17 Burst results for "Kate Lister"

"kate lister" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

07:36 min | 5 months ago

"kate lister" Discussed on WBUR

"Whether you should choose the days you get to come in. Or whether you should have them centralized. The problem is letting people chooses this. We know from survey data that not everyone's going to choose the same number of days. So, for example, women choosing 50% more days and survey data than men with did And we also know that when you work from home five days a week in a team where many people are coming in 34 days, your promotion rates of dramatically down You can see why that's going to generate a long run issue you're going to find basically, single young men are getting promoted women of young kids or not, you know you're gonna lose diversity in the workplace is not just gender be other things like people with disabilities, maybe people with strong religious views. Maybe folks that live far away from the office and that group of people discover that they're not getting promoted your lose them among senior managers. We want the diversity of views and opinions, and you're just gonna lose that by letting people choose. So what is it about not being in the office, for example, someone who's not in the office but is producing the work. Why should they be worried about being discriminated against? So When I've talked to firms, they usually say there are two factors. The first is honestly, they're forgotten about. They're not in the room. They're not around and promotion decisions that discussed. Of course, you can help to fix that. You could train against that so many ways that is long run flexible. The other issue is much harder. Which is they say, you need to be in the office and around to absorb the company culture to know off your coworker. Strengths and weaknesses are denounced going on and you know what you might have thought, well, waste of time. Coffee breaks and drinks after work. A lunch is actually turn out to be pretty important if you want to be a manager. And that is much harder to deal with, And I think it really means if you're fully remote, you may be more productive your current day to day activities, but you may be missing out in the sense on some of the Skills building and knowledge accumulation. It's important to be promoted upper level. So what is the answer? Then? Is the answer for an employer to say, Okay, you could work for home or to establish which days people should come in something to make sure that everyone is in the same time on same day if they are going to be hybrid working. The answer is hybrid working, but make sure within the same team people come in on the same day, so 10 of us worked together. We should all be in on the same day that a avoids people being, you know, forgotten about and passed over for promotion because they're staying at home and be a voice is horrible, mixed mode where some of us is zooming in and other people in the office and the others. You know that's horrible. So within the team, you just need to agree in advance Wednesday and Friday sale Tuesday Thursday. We're gonna work from home, and that's The way it's gonna be economist Nick Bloom of Stanford University. Well, given all those reservations and issues could it be that firms everywhere may embark on remote working in the next year, only to drop the idea further down the line over to Kate Lister. She's president of Global Workplace Analytics consultancy that helps employers manage remote workforces is remote working as Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon said an aberration. Yeah, well, he's in the minority. Comptel you from our clients from our research from what we're seeing companies do we owe the genie's out of the bottle? 80% of people have wanted to work from home for the last decade, and if anything that has increased during the pandemic, something like 88 to 90% globally. Of office workers say they would like to continue working from home. In fact, the majority of people want hybrid 10% want to be in the office full time about 15 to 25% want Toby remote, full time and the balance want that mix of 2 to 33 to four days a week in the office, and that's what companies are settling on that hybrid model. There are concerns that want their people who work remotely, and those who choose to go in the office might find that, for example, remote workers aren't promoted as quickly or as easily as those who choose to go into work. It could become a legal minefield. Yes, but then well, I think we have to remind ourselves this is not normal, remote work. People don't normally do it full time. Organizations usually have time to prepare for it and to think about those things, so as we go back, and we embrace him or hybrid model, ah, lot of the issues that people are having about loneliness about missing the company culture. Those things are going to mitigate themselves. The other issues were hearing are, as you say, people worried about their career prospects that you know they'll be this sort of haves and have nots in those who come to the office are going to get preference. It's something that company's really need to be intentional about. They really need to make sure that they don't create that divisive culture. The other thing is younger people are having the hardest time because they miss that sort of subtle grooming that goes on when you are in the presence of other people of of your colleagues. So you know those are legitimate concerns, and it's something that companies are taking very seriously a going forward when you speak to cos When you work with companies. Do you get the impression that they are? Happy about this change, or is it that they are just feel that they have to do it? Because the mood music has changed around flexibility and remote working and that they just have to get on the bandwagon. I think it's a little bit of both, and I think it depends on what organization you're talking to organizations with younger leadership tend to be more eager about this. But there really was a transformation about maybe 34 months into the pandemic leadership started to understand. Hey, wait a minute. This is an opportunity. This is an opportunity to increase productivity to increase employee well being increased engagement and higher talent, the best in the brightest no matter where they live, so they've really started to see those advantages. That's what's kind of leading the move to allow more hybrid. There will be businesses out there, though, who just cannot offer remote working for whatever reason, the nature of the business that they do. And they will be at a disadvantage. What there Because if you're recruiting now you have to be able to offer flexible. Working to some extent. I can't imagine that anyone is gladly going to join a company where that isn't part of the package offered in a contract. Exactly, And that's why I worry about companies like Goldman Sachs and some of those who have sort of flat out refused to accept the model. They're competing with organizations that are going to allow it, And so something like 40% of employees now say that they'll reject a job opportunity that doesn't include flexibility. And the key there is calling it flexibility and not virtual work. Companies need to think about this sort of as a whole continuum of a different way of working and well, not everybody is going to be able to work remotely. There are other things that they can do, they can offer. Staggered start and end times. They can offer four day work week they can offer sabbaticals. People just want some level of flexibility, and I think we need to be flexible about how we roll out flexibility. Kate Lister ends This edition Today's producer was Edwin Lane. I'm Manuela Saragosa and Business Daily is back again at the same time on Monday. Now on the BBC World Service Witness History.

Kate Lister Manuela Saragosa Edwin Lane Nick Bloom Monday 40% Goldman Sachs 80% 34 days 88 David Solomon 2 BBC World Service 10 Stanford University Friday Wednesday 10% 34 months next year
"kate lister" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:30 min | 6 months ago

"kate lister" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Directory of sex workers in london time who is telling sex and it lists not only address on their prices but very very intimate descriptions of what they do and they're all. This doesn't us very much. John cleland who famously boasted that he did it without writing any rude words at all these extent expressions like mossy grat. Keep its coal whole venus's mounds but we shy away from despite the reputation for being sexually prudish pornography flowed underneath victoria. Uppercrust society like a river of slamming ghostbusters. Thu they had pornography all over the place. Visual and literary and there are a lot of fun with current one of their pornographic magazines. The poll was published from eighteen. Seventy nine to eighteen eighty and published in it. Nursery rhymes lady of hitchin. Who was scratching. Contonou kitchen her father said roses the crabs. I suppose you're right of the book is a rich ing the amount of bombay fashioned to contact of clay but the heat of his turned into a brick and it chased list force away. Yeah well done victorian. Well done interestingly is also in the nineteenth century that we got the first recorded use of being used as an insult as an actual you are a current after the first time that it's used in the nineteenth century in the seventeenth century. We start it being used as a kind of derogatory collective noun for women. Some your peeps writes about this aphrodisiac was gonna make all the chase after him. Charming stabbing him with pins being sexually aggressive anyway. The victorians well-placed cont- one of the most important moments in history is the publication and the subsequent obscenity trial of lady chatterley's lover. This book contained fourteen concern. Forty folks and it was bound to go on trial in order to be published and it was shocking. Not just because the graphic scenes of sex and the and the language used but because it smashes down class boundaries. If you're not familiar with this it's about lady. Constance charlie a married woman who embarks on a fab with with sean bean but with is the game keep and the idea is it doesn't matter all her airs and graces titles. She's got a she's a sexual levels them but one of the pivotal scenes. Where mellows tries to tell her what couldn't means what do the accent. Nee folks only animals do but council lot more than that. It's they just are see a lot more beside novel. Anther even to fuck count. That's the beauty of the las- cont- the beauty of they laugh. I love that now. Just by jerry agree to work stuff. Full of Does have artistic merit on the allowed it to be published and you can see the pitches. The people queuing around the streets together hands on this book. Once it was never really made it. Back into the mainstream feminists maintain their own. Easy relationship with cont- judy chicago. She liked what was called the art movement of the nineteen seventy s. If i turned up a film a mainstream cinema in one thousand nine hundred ninety one in carnal knowledge with jack. Nicholson screamed a woman. That she is a bulbous. Busting son of a bitch or words to that effect on an exorcist as well it appears in the vagina monologues nineteen ninety-six. I think it was with enslin. She talks about reclaiming but it's still not the linguistic not step. Despite all of this work today it was finally admitted to the oxford english dictionary. Been around for thousands of years in the seventies and then a two thousand fourteen. They relented a little bit more and they added contented counting so we all know exactly what that means the off. Come the regulator for uk. Tv censorship.

John cleland Nicholson nineteenth century seventeenth century Constance charlie first Forty folks nineteen seventy s. first time uk jerry london fourteen concern nineteen today seventies eighteen thousands of years one thousand nine hundred nine -six
"kate lister" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:21 min | 6 months ago

"kate lister" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's been suggested that he uses play. Acquaint quinta count in his sonnet number. Twenty it certainly turns up in a lot of his work. It's a lot rude to them. We often give him credit for in hamlets. Act three scene. Two hamlet says to a failure he says shall i lie in your lap and she says oh no my lord and then he says. Do you think coming country matters. When david tennant played that part he paused think permanent. Couldn't re matters to try and really drive home. Another one twelfth night malvolio says of his mistress handwriting. Naby her caesar. Ut's makes her very great pease. putting on unpaid simultaneously. The immortal status is a smoke peddler as often swept under the cultural rug and eighteen. Seven thomas boulder publicity family. Shakespeare edited out all of these jokes. All of the rude bits of made a completely free affair. It's no surprise about this time. We start to get the first liable laws. In britain the first bombing of seditious offensive pamphlets with the rise of puritanism for shakespeare to be veiling his co. jokes and kind of cheeky do belong. Tundras suggests that it's not quite as free and open. His gernika couldn't lane once have had the puritans repressed sexuality we know this and languages are extremely important battleground for sexual liberation. How'd you talk about your body's if the very words you're trying to use a considered to be offensive. How'd you do that by the time we get to the restoration period early modern period is most certainly offensive. John wilmot earl of rochester is the absolute poster boy of fuck you. If the puritans tried to dominate sexuality this guy surf to notoriety on a wave of sexual repression. That was unleashed from. The plug was pulled on the puritan rule. He uses a lot and he's very naughty about. He wrote this poem about his mistress. Now jealousy delivers when your lewd couldn't came spewing home drenched with the seed of half the town my dream of sperm was swept up after for the digestive surface water for another time with a bust meal of slime which devouring half drawn from portis box and footmen broad. He uses that word to shock. And it's easy to look at his work. I think is sexually liberated. But he's actually quite angry continent owners and that goes all the way through it from here on out. Cont- is an offensive naughty word judge and say we go some what happens about eighteenth centuries the print industry really explodes and of course we being humans. We didn't just wanna published nice books we published on. There's a huge proliferation of that comes out of the eighteenth century but oddly enough most fish shies away from using that word count in seventeen eighty five francis grose published his book a dictionary of a volpato which is basically a dictionary of slang and he defined count as a nasty name for a thing search modesty from someone who also uses the word buccaneers boot lobster pot skirt and mrs paula for the vulgar harris's list. This isn't almanacs..

John wilmot eighteenth century Shakespeare Twenty shakespeare Two hamlet malvolio twelfth night earl of rochester paula first bombing david tennant first liable laws eighteenth centuries one harris Act three scene quinta modern period francis grose
"kate lister" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:33 min | 6 months ago

"kate lister" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"The word turns up in the seventeenth century. It's taken directly from latin. And it means a cupboard. It means something that a sword goes into vulva. Doesn't do much better. That appears in the fourteenth century. And it means but some people suggest it comes from. The french means rapper. Both these words derive their meaning and their import from the penis. Basically that's what. China is something a sword goes into. I say that these words are feminist is count which comes from a word that means queen create wisdom cow. When did it. I stop being used in english as we recognize it today. Grope couldn't lane. This is the first recorded instant in the oxford. English dictionary. turns up in twelve thirty a. Street name in london called grope lane which was exactly what it sounds like. This was in the red light district of civic. It was a lane for groping counts and there wasn't just one in london. There was one in bristol. It was what york the pace all over the british isles but whereas plus regions might be calling each other and their friends cons. It seems evil. People were calling their children because it turns up in a number of names bizarrely enough well. Twin claw couldn't is recorded in ten sixty six gernika controls and twelve nineteen john filkin in twelve forty. Six robert cleave. Couldn't thirteen to misspell wide. Cont- turns up in the norfolk subsidiary. Role we don't us these. Aliases or if the jokes but we did a lot of fun with evil named in fact originally the word fuck did not mean what it means. Today it means to strike something to hit which gives us the fabulous name of a dairy farmer in twelve ninety down to simon fook butter so offensive to many evil people know it wasn't concern up all over medieval culture and medieval literature. And they're certainly not offensive is just a descriptive term. Here's some examples. The proverbs of handing thirty and twenty five advises women to give your cont- cunningly make your demands later. I get a ring on it. First before you give it up. There's an a welsh. Poet called worth mccain from the fifteenth century and she advises a male poets to celebrate the fine bright curtain of a constant flops in place of greeting suprises that medieval culture. Was this open about cons- but the truth was they. Were more sexually liberated. Actually give them credit for this idea of them. Being in tower with a chastity bell on his largely hatchet job on their reputation by the victorians. now it wasn't a sexually liberated utopia. They had their own hangups but they weren't that offended by sex or get you in trouble. Swear words middle ages was religious ones blasphemous ones. If you said like god's wings or god's ti- thoughts what you'd say if you're caught your you fly in you soften dungarees in you. Fly one of poet drops to see bomb with precision of military geoffrey. Chaucer who turns. Gcc's a-level syllabuses. Although his jokes assembling not dwelled upon he doesn't use the word to use the word quinta which again means knowledge and it means so. This is his joke as the clocks been full. Subtle full hick cleanser and privilege. He caught by the quinta. A rough translation means the clock was really on a quarter by the to.

thirty london bristol seventeenth century fourteenth century Today thirteen fifteenth century first First latin English today one China Both these twelve thirty a. Street oxford twelve ninety twelve forty
"kate lister" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:13 min | 6 months ago

"kate lister" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Adult language and may not be suitable for all listeners. In fact the whole talk about the history of a word that can immediately offend or make us cringe. How did things get this way. What's the story behind a four letter. Word. i'm purposely not saying in this intro. Caitlyn twenty twenty talk from fedex. University of glasgow is a fascinating history. I a warning as far as offensive words go. You are now entering a hard hat area. We're going to be unabashed in this. I am talking to you about a very particular word of a powerful word. Very see you next tuesday word. I love this word. All my i love everything about this word. Not just what it signifies but the actual actual sound of it the fact that the sea and the tea just just cushion sound into this mono-syllabic that you can just spit like a bullet or you can extend out roll around your mouth coon. I live at dexterity. I love the fact the in scotland. It's a term of endearment but in america it's horrendously offensive elite. Means something different with your friends than it does. If he said it to your boss it would probably cost you your job. I do not recommend it. I love this word. I love the fact that the first three letters are still the same chalice shape old rolling for the word to. Let's stop explosive t at the end. I think the thing. I love most about it. Is it status as the nastiest of all nasty words. Although that title is under some contention other other obvious heavyweight contenders for the most offensive word the n. word for example. But here's what i would say to you. I know why that word is offensive. I can look at the history. That word enabled the brutalization and racial genocide of entire group of people it played its part in dehumanizing black people what did can't do does it not strike. Anyone else is odd that a word that just means the vulva could even be regarded. The same league of offense is the n. word are we saying. that vulgar's evatt offensive..

Caitlyn scotland america University of glasgow fedex first three letters next tuesday four letter twenty twenty talk
"kate lister" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:30 min | 10 months ago

"kate lister" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bupkis from Congress on a deal for a relief package. And at the risk of repeating myself again. If Congress continues to not do anything this economy could get a whole lot worse. Tens of millions of people are unemployed as we know Small and medium business is hanging on by their fingernails and local eviction moratoriums winding down all over the country. The federal one from the Centers for Disease Control ends on New Year's Eve. According to the Census Bureau, about 33% of American adults are at risk of eviction or foreclosure, and for millions of people rental debt is piling up marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has more on that one. Paying rent used to be no big deal for 65 year old grass yellow weighed in Chicago. She's retired and on a fixed income but was getting help with bills from her granddaughter and her granddaughters. Then girlfriend Then the pandemic hit with my girls movie their jobs as me not being able to keep up with everything just makes it worse. Wade hasn't paid rent since July and is now $3500 behind and at risk of addiction, just like about 14 million other households. Says Emily Ben for who leads the American Bar Association's task force on Cove. In 19 related evictions. The mere fact of filing actually plummets credit scores, and it precludes people from seeking a mortgage in the future or a car title or even seeking employment. Plus even after someone is evicted. The debt stays with them. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia estimates more than a million households over $5000 in rent. We will see the impacts of debt owed by renters across this country. For years to come. Deborah Throat his deputy director at the National Housing Law Project, It's going to absolutely slow the economic recovery. And we know that there are millions of people at risk of eviction prior to the band Emmick and that number has on Lee grown Throat says of Congress does pass more covert legislation It needs to address the estimated tens of billions of dollars in past to rent in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. This program today is being brought to you pretty much the same way. It's been brought to you since mid March. 3 people to audio engineers and yours truly. In about 20,000 Square feet of really, really empty office space. And then a couple of dozen more people working from home. And if the latest report from Pew is any indicator, it might stay that way for a while, nearly 90% of people yes, 90% of people who've been able to work from home, a Pew says, have no desire to go back to the office full time once it's safe to do so. Marketplaces. Samantha Fields has more on what that might portend. Jonathan soon is in that majority of people who would very much like to keep working from home. Permanently home. I have a window by where I worked like an opening to get fresh air. Just look out the window. There are no windows in the I T department, where he works at a university in Southern California. He likes how quiet it is at home and not having to commute. You. Research found that more than half of people whose jobs have allowed them to work from home during Cove. It want to keep doing it all or most of the time. Another third say they'd like to at least some of the time that's creating a lot of conversation about how we're going to operate in summer 2021. Justin Draeger runs a nonprofit in D. C with about 45 people on staff, and nearly all of them now say they want to be able to divide their time between home and the office and Draeger's. Okay with that this idea of being in the office five days a week. I think is a bygone era for companies that have successfully moved to tell a work and a lot have Kate Lister with Global Workplace Analytics, says the company's she's talking to in tech law, banking and insurance are planning to keep doing it. After the pandemic ends. We've reached the tipping point whether it's enough companies that are going to be offering it That if you're a company that doesn't offer it or allow it. You're simply not going to be able to hold on to your people or attract the best talent that will be a welcome shift for people in industries were working from home is possible. But they're generally the Americans who are in the most for.

Kimberly Adams Congress Jonathan Deborah Throat Centers for Disease Control Justin Draeger Kate Lister Census Bureau Federal Reserve Bank American Bar Association Emily Ben Wade Chicago deputy director Samantha Fields Global Workplace Analytics Washington National Housing Law Project
"kate lister" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:30 min | 10 months ago

"kate lister" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From Congress on a deal for a relief package. And at the risk of repeating myself again. If Congress continues to not do anything this economy could get a whole lot worse. Tens of millions of people are unemployed as we know Small and medium business is hanging on by their fingernails and local eviction moratoriums winding down all over the country. The federal one from the Centers for Disease Control ends on New Year's Eve. According to the Census Bureau, about 33% of American adults are at risk of eviction or foreclosure, and for millions of people rental debt is piling up marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has more on that one. Paying rent used to be no big deal for a 65 year old grass yellow weighed in Chicago. She's retired and on a fixed income but was getting help with bills from her granddaughter and her granddaughters. Then girlfriend Then the pandemic hit with my girls movie their jobs. Had lied. Not being able to keep up with everything just makes it worse. Wade hasn't paid rent since July and is now $3500 behind and at risk of eviction. Just like about 14 million other households, says Emily Ben for who leads the American Bar Association's task Force on Cove. In 19 related evictions. The mere fact of filing actually plummets credit scores, and it precludes people from seeking a mortgage in the future or a car title or even seeking employment. Plus, even after someone is evicted, the debt stays with them. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia estimates more than a million households over $5000 in rent. We will see the impact of debt owed by renters across this country for years to come. Deborah Throat is deputy director at the National Housing Law Project. It's going to absolutely slow the economic recovery. And we know that there are millions of people at risk of eviction prior to the band Emmick and that number has on Lee grown Throat says of Congress does pass more covert legislation It needs to address the estimated tens of billions of dollars in past to rent in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. This program today is being brought to you pretty much the same way. It's been brought to you since mid March, 3 people to audio engineers and yours truly in about 20,000 Square feet of really, really empty office space. And then a couple of dozen more people working from home. And if the latest report from Pew is any indicator, it might stay that way for a while, nearly 90% of people yes, 90% of people who've been able to work from home, a Pew says, have no desire to go back to the office full time once it's safe to do so. Marketplaces. Samantha Fields has more on what that might portend. Jonathan soon is in that majority of people who would very much like to keep working from home permanently home. I have a window by where I work, so I can open it and get fresh air or just look out the window. There are no windows in the I T Department, where he works at a university in Southern California. He likes how quiet it is at home and not having to commute. Few research found that more than half of people whose jobs have allowed them to work from home during Cove. It want to keep doing it all or most of the time. Another third say they'd like to at least some of the time that's creating a lot of conversation about how we're gonna operate in summer 2021. Justin Draeger runs a nonprofit in D. C with about 45 people on staff, and nearly all of them now say they want to be able to divide their time between home and the office and Draeger's. Okay with that. This idea of being in the office five days a week, I think is a bygone era for companies that have successfully moved to tell a work and a lot have Kate Lister with Global Workplace Analytics says the company's She's talking to in Tak, law, banking and insurance are planning to keep doing it after the pandemic ends. We've reached the tipping point whether it's enough companies that are going to be offering it that if you're a company that doesn't offer it or allow it, you're simply not going to be able to hold on to your people or attract the best talent that will be a welcome shift for people in industries were working from home is possible. But they're generally the Americans who are in the most for most people working from home isn't an option. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. If your social media feed is anything like mine, you're seeing a whole lot of people posting their Spotify 2020 playlists the past couple of weeks, the details of all the listening they did this year. But for a lot of the artists behind those playlists, especially the smaller, independent ones. 2020 hasn't been so great. So with a year about toe mercifully wrap up We've got the wrapper and writer Desa back on the phone. Hey, it's good to have you back. Thanks, Esso. When we spoke at the beginning of this thing Back in March. Your calendar you're good calendar had just like vaporized on. I wonder eight months nine months later on How it's been through this whole summer and fall. E mean, in some ways, I think most musician they're still looking at, you know, at calendars that air don't have too much in condom. Yeah, I remember talking to my agent, and he was like, you know, use this time when this is all over. You want to look back and be able to say you really spent this time making something wonderful. And I remember like a month after getting that council I was just like This is not a writer's or treat, man. This is like a global crisis. I don't I don't want to know. I don't want to spend my days thinking what rhymes with plague, you know, like, just so In the beginning, there was sort of alone. But now eight months in You can. You can hear the wheels humming again. You know people of writing rad stuff, And I think it is a consumer of music, too. I think I've found myself leaning harder. On art for comfort and distraction and all the things that we turned to art for, so Yeah, Yeah, well, So look, we all turned to art for comfort and distraction. Those of us on the consuming and those of you on the producing end turned art to pay the rent. Um and I don't imagine you been able to do that. I mean, maybe you're making your and I don't know that's none of my business. But but the point is, you can't You can't really Profit off your art when your gig calendar has gone away. Right. And even before the pandemic, like the alchemy of turning music into groceries had gotten really complicated it had and for all the reasons that a consumer can anticipate most of us Listen to some streaming services. Very few of us have two walls of our bedroom covered in vinyl, and so In the beginning, there were a lot of virtual concerts, then I think a lot of us got pretty screened out, you know is this thing rolled on, But there have been some exceptions, the cultural phenomenon that is vs Where artists kind of battle it out. You know what I mean? That's that's been a big win, obviously, but also patri in. Oh, yeah, yeah, like the subscription models fart. Essentially those of really that is really boomed, which which is cool, right? I mean, that's great that there's that resource. For artists and musicians and others, but at some point You're going to have to and you're going to want to, and you're going to be able to get back into actually performing and there are going to be clubs it open and venues that open what you anticipate that's gonna be like because so many things in this economy have changed. And you have to believe that that Sector. That space has a swell. You know the scene in a movie where, like someone is sitting alone trying to figure out where the other survivors are. So they're tuning a radio might still be out there. Yeah, I think we're approaching that scene like We've got all these artists out here who are going to be watching the news to try to figure out what you know What's the timeline for the vaccine? What is it gonna be healthy and safe to go back on the road? But of course we're all gonna want to go..

Congress Kimberly Adams Samantha Fields writer Centers for Disease Control Justin Draeger Census Bureau Chicago plague American Bar Association Deborah Throat Federal Reserve Bank Wade Emily Ben Washington Spotify Jonathan
"kate lister" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:38 min | 10 months ago

"kate lister" Discussed on KOMO

"Work is trust. Managers simply don't trust their people to work untethered. They're used to managing by counting butts in seats rather than by results. I thought managing its baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO, You know, the biggest hold back since the term Tele work. Telecommuting was established in 1973 by Jack Millis has been managers not trusting their employees. Basically, they're worried they're sitting at home on the sofa, eating bon bonds and not working. All of the literature has pointed to the fact that they're actually more productive at home even before the pandemic. Now they've had a chance to do it and the longer they've done it, the more likely they are to support it in the future. People don't necessarily want to work from home all the time if they can help, But they do like being in the office. Isolation and loneliness are very real struggles for a lot of Americans right now. But when the pandemics over well, they want to continue working from home, Lister's research says yes, but not all the time, maybe two or three days a week on average. There are things that you miss by not being at your desk and person, including not doing at your desk stuff. There's no substitute for face to face. You know, we're finding that the younger employees are actually having a harder time with this than the older employees. Because they depend on that sort of subtle nurturing that goes on in the office. You know, watching somebody and how they act. New York Times reporter told me that I learned how to interview By sitting in the bullpen. S so that you know, there's a lot of that We're having trouble with on boarding. We're having trouble with converting in turns into employees. There are companies that hired people all on shack. They've never even talked to the person. They're hired. Virtually, you know, in some ways that cuts down on discrimination, you know, it's really about who you are, and you know what you can do One of the things that real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran said she didn't think I'll ever go back to brainstorming meeting in person again because you get a lot of politics in the room. It changes things, and you can see everyone in a zoom. Call it it makes a difference, doesn't it? Yeah. I mean, it's less hierarchical when you see the CEO sitting there in a chair with his grandchild walking past or her grandchild walking past or the dog on his lap or whatever. It just makes us more human, and I hope that something that's going to come out of this is that that we will have more empathy toward one another understand them as whole people. One of the many things the pandemic may have taught us is that it's time to think of work differently. It's time to start giving our families as much priority is we do our jobs. Office workers have come to realize they don't want to spend an hour and a half in traffic or on a train. It's great for listening to radio our podcast, but it's not so great when it comes to spending time with your kids or your parents, and we've known for more than a decade that 80% of people want the ability to work flexibly to work from home to work from anywhere, and in particular, it's not just about flexibility in place its flexibility in time. Work is interspersed with life. It isn't just this heart stopped hard Start times, Lister says. The best companies work with their employees to find a balance that's productive for both of them, letting people who want to work from home work from home when they can and letting people who want to go into the office do that. She thinks that'll continue beyond the pandemic. I would say that that's the rule. And it's the exception where the company's heir, not saying that and I think they're going to have trouble in the future hiring good people because this has always been high on a job priority list. And now that so many companies are offering it, I think that you're really gonna be left out. If it's not part of your offering, maybe see Sherry Preston. Couple news time 8 20 in time for the propel insurance business update.

Kate Lister CEO Barbara Corcoran Jack Millis New York Times Sherry Preston reporter
"kate lister" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"kate lister" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Blocks of remote work is trust. Managers simply don't trust their people toe work untethered. They're used to managing by counting butts in seats rather than by results. Not managing baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO. We talked this week by zoom off course into the biggest hold back since the term telework telecommuting was established in 1973 by Jack Nicklaus has been managers not trusting their employees. I mean, it's basically they're worried. They're sitting at home on the sofa. Bond bonds and not working. All the literature has pointed to the fact that they're actually more productive at home even before the pandemic, But now they've had a chance to do it and the longer they've done it, the more likely they are to support it in the future. People don't necessarily want to work from home all the time if they can help, But they do like being in the office. Isolation and loneliness are very real struggles for a lot of Americans right now, But when the pandemics over well, they want to continue working from home Listers Research says Yes, but not all the time, maybe two or three days a week. On average. There are things that you miss by not being at your desk or in person, including not doing at your desk stuff. There's no substitute for face to face. You know, we're finding that the younger employees are actually having a harder time with this and the older employees. Because they depend on that sort of subtle nurturing that goes on in the office, you know, watching somebody and how they act. One of the things that real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran said she didn't think I'll ever go back to brainstorm a meeting in person again because you get a lot of politics in the room. It changes things, the politics of things and and you can see everyone in a zoom calling. It makes a difference, doesn't it? Yeah. I mean, it's less hierarchical when you see the CEO sitting there in a chair with his grandchild walking past or her grandchild walking past or the dog Slap or whatever mean it just makes us more human and and I hope that something that's going to come out of this is that that we will have more empathy toward one another understand them as whole people. One of the many things that pandemic may have taught us is that it's time to think of work differently. It's time to start giving our families as much priority ISS. We do our jobs office workers have come to realize they don't want to spend an hour and a half in traffic or on a train. It's great for listening to radio our podcast. But it's not so great when it comes to spending time with your kids or your parents or even your pet. I think absolutely. We've known for more than a decade that 80% of people want the ability to work flexibly to work from home to work from anywhere, and in particular, it's not just about flexibility in place its flexibility in time. Laszlo Block, the HR expert says in his opinion. People work better when they're with other people, all those little tiny moments that happened in the office where we bump into each other. Are badly missed because they're essentially, Lister says The best companies work with their employees to find a balance that's productive for both of them, letting people who want to work from home work from home when they can and letting people who want to go into the office do that. She thinks that'll continue beyond the pandemic. I would say that that's the rule. And it's the exception where the company's heir, not saying that and I think they're going to have going to have trouble in the future hiring good people. Because this has always been a jobs high on a job priority list and Now that so many companies are offering it, I think that you're really going to be left out. If it's not part of your offering. If you're one of the millions of office workers who have adapted to a new normal good for you, you're one of the millions who miss going in talk with your boss. She's a.

Kate Lister CEO Barbara Corcoran Jack Nicklaus Laszlo Block
"kate lister" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"kate lister" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Results, not managing baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO. We talked this week by Zoom, Of course, you know, the biggest hold back since the term telework telecommuting was established in 1973 by Jack Nicklaus has been managers not trusting their employees. I mean, it's basically they're worried. They're sitting at home on the sofa eating. Bond bonds and not working. All of the literature has pointed to the fact that they're actually more productive at home even before the pandemic, But now they've had a chance to do it. On the longer they've done it we're likely they are to supported in the future. People don't necessarily want to work from home all the time if they can help, But they do like being in the office. Isolation and loneliness are very real struggles for a lot of Americans right now. But when the pandemics over well, they want to continue working from home, Lister's research says yes, but not all the Time, maybe two or three days a week. On average. There are things that you miss by not being at your desk or in person, including not doing at your desk stuff. There's no substitute for face to face. You know, we're finding that the younger employees are actually having a harder time with this than the older employees. Because they depend on that sort of subtle nurturing that goes on in the office, you know, watching somebody and how they act. One of the things that real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran said she didn't think I'll ever go back to brainstorm a meeting in person again because you get a lot of politics in the room. It changes things, the politics of things and and you can see everyone in a zoom calling. It makes a difference, doesn't it? Yeah. I mean, it's less hierarchical when you see the CEO sitting there in a chair with his grandchild walking past or her grandchild walking past or the dog Slap or whatever mean it just makes us more human, and I hope that something that's going to come out of this is that we will have more empathy toward one another understand them as whole people. One of the many things the pandemic may have taught us is that it's time to think of work differently. It's time to start giving our families is much priority. ISS. We do our jobs office workers have come to realize they don't want to spend an hour and a half in traffic or on a train. It's great for listening to radio our podcast. But it's not so great when it comes to spending time with your kids or your parents or even your pet. I think absolutely. We've known for more than a decade that 80% of people want the ability to work flexibly to work from home to work from anywhere, and in particular, it's not just about flexibility in place its flexibility in time. Laszlo Block, the HR expert says in his opinion. People work better when they're with other people. All those little tiny moments that happened in the office worried about they knew each other. Are badly missed because they're essentially, Lister says The best companies work with their employees to find a balance that's productive for both of them, letting people who want to work from home work from home when they can and letting people who want to go into the office do that. She thinks that'll continue beyond the pandemic. I would say that that's the rule. And it's the exception where the company's heir, not saying that and I think they're going to have going to have trouble in the future hiring good people. Because this has always been a jobs high on a job priority list. And now that so many companies are offering it, I think that you're really going to be left out. If.

Kate Lister CEO Jack Nicklaus Barbara Corcoran Laszlo Block
"kate lister" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"kate lister" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Millions of office workers. Today we are announcing a mandatory statewide requirement. That no business can have more than 50% of their work force. Report to work outside of their home. His announcement would lead the country to do the same thing. I understand that this is a burden to businesses. I get it. I understand the impact on the economy. But in truth, we're past that point as a nation, and from then on, many of you have been working from home exclusively. I was deemed one of the essential so I never had to figure out how to set up a real home studio or struggle with zoom calls early on, or fight with remote applications that airlock clunkier and slower than the computers at work. There may have been only one or two of us in the office. But we were there and being there is something that very ahead doll Mrs. She started a new job at a nonprofit at the beginning of the pandemic and has been working remotely ever since building any sort of Relationship with my coworkers is kind of difficult right now. I've never seen any of them in person. I don't even know where our office building is, According to the Becker Friedman Institute at the University of Chicago, nearly 40% of jobs in this country can be done from home and some of the nation's biggest tech companies like Twitter and Facebook have told their employees. They'll remain at their homes from now on, even though Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg did say those who Moved to places where the cost of living is lower than Silicon Valley might see their salaries lower as well. Not everybody's on board with the work from home revolution, though Laszlo Block is the CEO of the HR startup, Hume you for the first several months, I think we all kind of lived off the adrenaline that adrenaline doesn't last forever. Others, however, say that is an excuse, According to the telecommuting research firm Global Workplace Analytics, one of the biggest road blocks of remote work is trust. Managers simply don't trust their people to work untethered. They're used to managing by counting butts in seats rather than by results. Not managing baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO. We talked this week by Zoom, Of course, you know, the biggest hold back.

CEO Facebook Kate Lister Laszlo Block Global Workplace Analytics Becker Friedman Institute Mrs. She Mark Zuckerberg Twitter University of Chicago
"kate lister" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"kate lister" Discussed on WTVN

"Not managing baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO. We talked this week by Zoom, Of course, you know, the biggest hold back since the term telework telecommuting was established in 1973 by Jack Nicholas has been managers not trusting their employees. I mean, it's basically they're worried. They're sitting at home on the sofa, eating bon bonds and not working. All of the literature has pointed to the fact that they're actually more productive at home even before the pandemic, But now they've had a chance to do it and the longer they've done it, we're likely they are to supported in the future. People don't necessarily want to work from home all the time if they can help, But they do like being in the office. Isolation and loneliness are very real struggles for a lot of Americans right now, But when the pandemics over well, they want to continue Working from home. Lister's research says Yes, but not all the time, maybe two or three days a week. On average. There are things that you miss by not being at your desk or in person, including not doing at your desk stuff. There's no substitute for face to face. You know, we're finding that the younger employees are actually having a harder time with this and the older employees. Because they depend on that sort of subtle nurturing that goes on in the office, you know, watching somebody and how they act. One of the things that real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran said she didn't think I'll ever go back to brainstorm a meeting in person again because you get a lot of politics in the room. It changes things, the politics of things and and you can see everyone in a zoom calling. It makes a difference, doesn't it? Yeah. I mean, it's less hierarchical when you see the CEO sitting there in a chair with his grandchild walking past or her grandchild walking past or the dog Slap or whatever mean it just makes us more human, and I hope that something that's going to come out of this is that that we will have more empathy toward one another understand them as whole people. One of the many things that pandemic may have taught us is that it's time to think of work differently. It's time to start giving our families as much priority as we do our jobs. Office workers have come to realize they don't want to spend an hour and a half in traffic or on a train. It's great for listening to radio or podcast, but it's not so great when it comes to spending time with your kids or your parents or even your pet. I think absolutely. We've known for more than a decade that 80% of people want the ability to work flexibly to work from home to work from anywhere, and in particular, it's not just about flexibility in place its flexibility in time. Laszlo Block, the HR expert says in his opinion. People work better when they're with other people, all those little tiny moments that happened in the office where he bumped into each other. Are badly missed because they're essentially, Lister says The best companies work with their employees to find a balance that's productive for both of them, letting people who want to work from home work from home when they can and letting people who want to go into the office do that. She thinks that'll continue beyond the pandemic. I would say that that's the rule. And it's the exception where the company's heir, not saying that and I think they're going to have going to have trouble in the future hiring good people. Because this has always been a jobs high on a job priority list. And now that so many companies are offering it, I think that you're really going to be left out. If it's not part of your offering. If you're one of the millions of office workers who have adapted to.

Kate Lister CEO Jack Nicholas Barbara Corcoran Laszlo Block
"kate lister" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"kate lister" Discussed on KOMO

"Office, and today you're working from home, you might be wondering how long Long will it last. Some experts say it should last forever. Let's take a look back and I look forward to the future of remote work. It was Wednesday. March 18th. When New York governor Andrew Cuomo announces the new reality for millions of office workers. Today we are announcing a mandatory statewide requirement. That no business can have more than 50% of their work force. Report to work outside of their home. His announcement would lead the country to do the same thing. I understand that this is a burden to businesses. I get it. I understand the impact on the economy. But in truth, we're past that point as a nation, and from then on, many of you have been working from home exclusively, and some of the nation's biggest tech companies like Twitter and Facebook have told their employees, they'll remain at their homes from now on, even though Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg did say those who moved to places where the cost of living is lower than Silicon Valley might see their salaries lower as well. According to the telecommuting research firm Global Workplace Analytics, One of the biggest road blocks of remote work is trust managers simply don't trust their people to work untethered. They're used to managing by counting butts in seats rather than by results. I thought managing its baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO, You know, the biggest hold back since the term Telework telecommuting was established in 1973 by Jack Millis has been managers not trusting their employees. Basically, they're worried they're sitting at home on the sofa, eating bon bonds and not working. All of the literature has pointed to the fact that they're actually more productive at home even before the pandemic, But now they've had a chance to do it and the longer they have done it, the more likely they are to support it in the future. People don't necessarily want to work from home all the time if they can help, But they do like being in the office. Isolation and loneliness are very real struggles for a lot of Americans right now, but whether pandemics over well they want to continue working from home. Listers Research says Yes, but not all the time, maybe two or three days a week. On average. There are things that you miss by not being at your desk or in person, including not doing at your desk stuff. There's no substitute for face to face. You know, we're finding that the younger employees are actually having a harder time with this than the older employees. Because they depend on that sort of subtle nurturing that goes on in the office. You know, watching somebody and how they act. New York Times reporter told me that I learned how to interview By sitting in the bullpen. So that you know, there's a lot of that We're having trouble with on boarding. We're having trouble with converting interns into employees. There are companies that hire people all on shock. They've never even talk to the person. And they're hired virtually, you know, in some ways that cuts down on discrimination, you know, it's really about who you are, and you know what you can do One of the things that Realestate Mobile, Barbara Corcoran said she didn't think I'll ever go back to brainstorm a meeting in person again because you get a lot of politics in the room. It changes things, and you can see everyone in a zoom. Call it it makes a difference, doesn't it? Yeah. I mean, it's less hierarchical when you see the CEO sitting there in a chair with his grandchild walking past or her grandchild walking past or the dog on his lap or whatever. It just makes us more human and and I hope that something that's going to come out of this is that that we will have more empathy toward one another understand, amass as whole people. One of the many things the pandemic may have taught us is that it's time to think of work differently. It's time to start giving our families as much priority ISS. We do our jobs. Office workers have come to realize they don't want to spend an hour and a half in traffic or on a train. That's great for listening to radio our podcast, but it's not so great when it comes to spending time with your kids or your parents, and we've known for more than a decade that 80% of people want the ability to work flexibly to work from home to work from anywhere, and in particular, it's not just about flexibility in place its flexibility in time. Work is interspersed with life. It isn't just this hard. Stop hard start. They say your home is your castle. When your castle's a one bedroom apartment. It can seem more like a dungeon. I think that's another reason that some of the younger people are having trouble because they don't have A bigger home a spare room. That's an office. We just did a survey and we're asking how many of you have worked in a closet and it's a pretty big number. You know, we're just we're just making do But again, you know, this is not normal times. Lister says the best companies work with their employees to find a balance that's productive for both of them, letting people who want to work from home work from home when they can. And letting people who want to go into the office do that. She thinks that'll continue beyond the pandemic. I would say that that's the rule. And it's the exception where the company's heir, not saying that and I think they're going to have trouble in the future hiring good people because this has always been high on a job priority list. And Now that so many companies are offering it, I think that you're really going to be left out..

CEO Kate Lister Facebook Andrew Cuomo New York New York Times Global Workplace Analytics Mark Zuckerberg Barbara Corcoran Twitter Realestate Mobile Jack Millis reporter
"kate lister" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"kate lister" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Office, and today you're working from home, you might be wondering how long will it last? Some experts say it should last forever. Let's take a look back and I look forward. The future of remote work. It was Wednesday. March 18th. When New York governor Andrew Cuomo announces the new reality for millions of office workers. Today we are announcing a mandatory statewide requirement. That no business can have more than 50% of their work force. Report to work outside of their home. His announcement would lead the country to do the same thing. I understand that this is a burden to businesses. I get it. I understand the impact on the economy. But in truth, we're past that point as a nation, and from then on, many of you have been working from home exclusively, and some of the nation's biggest tech companies like Twitter and Facebook have told their employees, they'll remain at their homes from now on, even though Facebook CEO Mark Sacha Verve did say those who moved to places where the cost of living is lower than Silicon Valley might see their salaries lower as well. According to the telecommuting research firm Global Workplace Analytics, One of the biggest road blocks of remote work is trust managers simply don't trust their people to work untethered. They're used to managing by counting butts in seats rather than by results. I thought managing its baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO, You know, the biggest hold back since the term telework telecommuting was established in 1973, by Jack Nicholas. Has been managers not trusting their employees. Basically, they're worried. They're sitting at home on the sofa, eating bon bonds and not working. All the literature has pointed to the fact that they're actually more productive at home even before the pandemic, But now they've had a chance to do it and the longer they have done it, the more likely they are to support it in the future. People don't necessarily want to work from home all the time if they can help, But they do like being in the office. Isolation and loneliness are very really struggles for a lot of Americans right now. But when the pandemics Over well, they want to continue working from home. Lister's research says Yes, but not all the time, maybe two or three days a week. On average. There are things that you missed by not being at your desk or in person, including not doing at your desk stuff. There's no substitute for face to face. You know, we're finding that the younger employees are actually having a harder time with this than the older employees. Because they depend on that sort of subtle nurturing that goes on in the office. You know, watching somebody and how they act. New York Times reporter told me that I learned how to interview By sitting in the bullpen. So that you know, there's a lot of that We're having trouble with on boarding. We're having trouble with converting interns into employees. There are companies that hire people all on shock. They've never even talk to the person. And they're hired virtually, you know, in some ways that cuts down on discrimination, you know, it's really about who you are and what you can do. One of the things that real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran said is she didn't think I'll ever go back to brainstorm a meeting in person again because you get a lot of politics in the room. It changes things, and you can see everyone in a zoom calling. It makes a difference, doesn't it? Yeah. I mean, it's less hierarchical when you see the CEO sitting there in a chair with his grandchild walking past or her grandchild walking past or the dog on his lap, or whatever mean it just makes us more here. A man and and I hope that something that's going to come out of this is that we will have more empathy toward one another understand them as whole people. One of the many things the pandemic may have taught us is that it's time to think of work differently. It's time to start giving our families as much priority ISS. We do our jobs. Office workers have come to realize they don't want to spend an hour and a half in traffic or on a train. That's great for listening to radio our podcast, but it's not so great when it comes to spending time with your kids or your parents, and we've known for more than a decade that 80% of people want the ability to work flexibly to work from home to work from anywhere, and in particular, it's not just about flexibility in place its flexibility in time. Work is interspersed with life. It isn't just this hard. Stop hard start, They say your home is your castle. When your castle's a one bedroom apartment. It can seem more like a dungeon. Think that's another reason that some of the younger people are having trouble because they don't have A bigger home a spare room. That's an office. We just did a survey and we're asking how many of you have worked in a closet and it's a pretty big number. You know, we're just we're just making do But again, you know, this is not normal times, Lister says the best companies work with their employees to find a balance that's productive for both of them, letting people who want to work from home work from home when they can and letting people who want to go into the office do that. She thinks that'll continue beyond the pandemic. I would say that that's the rule. And it's the exception where the company's heir, not saying that and I think they're going to have trouble in the future hiring good people because this has always been high on a job priority list. And Now that so many companies are offering it, I think that you're really going to be left out. If it's not part of your offering. If you're one of the millions of office workers who have adapted to a new normal good for you, you're one of the millions who miss going in talk with your.

Kate Lister CEO Facebook Andrew Cuomo New York New York Times Global Workplace Analytics Jack Nicholas Barbara Corcoran Twitter Mark Sacha Verve reporter
"kate lister" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"kate lister" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"90 for one. FM. From ABC News. This is perspective this week stories and why they matter. I'm Sherry Preston coming up, standing up in the face of rising violence against transgender women, but first so we talked about teachers completely transforming the way they're educating students. But really haven't almost all of us changed something about the way we work. If six months ago you were going into the office, and today you're working from home, you might be wondering how long Long will it last. Some experts say it should last forever. Let's take a look back and I look forward to the future of remote work. It was Wednesday. March 18th. When New York governor Andrew Cuomo announces the new reality for millions of office workers. Today we are announcing a mandatory statewide requirement. That no business can have more than 50% of their work force. Report to work outside of their home. His announcement would lead the country to do the same thing. I understand that this is a burden to businesses. I get it. I understand the impact on the economy. But in truth, we're past that point as a nation, and from then on, many of you have been working from home exclusively in some of the nation's biggest tech companies like Twitter and Facebook have told their employees, they'll remain at their homes from now on, even though Facebook CEO Mark Sacker Berg did say those who moved to places where the cost of living is lower than Silicon Valley might see their salaries lower as well. According to the telecommuting research firm Global Workplace Analytics, One of the biggest road blocks of remote work is trust managers simply don't trust their people to work untethered. They're used to managing by counting butts in seats rather than by results, not managing its baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO, You know, the biggest hold back since the term Telework telecommuting was established in 1973 by Jack Millis has been managers not trusting their employees. Basically, they're worried. They're sitting at home on the sofa, eating bon bonds and not working all the literature has pointed to the fact that they're actually more productive at home even before the pandemic. But now they've had a chance to do it and the longer they have done it, the more likely they are to support it in the future. People don't necessarily want to work from home all the time if they can help, But they do like being in the office. Isolation and loneliness are very really struggles for a lot of Americans right now. When the pandemics over well, they want to continue working from home. Lister's research says Yes, but not all the time, maybe two or three days a week. On average. There are things that you miss by not being at your desk or in person, including not doing at your desk stuff. There's no substitute for face to face. You know, we're finding that the younger employees are actually having a harder time with this and the older employees. Because they depend on that sort of subtle nurturing that goes on in the office. You know, watching somebody and how they act. New York Times reporter told me that I learned how to interview By sitting in the bullpen. So that you know, there's a lot of that We're having trouble with on boarding. We're having trouble with converting interns into employees. There are companies that hired people all on shock. They've never even talk to the person and they're hired. Virtually, you know, in some ways that cuts down on discrimination, you know, it's really about who you are, and you know what you can do One of the things that real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran said she didn't think I'll ever go back to brainstorm a meeting in person again because you get a lot of politics in the room. It changes things. And you can see everyone in a zoom. Call it it makes a difference, doesn't it? Yeah, I mean, it's less hierarchical. When you see the CEO sitting there in a chair with his grandchild walking past or her grandchild walking past or the dog on his lap or whatever, maybe just makes us more human. And I hope that something that's going to come out of this is that that we will have more empathy toward one another understand them as whole people. One of the many things that pandemic may have taught us is that it's time to think of work differently. It's time to start giving our families as much priority ISS. We do our jobs office workers have come to realize they don't want to spend an hour and a half in traffic or on a train. It's great for listening to radio our podcast, but it's not so great when it comes to spending time with your kids or your parents, and we've known for more than a decade that 80% of people want the ability to work flexibly to work from home to work from anywhere, and in particular, it's not just about flexibility in place its flexibility in time. Work is interspersed with life. It isn't just this hard. Stop hard start, They say your home is your castle. When your castle's a one bedroom apartment, it can seem more like a dungeon. That's another reason that some of the younger people are having trouble because they don't have A bigger home a spare room. That's an office. We just did a survey and we're asking how many of you have worked in a closet and it's a pretty big number. You know, we're just we're just making do But again, you know, this is not normal times, Lister says the best companies work with their employees to find a balance that's productive for both of them, letting people who want to work from home work from home when they can and letting people who want to go into the office do that. She thinks that'll continue beyond the pandemic. I would say that that's the rule. And it's the exception where the company's heir, not saying that and I think they're going to have trouble in the future hiring good people because this has always been high on a job priority list. And Now that so many companies are offering it, I think that you're really going to be left out. If it's not part of your offering. If you're one of the millions of office workers who have adapted to a new normal good for you, you're one of the millions.

Kate Lister CEO ABC News Facebook Sherry Preston New York Times Andrew Cuomo New York Global Workplace Analytics Barbara Corcoran Twitter Mark Sacker Berg Jack Millis reporter
"kate lister" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"kate lister" Discussed on KOMO

"Office, and today you're working from home, you might be wondering how long will it last? Some experts say it should last forever. ABC. Sherry Preston takes a look back and look forward to the future of remote work. It was Wednesday. March 18th. When New York governor Andrew Cuomo announces the new reality for millions of office workers. Today we are announcing a mandatory statewide requirement. That no business can have more than 50% of their workforce report to work outside of their home. His announcement would lead the country to do the same thing. I understand that this is a burden to businesses. I understand the impact on the economy. But in truth, we're past that point as a nation, and from then on, many of you have been working from home exclusively, and some of the nation's biggest tech companies like Twitter and Facebook have told their employees, they'll remain at their homes from now on, even though Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg did say those who moved to places where the cost of living is lower than Silicon Valley might see their salaries lower as well. According to the telecommuting research firm Global Workplace Analytics, One of the biggest road blocks of remote work is trust managers simply don't trust their people to work untethered. They're used to managing by counting butts in seats rather than by results. I thought managing its baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO, You know, the biggest hold back since the term Telework telecommuting was established in 1973 by Jack Millis has been managers not trusting their employees. Basically, they're worried they're sitting at home on the sofa, eating bon bonds and not working. All of the literature has pointed to the fact that they're actually more productive at home even before the pandemic. But now they've had a chance to do it and the longer they've done it, the more likely they are to support it in the future. People don't necessarily want to work from home all the time if they can help, But they do like being in the office. Isolation and loneliness are very real struggles for a lot of Americans right now. But when the pandemics over well, they want to continue working from home, Lister's research says Yes, but not all the time, maybe two or three days a week on average. There are things that you missed by not being at your desk or in person, including not doing at your desk stuff. There's no substitute for face to face. You know, we're finding that the younger employees are actually having a harder time with this than the older employees. Because they depend on that sort of subtle nurturing that goes on in the office. You know, watching somebody and how they act. New York Times reporter told me that I learned how to interview By sitting in the bullpen. So that you know, there's a lot of that We're having trouble with on boarding. We're having trouble with converting interns into employees. There are companies that hire people all on shock. They've never even talk to the person. And they're hired virtually, you know, in some ways that cuts down on discrimination, you know, it's really about who you are and what you can do One of the things that real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran said she didn't think I'll ever go back to brainstorm a meeting in person again because you get a lot of politics in the room. It changes things, and you can see everyone in a zoom calling. It makes a difference, doesn't it? Yeah, I mean, it's less hierarchical when you see the CEO sitting there in a chair with his grandchild walking past or her grandchild walking past or the dog on his lap or whatever. It just makes us more human and and I hope that something that's going to come out of this is that that we will have more empathy toward one another understand a Mazhar old people. One of the many things the pandemic may have taught us is that it's time to think of work differently. It's time to start giving our families as much priority ISS we do our jobs. Office workers have come to realize they don't want to spend an hour and a half in traffic or on a train. That's great for listening to radio our podcast, but it's not so great when it comes to spending time with your kids or your parents, and we've known for more than a decade that 80% of people want the ability to work flexibly to work from home to work from anywhere, and in particular, it's not just about flexibility in place its flexibility in time. Work is interspersed with life. It isn't just this hard stop hard start times, Lister says. The best companies work with their employees to find a balance that's productive for both of them, letting people who want to work from home work from home when they can and letting people who want to go into the office do that. She thinks that'll continue beyond the pandemic. I would say that that's the rule. And it's the exception where the company's heir, not saying that and I think they're going to have trouble in the future hiring good people because this has always been high on a job priority list. And now that so many companies are offering it, I think that you're really going to be left out if it's not part of your offering. Almost money report is sponsored by Propel Insurance. From ABC News Wall Street weekend more in the end of the most negative week in about two months. We have a fast and furious rally at the end of August, and we've given it back,.

Kate Lister CEO Facebook Sherry Preston ABC Andrew Cuomo New York Times New York Global Workplace Analytics Mark Zuckerberg Barbara Corcoran Propel Insurance Twitter Jack Millis reporter
"kate lister" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"kate lister" Discussed on KOMO

"Office, and today you're working from home, you might be wondering how long will it last? Some experts say it should last forever. Let's take a look back and I look forward to the future of remote work. It was Wednesday. March 18th. When New York governor Andrew Cuomo announces the new reality for millions of office workers. Today we are announcing a mandatory statewide requirement. That no business can have more than 50% of their work force. Report to work outside of their home. His announcement would lead the country to do the same thing. I understand that this is a burden to businesses. I get it. I understand the impact on the economy. But in truth, we're past that point as a nation, and from then on, many of you have been working from home exclusively, and some of the nation's biggest tech companies like Twitter and Facebook have told their employees, they'll remain at their homes from now on, even though Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg did say those who moved to places where the cost of living is lower than Silicon Valley might see their salaries lower as well. According to the telecommuting research firm Global Workplace Analytics, One of the biggest road blocks of remote work is trust managers simply don't trust their people to work untethered. They're used to managing by counting butts in seats rather than by results. I thought managing its baby sitting. Kate Lister is the company's CEO, You know, the biggest hold back since the term Telework telecommuting was established in 1973 by Jack Millis has been managers not trusting their employees. Basically, they're worried. They're sitting at home on the sofa, eating bon bonds and not working. All of the literature has pointed to the fact that they're actually more productive at home even before the pandemic. But now they've had a chance to do it and the longer they've done it, the more likely they are to support it in the future. People don't necessarily want to work from home all the time if they can help, But they do like being in the office. Isolation and loneliness are very real struggles for a lot of Americans right now. But when the pandemics over well, they want to continue working from home, Lister's research says Yes, but not all the time, maybe two or three days a week on average. There are things that you miss by not being at your desk or in person, including not doing at your desk stuff. There's no substitute for face to face. You know, we're finding that the younger employees are actually having a harder time with this than the older employees. Because they depend on that sort of subtle nurturing that goes on in the office. You know, watching somebody and how they act. New York Times reporter told me that I learned how to interview By sitting in the bullpen. So that you know, there's a lot of that We're having trouble with on boarding. We're having trouble with converting interns into employees. There are companies that hire people all on shack. They've never even talk to the person. And they're hired virtually, you know, in some ways that cuts down on discrimination, you know, it's really about who you are and what you can do One of the things that real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran said she didn't think I'll ever go back to brainstorm a meeting in person again because you get a lot of politics in the room. It changes things, and you can see everyone in a zoom calling. It makes a difference, doesn't it? Yeah, I mean, it's less hierarchical when you see the CEO sitting there in a chair with his grandchild walking past or her grandchild walking past or the dog on his lap or whatever. It just makes us more human and and I hope that something that's going to come out of this is that we will have more empathy toward one another understand, amass as whole people. One of the many things the pandemic may have taught us is that it's time to think of work differently. It's time to start giving our families as much priority ISS. We do our jobs. Office workers have come to realize they don't want to spend an hour and a half in traffic or on a train. That's great for listening to radio our podcast, but it's not so great when it comes to spending time with your kids or your parents, and we've known for more than a decade that 80% of people want the ability to work flexibly to work from home to work from anywhere, and in particular, it's not just about flexibility in place its flexibility in time. Work is interspersed with life. It isn't just this hard. Stop hard start, They say your home is your castle. When your castle's a one bedroom apartment. It can seem more like a dungeon. Think that's another reason that some of the younger people are having trouble because they don't have A bigger home a spare room. That's an office. We just did a survey and we're asking how many of you have worked in a closet and it's a pretty big number. You know, we're just we're just making do But again, you know, this is not normal times. Lister says the best companies work with their employees to find a balance that's productive for both of them, letting people who want to work from home work from home when they can. And letting people who want to go into the office do that. She thinks that'll continue beyond the pandemic. I would say that that's the rule. And it's the exception where the company's heir, not saying that and I think they're going to have trouble in the future hiring good people because this has always been high on a job priority list. And Now that so many companies are offering it, I think that you're really going to be left out..

Kate Lister CEO Facebook Andrew Cuomo New York New York Times Global Workplace Analytics Mark Zuckerberg Barbara Corcoran Twitter Jack Millis reporter