16 Burst results for "Kate Mcmahon"

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

08:19 min | Last month

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"He's doing to conspiracy business, and we totally understand, John. It's okay. We'll get you later this week. We'll get him later this week. It's okay. Look, all I was just gonna ask was, I mean, Kate McNamara's the starting quarterback. He's been named the starting quarterback for weeks. So they spring since spring Falls been up, not dude. Come on the players. Every player's saying, everybody saying we do not go on. You know what they say, J. Mo. So, with that being, said Kate McNamara is the starting quarterback, and I'm I'm going to believe these coaches. I'm gonna believe. I mean, you had them off. You got the You got the quarterback coach and Matt White saying he's a 10 year veteran in the making. I mean, you and not a start. He did say starters months ago. I know I know. And you got the head coach who went to The big Tim Media Day, it said. Kate back back. As our starting quarterback. That was little more recent. Then you got Josh Gattis, who meets with the media before camp starts it says Kate McMahon as I started quarterback. I mean, come on. Go. Yeah, That's what I'm saying. So I mean, Everybody said it. It must be true. JJ's gotta got some things to do, Alan. Almost. He's not caught up on things. So look. Came back Mayor will be the starting quarterback. We know one thing will be the starting quarterback for Western Michigan. That's what I do know. That's a look. You know is that you know how What? What I say about this offense. When I say about this defense this defense is going to take. It's good. It looks You'll take two games or it may take a game and a half the Western Michigan game full game and then Washington at halftime. But this team has got to be carried by its offense. The first Game and a half to two games. So it's going to be up to this offense doing there. Think they're the ones that the veteran guys they got. They got a lot of guys coming back together. I think they have from what I'm hearing. From from the individuals that I've spoken to and everything like that. They've got an offensive line that they've got an underrated dare I say it. Underrated offense blind because everybody thinks everybody I talk to God. I always like it ain't no good. I mean, they got rid of that because the coaches Baba Okay, we'll see. I mean, Marble, said he had three starting linemen already. Just looking for two more. I mean, think about, he said. We got three offensive starters already. Just got to fight some other guys, and we got eight guys that can play that already played. So look, you got you. Look, when you look at that you got wide receivers that have that have, uh Had had time on the field last year. They got a chance to play. Uh, you got some running, Baxter that that they're very high on you. You can see it that you You can hear it in how they speak about these running back, you hear? I mean, I've heard Jim Harbaugh called, Uh Hassan Haskins as well as Blake Coram. One A one b. Not just you know, it's it's It's, uh, it's you know, Number one number two RB one in our B two. He's called him 181 B and then they all you see them light up. When they talk about Donovan Edwards. I mean, they light up and when you hear what they have to say, even my cart set You know this guy? He's doing it What he did in high school. He doing it right here in college football, too. They don't talk about guys like that. I mean, they just don't say that so There's something about this offense that there that these coaches like there's something about these coaches. These players like you can see the recipient. The reciprocation of What the players love about these coaches and what the coaches love about these players. You can hear it in Mike Hart and Ron Bellamy's When they speak. I heard it in Josh Gattis and, uh, Mike McDonald. These the it sounds. I'm just going to give you from the coaches speech that I hear it sounds like these players like to come down your back of the hall and pride. And practice and practice, Mike Hart said it they come down here They give everything they got. They come back. They were the smile on their face. They're willing to get back on the field and do it again. I mean, that's that's what you want to hear. That's the kind of coaches speech I want to hear. That means they're enjoying what they do. They like the people around them. I mean, I played football for a while. There's a lot of times I didn't like the guy. I didn't like those guys around me. There's a lot of times I love those guys around me. So I'm just saying. It makes it makes a world of difference. J. Mo Uh, you know, we always like to think you know, I point out all the time. We always expect these athletes to be superhuman and you know, you know, rides above everything and, you know, always be Almost essentially perfect, But like you said, when you you know you can almost you can hear it in the difference and the players voices when they when they talk this season, and you can hear Obviously the excitement and the much younger coaching staff for this this upcoming season, and so there's you know, we don't know a ton of a lot of these guys. But You know, you and I are very lucky. We know that guy Mike Hart, who was the first interview. He's not really somebody who sugarcoats things very often, uh, again talking about the the things that we were hearing. From him, because I I do think and you know, I've heard him talk about the offensive line. In the important things of this offensive line. I agree with you, Jamie. The the offense is going to need to carry the team for you know, maybe even more than the first game and a half. It might be a little bit longer than that. And it might be until that Wisconsin game where, Hey, you're going to have to put up some some point to win that game. And so no matter who the quarterback is, and I agree with you, I think it will be Cade McNamara. Um No matter who the quarterback is. It's going to take a good offensive line. A good running Brad Group, a good wide receiver group, which you know we haven't even really talked about Baldwin in the the addition that he is the big transfer from from Jackson State, and hopefully the impact that he is going to have on this offense, But All of those guys, I think no matter who the quarterback is, they are going to have to play above themselves to make their job. Very easy. And you know, I was thinking, you know again. We were supposed to have John Navarre are Monday afternoon quarterback here on this segment. And I was thinking about, you know, before that first game that he played because I believe it was either Central or western Michigan. But he came out and he set a single season. Uh, you know, first start record. For throwing four touchdowns in his first game, and I'm sure he would be the first one to tell you that that record goes to everyone else on that team. The offensive line that was block informed the running backs that we're keeping up all the wide receivers or tight ends who called those touchdown passes? So you know you were. You were talking a little bit about the quarterback, and I'm sure you know that's always kind of our focus when we've got John Navarre here on the program, but I do think You are right that it's going to be the offense that needs to carry us those first few games, but it's everybody else the quarterback hopefully once whoever it is, gets that play up and, hey, I'm certainly hoping that whoever it is would be able to carry us for those first few games, But with the limited experience at any of those guys is bringing in, even though Bowman has a little bit more down at Texas Tech. Limited experience. It's going to be on all of these other position groups to elevate their play to make that quarterbacks job as easy as possible almost as full proof as possible. If Michigan is going to be going to be successful, so it does seem like there is some hope at all Those other positions are we see the potential. I agree that that offensive line That it's been talked a little bit down upon. But there are a lot of those guys that hes graded out..

Mike McDonald Jim Harbaugh Josh Gattis John Navarre Jamie Kate McNamara Matt White Kate McMahon Mike Hart Blake Coram Cade McNamara John Ron Bellamy Donovan Edwards Alan two two games Kate Monday afternoon eight guys
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This next report. In our series on child care, the lack of affordable child care is not just an issue in urban and suburban communities. In rural America. Limited access can also take a toll on small town economies. Special correspondent Cat Wise and producer Kate McMahon travel to Nebraska to see how to small towns there are working to solve problems. It's all part of our series, raising the Future Americas Childcare Dilemma. It's a peaceful morning outside the coffee, family home and Shipley, Nebraska inside the morning. Rush has begun getting Hank. Ready homework. There you go. Yes, Sadie Coffee is a mother of four, ranging in age from a year and a half to 14. Her husband heads to work most mornings by 5 30, So she's in charge of getting everyone up and ready. Basically is a small town just 341 people. Agriculture drives the local economy and supports businesses along Main Street about 10 years ago, there was concerned that those businesses and the wider community we're facing Iraqi future, not because of falling crop prices. Oh, okay, but for a lack of childcare. Community survey revealed childcare was a critical need for young families worried they might move away and businesses would suffer. The town took action. What do you guys do it in 2013, using state grant money, local tax dollars and fees from parents. Quickly created something. The nation has seldom seen an infant and toddler child care program owned and operated by a public school district..

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 months ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Importance for America's working families CHILDCARE During the pandemic, the federal government spent more than $50 billion to shore up the child care industry. But advocates say cost and access are still major issues. Over the past several months, Special correspondent Cat Wise and producer Kate McMahon traveled across the country for our series, raising the Future Americas Childcare Dilemma. They begin with how we got here and what's at stake. America's fragile child care system was thrust into the national spotlight last year. Daycares across the state are closing its doors because of the coronavirus, forcing parents to scramble and driving millions of women out of the workforce. Today as the country emerges from the pandemic, with businesses and the economy roaring back to life. The same can be said for the child care industry, and now many parents who want to go back to work are faced with a new problem. Child care shortage. Childcare has been one of the biggest struggles for working families. For decades. We were blown away by the cost of childcare. Heidi Loman and her wife, Miranda Chamberlain, live in Portland, Oregon, with their two year old daughter. Autumn, All right, I'm going to push you in Haiti as a high school counselor, and Miranda is an electrician. When they began their childcare search, they were shocked by what they learned. She was born in 2018, and some of the places I to word or two ring for the 2021 school year. So it was even like a year plus down the road. So It was a scramble by Mama. Eventually they found a program that cost nearly as.

Heidi Loman Kate McMahon Miranda Chamberlain 2018 Haiti Miranda 2021 Portland, Oregon more than $50 billion Cat Wise last year Today America two year old millions of women two ring one several months Americas
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

07:34 min | 9 months ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

"Joining me on the podcast. Today is somebody that. I regard is the new age. Pr guru of our industry is katie. Brayden katie heads up the pr for sofia hilton. None of salam as well as some other very very cool current brands. Kate is going to be coming onto the show. She's going to be telling you what s pr. Why does it matter to you. What is the content that you should be sharing. Why should you be sharing. This is all the great stuff that we are going to be talking about any step aside. So if you've been following our episodes over the last month or so you'll know we've really been going deep into raising your profile within the industry so if you're curious to wondering how you get your message. Up are out there statute. so let's cue intro. This is how to cut it in hairdressing industry podcast show with domain episode episode number one hundred and eighty one industry broadcast this show that easy that incites rations and information to take your handwriting added to the next level is your host dom whoa combat to help cut the in the hairdressing industry. This is a show that gives you the insights. Inspirations and that's going to take you headdresses angering careers to the next level and we do that by bringing onto the show every week industry leaders rising stars digital and business fingers are knows from the creative fashion and media industries. Now i have some really good news for any of you. The a planning you'll education scheduled for two thousand and twenty one because our sponsors of the cut podcast well it professionals have just released their education yearbook and this yearbook has become a must have tool for many salons and this year is filled full with more useful information than ever before as well as the low down on. All the courses are well as studios for the uk an island. There's plenty of information on the edible lineup of artists and educators as well as the weller passionate as a team of social influences who cherry picked to work closely with the brand. So if you would like to find out any more on this brochure or the education of well. It professionals are offering. Then you just need to go to education dot well dot com and just want to give a special. Thank you to our patrons supporting the how to cut podcasts. On this week. I just want to give out a chance to some of our latest patrons are now. Is natalie clark on instagram at netflix dot. Clark dot seven free. Four k mon- at kate mcmahon hair and beauty studio and sam too good on instagram at too good undescored underscore well under school being. Thank you for supporting the house. cows is. It really is appreciate moving then to Today we are joined by the new face of pr. Katie brayden sheds at the peel for sophie. Not of a silent as well as many leading brands as she is going to be giving us some absolute key points to understand. Npr what is about why you need to be in it. Why you need wants a reason. Feel peer these are all of the many points that we are earn to stand and she is also going to be sharing in. This won't make sophea hilton's pr stand out above so many in the industry with katie knows all that because she works on this website and she's going to be sharing some lows. Tips are absolutely fantastic listening for you today and as we come to the end of the poconos. We're then going to drop out if you want to hear this week's extra show with. Kt where she's going to be giving you top tips to get in payoff. You'll hairdressing korea. Then you'll need to go to patriot dot com slash. How to cut it so. Let's go to today's podcast with katie. Brayden who you can find on instagram at katie brandon. Npr eighty brayden. How i look at is really to have you on the podcast today. And it's a subject that i've been wanting to cover for a longtime really. I want to be talking about the pill. The new rules to pay our and so much has changed. Hasn't it and all the secrets you want. All my seat i want. Those clothes is so deep. It you'll you'll you'll. Cva of pr is pretty impressive. Just give listeners. Just some of the people that you look after so we have this affair hilton who he may or may not shoot. I may know of directly. Maybe and obviously gorgeous sal on another and then we have an axe and crazy cola who are also associated with miss. Cecilia severi incestual salary. That i have. And then. I have kevin massey gorgeous australian aeko wonderful in every way and then we have silk london who are more consumer but they are also now give us a people will think just listening to those pretty cool names. That you a massive. Pr company. A slow hoax is set up before we get in to the world of peel. I am a one man band. See us yeah well. I was an assistant who literally works for me five hours a week and sometimes not even that i mean free cove it. She would be so helpful she could actually come to my house out and work with me statistically health but now we are separated and we have been so basically the whole year so everything she does for me now is just still which has taken her workload down a little bit but yeah i do probably like ninety percent of the work i would say he'll that'd be people that hit the world. Pr bandied around. And it's a word that we're hearing more often than ever before because pr but just explain to listeners who think boys pl s pr. I would love to know. Basically he are it means public relations and everything that is public facing that is to do with a person or brand that falls under the category so the range of stuff that we can cover with. That is absolutely massive and so hard to define. It's no longer like just traditional press. It's press influences. It's social media. Campaigns is positioning is brand associations it's contracts. It's everything does it matter. I think it gets to.

Brayden katie sofia hilton katie natalie clark kate mcmahon Katie brayden salam sophea hilton katie brandon Kate weller instagram netflix Cecilia severi kevin massey sophie Brayden Npr Clark uk
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:19 min | 1 year ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Information and it needs to be reined in now reveals Emily Harris has been working with reporter Kate McMahon on today show and then Lee picks up this part of the story one person who believes genetic genealogy needs to be reined in is this man my name is Michael us free I live here in New Orleans and I work in the film industry down here it's Sunday morning I reach Michael on the phone as you sitting in a small office in his house he tells me about an encounter he had with a precursor of genetic genealogy back in two thousand fourteen he was visiting his parents a few hours out of town and I got a call from the police down here in New Orleans who told me my vehicle match the description of a hit and run he knew he wasn't involved he told the police he be happy to chat he could meet them at his house around to that afternoon I pulled up at exactly two o'clock and at two OO one three officers were at my door and I have a big ninety pound labradoodle and he likes to bark at people at the door so he was all excited when they came in and within about thirty seconds to a minute they were asking me if I would mind going down to the station to talk to Michael still has his labradoodle oboe thank and as he left bobo that day six years ago getting into the backseat of the police car Michael asked one of the officers if they really wanted to talk about a hit and run and at that point he said well actually we'd like to talk to you about some other things too just one other thing it turned out a murder a young woman named Angie died she had been raped and stabbed multiple times in nineteen ninety six in Idaho Michael had visited Idaho in the mid nineteen nineties his sisters had gone to college there and he co produced a short film about people who get obsessed with killers it's called murder of billions tell me songs from its made it's a fictional film that parts of it are pretty gruesome and one killing described in it resembles what happened to Angie and I was sure either in blocking her from the door and stabbing lunettes like tax this is one of the things that the police saw online when they were researching me they said look at this scene makes short films about men sneaking into houses and murdering young girls how how and when did they get a sample of your DNA probably two to three hours maybe into it and walks what turns out to be a Louisiana state police and he was a very large man it seems like at the time he was seven feet tall and four hundred pounds he had a mouth swab to latex gloves and he was walking directly towards me right from the door and he's like we're gonna take your DNA now and I backed up and I went whoa whoa wait a minute you know what what is this this is crazy I should I get a lawyer and he said well do you see this warrant and that means that you have to give your DNA to us right now what the officer said was true like with any search warrant a judge can sign an order giving police the right to collect your DNA if police can explain to that judge why you're a suspect Idaho police had zeroed in on Michael after trying something they've never done before putting crime scene DNA collected from Angie's murder through a genealogical database Michael says his dad gave a DNA sample to that database more than a decade ago the nonprofit organization that owns the database had visited the Mormon church Michael's dad went to asking people to take part the Mormon faith puts a lot of stock into genealogy because of religious purposes Mormons believe in identifying dead ancestors who were not members of the church and baptizing them so the whole family can be together in the afterlife years after Michael's father gave his sample that genealogical database was sold to answer history dot com Idaho police searched it using a DNA analysis that's less exact than what's used today they found a close match then they got a warrant to make ancestry give them the name it was Michael's dad they research the family and honed in on Michael because of his movie and his friends in Idaho basically my father participated in the DNA sample collection and you know fifteen years later I am being pulled in as a suspect in a murder what struck me about the S. three case was that this was using it not a law enforcement database and that struck me as quite noteworthy Natalie ram teaches law at the university of Maryland and she learned about Michael story in two thousand fifteen this was the first known time police had searched a genealogy database instead of the usual criminal databases created for police those law enforcement databases may have problems Natalie says but at least they have supervision state labs have to follow specific procedures database searches might be limited to certain crimes and the criminal database CODIS holds only DNA profiles of people who've been arrested or convicted so by law they've already lost some privacy rights by contrast the consumer genetic databases are comprised primarily of people who have decided they're interested in learning more about their DNA what it can tell them about their ancestral origins one of my total about their future genetic medical risks and soccer pretty personal stuff so personal says Natalie that consumer DNA databases need oversights laws about when and how police can use them in her view it goes back to the basics of the constitution we have a balance of values between of privacy and crime solving between liberty and crime solving afterall one four think it's all the last war crimes if they were able to enter anyone's home at any time just because they wanted to we don't allow that when privacy activists first heard Michael astri story in two thousand fifteen the criticism was quick and severe tough enough that ancestry dot com cut off public access to the database where police had found his father Natalie says that was the right move but people working in genetic genealogy say that's wrong consumer DNA databases should be easily available to police I decide to visit on the company that's built a business off genetic genealogy thanks in here is so hot already welcome to DC right CEO Steve Armen chart shows me around headquarters it's just desks and computers in a bland office building in the DC suburbs they outsource all their lab work my eye catches some small iridescent pieces of plastic on display we would use so those are Mike or ray scanner chips what's actually on them so DNA gets washed over these chips they have probes DNA sticks to the probes and a computer analyzes it so it's like at the peace of the DNA that you're reading okay service Dan is that I don't know these are expensive chips that our our partner lab gave us somebody's DNA turned into art for display when we sit down in his office to talk Steve argues that police using genetic genealogy to find a suspect is just like looking for clues on Facebook what if a cop he says find a photo of a suspect with his arm around a victim and he didn't post it his aunt Ted he didn't give his aunt permission to do that but she's made an association associations are all around us DNA is another one and police use all of those associations all the time when they're doing best cation as sort of the heart what they do so I don't see that this is a lot different than photographs on Facebook the right to privacy can depend on what choices you make on Facebook for with your DNA Steve points out that when you send in a split sample or you share your DNA profile on a commercial website to look for relatives you're agreeing to the terms of service as long as as people are voluntarily allowing their DNA to be searched I just don't see where the privacy concerns arise I asked Natalie about that argument she says that voluntarily sharing your DNA profile is different it's true she says the person sending in their own sample may be fine with police sifting through their genetic connections but it's fundamentally untrue with respect to their genetic relatives who may have never use one of these consumer genetic services would never want to and are being implicitly made fine noble through this database through no voluntary conduct of the round people like Michael astri after police swapped his cheek in the interrogation room they took him home they dropped me back on my side wall can that was it I didn't hear anything from them and on the thirty third day they sent me an email that said Hey Mister rush three your DNA did not match the the sample from the crime scene something you already knew sorry for the inconvenience your DNA will not be used for any other testing purposes thank you have a nice day but he knows his DNA was capped and looked out again and I know that because a year and a half ago the Idaho falls police department sent my sample to this company called parable on laughs Idaho police were still looking for Angie's killer last summer they turn to paragon and genetic genealogy see see more bonds chief genetic genealogist used the genealogy website Jed match to find the man whose DNA was at the murder scene that man confessed he's now in prison Michael astri is not but the experience has made him wish he could keep his DNA private this information could be used for a lot of different purposes wouldn't it be terrible if our DNA information was used to persecute and prosecute all the didn't agree with them politically we all think that things like that couldn't happen in yet we will we will see it's impossible to know where DNA technology will take us Hollywood has some ideas they're going to find me place where any so from any part of your body can be played hi welcome to Gatica but in real life here are some signs of where we already are this month the trump administration launched a pilot program mandating the collection of DNA samples from detained migrants those samples will be entered into CODIS vastly expanding the FBI's database and using it to enforce immigration law they say this complies with the two thousand five law until now border police hadn't exemption and last September North Dakota prosecutors filed felony conspiracy charges against a man who protested the Dakota access pipeline three years ago they found his DNA on a cigarette but at the scene and I tracked him down because of past arrest and then there's China where the government is rounding up a Muslim minority called the Uighurs center that's that's remarkable number a million Chinese Muslims in camps right because the the Chinese government cracks down on them because of their religion why is that true and be why don't we hear more about it that's absolutely true and they're collecting the DNA of these individuals by the way as well for someone and and using a potentially American technology to do it concerns about police use of DNA have even been raised in the Supreme Court in two thousand thirteen the court considered whether it was okay for police to take DNA samples from people who are arrested but not convicted the now late justice Antonin Scalia argued against that this will solve some extra crimes to be sure but so we're taking your DNA whenever you fly only on an airplane surely the TSA must know the identity of the flying public for that matter so we're taking your children to DNA when they start public school Scalia lost the argument the court ruled that police can collect DNA if you're arrested my classroom is never arrested he was only a suspect in the murder of Angie Dodge he was so freaked out by his experience with the police he decided to learn as much as he could about genetic genealogy and about the Idaho killing along the way he got drawn into details about Angie her death in her life she was the youngest of four children a year out of high school when she was killed an online tribute her family posted remembers how as a teenager and he would drive with one hand on the wheel and one foot out the window Michael now friends with Angie's mom Carol Carol always referred to Angie as her angel our little angel the man who killed Angie Brian drips lived across the street from her in a small bungalow with the wide front porch and police questioned him along with other neighbors after the murder.

Emily Harris Kate McMahon Lee Michael New Orleans reporter
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Talbot is convinced to work with police is not just solving crimes is preventing ever cases that work three months old you know they have a really high chance of re offending and even escalating and I'm sure there are you know people that were potentially serial killers that have been or will be stopped because of this but even as police crack cases faster than they ever thought possible some people warned genetic genealogy is moving too fast giving law enforcement too much access to personal information and it needs to be reined in now reveals Emily Harris has been working with reporter Kate McMahon on today show and then Lee picks up this part of the story one person who believes genetic genealogy needs to be rain Dan is this man my name is Michael us free I live here in New Orleans and I work in the film industry down here it's Sunday morning I reach Michael on the phone as he sitting in a small office in his house he tells me about an encounter he had with a precursor of genetic genealogy back in two thousand fourteen he was visiting his parents a few hours out of town and I got a call from the police down here in New Orleans who told me my vehicle match the description of a hit and run he knew he wasn't involved he told the police he be happy to chat he could meet them at his house around to that afternoon I pulled up at exactly two o'clock and at two OO one three officers were at my door and I have a big ninety pound labradoodle and he likes to bark at people at the door so he was all excited when they came in and within about thirty seconds to a minute they were asking me if I would mind going down to the station to talk to Michael still has his labradoodle oboe he will go if that and as he left bobo that day six years ago getting into the backseat of the police car Michael asked one of the officers if they really wanted to talk about a hit and run and at that point he said well actually we'd like to talk to you about some other things.

Talbot Emily Harris Kate McMahon Lee Dan Michael New Orleans bobo reporter
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KCRW

"Helped finger William Talbot is convinced to work with police is not just solving crimes is preventing ever cases that work three months old you know they have a really high chance of re offending and even escalating and I'm sure there are you know people that were potentially serial killers that have been or will be stopped because of this but even as police crack cases faster than they ever thought possible some people warned genetic genealogy is moving too fast giving law enforcement too much access to personal information and it needs to be reined in now reveals Emily Harris has been working with reporter Kate McMahon on today show and then Lee picks up this part of the story one person who believes genetic genealogy needs to be rain Dan is this man my name is Michael US three live here in New Orleans and I work in the film industry down here it's Sunday morning I reach Michael on the phone as he sitting in a small office in his house he tells me about an encounter he had with a precursor of genetic genealogy back in two thousand fourteen he was visiting his parents a few hours out of town and I got a call from the police down here in New Orleans who told me my vehicle match the description of a hit and run he knew he wasn't involved he told the police he be happy to chat he could meet them at his house around to that afternoon I pulled up at exactly two o'clock and at two OO one three officers were at my door and I have a big ninety pound labradoodle and he likes to bark at people at the door so he was all excited when they came in and within about thirty seconds to a minute they were asking me if I would mind going down to the station to talk to Michael still has his labradoodle oboe you will go a sack and as he left bobo that day six years ago getting into the backseat of the police car Michael asked one of the officers if they really wanted to talk about a hit and run and at that point he said well actually we'd like to talk to you about some other things too just one.

William Talbot Emily Harris Kate McMahon Lee Dan Michael US New Orleans bobo reporter
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Leave they finally solve the murder mystery from the day police picked up Talbot to a year later genetic genealogy cracked more than fifty cases of murder and rape that's a rate of more than one a week police say they did it using genetic genealogy company ran the then unknown DNA profile through a public database there was a partial match hello this is a message that obviously we're not gonna quit on these cases upon the families that haven't had a resolved yet most of cold case years old but some just a few months genetic genealogy CC more who helped finger William Talbot is convinced to work with police is not just solving crimes is preventing ever cases that work three months old you know they have a really high chance of re offending and even escalating and I'm sure there are you know people that were potentially serial killers that have been or will be stopped because of this but even as police crack cases faster than they ever thought possible some people warned genetic genealogy is moving too fast giving law enforcement too much access to personal information and it needs to be reined in now reveals Emily Harris has been working with reporter Kate McMahon on today show and then Lee picks up this part of the story one person who believes genetic genealogy needs to be rain Dan is this man my name is Michael US three live here in New Orleans and I work in the film industry down here it's Sunday morning I reach Michael on the phone as he sitting in a small office in his house he tells me about an encounter he had with a precursor of genetic genealogy back in two thousand fourteen he was visiting his parents a few hours out of town and I got a call from the police down here in New Orleans who told me my vehicle match the description of a hit and run he knew he wasn't involved he told the police he be happy to chat he could meet them at his house around to that afternoon I pulled up at exactly two o'clock and at two OO one three officers were at my door and I have a big ninety pound labradoodle and he likes to bark at people at the door so he was all excited when they came in and within about thirty seconds to a minute they were asking me if I would mind going down to the station to talk to Michael still has his labradoodle oboe you will go at that and as he left bobo that day six years ago getting into the backseat of the police car Michael asked one of the officers if they really wanted to talk about a hit and run and at that point he said well actually we'd like to talk to you about some other things too just.

murder William Talbot Emily Harris Kate McMahon Lee Dan Michael US New Orleans bobo rape reporter
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More who helped finger William Talbot is convinced to work with police is not just solving crimes is preventing ever cases that work three months old you know they have a really high chance of re offending and even escalating and I'm sure there are you know people that were potentially serial killers that have been or will be stopped because of this but even as police crack cases faster than they ever thought possible some people warned genetic genealogy is moving too fast giving law enforcement too much access to personal information and it needs to be reined in now reveals Emily Harris has been working with reporter Kate McMahon on today show and then Lee picks up this part of the story one person who believes genetic genealogy needs to be rain Dan is this man my name is Michael us free I live here in New Orleans and I work in the film industry down here it's Sunday morning I reach Michael on the phone as he sitting in a small office in his house he tells me about an encounter he had with a precursor of genetic genealogy back in two thousand fourteen he was visiting his parents a few hours out of town and I got a call from the police down here in New Orleans who told me my vehicle match the description of a hit and run he knew he wasn't involved he told the police he be happy to chat he could meet them at his house around to that afternoon I pulled up at exactly two o'clock and at two OO one three officers were at my door and I have a big ninety pound labradoodle and he likes to bark at people at the door so he was all excited when they came in and within about thirty seconds to a minute they were asking me if I would mind going down to the station to talk to Michael still has his labradoodle bobo you will go a sack and as he left over that day five years ago getting into the backseat of the police car Michael asked one of the officers if they really wanted to talk about a hit and run and at that point he said well actually we'd like to talk to you about some other things too just.

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:50 min | 2 years ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Birth detective Scharf then steps to the podium to explain how they use genetic genealogy to identify tell but as a suspect if it hadn't been for genetic genealogy we wouldn't be standing here today it's not allowed to be used in law enforcement we would never solve this case right after tablets arrests police around the country start using genetic genealogy and making arrests for three decades the death of eight year old April Tinsley has baffled Indiana. good morning leave they finally solve the murder mystery from the day police picked up Talbot to a year later genetic genealogy cracked more than fifty cases of murder and rape that's a rate of more than one a week police say they did it using genetic genealogy company ran the then unknown DNA profile through a public database there was a partial match hello this is a message that obviously we're not gonna quit on these cases. hotel the families that haven't had a resolved yet most of cold case years old but some just a few months genetic genealogy CC more who helped finger William Talbot is convinced to work with police is not just solving crimes is preventing I worked cases that work three months old you know they have a really high chance of re offending and even escalating and I'm sure there are you know people that were potentially serial killers that have been or will be stopped because of this but even as police crack cases faster than they ever thought possible some people warned genetic genealogy is moving too fast giving law enforcement too much access to personal information and it needs to be reined in now reveals Emily Harris has been working with reporter Kate McMahon on today show and then leave picks up this part of the story. one person who believes genetic genealogy needs to be reined in is this man my name is Michael US three live here in New Orleans and I work in the film industry down here it's Sunday morning I reach Michael on the phone as you sitting in a small office in his house he tells me about an encounter he had with a precursor of genetic genealogy back in two thousand fourteen he was visiting his parents a few hours out of town and I got a call from the police down here in New Orleans who told me my vehicle match the description of a hit and run he knew he wasn't involved he told the police he be happy to chat he could meet them at his house around to that afternoon I pulled up at exactly two o'clock and at two OO one. three officers were at my door. and I have a big ninety pound labradoodle and he likes to bark at people at the door so he was all excited when they came in and within about thirty seconds to a minute they were asking me if I would mind going down to the station to talk to Michael still has his labradoodle bobo. and as he left over that day five years ago getting into the backseat of the police car Michael asked one of the officers if they really wanted to talk about a hit and run and at that point he said well actually we'd like to talk to you about some other things just one other thing it turned out a murder a young woman named Angie Deitsch had been raped and stabbed multiple times in nineteen ninety six in Idaho. Michael had visited Idaho in the mid nineteen nineties his sisters had gone to college there and he co produced a short film about people who get obsessed with killers it's called murder of Delia timing. Turner falls from. it's made up it's a fictional film that parts of it are pretty gruesome and one killing described in it resembles what happens to Angie and I was sure either in blocking her from the door and stabbing it's like. this is one of the things that the. least saw online when they were researching me they said look at this scene makes short films about men sneaking into houses and murdering young girls how how and when did they get a sample of your DNA. we two to three hours maybe into it and walks what turns out to be a Louisiana state police and he was a very large man it seems like at the time he was seven feet tall when four hundred pounds he had a mouth swab to latex gloves and he was walking directly towards me right from the door and he's like we're gonna take your DNA now and I backed up and I went whoa whoa wait a minute you know what what is this this is crazy I should I get a lawyer and he said well do you see this warrant and that means that you have to give your DNA to us right now what the officer said was true like with any search warrant a judge can sign an order giving police the right to collect your DNA if police can explain to that judge why you're a suspect Idaho police had zeroed in on Michael after trying something they've never done before putting crime scene DNA collected from Angie's murder through a genealogical database Michael says his dad gave a DNA sample to that database more than a decade ago the nonprofit organization that owns the database had visited the Mormon church Michael's dad went to asking people to take part the Mormon faith puts a lot of stock into genealogy because of religious purposes Mormons believe in identifying dead ancestors who were not members of the church and baptizing them so the whole family can be together in the afterlife years after Michael's father gave his sample that genealogical database was sold to ancestry dot com Idaho police searched it using a DNA analysis that's less exact than what's used today they found a close match then they got a warrant to make ancestry give them the name it was Michael's dad they research the family and honed in on Michael because of his movie and his friends in Idaho basically my father participated in the DNA sample call. shin and you know fifteen years later I am being pulled in as a suspect in a murder. what struck me about the S. three case was that this was using it not law enforcement database and that struck me as quite noteworthy Natalie ram teaches law at the university of Maryland and she learned about Michael story in two thousand fifteen this was the first known time police had searched a genealogy database instead of the usual criminal databases created for police those law enforcement databases may have problems Natalie says but at least they have supervision state labs have to follow specific procedures database searches might be limited to certain crimes and the criminal database coatis hold only DNA profiles of people who've been arrested or convicted so by law they've already lost some privacy rights by contrast the consumer genetic databases are comprised primarily of people who have decided they're interested in learning more about their DNA what it can tell them about their ancestral origins one of my total about their future genetic medical risks and soccer pretty personal stuff so personal says Natalie that consumer DNA databases need oversights laws about when and how police can use them in her view it goes back to the basics of the constitution we have a balance of values between of privacy and crime solving between liberty and crime solving afterall one four think it's all the locks war crimes if they were able to enter anyone's home at any time just because they wanted to we don't allow that. when privacy activists first heard Michael astri story in two thousand fifteen the criticism was quick and severe tough enough that ancestry dot com cut off public access to the database where police had found his father Natalie says that was the right move but people working in genetic genealogy say that's wrong consumer DNA databases should be easily available to police I decide to visit para upon the company that's built a business off genetic genealogy Alex I sing here is so hot already welcome to the C. right C. E. O. Steve Armand chart shows me around headquarters it's just desks and computers in a bland office building in the DC suburbs they outsource all their lab work my eye catches some small iridescent pieces of plastic on display we would always so those are Mike or ray scanner chips what's actually on them so DNA gets washed over these chips they have probes DNA sticks to the probes and a computer analyzes it so it's like at the peace of the DNA that you're reading from a crank service Dan is that I don't know these are expensive chips that our our partner lab gave us somebody's DNA turned into art for display when we sit down in his office to talk Steve argues that police using genetic genealogy to find the suspect is just like looking for clues on Facebook what if a cop he says find a photo of a suspect with his arm around a victim and he didn't post it his aunt Ted he didn't give his aunt permission to do that but she's made an association visitations are all around us DNA is another one and police use all of those associations all the time when they're doing best cation as sort of the heart of what they do. so I don't see that this is a lot different than photographs on Facebook the right to privacy can depend on what choices you make on Facebook for with your DNA Steve points out that when you send in a split sample or you share your DNA profile on a commercial website to look for relatives you're agreeing to the terms of service as long as as people are voluntarily allowing their DNA to be searched I just don't see where the privacy concerns arise I asked Natalie about that argument she says that voluntarily sharing your DNA profile is different it's true she says the person sending in their own sample may be fine with police sifting through their genetic connections but it's fundamentally on true with respect to their genetic relatives who may have never use one of these consumer genetic services would never want to and are being implicitly made fine noble through this database through mill voluntary conduct of the round people like Michael astri after police swapped his cheek in the interrogation room they took him home they dropped me back on my side wall can that was it. I didn't hear anything from them and on the thirty third day they sent me an email that said Hey Mister rush three your DNA did not match the the sample from the crime scene something you already knew sorry for the inconvenience. your DNA will not be used for any other testing purposes thank you have a nice day but he knows his DNA was capped and looked out again and I know that because a year and a half ago the Idaho falls police department sent my sample to this company called parable on laughs Idaho police were still looking for Angie's Keller last summer they turn to paragon and genetic genealogy see see more bonds chief genetic genealogist use the genealogy website Jed match to find the man whose DNA was at the murder scene that man confessed he's now in prison. Michael astri is not but the experience has made him wish he could keep his DNA private this information can be used for a lot of different purposes wouldn't it be terrible if our DNA information was used to persecute and prosecute. all that. didn't agree with them politically. we all think that things like that couldn't happen in yet. we will we will see. it's impossible to know where DNA technology will take us Hollywood has some ideas they're going to find me. place where any so from any part of your body can be played. welcome to Gatica. but in real life here are some signs of wear we already are the trump administration has just announced they're working on plans to take DNA samples from detained migrants and enter them into CODIS vastly expanding the database and using it to enforce immigration law they say this complies with the two thousand five law until now the department of justice had a carve out for border police and last month North Dakota prosecutors filed felony conspiracy charges against a man who protested the Dakota access pipeline three years ago they found his DNA on a cigarette but at the scene and tracked him down because of a past arrest then there's China.

Michael astri Idaho falls police Idaho murder Angie Scharf Delia Turner Jed Hollywood China North Dakota Dakota department of justice Gatica. Keller four hundred pounds thirty seconds fifteen years
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Who helped finger William Talbot is convinced to work with police is not just solving crimes is preventing ever cases that were three months old you know they have a really high chance of re offending and even escalating and I'm sure there are you know people that were potentially serial killers that have been or will be stopped because of this but even as police crack cases faster than they ever thought possible some people warned genetic genealogy is moving too fast giving law enforcement too much access to personal information and it needs to be reined in now reveals Emily Harris has been working with reporter Kate McMahon on today show and then leave picks up this part of the story. one person who believes genetic genealogy needs to be reined in is this man my name is Michael us free I live here in New Orleans and I work in the film industry down here it's Sunday morning I reach Michael on the phone as you sitting in a small office in his house he tells me about an encounter he had with a precursor of genetic genealogy back in two thousand fourteen he was visiting his parents a few hours out of town and I got a call from the police down here in New Orleans who told me my vehicle match the description of a hit and run he knew he wasn't involved he told the police he be happy to chat he could meet them at his house around to that afternoon I pulled up at exactly two o'clock and at two OO one three officers were at my door. and I have a big ninety pound labradoodle and he likes to bark at people at the door so he was all excited when they came in and within about thirty seconds to a minute they were asking me if I would mind going down to the station to talk to Michael still has his labradoodle oboe. and as he left over that day five years ago getting into the backseat of the police car Michael asked one of the officers if they really wanted to talk about a hit and run and at that point he said well actually we'd like to talk to you about some other things. just.

William Talbot Emily Harris Kate McMahon Michael New Orleans reporter thirty seconds ninety pound three months five years
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on KCRW

"CC more who helped finger William Talbot is convinced to work with police is not just solving crimes is preventing ever cases that work three months old you know they have a really high chance of re offending and even escalating and I'm sure there are you know people that were potentially serial killers that have been or will be stopped because of this but even as police crack cases faster than they ever thought possible some people warned genetic genealogy is moving too fast giving law enforcement too much access to personal information and it needs to be reined in now reveals Emily Harris has been working with reporter Kate McMahon on today show and then leave picks up this part of the story. one person who believes genetic genealogy needs to be rain Dan is this man my name is Michael US three live here in New Orleans and I work in the film industry down here it's Sunday morning I reach Michael on the phone as he sitting in a small office in his house he tells me about an encounter he had with a precursor of genetic genealogy back in two thousand fourteen he was visiting his parents a few hours out of town and I got a call from the police down here in New Orleans who told me my vehicle match the description of a hit and run he knew he wasn't involved he told the police he be happy to chat he could meet them at his house around to that afternoon I pulled up at exactly two o'clock and at two OO one. three officers were at my door. and I have a big ninety pound labradoodle. and he likes to bark at people at the door so he was all excited when they came in and within about thirty seconds to a minute they were asking me if I would mind going down to the station to talk to Michael still has his labradoodle bobo you will go a sack. and as he left over that day five years ago getting into the backseat of the police car Michael asked one of the officers if they really wanted to talk about a hit and run and at that point he said well actually we'd like to talk to you about some other things too just one.

William Talbot Emily Harris Kate McMahon Dan Michael US New Orleans reporter thirty seconds ninety pound three months five years
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"CC more who helped finger William Talbot is convinced to work with police is not just solving crimes is preventing ever cases that work three months old you know they have a really high chance of re offending and even escalating and I'm sure there are you know people that were potentially serial killers that have been or will be stopped because of this but even as police crack cases faster than they ever thought possible some people warned genetic genealogy is moving too fast giving law enforcement too much access to personal information and it needs to be reined in now reveals Emily Harris has been working with reporter Kate McMahon on today show and then Lee picks up this part of the story. one person who believes genetic genealogy needs to be reined in is this man my name is Michael us free I live here in New Orleans and I work in the film industry down here it's Sunday morning I reach Michael on the phone as you sitting in a small office in his house he tells me about an encounter he had with a precursor of genetic genealogy back in two thousand fourteen he was visiting his parents a few hours out of town and I got a call from the police down here in New Orleans who told me my vehicle match the description of a hit and run he knew he wasn't involved he told the police he be happy to chat he could meet them at his house around to that afternoon I pulled up at exactly two o'clock and at two OO one three officers were at my door. and I have a big ninety pound labradoodle and he likes to bark at people at the door so he was all excited when they came in and within about thirty seconds to a minute they were asking me if I would mind going down to the station to talk to Michael still has his labradoodle bobo you will go a sack. and as he left over that day five years ago getting into the backseat of the police car Michael asked one of the officers if they really wanted to talk about a hit and run and at that point he said well actually we'd like to talk to you about some other things too just.

William Talbot Emily Harris Kate McMahon Lee Michael New Orleans reporter thirty seconds ninety pound three months five years
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on DAVIDBOWIE: ALBUMTOALBUM

DAVIDBOWIE: ALBUMTOALBUM

11:10 min | 2 years ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on DAVIDBOWIE: ALBUMTOALBUM

"I must admit I did Clinton stabler eggs. I read some of the Sleep Day. It's his political home. This one with my might take. This song is He's decrying the death of the hippie movement because he was him at a slab then they put on this big festival remedies coming to. Its End to make amends. And it's it's a role. The bitter damning over commercialization of the hippie dream of the death of the hippie dream really infiltrated business cesspool hating through our sleeves. But it gets quite Ramsey of what? I might my problem with this song as it gets. It's like how George Harrison's do these beautiful sounding songs in which basically tell you off for not being spiritual are you one of those talks about the poll stoned the poor on slogans. Such as wish you could hear love is all we need because John's kick out your mother cut up your friend. Screw up your brother will get you in the end when he ends but I believe in the path of love. I think it's it's a sung which is dealing with ideas of the time he says it has hanser equally. I've heard it said that sixties never got to the suburbs until the seventy but in pockets. It did because since David Byrne Circle of pre raphaelite circles of artists who who constructed a seed realm cells. And if you're lucky enough to be living there also lucky enough to be noticed them and shows to walk through the door. It must equated to mid eighteen to run into it much clicks. That must've been hanging out each other's houses going back to Sun's House blazes standing on the street looking at these strange getting underneath this all this wonderful langourous sifting melody which kind of which extends Wasilla worked beautifully in kind of like clicks into a four four kind of gruff thumping rock riff it drifts. Back into this sort of dreamy. It's amazing music. I think you mentioned about the Observer bookable station you saw. At the years. He used to teach himself to Teach percents music just and then it needs to be happy to give orchestrations that produce remiss done something on Gusto didn't read musically and again we're GONNA pres trump. Apparently there was. They had to come up some notation system to work up your consideration for musicians because music. I think he did not pull them. But we've pulled it and who else was not ring. I just wanted to George. My writings accused spent good guitarist. Why SHOULD WE JANINE? All right do you know what to call Kate Mcmahon? Have you heard that we talk on the Internet up in the in central said? Forget it and it's even it's even put in accreditation walks in the lyrics so apparently it's about someone else's Malaysian girlfriend his friend George Underwood and the only thing that mentioned find about but we talked about this song is him saying that was a bit of a throwaway friend of mine was going out with a girl. Who's my way of saints him? How he should treat her. Yeah but well. How did he want him to treat her tonight? That's that's intense. I have to keep you in your place so I could work out is sounded like he might be criticizing on trying to keep governed in their place. So it's about like approach mantra. Which wonder would that be? Famous Wanderers people. The famous wonder if they don't put it up. Picky is Norwegian this the the ancient mariner. Yeah Polish drew got into nerve like now with like oppose wonder I travel on. What's your land? And were not just for the jewels. I've close your hand. I don't think. Trevor Literal Interpretation. This is helpful opponents specific. It's actually yeah I. It's probably my least favorite really. I love the melody and he's Got Nice. It makes no sense of Michelle my bell thing about it and I hate just maybe just because it's gene gene is not with us not misleading. It's not unusual name. Either when you think of all the names in the world one could use it. Awesomely hone in on Chenine Miss. French doesn't it game. Sporting something in with Russia need well not favorites. Definitely one of my favorites. I just love this bouncy. So the Study Country K. Matadi Little Soto at the end and it's quite acerbic is tiger caught like that. There's all this stuff about to take your glasses off tax. Oh sincere but then there's a bit of a shining moment at the end you'd like to crash my walls but if you take an axe to me you'll kill another man not me it'll take this. Well let's move on then you cite two time for an occasional trip since dots are hinting a bit. Norwegian would discussion of Swedish rooms of Heston would. But it's just what a lovely fakey feel to it and it's a question. Two minutes from five is very little pop song. It's sprayed central. It's very very folksy. I think change is key. Yeah I think it also is a song inasmuch as his arms are about anything it's a song relating to her Miami and very nostalgic for on the one hand you have the angst of letter to her any on the other hand you have this. More Benign Mall Reflective. Roth sweetser tribute to Cat Stevens. Listen it kind of you know what they came up around the same time. I think his father is actually quite quite lyrically and musically similar interesting enough so that your rights deaf Steffi Cat Stevens fear that so far saga sweetness of as well I think. Sweetness is underrated in David. Perry quite student while they were quite serious. They often playing with Gordon. Cords this is unashamedly lyrical and sweet and a but not cloying but you get a sense from the song all what does it. Strike you as being Sad wistful doesn't doesn't start being happy necessarily but I just think it's beautiful. I think Lisa will speak poems and I suppose it's melancholic bit in its reflective on something. That's gone business about. And I really loved that medically bet one hundred days. This is the only play after break-up. Yeah definitely it'd be on my breakout but break-up meets tape on your break-up beholden to one kind of breakup was so horrible. Say You you'd be. Doug's won't be you'll number one thing. I think mine would be awesome anger rage so I might stuff with some. I hate you so much right now. Something by God that you'd be quite grade stupid. Go that when it rains. Spits on there as well I feel great about never having gotten to the Smith. I'd say there's pretty I'm the Saudis shore so Into the places we used to go. I walk along the city streets. We use do is always something to keep one patsy Kline Song about. She's got you up. Put your records class ring. She's got all these mementos but she's Oh it's amazing he's just put on Patsy Kline and there's this other one like the Sunday short film but I caught like sweet songs about this. Pope is older brother who was born in sixty three so from him. I two things one was obsession with the Beatles and Kind of mid sixties British music but also that late fifties early sixties American heartthrob seeing. That's partly itself music. Jan and Dean shoot founded. Bobby really big regrets. I really wanted to make a program with him died last year but in he was one of those kind of creations of questions was building. But I think it was gene Pitney. Three preview was writing songs for him. I'm sure yeah. He was a real. I just loved their sixties creches. Because his boys were you know they were marketed. A goals and they were they were to Russia's in their own way they were incredibly sweet and they were singing in price specifically as a lot of his songs about school on their about being kept in detention because he pumped some guide specific groups he designed to appeal a whole generation of record buying teenagers with must new demographic and I think I think this will be quite charming about goals having music written to appeal to them like they suddenly values can even if it was just as consumers but their emotions of teenage feeling being kind of represented in mass media. Lovely might again. I think is very why of that. Saying he will use history so when you see that footage of him with all those very young fans and they're all dress like him a he's taking it to a new level where it is unfortunate you know he is girl and boy and it doesn't matter and grey shot of having this John Lewis Trousers looks like Katherine Hepburn with this long for she sushi in the middle of the street and just seeing that in the suburbs. Lots of what value is appreciate that their life is complicated and they split up but they did actually find somebody. Positive ideas about how couples could be equal and creative new ways on that. You didn't have to CONFORM TO NARROW IDEAS ABOUT GENDER. You know she was amazing. He was amazing. That's what that's what we will say. It was the hub. Rolan is only success is really underrates down. I think she's not now being the select crazy. That's changing gang. I think but it's still under appreciated in their prime. The image of your being of Iraq. There's an exhibition. That's just opened at the Barbican about great couples yesterday and it's so interesting. How actually much more evidence of the surrealist partnerships with insomnia drowsiness creating beautiful images as much as music and at experimenting in living in a way that suits them and I think there's nothing except ration- to be had the people living there emblazoned with homing anyone Yup.

John Lewis Trousers Russia Cat Stevens George Harrison Clinton Ramsey Kate Mcmahon Patsy Kline Wasilla gene Pitney Michelle George Underwood David Byrne Chenine Miss Beatles Gusto George Barbican Rolan Little Soto
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on Talking Points

Talking Points

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on Talking Points

"Hey, talking points listeners. It's Brian Kelly the points guy, and I've got some exciting news. Now, I know you love hearing my voice on talking points. But tonight, my very own blog is premiering at six thirty pm eastern live on YouTube. You can find all three premiering episodes at my new channel, YouTube dot com slash Brian Kelly. The blog is all about joining me on my ventures all around the world from Colombia to Brazil to Scotland. And I'm going to bring you along for some amazing experiences and give you some tips on. How I booked my flights and hotels and my excursions in one of the first episodes. I have one of my best in-flight meals ever on American Airlines. And it's not what you'd expect that diabetic meal was stunning. It was really really good and on Thursday. Get ready to see me push. My fierce to the limits. That'd be here. Okay. Yes. Try not to jump. No. No. Find all of that. At my new channel, YouTube dot com slash Brian Kelly. Subscribe share and make sure you tune in tonight for a chance to win some amazing prizes and remember getting there can be more than half the fun. Talking points is brought to you by ADT. Look, if you're a frequent traveler like we are teepee g you know, how important it is to make sure that your home is locked up and in good hands. While you're on the road. Did you know that ADT is America's number one home security provider with twenty four seven monitoring its network of eighteen thousand employees and its direct connection to first responders. You'll never have to worry when you're away from home. You can even control your home security from wherever you are with the app, or when you're at home with the sound of your voice. Visit ADT dot com slash podcast to find out how can design and install a secure smart home system for you and your family again that is ADT dot com slash podcast. Take talking points listeners. It's your host Brian Kelly, the point sky, as you know, talking points is a podcast where I sit down with CEOs executives influencers staff, and so many more to talk all things travel on this episode of talking points. The hysterical and whip smart comedian. And actress Heather McMahon joins me Heather thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. And for anyone who doesn't already there is one of the funniest people on Instagram. So follow right now at Heather Kate McMahon. Heather K M C M A H A. And now that we have that out of the way. So we met each other on Instagram. Yes. And then I think we I actually met at the g awards on the red carpet. I think there's actually a photo of us. Yes. Like it having that embrace gosh. So instantly we connected I think we share a lot of the same interests food wine, and then of course, travel. I mean, I'm truly trying to like. My life these days, and I am on the go. You'll be so proud of me. I just got my silver medallion status on delta and earned the hard work earned it the hard way. And I'm just like have you ever gotten a gold now? But well because before you met me, you weren't appoints girl. I wasn't appoints girl. I didn't even understand. I've always been a delta, Brad. So I just flew delta. But I never liked tried to keep up with that stuff. And now that I follow you. I challenge it's a goal. I'm like, oh, I'm just going to book. I've I've become very brand loyal to delta. And I become brand loyal to like things that I actually am going to use. Like, I now understand how points work, and you can be brand loyal to delta and still earn other types of points. Like, that's what I think some people think that you just have to have a delta credit card. But like, obviously, sapphire cards platinum cards. It makes sense to have to have both know, but why do you like delta so much? So so yes, you're basing Atlanta am based in Atlanta, while I'm kind of grew up on delta like before I even you know could form a sentence. I was thrown on like a seven forty seven. So my grandfather was chief pilot for delta for like forty years. He wanted to Dallas and safety ward aviation. So I grew up kind of like that was just like our second home. Now granted I don't get any kickback from delta nowadays. Like, I'm do trouble for free could know what my parents could. But then as soon as he retired like as soon as I was doing we got nothing. And I mean they've written. There's been articles about him in the Wall Street Journal about like his heroic a saving of this flight and all this stuff, but I always loved delta. And here, here's the thing. When you have somebody who works for specific airlines that growing up he would not allow us to fly certain other airlines, and I won't throw those under the bus now because they've either got out of business they've been acquired, obviously, right? Yeah. He'd be like listen. I know the engineers I know who takes care of those planes. Don't get on those. You know, we don't you're probably spending a little bit more. That's my biggest thing people. I was like well dealt is more expensive with Mike. Yeah. But I'd rather pay a little bit more to know that I'm getting there, the safest way possible and also delta I mean, I've actually been flying delta more lately. I know you you appreciate meowing to the delta side of things, but don't just a better run airline, right? Employee wise like flight attendants are generally nicer, I got rejected from the flight attendant program. I didn't know this. Oh, yes. At three and you still love delta. I still love that that is brand loyalty sit three years ago. I was like Inuit's screw it. I'm just gonna apply for fun. First of all be such an amazing. So great, and they rejected me going viral every like safety video like other enough. I literally be so savage like, sir. If you don't turn off that iphone, I swear to God him in a whip off my hoops and crack your neck like, I don't play your feet down. Okay. I was in first class like two years ago in this woman. I swear to God got out fingernail clippers and she started clipping, her fingernails and then threw them on the on the floor. I lost my shit, so bad. I said are you really doing that? Right now was she was like, yeah. I mean, somebody else is going to clean it up. I lost my shit. I said, yeah. Some custodians gonna come in here and clean it up. And guess what that used to be my dad who had to clean his planes because my parents met working for Eastern Airlines back in the day. Oh, my dad flaked was your mama flight attendant? No, she couldn't they weren't hiring. Then she was. A gate agent. And she and my dad met at Miami International Airport in baggage claim he he was a manager. He like did grounds and then he drink the lavatory trip. So if you follow her on Instagram, you'll know Robin her she's a Spitfire. So phasing when you think about a gate agent. I mean, there's no one better prepared for that job. Then Robin her stories are insane. And that's why I like I feel that she disarms people to like. Oh, yeah. And she would shut stuff down when people would come up, and they'd say like, you know, she was like a boarding people in Miami.

delta Brian Kelly YouTube ADT Heather Kate McMahon American Airlines Heather K M C M A Miami International Airport Eastern Airlines Wall Street Journal Miami Colombia Robin America Scotland Dallas Heather Mike Brazil
"kate mcmahon" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"kate mcmahon" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"Hey, guys, it's candidate and Kayla, and we are directionally challenged. Yeah. We really thought we'd had it all figured out in our twenties. And then our in our thirties. And we're like what? No because we don't have anything figured out at all. I'm gonna act like it. No. But today, we are going to take a moment to get some direction from our guest Heather McMahon. You guys might know Heather from Instagram if you don't follow her get on your phone right now, go to Instagram and follow Heather Kate McMahon. She is such delight. She's open. She's honest. She's raw and real and funny, and we are so proud to be able to call her our friend, and she is going to talk to us today about grief. You guys had been leaving us comments about wanting a grief episode. And we thought we know exactly who to bring on for that. Because Heather went through a really traumatic experience and is here to talk us through what happened to her. But as always in true, other fashion she cracks a ton of. Jokes and has a really great perspective. So without further ado here, she is. And we are back with Heather McMahon. So we've wanted you on this podcast for so long. I am so thrilled to be here. Thanks for having me lady. Finally in LA LA, I'm truly doing the most in the lease at the same time. You guys know Heather, she's an actress, he's a comedian. You might follow her on Instagram. She is whole areas. Which is why we wanted to bring her on our podcast to actually talk about grief. Yes. Yeah. Heather you've been so open on your Instagram. And I think that that's why so many people seek you out is that there's obviously you are hilarious, and you can make everyone belly laugh, but you've also been really open vulnerable about your dad's sudden passing. Yeah. And I guess I just I tell us about your dad. Oh, you know. It's so interesting..

Heather Kate McMahon Instagram Heather Kayla LA LA