let's give some money to memorize them and and an make any fence you know maybe even endows of comments may be whatever it is making events you know in in a beautiful place to memorize their juice by the juice living was you know i mean it's like at all let's let you know what's album changes on the plane and of course the cord is a polish time. The code is is the stinian am am by itself. You know if you kill by the palestinians you know it doesn't mean that you don't like jews you know if you're critical officially doesn't mean that you're antisemites if you are cup only fizzle and if the only people who care about our justice palestinians because you killed by nobody else. Don't get about. Muslims in china while being tortured by million. Your don't care about syria. Don't care about libya you don't care about lebanon. You don't care about you. Don't even know what happens in yemen. Of course you never heralded by the war in chechnya and and distorted opening their head about anything. Only but it's going to stadiums you know is that there's a problem and they interesting thing when when i went into states and talk to the people and i tied to figure out. Why only this issue bottles you know. Other they show from people is back know underneath it. The other side was fight. Independence genius he. So did choose members alleys jews and a hall of people or some people would say something like you know what you will high. I don't know why feedbacks why feel about palestinians and i don't feel about anybody else. I have to think about it not over the palestinians up. You know it's like when. I wanted to start with like anyone to my my wife. Easy as you mentioned and i went to take a towards kamla sound everything and i'm gone to straight on that and i pick up young people young white folks as they call them. You know students. And i say i. My name is ahmed. And i'm from palestine. Would you like to appointing the individual cumberland. I say to say some wards full touma. Addison sister palestines and yet when you see slice cates looked like he must santana even studious and everything or well drafts. And the person free pop stein. And then he apologizes up. Tradit- day. Yes not yet picked up to join the battle. I'm just like you away. Think i'm posting. Think whether you might want to. Nobody looks like from his teens. You don't even have. Some people do not know the distance. When i asked him to stupid question between lemon palestine.

Johnny Gould Verson Jimmy Cued Britain Tenenbaum Jimmy Coleman Ken Loach Hewison Tina Zero Manchester UK Giuseppe Zane Biden Naomi Shakespeare Sean Jeremy Corbyn John Bishop FOX
Kotlin Multiplatform with John OReilly

Talking Kotlin

09:04 min | 2 months ago

Kotlin Multiplatform with John OReilly

"Regarding a desktop and service. what did you start in. Like what technologies were using so simpson so as deputy so. I wanna finish college in one thousand. Nine hundred started with sort fulltime masters speech recognition. You're using your wall things back then. That was sort of. You can do that about sums watching the cotton. Dl talk yesterday. Where a couple of lines of code can do that. But this writing everything from scratch in c in terms of audio processing fifties and and i've been never confronted themselves and there was there was a need for something. Kinda graphical and i don development for awhile and answer. Windows three came out. I think you're on june nineteen ninety and i So cool your concern dusen. Windows graphical is from speech patterns. And mike you're next so forth down again more chance occurrences a low company was starting to do windows and said hey you know obviously not too many people doing that stage said hey. Join to join to join us so i saw that again. That's what started the decade of doing windows see transitioning cpas plus windows. St kfc com hiram. It's funny because obviously was been toying with a proposed for desktop right now sort of i don't know what you call it control back. Go throwbacks ecstasy. That's what's what's old is new again. So when when did you. When did you actually start with With developing kotlin than so. I'm trying to was the announcement. Okay oh in about five years ago now. Is it a country member. anyway there was a natural icon. I you know to be honest. I hadn't i know a lot of people being aware columnist stage. And we're very excited about it. I i was a little bit in the dark. It wasn't something new to me. I haven't even wear and to another coin spos- as in most companies. We probably weren't in a position to start using cotton straight away. You know And i have had. And i have an obligation to restore cocoa puffs. It's actually it's an aug project hasn't up hope people's find somewhat useful. That actually does but for me. Personally i use it i e kind of overloaded somewhat in terms of as a pop from try technology so when the under doctors coronas came up first of all Used to try goes out. And then went. Kalkin emerged start reggie microsoft katainen and similarly montecot from down the road and And then you know as is frequently. The case trying that out. There then became a platform. Say okay now in the workplace okay. This looks interesting. Let's start to use his here and then shortly after that. Then maybe down. The road asked announced. Maybe we start to use it working and we start to use a gradually in africa project and we ended up doing a for various reasons. We did a company rewrite of our project and we started from the ground up dan with cartoon or katelyn underdog extra bonus cortines and so forth. So so is this your first multiplatform project or not so does sage. i wasn't using work. Under gorbachev sort of had supposed to give you know a little bit more brought on their. You know like this. Be working on mobile for eleven years now and i guess over time like many of us you know we would have source accession cross platform. I guess there's always sort of cross pot from monty python but cross platforms kind of sounders. Right once so reproaches. The dab senator in reactnative approaches. And you know over the course of various projects in the previous companies in new product. Monday or somebody coming in that. Have read some headline. This allows you to do everything in one place all your code face. We don't need to have all these separate irish and each time you took sort of had to move. That weren't approved was an us. Disapprove that dickey. We're gonna do competitions. And we had to prove that this wasn't suitable for the type about. We were developing this platform. it's christians. We needed an end user experience. We need But i'm saying that is supposed as a segue to you know I guess what come interesting monte platform. Because when i when cosimo mantra was aware of it i think we're not to those nineteen towards the end of that. It's sort of immediately struck me as okay. This is a pragmatic saint approach finally to the sharing of code across multiple platforms mobile. I've been involved by the way sort of number of initiatives over the years for free. Willion superstars shared code into office. Which is at least somewhat more sane approach but. I don't know if you guys have worked with john. I had to work jay. You know unfortunately goldstone feel like. That's one of those topics that if you can you usually avoid it. I guess yeah if you can avoid using it as well as we various we had to use it in their practical use. And it's one thing using stateless knight ridder touch it can function as in which you maybe media engine i. I just wanted to say on the topic of jane. I think this is. This is going to become a bit more interesting again now. Also with With all the topics around compulsive for desktop because of a bunch of lake system integrations. I dunno things like global hot keys or stuff the. jvm just doesn't really expose. so i think some some of the people at the forefront. They're wanting to write libraries. Yeah they might might have to go that route anyway. Yeah you know if if you're using it. I robot michael state library that district district functions wanting using your compete shared logic with the framework with the training involved with life cycle aspects. Dot is a different story completely debugging crush reports of So haven't gone through. That in us was having seen the sort of attempts sort of pulling in pushing us towards cross. Platform frameworks cottam. Okafor's was immediately. You know the caught cartoon. The cartoon obviously was an advantage a positive from my perspective but more generally i think it was a sane approach it was targeting shared logic target. Had kind of a mechanism in place where you could sort of. This is critical. You could incrementally adopted you know you start putting in for some small area. And i think that generally by today's still is that you start doing that in you take some particular business. Logic may be may be remote. Api endpoint access or so forth and then graduated up from there. And you know there's another kind of a discussion point around how you socialize that how you get in particular iowa's developers interested in an accepting of the but it's the topic himself but certainly certainly from that perspective. At least i think it's very important. Start small and and as the key thing about the type forums. It appealed point was that it had that capability that it it was lended itself to that sort of adoption. Yes so so just to kind of to recap your point. You feel that the that the main difference between cartland multi platform and these other cross platform. Toolkits is is what exactly that you can adopt them. Incrementally that you that you stay away from From what part would you say is kind of the most interesting here. This quite a few different aspects. I think cutting across different areas You know on one hand. I think If you've been involved in from at all you're very kevin gallagher and sort of pre advocates in and you know of this for some time and i think he did. He described it as a sort of perspective risk management as well. You know you're trying to you're trying to avoid locking out upsetting kita one key differentiator. A there's a. There's a number of them. I think but won't different areas. If you decide to use react native reuse flutter or use a variety of other coaches that have been there over. The years is a song that amount of of and and you know it's an all or nothing sort of approaching the with with commodity farm and it allows you to manage. You know you. Can you can sort of put in graduate. Start using it. Then the flip side of that is this touches on a couple of areas obviously but folks on sheriff business logic as ios an underdeveloped. I wanna use the best of breed technologies ideas get companies. That can when i on on iowa. Sony's combine that we have to frame of their likewise android. Cauchon coatings influence worth and that. That's the key difference here. You know that focus that you know it. I think touches on another area. I think we've got sort of a certain level of maturity culture monte platform where i think a good sign some regards that we've gone beyond okay. This is proof of concept What's it about renown sort of digging deeper into so architectures and different approaches. You can use. And i think this is is little bit as sort of a simplistic way sometimes mentioned quotas just because you can do something doesn't mean you should do something so i think we've be careful. You know it is. Its main sort of setting point is is as focused on shared logic. I see a lot of discussions pushing further up the stack. You know the view model and potentially you you hear in the context composed nowadays. of course. why can't we to compose. and. I think there's a danger to honest. Econ generally too much of a dangerous on too far up and then it just becomes another spot framework. I think our approach in general

Dusen Kalkin Katainen Cortines Cosimo Mantra Michael State Library Simpson Katelyn Monty Python Dickey Knight Ridder Mike Goldstone DAN Microsoft Okafor Africa Kevin Gallagher JAY Jane
S6 E4 - How do I use my Post-9/11 GI Bill? - FULL

Courage to Fight Again

21:30 min | 3 months ago

S6 E4 - How do I use my Post-9/11 GI Bill? - FULL

"Welcome to we served now. What were we seek to answer. The questions. veterans and their families are all ready asking. Don't today show. I want to share three things with you. Just three and here they are. I won't answer the question. Hopefully definitively how do you use post nine eleven. Gi bill number two. I will share with you how to maximize post nine. Eleven bill benefits and finally. I will tell you how you can buy side eleven. Gi bill benefits with another amazing benefits. That you've earned the most notable programs if you're interested in hearing more about that which i have to assume you are stay tuned and you are going to hear every single bit. Stay with us. Who am i. Why am i still here. How can i uncover you. I was meant to be during my own transition from the. Us army the wounds of war especially those not visible continued to play. I walked through the pain of job loss of ptsd diagnosis often crippling anxiety by finally discovered the reason. I'm here to earth. And i knew i couldn't keep it to myself. So i wrote a book simply titled resolve resolve is a book that is apologetically faith-based a step by step guide designed for maximum effectiveness in the context of a small group of other veterans resolve provides veterans everywhere with the tool to help you step into your new life a life full hope purpose and vision for the future to pick up your copy of resolve head over to courage to fight again dot com. That's courage to fight again dot com so today's question surrounds the post nine eleven. Gi bill as no doubt. You've figured out by now and specifically how you use it but the truth is if that was the only question i answered on today's show who would be a very short episode now using the post nine eleven. Gi bill is really really easy now. Of course. I want you to listen to this entire episode and if you do i have a special gift just for you toward the end of the episode. But i'll tell you right upfront. Using the post nine eleven she i bill is probably the easiest thing you will ever do when it comes to taking advantage of the benefits you've earned through your military service now before we dive in. I want to share some of my method with you kind of how we came to put this episode together posted a question on the courage to fight again facebook page. I shared that question on several veteran focused facebook groups and we got more engagement with this single question than with anything we've ever posted and the question was just this is what has been your experience with a post. Nine eleven jabil. We got over eleven hundred comments and i've read almost every single one of them and around ninety nine percent of those responses. Give or take. They were very positive in nature. Talking about how easy it was to us how it was the best benefit you can take advantage of and how to get the most out of the post nine eleven gi bill and not only did those who responded answer that question but they answered so many more as well man here. I am rolling right into the episode. And i haven't even introduced myself yet so if you were here for the first time you may be like. Who is this guy. Talking about. The post nine eleven. Gi bill well. My name is aaron perkins. I'm us army. Combat veteran husband to a beautiful wife. Daddy to amazing kiddos. I'm the author of resolve a step by step guide. That takes you the veteran through the journey of rediscovering purpose. Meaning and passion in your life after you've left the military and as you've probably already guessed on the host of this podcast so let's dive right in at the top of the show. I promise you three things. Let's tackle the first one. How do i use my post nine. Eleven gi bill. Now i'm going to assume you're already eligible for the gi bill. So i'm not going to dive into that part. But i will post a link in the show notes about your eligibility and how you can determine your eligibility in case you need to dig into that a bit more but step one is apply for the benefits on the va website. And guess what. I'll post that link in the show notes as well. You need a few things when you apply. Here's what you need your social security number your military history and that just basic military history. You don't need your full your your details of where you're stationed in when you were stationed there and all of that. He just need basically the years you serve and the date service egypt education history of the schools. You've attended other degrees. You hold things like that and finally basic information about the school or trading facility that you want to attend because you don't have to attend just a traditional community college or university or state scored like that. You can attend a variety of training facilities. Let's say you wanted to become an h vac technician. There are schools or training facilities that you can learn how to do that if you want to become a cybersecurity expert while their schools training facilities we can do that so again just some basic information about the school or the training facility that you want to attend now. You can do this by mail. Apply by mail using the va form or obviously the most preferred way is to apply online. That's going to be the fastest takes about thirty days or so for the va to verify eligibility. And that's it for step one. Step two you're just going to reach out to the school. the understanding. here's that you've already been accepted or you're well on your way to being accepted to the school. So you contact the school and request to speak to the va rep and these are your best friends in the post nine eleven gi bill business. Now i know i've heard some mixed reviews about. Va reps But they do know the school and they know the va. So they're going to be able to share some things with you. Some indepth information that you're not gonna be able to find him the va website. You're not gonna find on the school's website you're going to have to talk to them directly and step three. Follow the directions of your. Va school rep number. Four step four. Get your education. It's really that easy now. Look with nearly all things. Va there are multiple paths to get to the same destination but those steps has share with you apply online. Contact the school link with your. Va rep. That really is the simplest and most direct route to taking. Hold of your post nine eleven. Gi bill benefits. So if i would have had just a single question for this episode. We'd already be done. But i promise you i would share with you and the next is really important and that is how to maximize your post nine eleven. Gi bill benefits now. There are a bunch of ways to do this. And i'll mention those in passing and you can do your own homework and figure out if those are something you want or need to explore. But i want to focus on just two ways to maximize your benefit so your options. As far as maximizing your benefit goes find a yellow ribbon. School is one option tuition assistance. Top up that's another program that the va has. You may be eligible for you may need to look into There's also the option of a stem scholarship science technology engineering or math. If you're majoring in any of those categories you may be eligible for scholarship. Veteran education courses aka vet tech also tutorial assistance if you're struggling with biology or chemistry or calculus or whatever may be and you need a tutor to get tutorial assistance with the. Va actually pay you to go to a tutor. She can pass that course now here the two i want to talk about all the ones i just mentioned are in this section of the website that talks about the posting. I love jabil bill. But all the ones i mentioned in this section are in a section called additional information very simple and one of those is finding yo a yellow ribbon school. Excuse me and the second is not mentioned in that additional information but it is getting that monthly housing allowance and again. I'm going to dive into that but let's talk about the yellow ribbons school here for just a minute. So the yellow ribbon program can help you pay for hire out of state private school or graduate school tuition. That the post nine eleven. Gi bill does not cover so tuition might be higher than what the gi bill will cover or you want to attend a school as a nonresident student. Non resident of that state in other words. Another thing this is more of a side note. Not yellow ribbon schools specific. Your state may also provide additional benefits for you as a veteran. And that is something you should look into with your state. Truth be told your. Va rep at your chosen. School should be able to answer that question for you or at the very least be able to point you in the right direction. All right so that is the yellow ribbon school piece. I wanted to talk about and the other piece. That's not listed in additional information. section is section one. Oh seven sounds very boring but it's very very important. And that is the location based housing allowance the location based housing allowance. Now you will get a housing allowance for using the post nine eleven gi bill and if you attend all online classes this rate that it is set at is half the national average of an e five with dependence for their basic allowance for housing. So that doesn't change unless the national average changes. I know when i was taking a few online courses. It was eight hundred dollars a month. I don't remember the exact number but we're the location based housing allowance. Really comes into play is when you were attending in person classes. Now i want to set the record straight here then. There's this common misconception that your housing allowance rate is based on where you live. This is not the case. Your housing allowance is based on the zip code of where you're attending classes. I'm going to say that again. Your housing allowance is based on the zip code of where you are attending classes. Let me just share a little story from my own experience. I decided to take some undergraduate courses my undergraduate degree before went into the army. But i wanted to just take advantage of the post nine. Eleven she i built a little bit wasn't ready to work on my master's degree or anything so i was like you know what. Maybe i'll just take some courses. I know i have to take at least one of those in person. So i can get that in person Housing allowance right that location based housing loans. Well right up. The road from probably ten minutes or less away was a campus of the school. I was wanting to attend. They had multiple campuses all over the city and the housing allowance. Right there was. I don't know eight nine hundred dollars. Something like that. But if i would drive an extra seven or eight minutes i could get the location. Based housing allowance ended up being like eleven. Eleven sixty seven. Ninety i don't remember now. It's been a few years but i was like. Hey i will totally drive a few extra minutes to get the extra couple hundred dollars or so a month because to three hundred dollars a month because that just makes more sense because i want to get the same education and going to get the same course the same credit for the course. Why not just drive a few extra minutes so again. The housing allowance is based on the zip code of where you were attending classes. And i just mentioned this but keep in mind. You only need to attend a single class in person. that's it you can take the rest of your classes online and still collect the housing allowance based on the zip code of where you attending that one class. Now let's talk about kovic for a minute though we're we're still in the midst of this pandemic. I don't wanna say the middle. Hopefully we're nearing the end of it. But cova has missed a lot of things up our way of life our jobs our relationships a lot of things and it has changed the way a lot of schools do business and that is i'll say inadvertently affecting those of us trying to use the post nine eleven. Gi bill and some schools. They're not even holding in person. Classes yet and and veterans are facing this never before seen challenge and in fact. This was one of the concerns. someone maybe more than one person brought up when i ask about experiences with the post nine eleven. Gi bill. so. I just mentioned that you get paid at half the national average of an e five with dependence if you attend school all align. Let's say that's eight hundred dollars but if you attend at least one class in person you'll receive your housing allowance based on zip code of the school year attending so again when i attended in person. Who's eleven dollars a month so it made sense to at least attend one school. Excuse me or one class in person and this is where co vid really comes into play some schools. Excuse me some schools or universities that were previously holding in person. Classes do not even have the option to register for in person classes. Now which means that. If he veteran was attending in person in receiving that in-person housing allowance rate that housing allowance rate has suddenly changed to the online rate. And i've done a good bit of research into this. I have not found anything in my research for my conversations with veterans or anything social media no way to really get around this so to speak. So if you found a way to continue receiving the in-person housing allowance rate while attending only online due to covid. I would love if you would share that with us by reaching out to me at podcast at courage to fight again dot com. So i can send it out to the rest of our listeners. Finally and i'm really running low on time here but i promise three things at the top of the show how to use your gi bill. We cover that outta to maximize your gi bill. We cover that and now how to combine your gi bill benefits with another benefit. You may or may not have heard of and that benefit is vocational rehabilitation or volk rehab as it's often called now technically its known as veteran readiness and employment or vr and e but no one actually calls it that or at least not yet. It just hasn't a katelyn voc rehab. Though in fact is probably a better benefit than the post nine eleven. Gi bill pays for literally everything. You need special equipment for your degree. Plan pays for that. You have to pay for parking at your school. Pays for that. You'd pay for books pays for that pays for pretty much everything and just about anything you do that has to do with getting your education and i'm saying this because i want to reiterate it vo korea will pay for that and so it does seem at least initially to be a better benefit than the post nine eleven gi bill. But here's where you can. Combine them nate. Because you can't use them both at once you can use either one or the other because if you use vocal rehab or any it will cut into the total time you can use your gi bill. So here's the hack if you will if you use all thirty days of your post nine eleven gi bill and then apply for your vote rehab benefit. Frankly i'd opt for a bit more. Forty five sixty days. Something like that just to be on the safe side. But thirty days minimum is what i found volk rehab or vr knee or whatever. You want to call. It goes through a different process than the post nine eleven. Gi bill but leveraging these two benefits together is really the best of both worlds. And here's why. I say that because let's say you use just about all of your post nine eleven gi bill to get your bachelor's degree in psychology. But you wanna be a licensed professional counselor. Will you need at least a master's degree for that and you've used almost all of your jive. Ill what are you gonna do. Well then you go to your local. Vr knee or volk rehab counselor and say. Hey here's what i need to do. And then you move into the vote rehab program now again. Your mileage may vary. Because i've heard again a lot of mixed stories mixed reviews of working with folk rehab counselor but that is your process and again i will post a link to these processes or actually there's a few links but all these processes and all these resources in the show with that we have reached the end of season six episode. So what are your questions voice memo on your phone and send it to podcast kurds. Fight again dot com. So what's on your mind. What questions are you asking. What are your family members asking or join the post. Nine eleven veterans families facebook group and post your question. There have block of questions but the most important question we can ask ourselves. Is this have. I accept the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith in jesus christ well. I'll see you right back here. Two weeks from the day and the next veteran questions we'll be asking is this. How do i increase my va. Disability rating ohio and for the special gift. I promised every thursday evening is hosting a sous vide for justice guys who are veterans. Sorry ladies you're coming soon. The training for that. We will be walking through the resolved journey. Together get your copy of resolve for thirty percent off using the code asked and just head over to courage fight again dot com and click on. Get the book and if you like to join the group on the lincoln the show notes to let me know. And i'll be in touch tone next time. Thanks for We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

Jabil VA Aaron Perkins Va School Facebook Us Army Kovic The Post Egypt Cova Army Volk Nate
Interview with John David Washington

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

02:42 min | 8 months ago

Interview with John David Washington

"John David Washington who is the protagonist in Christopher Nolan's tenant talks about the stunt work they challenged me greatly Is. Groundbreaking stunt stunt work towards Katelyn Jackson Speidel fight coordinator, and all the guys were working together Groundbreaking we this has never been done ever in cinematic history cinema history and. These moves the way we're we're operating So creating them creating what we were doing and kind of finding it together with me I'll never forget it I'm so extremely proud of because we can say. I can say it was a part of what they started. You know how action films can start to be a shot and performed. It's really exciting. There were many fantastic shooting locations. I enjoyed basically every. Pretty much every stop and we made a you know someone challenging and others if you get seasick probably more challenging for you but I had an incredible time in Indiana heights as well. Speaking of India jumping off or jumping over a balcony climbing over balcony from that high up was quite challenging and I I I had a different relationship with heights before that movie. But now I say we're closer heights and I I think we're going to be okay you know it was lowered for a second put. I. Loved Mumbai. Loved Him Fico slicing across the Mediterranean on a boat that I got Dr Looking as cool as possible in the coolest clothes ever provided by Jeffrey I? You know that's the dream. Know I, kind of like the old school of not using as much green screen. Here's John David Washington. gave us a huge advantage when when thinking about an event film you most we see green screen and most of us audience members can tell me we when they're good. We're not as distracted but when they're bad, it kind of takes it's it takes you out of it. Well, that's not the case Christopher Nolan and he might he might be arguably the best event filmmaker in the. Game. So as an as an actor, it's extremely as it's an extreme advantage being able to use the real elements around us that we can use for the performance and it goes to show for me for my in my opinion why he loves and appreciates performance. So well, because he knows that we will affect us in a different way and we'll connect to it even deeper. And turn the audience while at the same time because he's relying on the characters in the performance to take the audience to the journey of these wide, you know huge scale and mass of set piece worlds that he creates.

Christopher Nolan Katelyn Jackson Speidel John David Washington Indiana Heights Coordinator Jeffrey I John David Washington. Mumbai Mediterranean India
Sitting down with the Kotlin Advocates

Talking Kotlin

04:59 min | 9 months ago

Sitting down with the Kotlin Advocates

"We are all develop had for Katelyn. Some of us are for areas that are better well known some of us of areas that are less known some of US offer areas that say oh. Oh, you mean that Kotlin is more than just android So talking starve aside talking Kotlin Jaaz stalking everything else that is not android and so I wanted to discuss a little bit. What life is like as a developer advocate at jeppe rains as a cotton develop advocate jeppe brains, how we work, who tells us what to do what not to do well. Before, I I would say that it was mostly we would decide and then sweater you decide now for us right? I wouldn't put it like this. No I'm just kidding. Like I know you're laughing there you're muted it doesn't make sense. I can record my life and you can after add it. On the places that you want. Yeah I'm like are we gotTA have a back? Channel on slack that I keep pressing a button that says you know now laugh and then everyone loves so this is I think to the vision death like long time ago so But anyway. So No, let's let's discuss a little bit like what what color advocacy implies. So especially, nowadays that you know a lot of times when we talk about when we talk about advocacy in general. People immediately associate that with going to conferences and giving talks and. Engaging with people in the community and stuff like that. And you know right now the situation in the world is a little bit. and. So people kind of ask me sometimes, I what do you do all day because you can't really do your work can you and we're GonNa Bust this myth right that developers are more than just about going to conferences. And to bars and to. Having Beers and and the. And the podcast yes. So what do you do? What? What do each of you do on a daily basis try to out a lot with a on on twitter and kind of A feeling for how people feel about technology, it's it's pretty known that that Cutler Jay s for example, has a couple of rough edges them So I tried to kind of see who is trying to adopt the technology try to help them get started and can either be on an individual basis reaching out to people asking them for their feedback to the technology, and then bring that back to the team. But it can also be in the creation of materials than the people can just consume at their own pace. So for example, on play dot, Copter Nine, dot org, we have our section of hands onto orioles, which are kind of long form to`real, you've go through in interactive fashion and we of course, right those we keep those up to date and we always allowed the community. What kind of topics should be covered. And also keeping with the Team that actually developed technology right Shanyou well. As, we know that the Greater China? Region is huge. So for me I think it's more important to facilitates with community. So basically I Love connection with the community leaders. Mostly East our cutting user. Group. Part of. Confront you. And I tried to arrange some Webinar, to invite sound speaker to share their experience about calling. And the in order to. Make more people to learn calling I arranged. Study Group. Study Jen. that. We have on lies degen that Basically teach people how. Write calling coat. And we also have their coating practice. that. Encourage. People to use calling in different way. For example, we use calling in beckon you can have a new can learn how to write calling. Using Kato War or even in Spring boot. You can use calling in enjoy can use calling in data signs. Et Cetera so we provide. The possibility to poke to calling is everything. So that's why we do every for every day.

Orioles Jeppe Rains Developer Advocate Kotlin Katelyn Kotlin Jaaz Twitter Stalking China Cutler Jay Jen.
"katelyn" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Katelyn I'm Dave Anthony fox news starting what's expected to be a very long day ready to take action on a new plan for the corona infected economy which Republicans oppose it on this is not about getting you back to work and getting the DVD work and helping us open up our country again as we continue to fight the virus and also to the president kellyanne Conway told fox includes a liberal agenda items not related to the pandemic and Democrats insist those make up a minuscule part of this plan fox's Rachel Sutherland as more live state representative Debbie Dingell Michigan Democrat told the fox business network she doesn't agree with everything in the three trillion dollar bill but is voting for it anyway it is laying down a marker it helps our state local governments which are decimated under the measure essential workers would get hazard pay in expanded unemployment benefits would be extended there's also another round of checks for Americans as well as a relief for people having a hard time making rent and mortgage payments Republicans refer a wait then see approach the White House has issued a veto threat Dave all right we just got an update showing how bad things got when everything started to shut down U. S. retail sales plunged more than sixteen percent in April from March that's a record the number of coronavirus deaths is risen the past few days in the U. S. higher than late last week but a lot of states are lifting restrictions today including Louisiana and parts of New York though not near New York City hardest hit in this crisis president trouble give an update later today on the push for a corona vaccine he's already been touting a milestone ten million tests we gave ten million Democrats have called his response a failure the testing was too slow to ramp up NASCAR's ready to restart the engines resuming racing at Darlington on Sunday without fans country star for life support and we're thrilled to be the first kind of major live sports that's that's our president Steve Forbes drivers had a lottery for starting positions Brad Keselowski won pole position America is listening to fox news he'll be G. news time eight oh two good morning.

Brad Keselowski Steve Forbes fox Michigan Debbie Dingell state representative kellyanne Conway Dave Anthony America Katelyn president Darlington NASCAR New York City Louisiana White House Rachel Sutherland
"katelyn" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

11:12 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Back to the program with Katelyn here one of the key issues that we talk about here on Ellen what we're talking about with a lot of our clients on a daily basis here at our firm at the moment an excellent chances to take control of what is really appearing to be an uncontrollable situation and one of the areas you can do that is your estate planning how should you be handling your wills and trusts and should you be reviewing them revising them in a key element is your medical directive how do you want to be treated if you find yourself in the I see you in the hospital to help us understand what life in the I see you might be like during the covert nineteen crisis I'm I'm very happy to bring on to the program Dr Albert hold he is a physician and a fellow in critical care medicine he is board certified in critical care medicine and internal medicine he is the medical director of critical care service at the inova hospital in Fairfax Virginia where he manages a team of fifty critical care physicians twenty four years practicing medicine Dr hold thank you so much for spending a few minutes with us thanks for having me here and before we go any further thank you so much for all the care and and dedication you're providing to helping so many people in desperate need these days tell us what the experience is like you know we we hear the phrase go on a ventilator we keep hearing news that were radically shorten the number of ventilators that hospitals need nationwide we have car manufacturers talking about manufacturing them to help out dealing with a shortage what does it mean for someone to go on a ventilator so when we talk about mechanical ventilation we're really talking about a form of life support for patients and so this is a life support for their longs essentially to kind of make it as simple as possible that's when the longer no longer able to get enough oxygen or provide enough ventilation to remove the carbon dioxide in these cases that we see most currently it's really around challenges of oxygenation because the longer don't become as functional as they would normally be so they get Bobby they get infected they get swollen so if you think about it spawns and all of those pockets to respond to being air pockets and all of a sudden you get an infection and then that infection basically makes them very heavy sponge is no longer able to oxygenate the body as well you need to provide a higher level of oxygen to those longer than would normally be the case and you can use techniques in mechanical ventilation that enable you to kind of open up those pockets that and help them to get that oxygen better so is it fair to say that as someone who needs a ventilator doesn't get one Vera Rana life may be threatened so it all depends on what the alternatives are we don't put people on ventilators until the need requires it so if they if they have a need for a ventilator that we would put them on it based upon their needs for being oxygenated or ventilated and that if they don't have that neat and we don't put him on a ventilator obviously but it all depends on how they do you along the care so you can take somebody and you can have them on oxygen and supplemental oxygen and they can do just fine if they get to the point where they need a ventilator that means that all of the external devices that were able to apply haven't been successful in terms of being able to activate them well enough and so then we would have to move towards mechanical ventilation if you get to the point where you need mechanical ventilation because you're not able to oxidative well as you need to to provide oxygen to the brain into the rest of the organs of the body then you're in a situation where you're more likely to not survive six and so you mentioned external there from presuming that the ventilator is an internal device so eventually is essentially it's a it's a device on the outside that you put a tube in the airway and you basically create a direct passage between events later and you're logged in so it goes into their their way in a way that supersedes your long to be able to provide all the support that belongs to the fiber to a potentially so it is an internal process the two goes through your mouth down your throat into your lungs correct and is that painful the innovation process itself is done under anesthesia and so people would get benefit center the medicines when they get integrated and then they will also receive pain instead of medications while they're on the ventilator so we wouldn't be accountable process to get without any of that which is why we try to minimize any kind of discomfort around that assuming that someone receives a van to later what's their prognosis all other factors being equal is this going to save their lives more likely than not or isn't really going to prolong their life until they die great question it really has to do with the co morbid conditions if they come with in other words what's there what are they are what is their status to their pre hospitalization status are they a young healthy person who has no other conditions like heart disease or diabetes or pre existing lung disease and other problems or and if that's the case then and it really needs to be taken in the context of what they want on the ventilator for so if it's if it's an infection and if it's if it's volume overload from somebody with heart failure what's the condition that led them to being on the ventilator helps to predict the prognosis in addition to having an understanding of all those free hospital condition that somebody has so the more pre hospital condition that someone has the more long term consequences of say a nasty infection that someone have from an ammonia or some other process the the the lower the chance of survival what's the range that you're experiencing the people are on a ventilator from the shortest to the longest so we could have someone on a ventilator and off within probably twenty four hours is probably about as quickly as we would have someone on and off of the ventilator and we would have someone on the server for weeks on a ventilator there are some people who go on to be chronically event attended to so they would end up with a tracheostomy which would be basically a hole cut into it directly into the trachea so that they would have almost a little button that they would plug onto the ventilators so that they could that could breed for them all the time and so those patients do exist those are ones that have been unable to be we incrementally or be able to breed on their own without the support of employers so there's the entire gamut sure and are you able to fairly project what the likely outcome is going to be meaning all this patient is probably going to be on a ventilator for a couple of days where is that patients going to be a couple of weeks so we usually have a pretty good indication of whether or not it's going to be days or longer we can usually predict that it just depends I would say in the situation we're in right now it's a little bit trickier some people don't take the attitude that I want medical science to do whatever it takes herculean efforts keep me alive no matter what because whatever I've got you're going to cure it tomorrow so do whatever it takes doc other people say look at all this is going to do is prolong my life for a very short period and it's going to be very uncomfortable for me and very discomforting for my family let's not do herculean measures and allow me to be comfortable and pain free but allow nature to take its course where would you put this ventilator conversation within that context of a dialogue so it's a great question because what I think about when it comes to people doing their dance directives as most people say well I don't want to be kept alive with machines right I mean that's usually what what people routinely say they want to have everything done but they don't want to be kept alive with machines and so it becomes a but an interesting conversation because a lot of it is what would that given the patient's condition what they're able to do before they ended up needing life support what would that person's decision being if they were making the decision himself this is kind of where the they dance directives sometimes get in very tricky because essentially when you're on a ventilator you're generally not able to make your own decisions are sedated you're on medications not necessarily in a situation where the that we would go to the patient on a ventilator to say do you want to have this do you want to not have this and so frequently families rely on that advance directive in so that it can't directive is is usually pretty limited in terms of what people are able to do and say okay well I'm going to be kept on life support I don't really want to do that some people set up time frames other people say that they don't want to have anything done they don't want to be subject to a ventilator that on the internet and they don't want to have CPR done those are all reasonable based upon whatever conditions they come into the situation with the whatever their quality of life is going to be a lot of that has to come from the conversations that had we had the ever is the substituted judgment person whose whose role is to make the decisions for that family member or friend based upon what that person who's now indicated on mechanical ventilator which used to be that sells and that's where it's sometimes we find it gets really tricky because people sometimes will apply their own moral judgment on what they want to do for them versus what that person who may be incapacitated to make those decisions to do which is why it is so essential for people to sign these documents while you're healthy why you need to get advanced Dickel directives and a power of attorney were you not only have a document the directive that says here's how I want to be treated but power of attorney that says here's the person authorized to make sure the doctors do what my medical director says to do but how often do you encounter patients who have not provided those documents they have not signed them in advance nobody knows what the patients' desires are or the family members the children are arguing some of them are saying one thing and others are saying another one is the hospital do in a situation like that so that happens too often and I would like and I'd say that what we what we try to do as an intensive care physicians and in conversations with families to really get to the root of what is going on with that patient their survivability in the circumstances at their end and then kind of some of the decisions that they have made over the course of time in terms of helping to guide what the decision would be in terms of either escalating or continuing or how how far to go when it comes to providing them with additional life support so we try to have those conversations with the the substituted judgment person or whoever it is that the proxy as you described and really part of what's needed is not just to have the document signed but you really have conversations with the people that are gonna be making those decisions in terms of things that they wouldn't would not choose to do six so it's it's a very sobering conversation and I cannot imagine the emotional toll on you and and all health care providers while you're dealing with what is best to treat the patient and get through this also dealing.

Katelyn Ellen
"katelyn" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

11:08 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Back to the program with Katelyn here one of the key issues that we talk about here on the show and what we're talking about with a lot of our clients on a daily basis here at our firm at the moment financial engines is to take control of what is really appearing to be an uncontrollable situation and one of the areas you can do that is your estate planning how should you be handling your wills and trusts and should you be reviewing them revising them in a key element as your medical directive how do you want to be treated if you find yourself in the I see you in the hospital to help us understand what life in the I see you might be like during the covert nineteen crisis I'm I'm very happy to bring on to the program Dr Albert hold he is a physician and a fellow in critical care medicine he is board certified in critical care medicine and internal medicine he is the medical director of critical care service at the inova hospital in Fairfax Virginia where he manages a team of fifty critical care physicians twenty four years practicing medicine Dr hold thank you so much for spending a few minutes with us thanks for having me here and before we go any further thank you so much for all the care and and dedication you're providing to helping so many people in desperate need these days I'll tell us what the experience is like you know we we hear the phrase go on a ventilator we keep hearing news that we're radically shorten the number of ventilators that hospitals need nationwide we have car manufacturers talking about manufacturing them to help out dealing with the shortage what does it mean for someone to go on a ventilator so when we talk about mechanical ventilation we're really talking about a form of life support for patients and so this is like support for their lungs essentially to kind of make it as simple as possible that's when the longer no longer able to get enough oxygen or provide enough ventilation to remove the carbon dioxide in these cases that we see most currently it's really around challenges of oxygenation because belongings don't become as functional as they would normally be so they get Bobby they convicted they get swollen so if you think about a sponge and all of those pockets to expunge being air pockets and then all of a sudden you get an infection and then that inspection basically makes them very heavy sponges no longer able to oxygenate the body as well you need to provide a higher level of oxygen to those longer than would normally be the case and you use techniques in mechanical ventilation that enable you to kind of open up those pockets and help them to get that oxygen better so is it fair to say that as someone who needs a ventilator doesn't get one Vera rod life may be threatened so it all depends on what the alternatives are we don't put people on ventilators until the need requires it so if they if they have a need for a ventilator that we would put them on it based upon their needs for being oxygenated or ventilated and that if they don't have that neat and we don't put him on a ventilator obviously but it all depends on how they do along the care so you can take somebody and you can have them on oxygen and supplemental oxygen and they can do just fine if they get to the point where they need a ventilator that means that all of the external devices that were able to apply haven't been successful in terms of being able to activate them well enough and so then we would have to move towards mechanical ventilation if you get to the point where you need mechanical ventilation because you're not able to auction it as well as you need to to provide oxygen to the brain into the rest of the organs of the body then you're in a situation where you're more likely to not survive N. Sir you mentioned external there from presuming that the ventilator is an internal device so a ventilator is essentially it's a it's a device on the outside that you put a tube in the airway and you basically create a direct passage between that ventilator and your long consumer goes into there your way in a way that supersedes your long to be able to provide all the support that belongs to the five virtue of the ventilators so it is an internal process the two goes through your mouth down your throat into your lungs correct and is that painful the innovation process itself is done under anesthesia and so people get painted set it set of medicines when they get integrated and then they will also receive pain instead of medications while they're on the ventilator so it wouldn't be a comfortable process to get without any of that which is why we try to minimize any kind of discomfort around now assuming that someone receives a ventilator what's their prognosis all other factors being equal is this going to save their lives more likely than not or isn't really going to prolong their life until they die great question it really has to do with the co morbid conditions if they come with in other words what's there what are they are what is their status their their pre hospitalization status are they a young healthy person who has no other conditions like heart disease or diabetes or pre existing lung disease and other problems or and if that's the case then then it really needs to be taken in the context of what they want on the ventilator for so if it's if it's an infection and if it's if it's volume overload from somebody with heart failure what's the condition that led them to being on the ventilator helps to predict the prognosis in addition to having an understanding of all those free hospital condition that somebody has so the more pre hospital conditions if someone has the more law long term consequences of say of a nasty infection that someone have from an ammonia or some other process the the the lower the chance of survival what's the range that you're experiencing the people are on a ventilator from the shortest to the longest so we could have someone on a ventilator and off within probably twenty four hours is probably about as quickly as we would have someone on and off of the ventilator and we would have someone on for for weeks on a ventilator there are some people who go on to be chronically event dependent and so they would end up with a tracheostomy which would be basically a hole cut into that directly into the trachea said that they would have almost a little button that they would plug onto the ventilators so that they could the event could breed for them all the time and so those patients do exist those are ones that have been unable to be weed from a ventilator or be able to breed on their own without the support of it later so there's the entire gamut sure and are you able to fairly predict what the likely outcome is going to be meaning all this patient is probably going to be on a ventilator for a couple of days where is that patients going to be a couple of weeks so we usually have a pretty good indication of whether or not it's going to be days or longer we can usually predict that it just depends I would say in the situation we're in right now it's a little bit trickier some people take the attitude that I want medical science to do whatever it takes herculean efforts keep me alive no matter what because whatever I've got you're going to cure it tomorrow so do whatever it takes doc other people say look at all this is going to do is prolong my life for a very short period and it's going to be very uncomfortable for me and very discomforting for my family let's not do herculean measures and allow me to be comfortable and pain free but allow nature to take its course where would you put this ventilator conversation within that context of a dialogue so it's a great question because what I think about when it comes to people doing their dance directives as most people say well I don't want to be kept alive with machines right I mean that's usually what what people routinely say they want to have everything done but they don't want to be kept alive with machines and so it becomes it but an interesting conversation because a lot of it is what would that given the patient's condition what they're able to do before they ended up needing life support what with that person's decision be if they were making the decision himself this is kind of where the advance directives sometimes get in very tricky because essentially when you're on a ventilator you're generally not able to make your own decisions are sedated you're on medications not necessarily in a situation where that that we would go to the patient on the ventilator to say do you want to have this do you want to not have this and so frequently families rely on that advance directive and so that it can't directive is is usually pretty limited in terms of what people are able to do and say okay well I'm going to be kept on life support I don't really want to do that some people set up time frames other people say that they don't want to have anything done they don't want to be subject to a ventilator that ought to be in today that they don't want to have CPR done those are all reasonable based upon whatever conditions they come into the situation with the whatever their quality of life is going to be a lot of that has to come from the conversations that had we had the whoever is the substituted judgment person who lives whose role is to make the decisions for that family member or friend based upon what that person who's now integrated on mechanical ventilator which used to do themselves and that's where it's sometimes we find it gets really tricky because people sometimes will apply their own moral judgment of what they want to do for them versus what that person who may be incapacitated to make those decisions to do which is why it is so essential for people to sign these documents while you're healthy why you need to get advance medical directives and a power of attorney were you not only have a document the directive that says here's how I want to be treated but power of attorney that says here's the person authorized to make sure the doctors do what my medical director says to do but how often do you encounter patients who have not provided those documents they have not signed them in advance nobody knows what the patients' desires are or the family members the children are arguing some of them are saying one thing and others are saying another what is the hospital do in a situation like that so that happens too often and I would like and I'd say that what we what we try to do as an intensive care physicians and in conversations with families to really get to the root of what is going on with that patient their survivability in the circumstances that they're in and then kind of some of the decisions that they have made over the course of time in terms of helping to guide what the decision would be in terms of either escalating or continuing or how how far to go when it comes to providing them with additional life support so we try to have those conversations with the the substituted judgment person or whoever it is that the proxy as you described and really part of what's needed is not just to have the document signed but you really have conversations with the people that are gonna be making those decisions in terms of things that they wouldn't would not choose to do so so it's a it's a very sobering conversation and I cannot imagine the emotional toll on you and and all health care providers while you're dealing with what is best to treat the.

Katelyn
"katelyn" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

12:29 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on KTRH

"Katelyn here one of the key issues that we talk about here on the show and what we're talking about with a lot of our clients on a daily basis here at our firm at the moment financial engines is to take control of what is really appearing to be an uncontrollable situation and one of the areas you can do that is your estate planning how should you be handling your wills and trusts and should you be reviewing them revising them in a key element as your medical directive how do you want to be treated if you find yourself in the I see you in the hospital to help us understand what life in the I see you might be like during the covert nineteen crisis I'm I'm very happy to bring on to the program Dr Albert hold he is a physician and a fellow in critical care medicine he is board certified in critical care medicine and internal medicine he is the medical director of critical care service at the inova hospital in Fairfax Virginia where he manages a team of fifty critical care physicians twenty four years practicing medicine Dr hold thank you so much for spending a few minutes with us thanks for having me here and before we go any further thank you so much for all the care and and dedication you're providing to helping so many people in desperate need these days I'll tell us what the experience is like you know we we hear the phrase go on a ventilator we keep hearing news that we're radically shorten the number of ventilators that hospitals need nationwide we have car manufacturers talking about manufacturing them to help out dealing with the shortage what does it mean for someone to go on a ventilator so when we talk about mechanical ventilation we're really talking about a form of life support for patients and so this is like support for their long financially to kind of make it as simple as possible it's when the longer no longer able to get enough oxygen or provide enough ventilation to remove the carbon dioxide in these cases that we see most currently it's really around challenges of oxygenation because the longer don't become as functional as they would normally be so they get Baaghi they constructed they get swollen so if you think about it spawns and all of those pockets to expunge being air pockets and then all of a sudden you get an infection and then that inspection basically make them very heavy sponge is no longer able to oxygenate the body as well you need to provide a higher level of oxygen to those longer than would normally be the case and you use techniques in mechanical ventilation that enable you to kind of open up those pockets that and help them to get that oxygen better so is it fair to say that as someone who needs a ventilator doesn't get one Vera rod life may be threatened so it all depends on what the alternatives are we don't put people on ventilators until the need requires it so if they if they have a need for a ventilator that we would put them on it based upon their needs for being oxygenated or ventilated and that if they don't have that need and we don't put him on a ventilator obviously but it all depends on how they do along the care so you can take somebody and you can have them on oxygen and supplemental oxygen and they can do just fine if they get to the point where they need a ventilator that means that all of the external devices that were able to apply haven't been successful in terms of being able to activate them well enough and so then we would have to move towards mechanical ventilation if you get to the point where you need mechanical ventilation because you're not able to oxidative well as you need to to provide oxygen to the brain into the rest of the organs of the body then you're in a situation where you're more likely to not survive X. and so you mentioned external there from presuming that the ventilator is an internal device so a ventilator is essentially it's a it's a device on the outside that you put a tube in the airway and you basically create a direct passage between that ventilator and your long consumer goes into there your way in a way that supersede your lawn could be able to provide all the support that belongs need five or two of the ventilator so it is an internal process the two goes through your mouth down your throat into your lungs correct and is that painful the integration process itself is done under anesthesia and so people get painted set it set of medicines when they get integrated and then they will also receive pain instead of medications while they're on the ventilator so it wouldn't be a comfortable process to get without any of that which is why we try to minimize any kind of discomfort around that assuming that someone receives a van to later what's their prognosis all other factors being equal is this going to save their lives more likely than not or isn't really going to prolong their life until they die great question it really has to do with the co morbid conditions if they come with in other words what's there what are they are what is their status if they're pre hospitalization status are they a young healthy person who has no other conditions like heart disease or diabetes or pre existing lung disease and other problems or and if that's the case then then it really needs to be taken in the context of what they want on the ventilator for so if it's if it's an infection if it's if it's volume overload from somebody with heart failure what's the condition that led them to being on the ventilator helps to predict the prognosis in addition to having an understanding of all those free hospital condition that somebody has so the more pre hospital conditions if someone has the more long term consequences of say of a nasty infection that someone have from an ammonia or some other process the the the lower the chance of survival what's the range that you're experiencing the people are on a ventilator from the shortest to the longest so we could have someone on a ventilator and off within probably twenty four hours is probably about as quickly as we would have someone on and off of the ventilator and we would have someone on for for weeks on a ventilator there are some people who go on to be chronically event attended to so they would end up with a tracheostomy which would be basically a hole cut into that directly into the trachea so that they would have almost a little button that they would plug onto the ventilators so that they could the vet could breed for them all the time and so those patients do exist those are ones that have been unable to be weed from a ventilator or be able to breed on their own without the support of it later so there's the entire gamut sure and are you able to fairly predict what the likely outcome is going to be meaning all this patient is probably going to be on a ventilator for a couple of days where is that patients going to be a couple of weeks so we usually have a pretty good indication of whether or not it's going to be days or longer we can usually predict that it just depends I would say in the situation we're in right now it's a little bit trickier some people don't take the attitude that I want medical science to do whatever it takes herculean efforts keep me alive no matter what because whatever I've got you're going to cure it tomorrow so do whatever it takes doc other people say look at all this is going to do is prolong my life for a very short period and it's going to be very uncomfortable for me and very discomforting for my family let's not do herculean measures and allow me to be comfortable and pain free but allow nature to take its course where would you put this ventilator conversation within that context of a dialogue so it's a great question because what I think about when it comes to people doing their advance directives as most people say well I don't want to be kept alive with machines right I mean that's usually what what people routinely say they want to have everything done but they don't want to be kept alive with machines and so it becomes the an interesting conversation because a lot of it is what would that given the patient's condition what they're able to do before they ended up needing life support what with that person's decision D. if they were making the decision himself this is kind of where the advance directives sometimes get in very tricky because essentially when you're on a ventilator you're generally not able to make your own decisions are sedated you're on medication not necessarily in a situation where the that we would go to the patient on a ventilator to say do you want to have this do you want to not have this and so frequently families rely on that advance directive in so that it can't directive is is usually pretty limited in terms of what people are able to do and say okay well I'm going to be kept on life support I don't really want to do that some people set up time frames other people say that they don't want to have anything done they don't want to be subject to a ventilator that ought to be in today that they don't want to have CPR done and those are all reasonable based upon whatever conditions they come into the situation with the whatever their quality of life is going to be a lot of that has to come to the conversations that had with the whoever is the substituted judgment person who lives whose role is to make the decisions for that family member or friend based upon what that person who's now integrated on mechanical ventilator which used to have south of networks sometimes we find it gets really tricky because people sometimes will apply their own moral judgment of what they want to do for them versus what that person who may be incapacitated to make those decisions to do which is why it is so essential for people to sign these documents while you're healthy why you need to get advancement all directives and a power of attorney were you not only have a document the directive that says here's how I want to be treated but on the power of attorney that says here's the person authorized to make sure the doctors do what my medical director says to do but how often do you encounter patients who have not provided those documents they have not signed them in advance nobody knows what the patients' desires are or the family members the children are arguing some of them are saying one thing and others are saying another what is the hospital do in a situation like that so that happens too often and I would like and I'd say that what we what we try to do as intensive care physicians and in conversations with families to really get to the root of what is going on with that patient their survivability in the circumstances of their end and then kind of some of the decisions that they have made over the course of time in terms of helping to guide what the decision would be in terms of either escalating or continuing or how how far to go when it comes to providing them with additional life support so we try to have those conversations with the the substituted judgment person or whoever it is that the proxy as you described and really part of what's needed is not just to have the document signed but you really have conversations with the people that are gonna be making those decisions in terms of things that they wouldn't would not choose to do yes so it's a it's a very sobering conversation and I cannot imagine the emotional toll on you and and all health care providers while you're dealing with what is best to treat the patient and get through this also dealing with the emotional toll the family toll so I I my hat's off to you Sir thank you if there's a lot of people who every day day in and day out help provide support Canada families and hospitals and elsewhere and so there's a great effort to try and make sure that people are having the care that they need and that they have the care that they want if you could give one final piece of advice to our listeners regarding this conversation what would that be really be sickened since there and have conversations with family members around what your wishes are in terms of care and what you wouldn't would not want to have happen to you and what kind of quality of life is consistent with your values that that conversation to have with families around this and choosing the the person that you want to be the decider is gonna be vitally important for people and and that's that those are the conversations that we had the clinicians have the the best outcomes when it comes to making sure that we're comfortable doing exactly what a patient would have chosen in a circumstance that they were sitting there talking to us when we present them with whatever the decisions are in terms of care that's Dr Albert hole to the medical director of critical care services at inova hospital in Fairfax Virginia doctor whole thank you so much for joining us thank you.

Katelyn
"katelyn" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on 600 WREC

"With Katelyn here one of the key issues that we talk about here on record I'm showing you what we're talking about with a lot of our clients on a daily basis here at our firm and financial engines is to take control of what is really appearing to be an uncontrollable situation and one of the areas you can do that is your estate planning how should you be handling your wills and trusts and should you be reviewing them revising them in a key element as your medical directive how do you want to be treated if you find yourself in the I see you in the hospital to help us understand what life in the I see you might be like during the covert nineteen crisis I'm I'm very happy to bring on to the program Dr Albert hold he is a physician and a fellow in critical care medicine he is board certified in critical care medicine and internal medicine he is the medical director of critical care service at the inova hospital in Fairfax Virginia where he manages a team of fifty critical care physicians twenty four years practicing medicine Dr hold thank you so much for spending a few minutes with us thanks for having me here and before we go any further thank you so much for all the care and and dedication you're providing to helping so many people in desperate need these days I'll tell us what the experience is like you know we we hear the phrase go on a ventilator we keep hearing news that were radically shorten the number of ventilators that hospitals need nationwide we have car manufacturers talking about manufacturing them to help out dealing with the shortage what does it mean for someone to go on a ventilator so when we talk about mechanical ventilation we're really talking about a form of life support for patients and so this is like support for their lungs essentially to kind of make it as simple as possible that's when the longer no longer able to get enough oxygen or provide enough ventilation to remove the carbon dioxide in these cases that we see most currently it's really around challenges of oxygenation because the longer don't become as functional as they would normally be so they get Bobby bacon inspected they get swollen so if you think about it spawns and all of those pockets to expunge being air pockets and then all of a sudden you get an infection and then that inspection basically makes them very heavy sponges no longer able to oxygenate the body as well you need to provide a higher level of oxygen to those longer than would normally be the case and you can use techniques in mechanical ventilation that enable you to kind of open up those pockets and help them to get that oxygen better so is it fair to say that as someone who needs a ventilator doesn't get one Vera rod life may be threatened so it all depends on what the alternatives are we don't put people on ventilators until the need requires it so if they if they have a need for a ventilator that we would put them on it based upon their needs for being oxygenated or ventilated and that if they don't have that need and we don't put him on a ventilator obviously but it all depends on how they do along the care so you can take somebody and you can have them on oxygen and supplemental oxygen and they can do just fine if they get to the point where they need a ventilator that means that all of the external devices that were able to apply haven't been successful in terms of being able to activate them well enough and so then we would have to move towards mechanical ventilation if you get to the point where you need mechanical ventilation because you're not able to oxidative well as you need to to provide oxygen to the brain into the rest of the organs of the body then you're in a situation where you're more likely to not survive and so you mentioned external there from presuming that the ventilator is an internal device so a ventilator is essentially it's a it's a device on the outside that you put a tube in the airway and you basically create a direct passage between that ventilator and you're logged in so it goes into there your way in a way that supersedes your lawn could be able to provide all the support that belongs need by virtue of the ventilators so it is an internal process the two goes through your mouth down your throat into your lungs correct and is a painful the innovation process itself is done under anesthesia and so people get painted set set of medicines when they get integrated and then they will also receive pain instead of medications while they're on the ventilator so it wouldn't be a comfortable process to get without any of that which is why we try to minimize any kind of discomfort around that assuming that someone receives a vent to later what's their prognosis all other factors being equal is this going to save their lives more likely than not or isn't really going to prolong their life until they die great question it really has to do with the co morbid conditions if they come with in other words what's there what are they are what is their status their their pre hospitalization status are they a young healthy person who has no other conditions like heart disease or diabetes or pre existing lung disease and other problems or and if that's the case then then it really needs to be taken in the context of what they want on the ventilator for so if it's if it's an infection and if it's if it's volume overload from somebody with heart failure what's the condition that led them to being on the ventilator helps to predict the prognosis in addition to having an understanding of all those free hospital conditions if somebody has so the more pre hospital conditions if someone has the more long term consequences of say okay a nasty infection that someone have from him all year some other process the the the lower the chance of survival what's the range that you're experiencing the people are on a ventilator from the shortest to the longest so we could have someone on a ventilator and off within probably twenty four hours is probably about as quickly as we would have someone on and off of the ventilator and we would have someone on for for weeks on a ventilator there are some people who go on to be chronically event attended to so they would end up with a tracheostomy which would be basically a hole cut into it directly into the trachea said that they would have almost a little button that they would plug onto the ventilators so that they could the vet could breed for them all the time elements of those patients do exist those are ones that have been unable to be weed from a ventilator or be able to breed on their own without the support of it later so there's the entire gamut sure and are you able to fairly predict what the likely outcome is going to be meaning all this patient is probably going to be on a ventilator for a couple of days where is that patients going to be a couple of weeks so we usually have a pretty good indication of whether or not it's going to be days or longer we can usually predict that it just depends I would say in a situation we're in right now it's a little bit trickier some people take the attitude that I want medical science to do whatever it takes herculean efforts keep me alive no matter what because whatever I've got you're going to cure it tomorrow so do whatever it takes doc other people say look at all this is going to do is prolong my life for a very short period and it's going to be very uncomfortable for me and very discomforting for my family let's not do herculean measures and allow me to be comfortable and pain free but allow nature to take its course where would you put this ventilator conversation within that context of a dialogue so it's a great question because what I think about when it comes to people doing their dance directives as most people say well I don't want to be kept alive with machines right I mean that's usually what what people routinely say they want to have everything done but they don't want to be kept alive with machines and so it becomes the but an interesting conversation because a lot of it is what would that given the patient's condition what they're able to do before they ended up needing life support what with that person's decision be if they were making the decision himself this is kind of where the advance directives sometimes get in very tricky because essentially when you're on a ventilator you're generally not able to make your own decisions are sedated you're on medication not necessarily in a situation where the that we would go to the patient on the ventilator to say do you want to have this do you want to not have this and so frequently families rely on that advance directive in so that it can't directive is is usually pretty limited in terms of what people are able to do and say okay well I'm going to be kept on life support I don't really want to do that some people set up time frames other people say that they don't want to have anything done they don't want to be subject to a ventilator that ought to be in today that they don't want to have CPR done those are all reasonable based upon whatever conditions they come into the situation with the whatever their quality of life is going to be a lot of that has to come from the conversations that had we had the whoever is the substituted judgment person who lives whose role is to make the decisions for that family member or friend based upon what that person who's now integrated on mechanical ventilator which used to do themselves and that's where sometimes we find it gets really tricky because people sometimes will apply their own moral judgment on what they want to do for them versus what that person who may be incapacitated to make those decisions to do which is why it is so essential for people to sign these documents while you're healthy why you need to get advancement all directives and a power of attorney were you not only have a document the directive that says here's how I want to be treated but power of attorney that says here's the person authorized to make sure the doctors do what my medical director says to do but how often do you encounter patients who have not provided those documents they have not signed them in advance nobody knows what the patients' desires are or the family members the children are arguing some of them are saying one thing and others are saying another what is the hospital do in a situation like that so that happens too often and I would like and I'd say that what we what we try to do as an intensive care physicians and in conversations with families to really get to the root of what is going on with that patient their survivability in the circumstances of their end and then kind of some of the decisions that they have made over the course of time in terms of helping to guide what the decision would be in terms of either escalating or continuing or how how far to go when it comes to providing them with additional life support so we try to have those conversations with the the substituted judgment person or whoever it is that the proxy as you described and really part of what's needed is not just to have the document signed but you really have conversations with the people that are gonna be making those decisions in terms of things that they wouldn't would not choose to do so so it's a it's a very sobering conversation and I cannot imagine the emotional toll on you and and all health care providers while you're dealing with what is best to treat the patient and get through this also dealing with the emotional toll the family toll so I I my hat's off to you Sir thank you if there's a lot of people who every day day in and day out help provide support care to families and hospitals and elsewhere and so there's a great effort to try and make sure that people are have the care that they need and that they have the care that they want.

Katelyn
"katelyn" Discussed on Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

"The new house he does. It's an extension of our bedrooms so I can watch them. I watch them talk shit. I think it's great. That is hilarious. It's like big kids. Yeah Oh yeah. My Gold is recently got a playstation. I guess that's what it is. And he just like goes upstairs and disappears on my Ra. But it gives you ain't it. Yeah I guess that's the point of this a little bit of QNA because we're right at eight o'clock we'll keep talking forever you questions. Does anybody have any questions? We're going to open up a couple of Cuna Mars. Just pass it on so razor. Okay right here on the front unless your nervous thank you. Hi My name is Sarah. I live in Williamson County and I'm opening a dog grooming pet SPA. Oh so my question is do you. Guys HAVE ANIMALS. And what's their names. And why did you name because I hear every single day? What dogs or cats names are? And why so? That's my question. Okay Okay we have MIA. Who's a Pomeranian? Honestly Keeling Kindle Jason's August two we pulled tabs one night. We had they each got to pick a name it was. Khloe and MIA FLIPPED. And then we pulled in me a one. I don't know they chose it or kindle. Actually I think one that one and then saint. We rescued him from Saint Louis and he was found in a gutter and he is currently at school again because he keeps chewing the wood work. But he's he's with us but his name Saint after Saint Louis so there's we have. Rambo and Rambo was three months when I met Rambo. And he's he's like he's old English bulldog so he's like this chunky attitude a whole lot of love but like the best for the owners the worst dog for everybody else because very territorial and he. Yeah and then we have Nash but right now I know a lot of. I've got a lot of messages about Nash all my instagram. Because they haven't seen national wile and we sent him back to his trainer as of now because with the baby he's about one hundred and thirty pounds and it was just starting to get a little scary. So we're kind of testing Nash. To See if we can help some of his hyper nece and staff. Because you don't Wanna put her in like the little bouncy chair and God forbid so but we have Nash and I thought nationals a cool name Nashville. I guess it goes without saying. Yeah but their sweep babies we did have an Frenchie. A sounds bad. But I didn't realize how energetic French bulldogs were. I had an English in. He passed away and then we had a Frenchie named boss. Jason wanted to name our child boss. I said Hell no so I was like you can have the dull to name him that but so that's how he got his name. But in by Jason. Gone so much. He was gone for almost two weeks. I had met this. I was pregnant. Memphis was like four months. I was pregnant. I had dogs cancer. Mia Who's really loud and then I had boss who was crazy eating.

Nash Rambo Saint Louis Mia Who Jason kindle Khloe Cuna Mars Williamson County Keeling Sarah Memphis Nashville
"katelyn" Discussed on Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

"Here's hair extensions. He's like Okay Mrs Potato and just just shit on what I looked like in the morning and what I look like at night as a full Jason but at that point he was too far in people. Say you know makeup spouse advertisement. I'm like no you're welcome. Honestly you know gets falls. I think it's great. It's or when they're like see baby. Donnie. Macomb like that. First Day that we met. If I wasn't wearing makeup would you have wanted to hang out exactly? I look like my brother. You're looking though using Q. Right I like just I need it I needed. I want it. I like it to where the make up. No no I like it makes me. Happy Espirit de Happy. I'm actually because I wish I could just can't and it's fine but I think that's how all things should be do. What makes you happy if you feel good rocket? If it doesn't don't you know it's expressive for me. Yes you know. It's like what am I going to be tonight. Do I want to be. Do I want to wear pants? That's fine fashions. Von being females fun. Yeah I think so rock the. We've let's talk to me about superstar life. What is it like being 'cause y'all donder you're talking about your husband's being so down to earth but you guys are so down to earth and what is it like being in this bright light spotlight lifestyle? What is it like everybody wanting to know about your lives like everyone like wondering what's going on? How how do you navigate that I mean I think tough yeah I mean? I think everyone thinks it's like super glamorous but is it not always super glamorous no no it's not like today. I'm so this is the best part of my day. Obviously so I'm so excited for this tangle with all you ladies let me tell you I have felt like crap last four days and we had about fifty people at our house at seven thirty this morning filming and we got done right before I got here and so to like meet. People and for his impressions are everything and everyone so quick to judge. So if I'm not like hi it's so nice to meet you because I feel like about to throw up then. They're probably going to go back later. That day and be like kind of rude or you know what I mean. When you're having an off day you're not really allowed to have an off. Day are no no not really hard to navigate that. Yeah it is because everybody has an off day right four in a row.

Jason Mrs Potato Macomb Donnie
"katelyn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Welcome back to the program Katelyn here rich people buying homes paying cash or are they getting mortgages well it was just so some research done of all the people in New York City you bought homes in twenty nineteen that were worth five million dollars or more that's a pretty expensive house which the okay only rich people are find houses like that you got to assume someone's wealthy enough to buy a house of five million dollars or more they can write the check well guess what according to the research fifty six percent of those purchases were obtained with mortgages what a wealthy people know that you don't now well one of the things they now is something called arbitrage I mean think about this you've got five million Bucks in your bank account you can write a check for the five million Bucks to buy that five million dollar house but if you can get a mortgage instead at four percent what rate of return on your investments might you think you can obtain over the thirty year life of the mortgage if you're gonna pay four percent a year every year for thirty years the alternative is to invest the money and what rate of return on average might you get over that thirty year career the S. and P. five hundred the stock market's been averaging ten percent a year since nineteen twenty six I'm not suggesting you invest money you otherwise would use to buy a house and dump it all into the stock market heavens no but the point is what rate of return might you be able to obtain more importantly as the house grows in value the mortgage balance doesn't the mortgage balance is going down which major automatically building equity over long periods if the property rises in value your mere mortgage payments alone will help you build equity in the house and you get to keep your money available to you if you write a check to buy the property you'll never see that money again it's like burning money in the walls of the house that's not liquids not available what if you certainly need the cash think about this if more than half of the wealthy people in New York or buying homes with mortgages maybe you should consider how you're handling your own mortgage and this helps explain why it last year in the third quarter alone there were seven hundred billion dollars worth of free finances what did people do why would they re finance well one reason was to lower the interest rate interest rates are again near historic lows you could save hundreds of dollars a month potentially by refinancing your mortgage you could even conceivably do a cash out refi the house is grown in value pull some of the equity out of that house what did people do with it the use the money to pay down higher costs debt they use the money to renovate and here's the crazy thing sixty percent of the people who refinanced ended up with a higher interest rate than the one they were eliminated why would someone refinance a loan and do so willingly if you're gonna end up with a higher interest rate it's because they wanted the cash that they could use for other purposes and one of the things that they're using it for our home improvement projects big study was recently done by the national association of realtors on what are people doing in the area of home improvement this is one big reason people are doing refinances their houses grown in value they pull equity out of the house were re finance in the use the money to build a new master suite the average cost is a hundred and fifty thousand dollars according to the national association of realtors and yet when they sell that house they only recover seventy five percent of the money they spent this is something you have to understand if you're going to engage in home renovation projects you need to recognize that you are unlikely to generate a return on that investment according to the M. A. R. you only get seventy five percent of the money back.

Katelyn
Country Singer Kane Brown and Wife Katelyn Welcome Daughter Kingsley Rose

Donna and Steve

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Country Singer Kane Brown and Wife Katelyn Welcome Daughter Kingsley Rose

"You Aaron Cain brown and his wife Caitlyn welcomed their first child a daughter named Kingsley rose brown on Tuesday October twenty ninth a rep for the country star confirms to reporters brown announced the news on Instagram Wednesday sharing a photo of him and his wife with their newborn daughter writing welcome to the family kings lead roles brown Caitlyn added her own post saying obsessed with my little family Kingsley rose we are absolutely in love with

Caitlyn Instagram Aaron Cain Kingsley Rose Brown
Riot police clash with protesters over Catalan separatists' trial

The World

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Riot police clash with protesters over Catalan separatists' trial

"Katelyn rise please have clashed with protesters disrupting flights into Barcelona apples offices wielding batons charged to demonstrate his on nearby roads the protesters are angry at lengthy prison terms handed down to nine cats on

Katelyn Rise Barcelona
"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

NBC's Songland Podcast

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> You. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> was through in those. <Music> Two <Speech_Music_Female> miles <Speech_Music_Male> out of this town <Speech_Music_Male> say goodbye <Music> and Blah. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> Seconds. <Speech_Music_Male> Hours <Music> in a minute. <Music> We'll. <Music> It. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> Second <Speech_Female> performance <Speech_Female> was little as nerve <Speech_Female> wracking for me, because <Speech_Female> I didn't have to <Speech_Female> sing. I <Speech_Female> was just out there <Speech_Female> to throw in some harmony, <Speech_Female> so I was like <Silence> I'm chill, <Speech_Female> but also <Speech_Female> it's like handing off your song <Speech_Female> to this like. <Speech_Female> And being <Speech_Female> like hey, <Speech_Female> you have to make sure <Speech_Female> you've sell <Speech_Female> the song, <Speech_Female> but I knew Ted <Speech_Female> was a great singer <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> he was <Speech_Female> excited and I <Speech_Female> wasn't really worried <Speech_Female> that he wasn't going to do a good <Speech_Female> job, but I just was <Speech_Female> like. I hope <Speech_Female> this comes across <Silence> in the way that <SpeakerChange> we want it <Speech_Female> to. <Speech_Female> I felt really <Silence> really good about it. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> I was <Speech_Music_Female> hopeful, but <Speech_Female> I wasn't <Silence> sure. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> So <Speech_Female> they bring us out <Speech_Music_Male> the song that <Speech_Music_Male> we're GonNa take <Speech_Music_Male> him to the studio. <Speech_Music_Male> And the <Speech_Music_Male> deepest GONNA use <Speech_Music_Male> in the commercial. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Is Young <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Such a like <Speech_Female> an amazing <Speech_Female> moment. <Speech_Female> It was really <Speech_Female> really big and really <Speech_Female> special and meaningful <Speech_Female> and I'm just really <Speech_Music_Female> thankful <SpeakerChange> for the whole <Music> experience. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Young <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just had. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That thing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it just seemed to be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the song. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That <Speech_Music_Male> sounded like something <Speech_Music_Male> we would have done <Speech_Music_Male> or would have written, <Speech_Music_Male> and could do <Speech_Male> it also really <Speech_Music_Male> fit the jeep campaign. <Speech_Music_Male> Obviously, she <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nailed it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They were tuned into <Speech_Music_Male> exactly what that song <Music> needed to be. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm <Speech_Female> so excited <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> this song <Speech_Female> is being sung <Speech_Female> by Old Dominion. It's <Speech_Female> a song that <Speech_Female> is really really special <Speech_Female> to me <Speech_Music_Female> and I think <Speech_Female> it sounds amazing. <Speech_Female> This is <Speech_Female> Old Dominion <Speech_Female> with the song <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that I wrote <SpeakerChange> called <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Young.

"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

NBC's Songland Podcast

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> you <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> was through in those <Music> two <Speech_Music_Female> miles <Speech_Music_Male> out of this town. <Speech_Music_Male> Say Goodbye <Music> and Blah <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> seconds <Speech_Music_Male> hours <Music> in a minute. <Music> <Music> It <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> second <Speech_Female> performance <Speech_Female> was little as nerve <Speech_Female> wracking for me. Because <Speech_Female> I didn't have to <Speech_Female> sing. I <Speech_Female> was just out there <Speech_Female> to throw in some harmony <Speech_Female> so I was like <Silence> I'm chill <Speech_Female> but also <Speech_Female> it's like handing off your song <Speech_Female> to the other <Speech_Female> person and being <Speech_Female> like hey <Speech_Female> you have to make sure <Speech_Female> you've sell <Speech_Female> the song <Speech_Female> but I knew Ted <Speech_Female> was a great singer <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> he was <Speech_Female> excited and I <Speech_Female> wasn't really worried <Speech_Female> that he wasn't going to do a good <Speech_Female> job but I just was <Speech_Female> like. I hope <Speech_Female> this comes across <Silence> in the way that <SpeakerChange> we want it <Speech_Female> to. <Speech_Female> I felt really <Silence> really good about it. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> I was <Speech_Music_Female> hopeful but <Speech_Female> I wasn't <Silence> sure <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Female> they bring us out <Speech_Music_Male> the song that <Speech_Music_Male> we're GonNa take <Speech_Music_Male> him to. The studio <Speech_Music_Male> and the <Speech_Music_Male> deepest <Speech_Music_Male> commercial <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> is young. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Such a like <Speech_Female> an amazing <Speech_Female> moment <Speech_Female> it was really <Speech_Female> really big and really <Speech_Female> special and meaningful <Speech_Female> and I'm just really <Speech_Music_Female> thankful <SpeakerChange> for the whole <Music> experience. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Young <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just had <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that thing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It just seemed to be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the song <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Music_Male> sounded like something <Speech_Music_Male> we would have done <Speech_Music_Male> or would have written <Speech_Music_Male> and could do <Speech_Male> it also really <Speech_Music_Male> fit the jeep campaign. <Speech_Music_Male> Obviously she <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nailed it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They were tuned into <Speech_Music_Male> exactly what that song <Music> needed to be. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm <Speech_Female> so excited <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> this song <Speech_Female> is being sung <Speech_Female> by Old Dominion. It's <Speech_Female> a song that <Speech_Female> is really really special <Speech_Female> to me <Speech_Music_Female> and I think <Speech_Female> it sounds amazing. <Speech_Female> This is <Speech_Female> old dominion <Speech_Female> with. The song <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that I wrote <SpeakerChange> called <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> young

"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

NBC's Songland Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

"Wan Carpet. In your was apartment. Code of emotion. Go back just. Making out on his sofa. My head on your shoulder. Open. Just. Listen. Brazil. View..

"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

NBC's Songland Podcast

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

"All had been thinking about who this feeling of like remember when I've been married for actually just celebrated five years so I got married young and fell in love young. And when you're falling in love with this certain person for the first time it's like Sarah mandated so fun and everything's fun and you're always just like living life like it's a movie. You're not really thinking about logistics or your schedule or your calendar or whether or not you need to like. Get your oil changed. It's like that's just like isn't as relevant and you're just like well whatever I have you in life's amazing you know when you're with the same prison for a long time that starts to fade out and real life takes over. I was like Oh remember when it was like so new. Didn't know everything about each other yet and you would pick them up from lax and all the things that you do in sort of the bitter sweetness of that being gone and the fact that will never happen again was just sort of in my brain and this like nostalgic kind of Mellon Collie looking back. Oh how things used to be how I used to be. We ended the first day really was just the chorus.

lax Sarah
"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

NBC's Songland Podcast

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"katelyn" Discussed on NBC's Songland Podcast

"Kathleen Tarba's with her Song Young. This was another really interesting show because ever song chosen Old Dominion and not only GonNa cut it as a single but it's instantly going into jeep commercial. Now that is pretty amazing for a song writer. It's kind of leap from being over all sorts of complicated issues to get your son placed in the commercial songs when you play some in different context. It gives a whole new gravitas. The Walnut Old Dominion chose. It was a song called young. The song is a great solve Jefferson position to what the band would probably normally do. So we going to hear from winning Rights Catlin Tarver about her sung. Yung in a bit. First Ladies and Gentlemen Old Dominion Sometimes when you are writing a song. You don't how you're writing you. Just you feel something you follow that song where it wants to go and we have a little idea and we go wonder what could be and then you follow it. We're always looking for a great song and that's sounds generic but that's a tough thing to find the now and it's tough thing to write the concept for Song Land. Part of me is surprised that this hasn't existed up until this point. You know. Maybe that's just coming from my own perspective on life. Because I love songwriting so much. We all love music and we love artists. We love that part of it but those songs had to come from somewhere and the the process which they're created to me is the most fascinating thing you know so the the show is so cool so awesome to to give people a glimpse behind the curtain of. Where do you start like? How do you come up with the melody? How do you come up with lyrics? And how do you find tune that how do you get it to a point where it's that final product that you finally get to hear on the radio or on a commercial or whatever? It might be the type of song that we're looking for is one that changes are mood and changes the room. You're in when you listen to it or changes you know changes everything just inspires you makes you want to write more or makes you wanNA play it in front of a crowd of people just fills you with an energy that you can't put your finger on and only that song can do that can do that for you. So Ladies and gentlemen the winning writer in Tarver Hi this is Caitlyn Tarver. And I'm the winner of the Old Dominion Episode and they chose my Song Yang. I'm from Georgia. I grew up in the south and like a small town and would go to church every week. I was kind of like a lot of the music I was exposed to. As a small child I would put on shows in the living room and staying also in charge and talent shows like different small town type of events. I remember when I was six grade. I was going to my birthday party and most of my friends had started listening to the radio so on the way to the party they wanted to listen to the radio then turned it on and I immediately became says to with the radio and Britney Spears and insane backstreet boys and that whole era of pop and I was just kind of hooked and then American idol aired its first season and we watched it and Ryan seacrest talking about how they're going to do in American idol for kids and it was like it's going to be auditions the summer and he's saying this on TV. And I was like I gotta go. GotTa go and so. I went to the audition in Chattanooga Tennessee. I did alright and ended up making it to Hollywood getting to be an LA and getting to go to set and like singing onstage and kind of being exposed to that. I was pretty much hooked with the idea of becoming a singer from that point on and Went back to like eighth grade and I was like Okay so what do I do now? So we just SORTA started off with like my dad would. Cold call like middle schools and be like. Hey my daughter was on the American Juniors show and she would love to come sing at your school and most places would be great. I did that for a few years and saying at some of the weirdest stuff kind of cut my teeth as like a performer. Like I've played to so many empty fields and somehow survived. I'd also at this point met the Jonas brothers. I played this festival New Jersey around the same time that they played one of their first shows so we met at that time and they were you know nobody and so was I and then we kind kept in touch so when they would come down to like Orlando or Atlanta. My Dad would be like. Hey can we complain the show at the small club or whatever and they'd be like yeah so I kinda got in with them and then that was like all right. Let's get you in some writing sessions. And so that's when I sort of was able to be in the studio with another writer being like them asking me questions about my life and sort of opening my eyes to what it meant to write a song about something. You've gone through so probably around like sixteen or seventeen was when. I started writing when I was reading young. The song that ultimately chose on Song land as the winning song. I wrote a pretty recently like about a year ago and I went in for the first session of it with these producers that I work with a good bit and this other writer and we were sort of having one of those days where an idea dislike wasn't really flow in a lot of times. I like to come in and just sort of start from scratch and see what chords we're going to work with which sort of informs the feeling of the song to me. We had these chords that I really liked and it did feel real estate..

writer Caitlyn Tarver Walnut Old Dominion Kathleen Tarba Tarver Hi Britney Spears Yung Ryan seacrest Jefferson Chattanooga New Jersey Tennessee Georgia Hollywood Orlando Atlanta
"katelyn" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"katelyn" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"And katelyn coming up the W G Y AccuWeather four. Forecast. Now open the Masri family children's emergency center at Albany mass time for podcasters to get the recognition they deserve. Introducing the iheartradio podcast awards presented by capital. One for twenty categories like crime comedy. Us exports curiosity and more cast your vote, and you're automatically qualified to join us in verse and for the first-ever iheartradio podcast awards vote. Now iheart podcast awards dot com. Capital? One is the proud presenting partner of the iheartradio podcast awards. Just another example of the great products rewards service and access to unique and unforgettable experiences neighboring to their customers. This is Barbara Harris for Greenbury cereals, you may know, the grain barriers known for nutritious, whole, grains, and natural antioxidants. But now I'd like to tell you about new Greenbury cereals with remarkable onyx unexplained sorghum was perfected a Texas. A M university is health benefits are remarkable like neutralizing full range of free radical threats to your body from the sun's rays to normal digestion and everything in between. Not only more powerful antioxidants onyx helps control sugar metabolism in your body is slows down the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream and Greenbury onyx has natural fiber grown within the plant itself. So we don't have to borrow fiber. As some thorough zoo, also Greenbury pancake and waffle, cookie, brownie and Muffin mixes all was remarkable onyx time to give your body some real support grain berry with onyx available at your local market, thirty two..

Us katelyn Greenbury Masri Barbara Harris partner Texas
"katelyn" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"katelyn" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Greg picker Ryan katelyn, Chris Detweiler back the Barclay center in Brooklyn, New York where tonight the New York Islanders black the New Jersey. Devils by the final score of three to nothing in Greg. It was a great atmosphere for hockey. It was a Saturday night nearly twelve thousand on hand over fifty alumni of the New York Islanders all the way back to the inaugural seventy two seventy three season we're here and they saw quite a game as the islanders had an early. One. Nothing lead on a power play goal by Jordan, Everley it stayed that way until they are under five minutes remaining. When Nelson scored a huge goal to make it to nothing, and then may feel let us all breathe a little easier. As you went goal line. The goal line into the empty net to end it about three goals in four different situations because you have the power play goal. Yep. Even strength goal. And then a short handed empty-net goal islanders. Now, four shorties already on this young campaign. That's tied for second. Now in the NHL trailing only Arizona coyotes who have seven shorties, but it really was a team effort because they made that Everley goal stand up. The defense was terrific and any time. There was a breakdown Thomas. Price was there. The devils went over four on their power play. So this island or penalty kill Greg. That was so good on the road trip where they went three and Owen went nine for nine in the kill stumbled a little bit Thursday here against the penguins who have all that firepower. They lead up to on the disadvantage. What tonight the New Jersey Devils had four chances man up including the late one. When comrade was called for delaying the game, they're often icing, but they couldn't get anything behind Grayson the islanders in New York one it by three and how about on only Thomas gross, but the block shots by the Andrea. Bul honors twenty total blocked shots in this game. By the islanders from shots off the sticks of devils four blocked shots each by Thomas Hickey, Ryan Polack and Scott Mayfield. So twelve blocked shots combined between those three defenseman also a big part of the success tonight. So again, the islanders now have a five game winning streak their longest winning streak a year ago was four they have points in six straight games. And for the moment. They sit alone atop the metro division at seventeen points penguins star of the night, the same fifteen the islanders have. But right now, Pittsburgh continues to trail at home to Toronto three nothing with under six minutes to go in regulation, again, your final tonight in Brooklyn, the New York Islanders three the New Jersey Devils, nothing we'll take a break. And when we come back much ROY head on the post game show or Ryan tunnel will bring us player reaction from the outer dressing room. But straight up the full recap of how in down tonight highlights included in New York's three goal victory. It's next. You're listening to your Commodores hockey on the isles radio network..

New York Islanders New Jersey Devils New York New Jersey Greg Ryan katelyn penguins Brooklyn hockey Everley Commodores Ryan tunnel Barclay center Chris Detweiler NHL Thomas Hickey Pittsburgh Nelson Jordan
"katelyn" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"katelyn" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Announcing the rest of the company. We sat down with the engineering manager of every single team that's working on, react native to understand what the impact of it was. And then we have a spreadsheet now internally where we have all the reactive projects and their owners in the process of moving away from it. I can speak more on the side because that's what I'm more familiar with. But I think the teams have been very, very, very cooperative in. I'm very thankful for that such that they all are making sure that they have resources on entering IOS to move away from it at a high level, we agreed so essentially maintain support for reactive through twenty eight eighteen in maybe a little bit into twenty nineteen. Basically, we're saying, hey, like this way we through this really quickly. We don't want to randomize your current roadmap, and so we're gonna make sure it doesn't break for at least a year year at half. But after that, you should really start to move away from it because we're not going to be putting his much effort into maintaining the infrastructure. So that was one side of things. The other side on the inside we've used this opportunity of moving away from native, but also doing things like opting common, which we've done very well. This year, we've gone from zero to eighty percent of new code and katelyn in twenty alone on. But we've used this opportunity to kind of take some of the best aspects of the functional reactive nature of react. And we built this really nice, Android katelyn library or framework that leverages some of the basically a lot of the common things already do in screens and it it robs us some of these patterns into really nice framework that's both fast to develop in, but also it will feel familiar for people who are used to react native because it has some similar concepts. Do you have any advice for people. Regarding react native, so who should use react native, who should not use react native or I don't want to make you prescriptive. Maybe you just want to talk about specific strategic decisions, but can you help people vet this technology? Yeah, so this is the golden question. Should I use reacted over? Not and I refuse to give a specific. You should use your active, you shouldn't. But this is what I would say. First of all, doing reactive does not preclude you from ever having to native Android or Iowa. So there will unless you hire people who explicitly had to do that, just be aware that if you do native, you will need to jump into Andrew us fairly frequently depending on what you're doing. And the second one is that when reactive works, it is amazing. Like we had a couple of teams that had really good experiences with reactive and the productivity and the speed with which they were able to move was simply off the charts which Wayne hot module reloading which actually works reliably you right line of code in it shows up on Andro nihilist. In one or two seconds. I think that's really incredible. But what you wind up with is these what I call landmines? So everything is going swimmingly well, and then you hit a little landline. So I'll give you an example of one. We had one instance where sometimes on certain phones, even in particular, the pixel was particularly notable for this randomly. We didn't feel like we had made any significant changes. We one out of ten times, so all recognize screens rendered white. They would never render and we didn't know what everything seemed fine. It was initialising. It was hitting the Java script, but it just simply wouldn't show up on the screen and we were pulling our hair out trying to reproduce reliably figure out what is going on. And after I would say a solid week of multiple engineers going heads down trying to figure out what was going on..

katelyn engineering manager Andrew Wayne Iowa eighty percent two seconds
"katelyn" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"katelyn" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Announcing the rest of the company. We sat down with the engineering manager of every single team that's working on, react native to understand what the impact of it was. And then we have a spreadsheet now internally where we have all the reactive projects and their owners in the process of moving away from it. I can speak more on the side because that's what I'm more familiar with. But I think the teams have been very, very, very cooperative in. I'm very thankful for that such that they all are making sure that they have resources on entering IOS to move away from it at a high level, we agreed so essentially maintain support for reactive through twenty eight eighteen in maybe a little bit into twenty nineteen. Basically, we're saying, hey, like this way we through this really quickly. We don't want to randomize your current roadmap, and so we're gonna make sure it doesn't break for at least a year year at half. But after that, you should really start to move away from it because we're not going to be putting his much effort into maintaining the infrastructure. So that was one side of things. The other side on the inside we've used this opportunity of moving away from native, but also doing things like opting common, which we've done very well. This year, we've gone from zero to eighty percent of new code and katelyn in twenty alone on. But we've used this opportunity to kind of take some of the best aspects of the functional reactive nature of react. And we built this really nice, Android katelyn library or framework that leverages some of the basically a lot of the common things already do in screens and it it robs us some of these patterns into really nice framework that's both fast to develop in, but also it will feel familiar for people who are used to react native because it has some similar concepts. Do you have any advice for people. Regarding react native, so who should use react native, who should not use react native or I don't want to make you prescriptive. Maybe you just want to talk about specific strategic decisions, but can you help people vet this technology? Yeah, so this is the golden question. Should I use reacted over? Not and I refuse to give a specific. You should use your active, you shouldn't. But this is what I would say. First of all, doing reactive does not preclude you from ever having to native Android or Iowa. So there will unless you hire people who explicitly had to do that, just be aware that if you do native, you will need to jump into Andrew us fairly frequently depending on what you're doing. And the second one is that when reactive works, it is amazing. Like we had a couple of teams that had really good experiences with reactive and the productivity and the speed with which they were able to move was simply off the charts which Wayne hot module reloading which actually works reliably you right line of code in it shows up on Andro nihilist. In one or two seconds. I think that's really incredible. But what you wind up with is these what I call landmines? So everything is going swimmingly well, and then you hit a little landline. So I'll give you an example of one. We had one instance where sometimes on certain phones, even in particular, the pixel was particularly notable for this randomly. We didn't feel like we had made any significant changes. We one out of ten times, so all recognize screens rendered white. They would never render and we didn't know what everything seemed fine. It was initialising. It was hitting the Java script, but it just simply wouldn't show up on the screen and we were pulling our hair out trying to reproduce reliably figure out what is going on. And after I would say a solid week of multiple engineers going heads down trying to figure out what was going on..

katelyn engineering manager Andrew Wayne Iowa eighty percent two seconds