17 Burst results for "Kate Aaronow"

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:24 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Yes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> do you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> feel like you <Speech_Music_Male> are a dinosaur <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shit <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> exactly. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I'm happy now <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> win win. It's a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> win win <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> win. Hell <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> yeah hell listen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to me. Two three <Speech_Music_Male> four five <Speech_Music_Male> times <Speech_Music_Male> eight. Four seven <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nine. 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I mean <Speech_Music_Male> it's a free speech <Speech_Music_Male> issue if you don't <Speech_Music_Male> like me. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you for calling <Speech_Music_Male> in to the majority <Speech_Male> report. Damn will be with you shortly.

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

08:39 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"It's an organization founded in part by joe lieberman perfect fit it funnels. He's in the money to conservative. Democrats and moderate republicans and mansion described and openness to fillibuster reform in this thing in this meeting In he gives a list of who's there let's see the wide ranging conversation went into depth on the fate of the filibuster infrastructure negotiations and the failed effort to create a bipartisan commission to explore january. Sixth storming of the capital that. What's fascinating to me is. This must really like i think. Look joe manchin is joe manchin is i think. Much of his reasoning is motivated right. But i do think that he actually was like even his most basic assumptions about like bipartisanship. Were a little bit rocked when january. Sixth thing it was like they were coming after us and he says he wants to. He told the assembled donors that he needed help flipping a handful of republicans from not yes on january six commission in order to strip the far-left of their best argument against the filibuster so he is conscious of like how ridiculous his argument about. Bipartisanship looks in the face of the refusal to pass anything on january sixth commission and he said the filibusters eight or maybe this is an interesting is a critical priority for the donors on the call as it opened at zip bottles up progressive legislation. That could hit their bottom line so this is mansion sang to his benefactors. Look i'm getting squeezed here and you need to make your money work in such a way that you're gonna get republicans most likely the ones that are retiring right as anybody was get reelected. Wouldn't do it. You gotta get them to vote for this thing. That's clearly bipartisan. And when it came to senator. Roy blunt or moderate missouri republican. Who voted no on. The commission match offered a creative solution. Roy blunt is great. Good friend of mine. Great guy great. Awesome roy's retiring. Some of you all might be working with roy and his next life could tell him that it'd be nice if he'd help our country that would be very good to get him to change his vote and we're going to have another vote on this thing that'll give me one more shot at it and other words. Yeah can't somebody now. What is so unbelievable about that is imagine if this was not a vote that these billionaires didn't care about right because he's billionaires day care about january six commissioner but imagine if it was just like something that was slightly even marginally beneficial to them like how tax rate estate tax capital gains some cutting of of environmental regulations. You got joe manchin saying hey you guys are gonna be some of. You are going to be hiring roy blunt through some entity that you funnel money into how 'bout you send him a little gift card or a thank you note a pre thank you note and vote this way and you know the pot will be a little sweetened. Can you imagine if it was something that billionaires actually cared about like mansion is sitting here basically announcing this is the way it works on the zoom call. Which is you know. I don't know that people should be surprised by it. But i wanna hear this audio. Because he's basically outlining how it works and also incidentally if you want to know why he's not voting for s one which pulls a lot of money out of politics my something to do with who he's meeting with tak- it is. This is really just. It's like it's it. Echoes mob boss. Backroom deals it's so sick. It really is stunning and it is. It's going to be really interesting to see what the fallout from. This is because i mean presumably right like you got a bunch of billionaires on zoom call. I wonder who it was that leaked. That's the point right. Maybe it's some staffer or why would a staffer beyond it. I mean you have to see when we check out this call who was on the call be incentivized to leak it. It's i wonder if the call included billionaire masters republican consultants to me. It seems like this should all be buttoned up. Who's on the call very interesting. Well we will talk more about this as the days. Go on In the meantime we're gonna head into the fun half. But i matt lack of the matt lack media universe Is going to Sorry tell you what's happening in that universe Yeah will bring branson's and Yeah so for patrons. On monday davis combined talk to To his true prisoners from missouri state gene bijlani. John graham about the seventeen seventy six commission. And how busiest just anti-communism and at and pro racism Era package for the new age. And also tomorrow Lance from the surf's is going to join us to talk about the kamloops and other boarding school gravesites found and also left Left the importance of digits struggles to the left in general talking a little bit of feedback from his stomach. Hearing that brandon. Are you getting any feedback. I maybe from my end then. It's apparently except us. Everyone except us now brandon numb found. You hear me founding. Great if i hear myself yeah you sound great thank you. What's happening on the discourse these days. Well we just put our episode for patrons about the lab leak theory might theory on dalmatian revenge and revenge coronation revenge and the origins of dalmatians as fire. Dole's apparently all right fair enough. The did this. This inspired by that crew l. Movie no i actually just re washed one hundred and one down missions completely unrelated to the carell movie not unrelated infants. That about the same thing. Just not because of that. Yeah i don't really say no. Desire to see another disney reboot. I wish he would just stop. I'm done. I'm done with that So let's head into the Fun half shall we and brandon will join us left. That jamie and i may have a disagreement. Yeah you can't just say whatever you want about people just because you're rich. I have an absolute right mark. Mark them on youtube. He's up there buggy thing like he's the boss. I am not your employer negatively. I'm sorry i didn't mean j- upset you nervous a little bit. Upset he riled up. Yeah maybe you should rethink your defensive at booking idiots which is going to get rid of you all right but dude dude dude dude. You want to smoke this joint..

joe lieberman youtube John graham roy january tomorrow joe manchin Lance Roy Democrats Sixth republicans roy blunt monday republican Dole brandon one more shot one hundred and one down davis
"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

08:03 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"A real a real shaft as tough as the path toward passing. Green new deal lacks in the united states. The mac of this like horrible infrastructure debate it reemerging under of the scene in twenty eighteen of the sedan. Nancy pelosi lapiz by the sudden movement. That alexandria ocasio cortez giants right. That's really does shift something for politicians both in the us for eating candidates. Or i should say presents. Like joe biden right. Who who takes it up after he he's elected and you know has meetings at sunrise and integrates into at least his rhetoric for what climate policy should look like to frame it as a matter of investment. We're going to create jobs right. Take some sort of big line talking points about the green new deal in integrates them into a plan. Which i think is not is not great. It's on right And you see countries abroad in south korea The the government won re election running on a green new deal stain. Same thing the european green deal which a whole mixed bag of weird public private partnerships and but that takes out this logic which really does some of the work that sort of centrist politicians had not been able to do which is to say this was not a matter of collective sacrifice. It's not that dealing with the climate crisis. Means making your life worse. There's a tremendous opportunity for jobs bass macron these things can fall out of actually doing with this price us and really helps shift the conversation in a real way to make this again about jobs about investment about building up. More of the things that we want is there. Is there a sequencing. Like i mean when you when you when you look at this is there. Is there a a A linchpin. I guess where i mean. I guess you know Just as an analogy ic- vigorous antitrust like returning to our pre nineteen eighty antitrust Disposition as a good step one in weakening the the financial and then indus- the political power of those who are standing in the way of greater reforms. Right like is there one in the context of of what you've laid out that you perceive is from a sequencing standpoint the the sort of the lowest hanging fruit and the or the you know the first step on the ladder that will make the subsequent steps more possible. Yeah i mean i think just thinking about like what a mask legislative processes that probably makes sense to focus on what can happen within the administration. And there's actually a lot of tools right. I know david. Dan has done a lot of this. Work flushing out jeff house the rubbing revolving door project you know have laid out a sort of poll massive things including speaking seven the realm of antitrust. The dodd frank rules which you know provide a path for policymakers without putting it to a vote to restrict investments in battlefields from major banks. Right the fed could declare a climate change in an existential threat to systemic threat to the to the economy and you know and and really restrict the cut off the flow of financing the possibility i think logistically right. That's probably the way the way to go. Short of whatever can happen in this infrastructure by which looks pretty limited. And there's a lot of this sort of regulatory power had that the administration has whether wants to use it Do things like reinstate crude oil export ban. Which wasn't placed shrimp and nineteen seventies through two thousand fifteen and has turned the us entirely major reporter and then it just wasn't wasn't before and so there's a lot that can be done. You know in in the short tournament question how to sequence that because some of the politics we talked about the four right. That stuff is not necessarily sexy rule. Be sort of Framed as as restrictions. Not going to give people you know the things that they might want out of. I'ma policy like a job Targeting through some of these regulatory mechanisms. But there there's a lot that can be done relate really short term a huge impact on on on the carbon emissions in the united states. Why does the explain to folks why it is problematic for us to regain our status as a as an exporter of fuel like why. What are the implications of that. Yeah so it's totally possible. Right for the united states to decarbonise domestically To get rid of internal combustion engines to green our power sector to brand a lot. More activity undergrad. We could be green economy right and that you is totally compatible. There's a way for that to be totally compatible. Sending massive amounts of coal oil and gas to be exported abroad Which is you know has been sort of seems to be kind of what the biden administration think is thinking has been the these bipartisan lion. Right is that you know. Our experts are secret And now they're they're green because natural gas is greener than coal which has been pretty thoroughly debunked by a series of studies. But so long as we're sending our emissions out into the rest of the world we don't really have a claim to be a climate climate hero or climate champion until that flow stops at really really difficult to think about the us as sort of leading climate and not just not just the raw but the amount of funding that we flow tore from like the us export import bank right to do things like finance terminals in mozambique for roiling ass right so these sorts of there's a whole sort of apparatus at state support that goes toward a half hill industry. Both in the us and abroad which has to be thought of as within our harvard footprint here and cut off. What if if the if the sequencing is a you know. I mean if there's if there's some measures that can be taken from a governmental standpoint what about from like you know citizens like from protests from movements. I mean you know last month we had Two members. I think it was of the exxon board who were elected by essentially a climate change activists. I mean maybe. It's a slight exaggeration as to who they were but engine one which is a A hedge fund that. That's the way they're marketing themselves. And to be fair the exxon was bombed. But i mean does that are there it. What actions from sequencing standpoint on the activist side are do you perceive as being most effective in terms of like diminishing the biggest forgive the analogy the biggest bang for the buck in terms of diminishing the power of a fossil fuel interests. Yeah as you said. Most people probably don't have a couple of dollars to throw it an exxon share. So we'll not if you do you know. I don't now a faint..

south korea Dan exxon joe biden mozambique last month Nancy pelosi lapiz Two members first step Both david twenty eighteen both united states exxon board four european biden two thousand fifteen united
"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:55 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Somebody's gonna know and we have a fossil fuel industry with pr arm which is very ready to call out anything called climate policy. So what what. What i do you have to bring that to the people and this is what folks are pushing bird. Green new deal really center on his climate policy has to make a credible threat. Nick people's lives better. And so i look at policies like a federal job guarantee right which can do a lot of this. Very climate necessary work for the private sector is in prioritizing and also would have a massive impact on people's lives right taking away involuntary unemployment giving people job at dignified that pays them a living wage and that is improving their own communities with work that has decided by folks from their communities. Right these sorts of things. I think have to start the cycle. And to to put bluntly reelect democrats for a long time to calm ray. It's not enough to just sort of one off climate policy past and to seed over to republican role which will strike it down in the courts. May even before election happens Which will pass allows repeal them or whatever what we saw in the new deal of seeing you know throughout history that it takes of sustained role by in our case now the democratic party. Unfortunately i don't you know no no no real real warm feelings right toward toward the rattus by practically when we have a one of two major parties that is not interested in also just not terribly interested in liberal democracy that that is what it takes so climate policy really has to bring it's real offer to to to the people to owners Which is you know. Thankfully very real right providing millions of jobs wind and solar. I'm creating something like a federal job guarantee no putting people to work. I'm doing all of the of crucial work for low carbon transition. All of these things can be very attractive. Right to to voters but That is just not the kind of conversation that's been hansa farts being the rule of experts type thing and if we just believe the science or whatever that'll that'll build the bill the door we need and we know we know that's not true. We now we need to create policies if people like her gonna vote for and are gonna re elect people based on an elect people based on them. We're what's the progress of that just started tracking like the gore's inconvenient truth right which is saying like you know presenting like we sort of presenting the vision of dealing with climate change. As a as we're we've got create a bunch of disincentives as opposed to what the green new deal is. We've got to create a bunch of incentives right. Like you know that that basically that you know we're gonna we're gonna give you a reason to walk through that door as opposed to. We're gonna curb how much you can stay inside type of thing and what is the. Where are we in that in that. You know. I mean if if if we have been able to move from the inconvenient truth to agree new deal where we see this as a as an opportunity to provide material benefit to people which coincides with also dealing with these problems that we have. Where are we in the sort of like the uptake of that. I think there has been.

one democrats millions of jobs hansa farts two major parties democratic party
"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

09:31 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"G kelly's work on alabama the coal mines and alabama and how they would bring in black strikebreakers To really pit at pit white workers against black workers and really break-up any sort of any any sort of hint of multi racial solidarity in the mind. And you see that sort of across the board you know even if you look at sort of. The workforce of of a lot of refineries can be predominantly white and predominantly black areas right. So there's this divide and conquer politics which happens in the united states and also happens at the micro level by saying we don't want their. We don't want oil from from the middle east. We want homegrown american oil and must. That's not sort of conscious choice if you're filling up the gas tank But if you're watching the news than it's an easy thing especially you know in seeped in the politics things like war on terror is sort of course finger abroad and and you know make it seem as if it's so vitally important to the. Us we continue drilling as much oil as possible here. Do you wanna talk about some of the both the mark. The way that the market solutions that have been come up over the years and also Not just sort of the the the failure of them to be implemented and maybe the failure of their structure but their function as a way of sort of limiting the conversation. As to what what we need to do to address these things. Sure yeah so. I look not seeing the buck. At sort of sweet of policies known as carbon pricing so that includes cap and trade which people may be familiar with ram policy battle about a decade ago. They'll come back. Marquis that looked implement a cap and trade program in the united states as well as a carbon tax which exists in some states today some some countries abroad and try to trace back why these these policies become so popular on the one hand a little bit of a fluke of modeling right and it's very easy within a climate economy model. This sort of technology developed in around the seventy s to look at the impact of climate policy on economic growth and the sort of main input. That ambler is carbon pricing to change the price of carbon. And you know what that means is changing. The price of oil changes the price of gas from coal right until that gets looked at as the most efficient economists still statements today the most efficient policy for dealing with dealing with climate change and why has become clear at least united states. Right in the book really does focus on the united states. Is that some very efficient because very hard to get past and they're very hard to actually implement wedged. All climate policy is but there's a particular sort of playbook which is built up around carbon pricing. Which makes the right very good at attacking. You know. I i look at the the two thousand nine thousand ten cap and tray and you know what we see there. Is this very reliable tactic from the fossil fuel industry from companies. Like exxon. Say we agree. There's a problem right. We agree that. I'm change real that it's bad. They're not denying climate change at that point. Maybe there are still funding people who who were saying similar things but there are public line right us that we would rather have an economy wine carbon tax. Because that's much more efficient and this cap and trade thing. This is not what we want. And so you see. Different forms of carbon pricing pitted against each other as a means to battle off whatever climate policies actually on the table. And we're seeing this right now right. We're talking about giving or putting a decent shanghai and name for green investment into an infrastructure plan right. Those debates are very complicated right now but what. Exxon mobil cost companies are saying and did really at the start of the biden administration. The american petroleum institute came out with a policy and support of carbon pricing for the first time. Ever so again again you know. Regardless of the merits of the actual policy which i think are are very debatable politically. It's wielded as scheduled against any actually existing climate policy into i mean. How is that happened. It just it just muddies the water and basically says like we're gonna make every step that we take somewhat controversial and really we're gonna pretend like we're we're arguing efficacy. What we're really doing is just slowing the role as it is. Yeah i mean and there's like the public line right is that we want a carbon tax. Went this more efficient thing. Whatever behind the scenes right. they're funneling money to the gop. Which had the party line that. We don't want pay anything compliment policy. So that's you know really who can win. It can water down view. The debate about whatever policies actually the table in behind the scenes or just trying to make sure nothing passes and all funding trade associations and politicians who are are working toward that end and to be clear the carbon tax the way that supposedly set to work is that it just prices makes oil increasingly in petroleum products increasingly more expensive so that substitutes and up you know slowly overtaking the function of oil and gas in our society. And i mean so. On some level it basically offloads the pain of transition to everybody but the producer. Yeah and we've seen what happens. When countries tied to the july movement in france results the passing a carbon tax. You know. I don't think a carbon tax in itself is a bad idea. I think it's good certain. Things like racing revenue. I think it can sort of drive certain tweaks in behavioral in behavior that that might be helpful to the planet but to consider it in a vacuum which is sort of what economic modeling encouraged us to do is think about the world is if it exists in. A model is absurd right. Somebody is not going to want to pay more for gas when there is a train line which hasn't been invested in twenty or thirty years or there isn't a train line right and they need to drive thirty miles to get to their first and second job. And if it's not nestled within a match much broader array of policy which is making though those sorts of ships actually possible for people actually reasonable in it. of course it's gonna produce a massive backlash e yellow for those crunch also. Don't speak french. I also i do. Not but and so just to be clear. The carbon tax is is an effective policy as rearguard measure essentially right. It's the comes in and up and is an incentivizing you to go to the greener pasture that we've already built but the way that we're implementing it is we're just pushing you out the door and there's nothing out there essentially That we have we have constructed all right. So let's let's let's move into your suite of non reformer forms. I guess as you like what. Where would if you were going to construct something i mean. Obviously it would look like the green new deal that on some measure that we have seen. I mean let's just start with the idea of of. How do we get that passed. Like how do we implement these. Non reformer like major structural changes to our economy. When we've got a guy who literally shot the cap and trade bill with a shotgun. I've said in the past. Ar fifteen. I guess it was a shotgun. It's been a long time size of that ad. And that's how joe manchin got to office was that was his big commercial like ch and literally firing at the stack of pages that were cap and trade. How do we get. How do we get there like politically so in the book and me several co-authors devote and Co-authored becca planet to win. Is that there has to be this virtuous cycle between policy and politics right so sort of raining. Logic of the democratic party for a long time. Was that if you give people stuff that makes their lives better. Probably more likely to vote for you. That fell out of fashion. For some of the reasons we talked about earlier in the nineteen seventy s and nineteen eighty s. But that is a fairly standard logic. That's not a magic bullet but policy probably has to follow something like that so for many many years kinda policies talked about like the carbon tax lake. these other others market-driven tweaks as something which can be fit in sort of around the edges. It's sort of realm of technocrats. And you know something that only dealt with basically in boardroom or by you know very skilled people who are taking a serious like this problem and we just know that the problem is way too big to fit around the edges right..

thirty miles twenty G kelly first exxon nineteen seventy s alabama fifteen thirty years nineteen eighty s. joe manchin france Marquis both united states two thousand nine thousand ten today a decade ago second job around the seventy s
"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

07:02 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"It would be and what a profound effect their corpus's panel hat on it right. They knew this early on so the tactic is to say well. It's not happening. Is this fun. People who will say this isn't a problem Which gets you which allows you to push that conversation. Ten twenty thirty forty years down the line. Which is what's happened and what's why you know we're only now starting to have a productive conversation about this and that different you know from places like europe where even the us oil majors shall be and these other companies have had a very different line. I you know. I think probably most people united states would rather be there. I'm worried say it's better. It's very different. And i don't think we're necessarily doomed to be a high near at forever that's plenty of flaws with things like the european green deal and how the policy conversation has been sorted out there by in the united states. This thing happens where we revolve this entire debate around climate happening or not. Not you know. What do we do about it which is much meatier. Thornier question to deal with and we're only now having oceans a disaster and it's twenty twenty one. These conversations should have been happening thirty forty years ago now when we first learned about his problem and instead were just catching up and sort of starting this Through very complicated questions. Dunia carbon tax. We need a much broader scale industrial policy these sorts of things which we're just really really behind. Well i just wanted to ask if you could expand on that relationship that the united states has with oil right one its relationship with capitalism seems intrinsically embedded in the even just like cultural way that we see oil. I mean there's like just in new orleans or louisiana. I should say or in texas. I mean it's very much embedded in a lot of the the way. Many americans see the country. Which i feel like is unique in its own specific way. Just curious if you expand on that a little bit. Yeah i mean. I think a lot of these policies politics really crystallized around the oil crisis and nineteen seventy-three which you know there's a lot that goes into that and i. I spent a little bit of plano in the but-but what that really does sort of questioned whether the us needs to depend on other countries for its energy which has always has. And what is sort of feeding into. That moment is decolonization right. There are countries who have a lot of oil reserves who have historically been in these either colonial or quasi only relationships with major producers including companies like bp or standard oil and which is splintered off into companies like chevron and exxon at some point but have always you know have this beers for up relationship with With with middle east oil producers and so at a time when you know different countries or sort of fighting independence battles are claiming control right of these of these natural resources to build wealth in their own countries instead of funneling not a broad. Us loses its mind. And that's how. I think how we have to understand the crisis in nineteen. Seventy three is not necessarily house. A shortage of oil which it really wasn't right supplies of oil to the. Us weren't really threatened but it was this moment of countries really asserting sovereignty over over there now to resources and the the oil sector the private oil sector particularly in the united states has always depended for its its lifeblood on sounds minority rule right and that aligns very well with the right wing project in the us and they need to suppress the right of other countries take wealth and that happens in smaller ways you know in the fossil fuel economy here right. There's a reason why. I says like appalachia. In places like west texas funneled all that wealth right toward the top in. You know what most normal you know. oil gas. Coal producing nations is considered the sort of wealth of the nation not just is hoarded by a handful of executives who have totally worked politics. Who really star pulled parts of this country which have been crucial to building wealth in this country. And you know. That's that's her unique. It's very neatly united states. I think helps explain why you know we are have have such strange identity is like an oil producer major oil oil consumer. How or i guess. How has that been. How's it been so obscured. I mean not eight. Obviously but how is not seeped into the consciousness of like i i look at appalachia and and you know i talked to people. Who are you know in in west virginia or whatnot. And you know most of the people i talk to are like yeah. They're they. They literally like scrape up the the surface of the earth and And and we're being completely exploited but how is it but on some of it also feels like it's being obscured in has not gotten into the consciousness of people that they can find that there. You know i don't know i mean we have moments in our in this country where people realize like. Hey we were being taken advantage of here. But it seems like large swaths of particularly when it comes to fossil fuel that consciousness doesn't seem to emerge. Why is that. There's a lot of reasons i mean. One right is just as broad sort of a shift in the funniest century toward seeing private sector actors in companies assert sort of heroes and making them out to be you know the titans of industry or creating jobs and doing great things for the nation and there's plenty of propaganda and to see that but you know this isn't unique to the fossil fuel industry of course but there is logic divide and conquer Which is really shot through right. You know if you talk to minors in west. Virginia four years ago they would not have told you the coal boss was their friend probably right. These were heavily unionized industries not really militant battles against coal companies or better wages for work felt like they were talking about climate change but there was militant unionizing throughout the mind the united mine workers right and that is systematically killed and part of the way that That that organizing in the fossil fuel sector is killed off is two different groups of workers against each other. You know. I think about robin d. G kelly's work on alabama the coal mines and alabama and how they would bring in black strikebreakers To really pit at pit.

west virginia new orleans exxon texas louisiana chevron thirty forty years ago robin d. G kelly four years ago Virginia appalachia west texas united states europe Ten twenty thirty forty years eight first earth two different groups Seventy three
"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

07:37 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"I'll tell you right now folks it is check it out because it is less expensive than you think it is. And if you've ever been bedale curious by curious day curious right now well. I tried out all right. Welcome back to the program. Staff writer at the new republic. Author of overheated how capitalism broke the planet and how we fight back. Kate aronoff kate. It's a pleasure to have you back again. I'm here with a emma vaguely. Thanks for having me. So let's i guess your book is basically a two parts as you know one is sort of how we got here and then the other part is where we should go in many respects. But let's talk about how you know the the the world that has been constructed of for us in some respects that makes it very very difficult to deal with with climate change particularly on a personal level. Has it were yeah to back just slightly. I mean part of the reason. I was interested in in writing. The back was to to look at this weird thing that seems to unique unique to the united states called climate than i'll and what i found sort of looking back at that as it's really hard to understand climate denial as sort of removed from this broader shift to the right. You know both within the republican party and something that i look at it as very close to the heart of this story of how this country got screwed so screwed up around. The question of climate change is writing think-tanks right. So you have bodies like the american enterprise institute heritage foundation you know people like james buchanan. The coke brothers famously right. All of these institutions are really core to dragging the country to the right through the twentieth century. And so i look in the back about the very fruitful over loud right between the fossil fuel industry money and this really broader shush to inject some heavily radical ideas about how the economy works about how the government works. And what that does alongside these sort of broader translate red baiting right alongside white supremacy which is always sort of core to the right wing project in in the us and that you know this really helps to take a lot of what should be commonsense ideas for how to deal with the climate crisis off the table at the time it enters the public consciousness in late eighties. Right to that point. But the time by that. It's it's global warming. It's sad you know it's not called climate change quite yet but by the time people are really talking about heating right by the time. People are talking that planetary heating The the the most reasonable ways of dealing with that are sort of out of public consciousness and everything filtered through this logic of markets logic that you know it is the private sector which is best equipped to do anything in the government really can't Can't play play a big role in this. And that would be sort of bad thing in of itself appear to have harsh regulations or public ownership or any of the things that have been pretty common. You know to even us history let alone sort of policy solutions elsewhere. Why i mean. Because as far as i know. The republican party is unique in the world of being a major political party. That has you know for all intensive purposes. Maybe there's it's it's changing now to they've shifted from Climate change existing to like you know whether it's a manmade to whether it's really there's nothing we can deal with but there's no other major political party in the world that has held that position and it's not like we're you know the the is that we're unique. That this country has a unique conservatism. Or is it was it just like business interests. Here were so savvy or adapt that they were going to construct this whole thing because it seems to me there was like much of what you write about was constructed at least two large part in the early seventies. And you know you you had Lewis powell memo. That was commissioned by the chamber of commerce that was in many respects a response to not just serve the emancipatory things that were happening in this country at the time but really you know what was happening. From an environmental standpoint. People became aware of this. We also at that point hit peak oil production in this country and people knew that You know at least the the oil companies knew the amount of oil that we were going to be able to produce at least at that dollar point was going to drop i mean. Is that what what's going on here. Is business constructed this whole sort of on some level like this this massive movement. I mean there were pieces there right. I mean we had a decent amount of racism and but they but these things were sort of congealed in some way to provide like forgive the metaphor an iron dome around the this profit motive. Yeah i mean so you do see shades of climate. Denial in places like australia. The uk germany alternative for deutschland sort of dabbles in in climate. Denial bet but as i can tell wherever it shows up it really is sort of an export from united states and often are getting. You know direct support from places like the heartland institute and you know the the place of i came to on. This question is that there's so much machinery bell tat through. What's really you know. Organizing on behalf of business conservatives through the nineteen forties and fifties you know for for decades writing and find great visible hands really tells the story. I'm very well but you know it is buried advanced in the united six berry advanced infrastructure to sort out these problems and so when the climate crisis comes along. People aren't stupid right. I don't think that the folks who were who are running these think-tanks spouting climate. Denial and that was more prominent in the debate. Necessarily believe it right. Maybe maybe a couple of them do but what they recognize very early on. Is that dealing with the climate crisis right now me climax spine as well dealing with. The climate crisis requires such massive changes to business as usual which is very profitable for them at even entertaining the conversation of doing something about it is so damaging to their business model and the major fossil fuel producer rang. We produce a lot of fossil fuels. We don't tend to think of ourselves as a petro state but in in many ways right that is very core to the us aid entity and so that is a very powerful influence on how climate change gets talked about to say you know whether or not we know that companies like exxon and shell. They knew very early on sort of both that. The climate crisis was happening..

james buchanan australia late eighties two parts uk twentieth century united states both early seventies exxon Lewis powell republican party deutschland one Kate aronoff kate shell united american enterprise institute nineteen forties two large part
"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:04 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Boston be your husband or your and your bad folks to dads too so maybe like oh but i will give him to both high. I wouldn't pick one and decide. One is more special than the other. They usually have two dads. You want to consider them both special. I would think right right right but look people can. I'm not going to get involved in people's family relationships. God knows that all right. Let's do this hello to. She is once again. Essentially pushing me the real address. I'm going to good. Summer's here the studio and live in easy. If you've got swamp as i don't know but high you gonna stay on top of your sweaty bottom. Well it's easy a refreshing spray from a hello toshiba day. I don't know if they meant to make that. I'm gonna read that part. Look day really is honestly a revelation and want to get too into it but probably the best thing that came out of it for me. I don't know if i would have tried a day. But it was like in the wake of the toilet paper. The great toilet paper shortages of twenty twenty. And kyle's like i got a day and it's amazing and i'm like i'll try this one out from. Hello toshi. i got the two point. Oh i've upgraded to the three point. Oh now it is stylish. It is eco friendly. It is super easy to install and it saves you money. Hello toshi three point doesn't just clean your but with a precise stream of freshwater it cleans itself to with the smart spray automatic nozzle exit attached to your existing toilet literally. All you gotta do is to lift up the toilet seat the unscrew. It super easy. You can do that with your fingers and then just need ranch you put it into the existing Plumbing any new plumbing. You don't need any electricity and it will pay for itself in a few months. Plus cuts toilet. paper.

two point two dads both twenty twenty One kyle a day toshi one three point Boston day
"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:00 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Cannot today offered by congressman waltz. And she leaves name. Elsie is named. I impress the his name. On homers named you are not named betty. Mccollum is not named mark. Cook is not named All of you have been critical of israel all of you of called israel apartheid state. Why aren't you need to the resolution. Well i'm not. I'm neither black nor female nor muzzle. I don't think it's fair. I don't think it's right congresswoman. Omar has as much right to criticize israel or any other government or any other national leader as any other member of congress without being singled out awesome and we should say yarmuth is jewish. And so he he he sure he doesn't have internalize anti-semitism. It's i. I will leave that to others to decide but good for him. Is his writing something up right now. Good for him for coming out. That's important and it is. I think an indication of a growing sort of sense at least in You know the the institutionalization on some level of the more progressive members of the house. Where they're getting some measure of at least just sort of decent protection. There's not a knee jerk attack on them or or fear of defending them and that is yeah just good job and a recognition that his democratic colleagues who aid in the bet. This are complicit in the death threats and vitriol leveled at ilhan omar and afc and whoever else speaks out against this. I mean he makes the point that it is a racialized misogynistic undertone. At least you know from from the right wing for sure and democratic leadership is at the very least blind to it. But i think they're aware of it and they're trying to use her as a punching bag in order to sure up a specific kind of base. And i think that's true too and i think they're also and a distraction and it's a. It's a mistake and good for yarmouth that is it's nice to see all right. We're gonna take a quick break when we come back. We'll be talking to kate aronoff. She is a staff writer. At the new. Republican author overheated how capitalism broke the planet. And how we fight back. We'll be right back after this folks. Today's show is in part sponsored by harry's razor now i'm still now day further out from shaving. This week pushed it all the way to wednesday. I probably might shave tomato. I dunno. I may go the whole week so like the less. You shave though right. The less you need to shave. That's no it doesn't work. It doesn't work that way. But i will tell you this when i do shave. I choose harry's why because with harry's you don't have to choose between a great shave and an incredibly And a fair price and as you know we are just a couple of days away from father's day and the trick i always used to do. Was you order something online. I don't know if it will come. It may come in time but if it doesn't you just download a picture of it and you had to put in a card. I've done that many many times. And then you actually give them to presents you give them the representation of the present and then you get to give them the president and you get credit for for twice you make you people your dad or whoever Guy in your life. It doesn't have to be a guy but i mean this is what the there angling at right now. A harry's razor and They're going to be happy..

kate aronoff Omar betty father's day Elsie wednesday today congress This week twice jewish Mccollum Today Republican waltz Cook yarmuth harry harry's congressman
"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:00 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"International criminal court she used the word united states hamas israel and taliban all in the same sentence and apparently. You're not allowed to do that. And the democrats. Or i should say a small group of democrats. Plus the democratic leadership chastised her for this and this is good to see john yarmuth congressman from kentucky. The third third district. I should say came out. There was a couple of other democrats who came out and said you know enough is enough. This is ridiculous. A squad but more than that to more than that. And here's yarmuth not a democratic socialist from the bronx but rather a congressman from kentucky and here is he comes out and and defense. Ilhan omar check this out. Well i think a lot of my colleagues overreacted to her remarks. I think there's a there's It's always fair for a member to criticize the policies of a government and or of a governmental leader. I've been highly critical of these rayleigh government's policies and of now former prime minister netanyahu. I don't think anybody would call me. And a semitic and i think that's again. I think they just overreacted. Which without actually considering exactly what she said and You can the fact that you'd put hamas and in the same sentence with the united states does not necessarily mean that you're equating the two and i think that was an unfair suction that So my colleagues made but there was a resolution that.

john yarmuth kentucky Ilhan omar two yarmuth netanyahu united states third democrats prime minister israel rayleigh government taliban third district united
"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

07:12 min | 3 months ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Majority report. Yes ladies and gentlemen thank you so much for joining us. You know there are just. There are days where i have trouble remembering what year it is or articulating it so twenty twenty one you get into a rhythm and you say twenty twenty and then it just seems weird is june but yeah i i i think you know all we can let it slide. I mean i expect that to last until two thousand twenty two. And i'm hard on you because i expect excellence. I appreciate that damage. Viglen here to to be basically You know grading me in a moment to moment basis. I appreciate that. Were trying to like recall memories of that baseball coach that you dealt with when you were growing up the s pretty harsh much worse on its own son. Frankly than he was on may or other players. But well thank you. That's great ended her. Yes welcome to the show lays jomon glad you could make it today. Something's going on right now in washington. Dc they're sort of like this stasis as we await. I think when biden gets back into town and there is supposedly. He's given another week or so for this gang of ten to come up with a deal. Meanwhile as i said chuck schumer has made it clear that the reconciliation process has started. This involves a lot of committee work. There are specific resolutions. That need to be brought up because reconciliation is a sort of a unique type of legislation legislative process. I should say and it can only deal with measures that directly impact the federal budget now. Of course this is all rules that are made up by the senate and can be changed by the senate if they really wanted to they. The the way that the senators view the the senate itself is that these rules are sacrosanct. Part because it also allows them certain guardrails that they can blame as opposed to their own refusal to do things. So it's not it's not me. It's the senate that's constraining may and that is you know it's not it's not us. It's the filibuster this is the this is the way that they play that game. But the fact that reconciliation. Starting you can look at it in two in two ways one that this is encouraging because the democrats will be ready to go or to that. It's really just a way of creating more pressure on this gang of ten to come up with a really insufficient compromise now with that said even if the gang of ten comes up with a deal it's five republicans and five democrats. You still need five more. Republicans sign onto anything that they do. And that's highly unlikely. So the idea that they're going forward with reconciliation at least says that we're not going to get completely sidetracked by what This so-called gang of ten is doing. They are anticipating going forward with reconciliation by july. So that's that's the good news. Well i i just want to caution though that. This this bipartisan bill. Mcconnell's held off on saying if he'll back it you know it's only one trillion dollars over own nearly six hundred Billion of it is in new spending excetera. Which could be away for mcconnell to save up mansion and cinema. Take those votes away from the reconciliation process. Because then they could say oh. We found this bipartisan agreement. Were in favor of it. And then they wouldn't have the fifty votes that they need in reconciliation. So that's just one thing. I want the audience to look out for. Mcconnell as of reports from yesterday is apparently weighing. How am i going to deal with this. Gang of ten reconciliation deal because if he throws his weight behind it. Then you actually could get if mcconnell allows for a bill to pass in the senate the big fear like you say is that one thing that was floated was the idea that like okay. We'll do a smaller bill with the republicans that they can agree with. And then we'll take all the other stuff that that we want that. Republicans won't do and we'll pass that in reconciliation. But like you say once mansion or in cinema or whomever vote for the first bill. If mcconnell gives that a green light then they are less inclined to vote for the second bill. And that's but i. If i had to bet if i had to bed i would say mcconnell is just. He knows how to play. He knows how to play the completely obstruct the game and it has served him quite well. This would just be the sabotage game. Which i don't know i mean they're still they would still pass would still. I don't know five. Six hundred billion dollars of new funding and i have a feeling republicans. Don't want to do that so but we shall see when we'll have a better sense of that in the next two weeks because they to get that reconciliation done before they go on break. They need to get this whole process. Basically done by the third week or so. They need to have that. Vote the third week or so of july and so we will know sooner rather than later. Meanwhile this is good to see about two three years ago. I guess twenty nine thousand nine hundred maybe january. The democrats may february democrats started unveiled their their big for the people act which was known as hr one in the house ultimately became as one in the house and the senate. I should say this is the joe. Manchin has basically said he won't vote for ends. Partisan gerrymandering creates a process that would crack down on corruption with a matching system among other things and voting rights. Sort of And this was a going to be a big rollout. It's an impressive piece of legislation and the democrats stepped all over it because they were falling all over themselves to criticize ilhan omar at the time because she had said something to the effect of you know the israeli lobby is outside in washington dc. Why which which was. What a rather on controversial statement. When tom friedman said it for instance Yet she was attacked. And it's as if we have a reprise. The other day that she was talking about.

tom friedman washington yesterday january Mcconnell five two washington dc today Republicans mcconnell second bill one trillion dollars fifty votes two thousand thousand july february Six hundred billion dollars first bill
"kate aronoff" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"A really interesting question about the stimulus more broadly right I mean I I focused mostly on on kind of politics M. M. and what's you know pretty clear that we cannot have an airline industry which is expanding as rapidly in terms of the sheer amount of flights offering as the airline industry house over the last several decades we need we know we need to be flying glass that does not need to be something that you know works out poorly for workers but we have a really pitiful mass transit system in the US right so while it's certainly you know some number of flights will continue for for a very long time we also need to build out you know things like rail extending Amtrak service to places where it used to go no longer does expanding regional rail in different places basslines importantly facilities ideas about wind and idea for green stimulus the the you know several sort of climate scientists and thinkers of of put out in the last couple of weeks and I think you know it's it's it's hard to look at any one piece of of of the stimulus in a vacuum and and I think the conversation of the early it's a particular always have to be kind of out in the sort of bigger picture of of what triggered a flow flick and you know what the economy here we want on the other side of this crisis is that I think that have to be one of the more your available probably thinking that it is now truly have your now you're you're saying it's it's too big to fail there might be a better example in two thousand eight here's the headline an airline bailout should have more strings attached than a hard to find that new Republic dot com that's new Republic dot com Kate Aronoff is the writer the staff writer with the story and we appreciate you sharing it with us Kate thank you so much for being on the mark Mason show this is just for her from this record auto group but in the primary you probably knows better by our names or maybe even our jingles of our local dealerships Mercedes Benz of Wilsonville question Toyota has flickered Honda this community's helped us grow over the years and we want to be of service to you.

M. M. Kate Aronoff writer staff writer Toyota Honda US Amtrak mark Mason Mercedes Benz Wilsonville
"kate aronoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Drawing in Friday's strike strike for our ocean five four four. thanks for each other because we have a very short amount of time. that. California. their Instagram accounts like Klein medium change with forty four thousand followers joke ironically about the end of life on earth share give filled primers on the green new deal and throw shade on the complacent house darn it god do everything yourself around here picking up human Strassen shown how it's done here one two in the Duma Hickey getting involved says the intercepts Kate Aronoff has become fashionable with some degree of amazement and confusion she's been following a meme called visco that's V. S. C. O. girls a suddenly emerging stratum of middle and high schoolers who affect a very particular look to project common cause with the planet the line between who the cool kids are and like whatever bisco girl is in twenty nineteen is a thin line that sort of an athletic the wearer you know Birkenstock crops and socks Christian necklaces oversized tee shirts metal stronger part of that there's an affinity for turtles hydro flask these reusable water bottles there's a latent kind of environmental consciousness in at it's a bit of a fad a bit of whimsy and a bit of earnestness and the name comes from an app photo editing app called disco but exist on different platforms Instagram I'm a little bit on Twitter one of them is tick tock. if Twitter is a mini blog tictoc is sort of a mini you too they're very short user generated videos one tick tock video has been shared the grid jillion times hi you must be them..

Twitter Kate Aronoff Duma Hickey Instagram Klein California. S. C. O.
"kate aronoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My millions of followers to drawing in Friday's strike strike for ocean flight for. thanks for each other because we have a very short amount of time. that. the California. other Instagram accounts like Clive medium change with forty four thousand followers joke ironically about the end of life on earth share give filled primers on the green new deal and throw shade on the complacent harsh darn it god do everything yourself around here picking up human stress on the show how it's done here want to in the Duma Hickey getting involved says the intercepts Kate Aronoff has become fashionable with some degree of amazement and confusion she's been following a meme called visco that's V. S. C. O. girls a suddenly emerging stratum of middle and high schoolers who affect a very particular look to project common cause with the planet the line between who the cool kids are and like one of disco girl is in twenty nineteen is a thin line that sort of an ecstatic the wearer you know Birkenstock crops and socks precocial necklaces oversized tee shirts metal stronger part of the there's an affinity for turtles hydro flask these reusable water bottles there's a latent kind of environmental consciousness in at it's a bit of a fad a bit of whimsy and a bit of earnestness and the name comes from an out of photo editing app called disco but exist on different platforms Instagram I'm a little bit on Twitter one of them is tictoc. if Twitter is a mini blog tictoc is sort of the mini you too they're very short user generated videos one tick tock video has been shared a grin jillion times hi you must be them..

Duma Hickey Kate Aronoff S. C. O. Twitter California. Instagram Clive
"kate aronoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:30 min | 2 years ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In Friday's strike strike for ocean five four four thank for each other because we have a very short amount of time. that. California. other Instagram accounts like Clyde medium change with forty four thousand followers joke ironically about the end of life on earth share give filled primers on the green new deal and throw shade on the complacent harsh darn it god do everything yourself around here picking up human stress on the show how it's done here want to in the Duma Hickey getting involved says the intercepts Kate Aronoff has become fashionable with some degree of amazement and confusion she's been following a meme called visco that's V. S. C. O. girls a suddenly emerging stratum of middle and high schoolers who affect a very particular look to project common cause with the planet the line between who the cool kids are and like one of this go girl is in twenty nineteen is a thin line that sort of an ecstatic the wearer you know Birkenstock crops and socks the shell necklaces oversized tee shirts metal stronger part of the there's an affinity for turtles hydro flask these reusable water bottles there's a latent kind of environmental consciousness in at it's a bit of a fad a bit of whimsy and a bit of earnestness and the name comes from an out of photo editing app called disco but exist on different platforms Instagram I'm a little bit on Twitter one of them is tictoc. if Twitter is a mini blog tictoc is sort of a mini you too they're very short user generated videos one tick tock video has been shared a grin jillion times hi you must be them. you don't know how do you make your response. the trustees. one you keep that don't even worry about it. in terms of like visco girls on tech talk there's a slick incredible amount of self awareness about the fact that this is very silly everyone seems to be sort of making fun and just making the videos so I'm really into saving the turtles lately so I had a metal straw. don't have one. evil in a box water please and your strong are made of plastic are they I think it would be easy to compare this to valley girls the nineteen eighties and there is a temptation and the the sun the society to treat young women stupid the visco girls phenomenon complete into that I also think part of that masks over some very real things that are affecting in people people who identified themselves as this girl who I've talked to have said this go girls is a trend really is reflective of the fact that young people in general are concerned about the climate crisis the folks I talk to you there are organising for climate strike and in our themselves teens they see this more than anything I've kind of an organizing opportunity a movement has really fully coalesced into a large number of stake holders have embraced it it's easy to have fun with the notion of a little meme and it's this kind of odd collection of participants is evidence that climate activism has gone beyond the sort of usual suspects does this mean it's gone mainstream yeah I think that's exactly right folks that I talked to Dave said when I was a freshman in high school for instances of someone who just graduated I was trying to do activism and it was a strange thing to do activism was not popular where is now all after Donald Trump after parkland you have this call coming out and being a part of the move and the way that many many other people are all sections joining up in the climate fight after this is becoming cool young people are more active immobilized then maybe any other generation in history just yesterday speaking in congressional testimony the head of the zero hour you climb a movement that is participating in the strike people call my generation generation Z. as if we have the last generation but we are not we are refusing to be the last letter of the alphabet I am here before the whole country today announced. that we are instead it generation GND the generation of the green new deal the only thing that will save us is a whole new era was pretty dark and a pretty setting way to think about your future and part of what this you climate is really about is giving people a space for community and not to feel just hopeless about the potential in the world Kate Aronoff rights for the intercept and is a fellow at the type media center thank you so much thank you. so even the cool kids want to be involved in climate activism or maybe climate activism is redefining what it means to be cool in the halls of Congress and in many news rooms there are other less existential concerns and they fill the political ether with mixed and misleading messages Leo Stokes is a professor at the university of California at Santa Barbara where she studies public opinion and political behavior with a focus on energy and climate change last year she co authored a study that told us what you might have already suspected Congress has no clue what Americans want so these are the chiefs of staff and legislative directors in Congress the people who helped their bosses decide how to vote on a bill and we ask them what do you think the public wants on climate action and they dramatically underestimated the public support that's out there for acting on the climate crisis ninety two percent of the staff members that you surveyed underestimated the support in their district or state including all Republican aides and over eighty five percent of the democratic aides and we actually show the more of those offices are meeting with the American petroleum institute which is the association of fossil fuel companies and the more they're taking money from them relative to meeting with let's say environmental groups like the Sierra Club the worst job they do at guessing public opinion so it seems like interest groups who are allied with fossil fuels are kind of driving a wedge between what the public wants on climate change and what our politicians and their staff I think that the public wants research done by the Yale project on climate change communication which I am affiliated with they make these maps and they'd look at all these different policy areas and show what the public wants and the media has had a near. Evan politicians have had this narrative to the public doesn't really care about climate change is not really an important issue and if you just go look at these amazing maps you can see that that's just not true no more example they've just put out a new map about the proportion of people who think that fossil fuel companies to have to pay for the harms that they're already causing fifty seven percent of Americans a majority of Americans support that and then you can actually zoom into every single congressional district and figure out for example cross Arizona relatively conservative state people support that across New Mexico they do. why do you think the public feels this way in the absence of support from their politicians and their media. support for climate action has been hi for a long time but in the past nine months we've seen a huge surge something like ten percentage points more people are worried about this this reflects a number of things first last fall we had the I. P. C. C. the intergovernmental panel on climate change report come out which really showed that we have to make dramatic strides to cut our emissions and I think that's very sobering but stuff that the U. N. does never seems to make much of a dent on the main stream American public I would agree but somehow this report broke through there is a new report out about climate change and it is not positive when I think actually journalists had a role in that somebody picked up that report and framed it around we have twelve years left to the world has just twelve years to stop the climate change catastrophe that gives us twelve years to make sure that the time for the little more than a decade to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide released in the world is going to end in twelve years if we don't address climate change and their biggest. is. your biggest issue is how are we going to pay for it twelve years is not a long period of time that's not in the report that was a media decision and then the sun rise movement picked it up and a lot of scientists actually have gotten very upset about the twelve you're framing but from a media and communication perspective it's a genius because what is for people and we have eleven years to cut emissions by about half that is what the report says so yeah it is true that there is a.

Instagram California. Clyde Arizona Evan New Mexico P. C. twelve years eighty five percent fifty seven percent ninety two percent eleven years nine months zero hour
"kate aronoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Drawing in Friday's strikes strike for ocean drive for. thanks for each other because we have a very short amount of time. that. California. other Instagram accounts like Clive medium change with forty four thousand followers joke ironically about the end of life on earth share give filled primers on the green new deal and throw shade on the complacent Haas darn it god do everything yourself around here picking up human stress on the show how it's done here want to in the Duma Hickey getting involved says the intercepts Kate Aronoff has become fashionable with some degree of amazement and confusion she's been following a meme called visco that's V. S. C. O. girls they suddenly emerging stratum of middle and high schoolers who affect a very particular look to project common cause with the planet the line between who the cool kids are and like whatever this go girl is in twenty nineteen is a thin line that sort of an ecstatic they wear it you know Birkenstock crops and socks the shell necklaces oversized tee shirts metal stronger part of it there's an affinity for turtles hydro flask use reusable water bottles there's a latent kind of environmental consciousness in that it's a bit of a fad a bit of whimsy and a bit of earnestness and the name comes from an out of photo editing app called disco but exist on different platforms Instagram I'm a little bit on Twitter one of them is tick tock. if Twitter is a mini blog tictoc is sort of a mini you too they're very short user generated videos one tick tock video has been shared the grid jillion times hi you must be them..

Twitter Kate Aronoff Duma Hickey Instagram Haas Clive California. S. C. O.
"kate aronoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:40 min | 2 years ago

"kate aronoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Conversation. With congressman Adam shift or shift, also democratic presidential candidate beta Rourke gay Qaeda newsroom, you can hear that tonight at nine thirty. When the campfire ripped through the town of paradise last November, it became the deadliest fire in the United States in one hundred years. Many people are asking can we stop this kind of devastation from happening again? Well, that's a challenge, because, you know, there's at least one hundred paradises out there, I'm Danielle Vinton. Join us for a series we're calling living with wildfire California. Reimagined can hear that starting Monday during morning edition on. K. Q. E. D. This is on the media. I'm Brooklyn stone, Bob Garfield the man tapped to head Trump's new climate review panel as Kate aronoff, explained is not a climate scientist and yet in recent years, William happier has made a mission of attacking climate science here. He is at a two thousand sixteen event hosted by the right wing. Heritage foundation. Sowing confusion over. Why atmospheric carbon dioxide is so dangerous. We're all doing our best to try and counter this myth that co two is a dangerous pollutant. It's not a pollutant at all the straw man argument about how poisonous CO two is or isn't obscures its lethal role in trapping. Heat in the atmosphere, thus has heritage worked to redirect public sentiment and policy-making away from addressing climate change and towards deregulation. Which is part of. Uneven bigger decades long goal, the preservation of capital for rich people. Jane Mayer is a staff writer at the New Yorker and author of dark money, the hidden history of the billionaires behind the rise of the radical, right? We spoke to her in may twenty seventeen a lot of what you think of as the modern day machinery of right wing ideology. All goes back to the imposition of an income tax in this country, which happens to run one thousand nine hundred sixteen. There was a great uproar on the part of some of the wealthiest families in the country who didn't want to pay income taxes and a deal was struck congress told these families, if you give your money away to charitable organizations, we will give you a tax break, but the gifts have to be in the public's good and a lot of what you're looking at now think tanks and much else in politics, actually. Is set up as sort of an arm of philanthropy. I wish speaking of the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and similar philanthropic -ly funded organizations. Absolutely. The ruck filler foundation is the granddaddy of them all when the Rockefeller family wanted to set up its own personal family foundation. It was incredibly controversial. There was bipartisan opposition from cross the board all of these congressmen and senators said, this is an undemocratic thing to have a rich family be able to spend its money on public policy and get a tax deduction. They saw foundations as unaccountable to anybody, but the super rich and playing a undemocratic role in the midst of our democratic society where these big capitalists indeed figuring out a way to influence public policy. Well, the first step towards politicized philanthropy, in the view of many people was the Ford Foundation and it wasn't for. Quite some time. It was really in the nineteen sixties when it got involved in education policy, all tied up with teachers unions, and with integration, and all those issues and the right wing made a lot of noise about it. And the Ford Foundation backed off, but the right wing also learned from it and soon started pouring money into its own philanthropies that became intensely political the Heritage Foundation undertakes to understand and promote conservative policy and ideology, but it wasn't the first think tank who were the first thing tanks. The early think tanks were Brookings, which was actually founded by a Republican who wanted explicitly to have people of different points of views gather together to do scholarly work, and try to solve society's problems. He wanted many points of view. The Russell sage foundation was also quite early. They were trying to put the best minds towards. To solve society's problems non-ideological nonpartisan presumably legitimate academic scholarship. Right. And they thought of themselves very much as neutral and apolitical, really many of the solutions that the earlier think tanks, including Brookings, came up with involved answers that involved government activism of some sort or another. So when the right finally weighs in with its own version, they attacked these organizations as being liberal, but the organizations were not set up to be liberal or anything else from their own standpoint. So to the extent that the political right believed that think tanks like the Brookings Institution had aligned with progressive ideas. This gives us heritage by about nineteen seventy-one some of the leaders of the biggest businesses in America became alarmed. They watched the anti-vietnam war. Movement, taking on the companies that were involved in the defense industry. The consumer movement of Ralph Nader and the environmental movement. That was beginning to call for all kinds of regulations on pollution, and you get this kind of call to arms by Lewis Powell, who was then a lawyer from Richmond, wasn't yet on the supreme court. He wrote a paper for the chamber of commerce, and he said big business. If you don't get organized, we're gonna lose our way of life. The enemy is not the kids who were on the streets protesting. It's not hippies or yippies, the enemy is elite public opinion. And if we wanna fight back, we have to change the way, the elite public opinion is formed in this country, all of the instruments that form public opinion, meaning the media, the pulpits, academia, science the courts. And public policy. So the creation of right wing think tanks starting in the late nineteen seventies was an answer to Lewis Powell's call to arms. The people who've set up the Heritage Foundation were literally talking about this Lewis Powell memo and saying, we've got to do something, we've got to spend money we've got to fight back. Joseph course who was heir to brewing company in Colorado, sent a letter to his Senator Gordon, Elliott and said, I've got money. How do I spend it and an aide who was working for Alex saw this letter and his name was pulled y RIC and he was one of the two founders of the Heritage Foundation? And he said, I've got an idea we're going to set up this think tank, and Richard Mellon Scaife, the arch-conservative Pittsburgh, billionaire came in approximately the same time with approximately the same idea. That's absolutely right. Of course, came in with the first funding for the Heritage Foundation. Of course. Was a John Birch society member? And so coming from the far right? And people said it heritage, he gives six packs, but Richard Mellon Scaife gives cases. He was just overwhelmingly the, the major funder of early Heritage Foundation. He gave twenty three million dollars in its its first ten years or so at that time, just a phenomenal amount of money. Now there's two ways for an institution that wants to influence policy to behave. One is to do bonafide scholarship, and that's collar ships should inform recommendations for public policy another way to determine what public policy want. And then kind of manufacturer the scholarship to suit. Is that what heritage did? Right. Eric Wanner, who is the chairman of the Russell sage foundation said heritage turned the model on its head. When the Heritage Foundation was started. There's sort of a origination myth. Edwin Fulmer junior who was one of the co founders and is now coming back to run it again. He was working in congress as an aide, and he and pull wire, his friend. There was some kind of legislation that they were unhappy with and the current think tanks that it existed at the time only weighed in after the fact, the American Enterprise Institute was a conservative think tank that already existed. But it didn't feel its place was to get involved and lobby the congressman before the legislation was voted on. And these two young aids thought, well, that's stupid, you have no effect. If you're not gonna get in the congressman's faces before they take the vote. And so when they founded the Heritage Foundation it was explicitly to lobby. They weren't just a think tank, they were as they call themselves a do tank. It's kind of an unfortunate term debuts. You know, I have a friend who was back in the day, a Soviet emigre and back in Lithuania. In Soviet Lithuania. He wasn't economy, Trish in. He had to fill his model with input output data. That was in tirelessly invented by kindness bureaucrats. He was told what the outcome should be then had to come up with the raw data to produce that outcome. Is it that bad people like, Steve Clemens who worked in of conservative, think, tank, worlds and David Brock who was originally on the right? And it's now on the left, but who was inside those think tanks, what these people who were first hand observers inside would talk about is that the scholarship was corrupted, and they do describe that now I mean, I have to say, I'm not willing to think the liberal side has all the answers, and that it's always academically honest either. I'm sure that they things happened on all sides. It's just that the think tanks on the right we're built for political purposes. One of the areas where this matters the most, of course, is when it comes to issues, like, level forming. Where there's so much money on one side of the scholarship. The whole fossil fuel industry is trying to fund research that says Clavell warming is either not real or if it's real, it's not bad. Then nobody should do anything about it because the solutions are worse than the problem. There's just endless amounts of that kind of phony science. And it follows very much in the wake of the same kind of phony science that was paid for by the tobacco industry, which for years, said that cancer is not caused by smoking. You would get out of these right wing think tanks theories, like supply-side economics, which claimed that, if you cut everybody's taxes more money will come into the government somehow because the Konami will thrive. Well I mean we've had a few experiments in it now and it hasn't worked that way and yet remains an article of faith in conservative, thought, it's the theory that can't be killed because it keeps being revived by these think tanks and also it serves the purposes of the dough. Donors to the think tanks or let's just say, I'm really mad about this right tact and clean water act and the Clean Air, Act, and I want to build myself a great influence machine. How do it? Well, that's pretty much the question that faced Charleston David coke among others, and they were engineers, who had graduated with both undergraduate and graduate degrees from MIT, and they looked at taking over American politics as a great engineering challenge. And they decided you couldn't really rely on just funding candidates because the candidates are just going to spout sort of conventional wisdom. And so what they set out to do was changed, what the conventional wisdom in the country was by setting up think, tanks, funding intellectuals funding academic centers, they now fund, something like three hundred and fifty of them in universities and colleges across the country funding media organizations, and disputing science by coming up with. Counter science studies all that is how you do it. And that's really how they did it, they, it might be instructive to look at just one little point within the ecosystem to see how interconnected at all. Is. There was a time when Dartmouth was just one of the Ivy league colleges, then there was a strategic investment in academic centers at Dartmouth, which became one of the hotbeds of conservative thinking, at least on the east coast. Dartmouth, a good example. The Dartmouth review in particular started getting money from outside organizations, and it was on campus publication that became kind of an incubator for many of the more famous conservative propagandists and writers right now diminished sues the came out of there and Laura Ingram and many others. It was directed effort by funders on the right to try to have centers in the universities that would cultivate. Conservatives that would then go on and become leaders in your book, you, quote, Steve Wasserman who is editor at large at Yale University, press, one of the bastions, I suppose of the liberal coastal elites, lamenting that wealthy liberal donors, simply aren't as keen to make intellectual investments. As the right wingers. Well, I thought that was a really good point. You have to give conservatives some credit here they funded an intellectual movement, and they did it over forty years. They played a long game funding, people writing books, people like Charles Murray, people like George Gilder, and the Democrats were much more short term in their thinking, they may be put money into particular political races..

Heritage foundation Russell sage foundation Ford Foundation early Heritage Foundation congress congressman Richard Mellon Scaife congressman Adam shift Lewis Powell United States California Dartmouth Rockefeller Foundation Danielle Vinton Brookings Institution Lithuania Bob Garfield Jane Mayer Ralph Nader