17 Burst results for "Karina Longworth"

"karina longworth" Discussed on Glowing Up

Glowing Up

09:11 min | 2 months ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Glowing Up

"By the time that she was like in the spotlight I mean, I'm looking at pictures of her before and she so she's beautiful always but her hairline before I mean it really is such a market difference I. Don't know if I'd ever seen a picture of it, but it's she so beautiful and she really does like look you can see the. Can See her more exotic side. It's just it's so sad that looks like it was sounds like it was really painful which you had to go through. Yeah, it was and you know that she ended up as this beauty icon. Certainly, she was one of the the top pinups of the World War Two era and that that whole pinup of her as part of the story of the Shawshank redemption. So it's she's almost has these reverberations retired. But and you know I watched one of her movies with Fred astaire recently, and her as a dancer. She's so underrated. She's such an incredible dancer and she just. She just has this perfect dancer's body and like very few people have ever looked as good as she looks in those movies. But when you think about the cost of it like the personal cost and how she had to really become a different person, it's Definitely, a sad moment in history. Wow I, feel like it is it's always So, strange to me like but the recurring theme of how much people changed about themselves to succeed in old Hollywood like it almost makes me think like was anyone able to just kind of walk in and be themselves and make it work for like did everyone like get their jaw fixed or like pretend they're different ethnicity like it just feels so recurring. Yeah I. think that I'm sure there probably is an example of somebody who didn't have to do anything but. On some level I think that the studio system liked to find people where there was something they could fix because then it it was sort of an easy path to taking total control over them and making them feel insecure making them feel like they wouldn't be able to do it without the studios help. Wow, wow of and you just know I mean this is an obvious thing to say and I've now said it three times I think but I can't get over like how painful surgery and like beauty modification stuff must have been back. Then like I think about Maryland a million people getting their like nose jobs in the nineteen fifties like a chill goes through my body. We're they awake like I don't even know. Oh it's not right. It's just it's sad also like Marilyn Monroe is you know she had like a Chin implant yes that's. Pretty Serious plastic surgery a Chin implant like a Chin implant. Stuff back but that's On? Yeah, that's crazy town. My favorite band. Okay we. I just found this and I don't know if it's true but it feels like on a lighter note interesting to bring up that Rita Hayworth's hair care routine and Karina You can feel free to be like that's bullshit like. That's true but apparently to keep her hair soft and smooth. She like her sad hair that she had to completely change. If fit into the studio system, she applied olive oil to the ends of her hair. Nice and then she wrapped in a towel let it sit and then she rinsed her hair with hot water and lemon juice to get rid of the oil. Look I'm not saying we should do it. I'm just saying. It's nice to think about it's a lighter note she put oil in her hair it's a happy ending. I don't know if that's true or not but it doesn't sound that crazy I lake just a year ago or something I read like basically what's her name Blake lively like doing the same thing but with coconut oil coconut oil was trendy I know yeah. Yeah. We should all be like putting oil in our hair D- I'm learning anything. Not me either okay I need like dry shampoo. Schmidt, here we I wish with dish soap last week, and it was the best the best thing I've ever done. So just throwing that out there. Sorry Carrollton. No, that's an old school thing. I remember reading Debbie Mazars into the gloss interview. Grandmother was the most beautiful woman of all time and she washed her hair with palmolive Nowak show. I'm freaking right now I'm like. Pull that Tabah fast enough. You guys I have like major oily scalp like full of like buildup like my scalp is a nightmare and I just got in I feel like this is a gross like not chic recommendation but Neutrogena makes a shampoo called T. Sal and it has solid silica acid in it and my boat my face like love salicylic acid I, love all acids especially Salicylic and yes apparently this chimp who was like a a cult favorite gross scout gals like me and it helps take down some of the build up it. Look I'm just throwing out there might be helpful for some nasty South Globe's listening. Look. It's a straw. I'M GONNA look into that because you know not to bring it back to x amount. But like sometimes I get on the crown of my hair and there's there's like an Veda spray that has that solit- solicits cellulosic, whatever it is. That, I use sometimes but have a feeling the neutrogena stuff like we could probably prevent it. Oh Yeah. That seems worth looking into I also WanNa like lightly touch on. Are you guys to? The trend or like the the behemoth I should really say that are co washes. Have you guys heard of these? Things so. That makes me feel better green. I want to hear more about this but the ideas like it has no soap or detergent in like soap is actually like what's fucking up your hair? What's fucking up your? HOMER homer so men. So this is like once you train your hair to not use so and it's this thing called co wash like all your problems will be gone. I fell for this one did not go well, it just made my hair. So Greasy it was like heavy dripping it was awful I seriously need to find like the dish soap equivalent of shampoo because I don't want to keep using dish soap but I need something that's going to work and just drive that hair out to dry it out because it's greasy the Dafur wash it it's meal just use dish soap make deb's grandma like just get it together. Let's go. You're right. You're right. You're right about that note. My let's let's talk about. Let's go back to re day with for a second. I just want to say I think she would be such a good friend because she was down to do whatever it took to be a star she lake. go-getter that's someone you want on your team look maybe that also means she back stab you I, don't know but I'd like to think I'd like to think she's a pretty would have been a pretty cool friend. I'm going to flip it around and say I want to be her friend I want to be there for her it sounds like she went through a lot. Like I don't care if she's a good friend or not like she needs she needs people in her life. That are there for her and if I could go back in time and do that, I would do it in a second. Yeah I agree I think that she was lonely and she might have had. A different life if there are more people around who are supporting her and giving her self esteem who weren't men because it seems like that's you know, should go through these phases where she'd be in a romance and she would sort of put all her faith in a man to rescue her from the things that were not good about her life, and then it wouldn't work out and it would be sort of an emotional disaster and I think that like that's sort of sort of more important because I I get the sense that she wasn't really about fun to hang out with. You know there's these stories about her when she was with Orson Welles and like he kept, he tried to build her build up her self esteem and be like you know you're not just a sex symbol. person but then he would take her around you know with his friends and she felt very intellectually insecure and she would just sort of clam up So, yeah. I think that it the first step is to be a friend to her so that she can be a frontier you. Yeah. Yeah. Hands. Together. You know give her big. Hug. Tell her. Everything's GonNa be okay and like maybe go to yogurt with her. Show her a good time Lord knows she needs it. Oh Gosh Rita we this episode is dedicated to you..

Neutrogena Fred astaire Rita Hayworth Karina You Maryland Marilyn Monroe palmolive Nowak Debbie Mazars Orson Welles Hollywood Blake Schmidt Carrollton Tabah Lord deb T. Sal
"karina longworth" Discussed on Glowing Up

Glowing Up

07:59 min | 2 months ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Glowing Up

"Look. Look all you need is like a A. A can't Ollie. Pop and boxing matches and you can make it happen crane ice ice I'm so down with that if you need a filler recommendation. My would ask her last week. Have a very bad recommendation of woman who an Armenian woman who came to my house with a rolling backpack. My mom found the super weird like network of cheap Persian. Lady friends. And she yeah, she gave me fillers in my house and I paid her in cash. So do not ask me for a recommendation because I don't want to give you her and she is. Amazing A. How are you? I'm curious. How are you feeling about turning forty? Are you feeling great and energized? Are you feeling down at all like it does seem like that's a pretty big monumental moment for in your having it in this pandemic like how is that? Yeah, you know I had had a plan to have a big party and you know I was feeling really good about it because I I feel like I'm the kind of person who was made to be forty, fifty, sixty seventy wasn't really made to be a young person but it's definitely harder at you know when you can't really share things with people and you can't I mean as it is. It's hard for me as somebody who lives in Los Angeles and is so engaged with the film industry because the film industry is just like completely shop stopped showing aging looks like so I'm like the only forty year old who looks forty in anywhere near where I live. But I was okay with that and I was you know I, think I was kind of excited to own that and now I'm just you know I. You know I feel fine about it but I'm just so bored. I. Know. Well, that's how I feel like I. I. For some reason like clothing matters so much more to me in quarantine that it ever did before like clothing I'm wearing like colored hair shrimps in my hair like I just it's like I need that excitement that like a rush need jolt of like Oh look good in the mirror like I know what you mean because before I didn't care about clothes and now I'm like obsessed with them it's weird. Now you're now you're a clothing manufacturer. That's true. That is true. I did jump in the industry right at the defense starting a clothing line for some reason. I because I I can't just like things I have to like completely make them my business. Sorry. Carolina. We're going to say. I was just going to say. I'm going to zoom writer's room and I have to admit like you would think that I'd be looking at my coworkers are. Making eye contact with people but I'm making eye contact with a three inch by one inch square of my own face looking back at me, and I'm like in this feedback loop with myself and I'm dislike. Nodding at. Myself. Think that like fifty percent of their reason why zoom is so stressful is because you're constantly looking at yourself in pretending that you're not looking at yourself and you're like trying to look at yourself and make sure you look okay in a way where nobody will really know that you're only looking at yourself. I wonder I'm always wondering if people can tell. That I'm just because they're. Less fully. Oh God. It's so dark and and okay do you have like a zoom makeup approach I'm always so curious to hear what people's zoom makeup routine Latinas. I so I've been doing what I call like no makeup make for Zoom, which is of course a lot but I mean, it's basically a use the This is actually from my last four hour trip before. So foreclosed I got the Ilia beauty tint stuff. which is for me it's the closest match to my actual skin care of any foundation or skin tone of any foundation I've ever seen and it is sort of just kind of translucent and so it it provides full coverage, but it doesn't look like it's full coverage and so that's been really valuable but you do have to put powder on top of it. If you're going to be on zoom because otherwise your face just looks wet. And so there's like a powder situation on top of that, and then I have to fill in my eyebrows and I have to use Mascara which is something I wanted to talk to you guys about because I'm just having a really hard time finding a Mascara that lasts all day and is like not underneath my eyes by four o'clock zoom. I know what you mean like I. I wonder if that's just a thing of of it being so hot al because I'm having that same issue. I've noticed that my glossiest lash. Lick will. Will last me have sometimes it'll be a little flakes below like at the end of the. Afternoon. But I don't have the perfect answer for that like I kind of need that to Carolina. What about you? I have thoughts, ladies Okay. Good. Okay. First Question Corinna are you using a waterproof? Mascara or are you avoiding those like where do you stand on Waterproof Mascara? I'm fine with them and I mean I I used mailing great lash for a really long time but it just kind of stopped working for me like it seems like the older I get like maybe maybe it's just that I'm using more powerful ice creams or something, but it just seems like I can't keep Mascara on my eyelashes. It's just always bleeding underneath the best one that I've been using recently is from milk it's I forget which one it is, but it's in the sort of Turquoise tube water that Kush Yeah even that doesn't last all day for me Okay. My recommendation for you is going to be the there's this cult classic Mascara from the drugstore it's called essence lash princess. I got false false lash effect Mascara and they have a waterproof variety. This is like truly a cult favorite people swear by it for short lashes. For like. Let's say problem lashes. Let's just leave it at that me ball. It's like it's looks. Looks like Chintzy almost it has like such poor graphic design. They sell it at CBS but this Mascara is great. It's five dollars people absolutely love it. And then I wanNA. Give shout to the mask air that's blowing up on Tiktok and it's one of my favorite Mariah's. Yes, tick a tick tock makeup find, and it's the drugstore duke for Gosh Glossy Lash like in my opinion, it's L'OREAL telescopic nick comes in this like long silver it looks it looks like. It looks like the kind of Dildo they'd prescribed to an old Hollywood actress in a sanitarium for like having a rod erotic mania or something like that. It's a long silver to. And I tried to tie it into credence interests and. I tried yeah. I tried like you can't say didn't try and it has and has a very. Like you know how the glossy lash like brush has, it's not like a typical Mascara, brush. It's like very small in plastic and it really separates your lashes. It has that kind of has that kind of brush. So yeah, those are my two rex. I really do swear by this essence waterproof lash princess I think you should check it out Creena and it's only six dollars so. You know I have to lose what do you have to lose except you do have to maybe set foot in a CBS and put your life on the line but I'm sure you could find it online I mean.

Carolina CBS boxing Corinna writer Los Angeles Creena Chintzy Tiktok Hollywood Mariah
"karina longworth" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

16:12 min | 1 year ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"Of being in studio today with the Great Willem Dafoe. Thank you for being here. Thank you so I'm just going to get right right there at the top of things and ask the lighthouse. What is what is the lighthouse about how God It depends on the person. Yeah I suppose like Russia test Maybe I mean it's It's two guys in lighthouse that There lighthouse keepers. One is an old hand. He's the regular lighthouse keeper. And then there's kind of a Newbie who's WHO's there for the first time and basically There to be relieved after a couple of weeks but bad weather comes and they don't get relieved. Things go very wrong after that they do. Indeed I saw the film at Cannes and I didn't know what to expect back. Because I'd seen Robert eggers. The the writer director his first film The witch and there is something totally similar. I guess but this is also something entirely. Its own beast. Some curious like when you first laid eyes on the script. Wh what did you make of. It ended relief out to. You is something you just had to do right away. Well To give you a sense of how the script came to me I saw the witch And I I didn't perfect circumstances in the respect that I had been away working I am. I didn't know anything about it and I went in cold and I liked it very much and I thought wow this who made this. This film has a really distinct voice. I want to meet this guy so I talked to my Representatives and arranged a meeting and met Robert and we we get along fabulously and agreed that we should work together and it took a while but This is the first thing that came gain press to do he presented to me said in a very direct it was you and Rob Pattinson. It's basically two hander. Hander here's the script and it was a beautiful script. I loved the text. There's an elevated language. I liked the character. I I liked the events I know we would be shooting in nature in very extreme nature so I knew that would road it. It would be an adventure and I'm like Basically the Ark of the characters in what happens to them so there was a Cornucopia of clashes had bad so It was a no brainer. Do you at this point in your career. You've worked with so many fascinating directors which I do want to ask you about In a bit Do you ever I mean do you get daunted by things. Do things like this production. I'm the shoe. I'm sure it was very difficult with the elements. And the you know Are there projects where you just were like scared of in away all the time. Yeah that's kind of the point right now. I think It's human nature to seek comfort. Take the familiar but as an actor. you're given these relatively safe opportunities to challenge that that nature and to Do things that you don't know how to do and The pleasure of that is you learn things and and You have the possibility to be transformed through stories and the experience of others The experiences variances. You have telling the story of others. And that's that's the beauty so I've find that in I think you'll hear the other actors say this as well when you have challenges it pushes you in a way to find a new way of being a no way of working working. And that's what keeps US alive. I mean speaking of other actors Your Co Star in this film wherever patents in Has had a really interesting career trajectory. He became very famous with Harry Potter. And then the twilight movies and since then has done I think a remarkable job of finding these interesting directors. Doing his a little kind of already projects. How important was your rapport with him in in shooting a movie? Because it's just to you I mean and and obviously Robert Behind the camera but like did you guys work to establish that kind of connection before shooting or did it come on set. Not really we. We had some rehearsal but the rehearsal was very particular because the film language is so the language of visual language is so rich that a lot of the rehearsals were basically to find out where the camera is going to be and basically to put the scenes in the frame of the camera. Normally you you play you play around with the scene and then you set the camera here. The camera was sat. And you had to kind of submit to that frame right which is interesting way to work because it really focuses casse issue it takes away certain choices but that can be a great source of power. As far as Robert. I agree with you one thing we have in common is I think we both Are turned on by strong directors and strong and you know people that have very very particular ways of making movies so we had that in common we have very different characters and very different Our position in the movie is very different so there was nothing really to talk about. There was it was really about the whole movie was about coming together or not right and That was the process of making the movie. I mean because I start out kind of Lording it over him and then it becomes a little bit of power struggle initially he's quite reticent but then with time I push him. I'm in the character pushes his character character to a point where he kind of pushes back and then difficult things happen Do you remember a particularly difficult thing while shooting was it was it the the water was at the. What was? It's the conditions that that's also the pleasure. Because that tells you what to do that really informs everything saying that you can act a cold pretty easily. Exactly exactly when you're laying in you know five inches of freezing water and Darts been poured on you. Yeah you don't even think about what has to happen because it's happening right. So you're receptive and you're you know you're experienced something you probably is beyond your imagination. Yeah Yeah it's like it's verite. I mean it's just it is so I liked hearing the story about using the witch and seeking Robert eggers is is that have have you worked that way in the past where you've seen a film and been like I gotTa talk to that person a little bit. Yeah a little bit. I mean I not so specific of seeing one film and saying hey I gotta talk octave this guy that that's happened some But I've cultivated relationships With Wes Anderson with Sean Baker. I mean I've sought them out Because I like what they're doing and then I arranged to meet with them and we talk and then when there's an opportunity that makes sense we've worked together I'm always interested in those careerist terms because you know a lot of the actors that I really love like yourself. I find that when I asked him like. Do you have like a career strategy. They always say not really. How much have you had to sort of pay attention in your career to like the sort of economics of the business of it or have you been able to be pretty artistically minded pretty artistically minded and for almost thirty years I worked day to day hey apathetic company so that was my main job and then occasionally it started out i? My identity was theater actor. And then people saw me at the theater and Most notably Kathryn bigelow and said You know would you like to to do this movie that I'm doing and I did it and I enjoyed it and then I wanted to do more but even then I was day in day out mostly at the theater and and then slowly I got an agent. I got a manager and started doing the business of having representation in the career but still day to day was the theater and I could only do so many movies now now I still do theater. But it's in case by case it's I'm not no longer with the company the wooster group. So that's changed things but really what set the tone was you you know. Mostly my identity wasn't in Hollywood for example right and I went to situations that I thought that would be exciting and thrilling. Really I on some level I mean. It sounds irresponsible but I I'm best when I'm kind of have a little off balance When I'm you know I cultivate Curiosity so I've been kind of all over the map in the kind of movies I've done the kind of roles I've done and I don't say that prideful that's just the way it was That's just the way it is is. That's where I'm lead so in that definition I think most people that have the strongest career plotted careers. are people that perfect Perform Persona and then that can be plugged into various projects. Now that that can be a wonderful thing we've seen some actors that you don't think of as as being crazy versatile but they worked beautifully in movies So not. I'm not a snob about that. It's just particular to me. I'm in I I. I don't even think of my self as an actor. Sometimes I I am always kind of Ray thinking what I do so I looked for opportunities where I can do that. You know the challenge challenge that idea of being an actor. It's like I have nothing out. I I want to have adventures. I want to be transformed. I WanNa learn learned something and then the things that I learned I can apply to Challenging how I think in challenging challenging my sense of self other than the obvious physical challenges and the verbal challenges. What did shooting the lighthouse kind of teach you or what is as you what is your takeaway from that? That Rob Eggers knows what he's doing that. I always like movies where the making of the movie at the movie is very is some sort of record of the making of the movie and of course this is you know. There's very disciplined informal formal Cinema language to this movie. It's very clear so don't get me wrong. Not Cinema verite like where recording things that as they're happening but when I see the movie it looks and feels like what we went. Okay yeah that that must that must feel nice. You're it is it is it gives you know it helps you. Connect the dots in a funny way to comfort. You know because the Matrix films are so oh collaborative that sometimes not just myself. I see this and other people you know you can do beautiful even heroic things things and have them get lost and you can do not so heroic lazy things and have them be elevated by the nature of editing. All these these things so when it's true to what it felt like when you're shooting it it's I duNno. It's it's I like it. It's something that you who Yeah I I can only call it a comfort. You know I I would say in the past couple years. You've between the Florida project and add attorneys gate eight and now the lighthouse and motherless Brooklyn like you've had a really interesting run of films of late and does it feel like a particularly exciting time for you right now. It does. Yeah it does. Yeah because I'm I'm excited by performing and I've been given some nice opportunities and they keep coming so I'm I'm happy about that. It's I'd be a liar if I said it wasn't a good period. Do you have any particular the project that you've worked on. This is a hard question. Maybe that can you kind of like has a special kind of glow in your memory like is there. Is there a piece that really stands out as a kind of cherished item item. So many maybe does that. Make me a narcissist a little bit like that many. I I mean you know occasionally you're also disappointed But for the most part I'm not into Regret are you a big sell successor of your work. I mean 'cause I talked to plenty of actors who never watched the Finnish version. I watched them yet. I watch them but I don't study them. I watch them just so I know so I can talk about them the right like this and also. I'm curious how they come out but it's very hard to really you know it's so tied up in in the shooting and when I watch a movie I can't really see the movie. I trust other people to see it better than I can because technically I can notice certain things. Oh they use that tech You know I thought there was a better one oh that's not at all like. I thought it would be we all. That's better than I thought it. All those things are happening in on not to mention. Oh I remember that dad feel so there oh I remember the director. It was mad matt. So and so this sort of thing That's what I'm experiencing right. I'm watching a movie so I don't watch it to say like Ooh you did that or Ooh Ooh you you were lazy. They're rule. You know why did you do that. I don't do that kind of analysis. Yeah that's probably healthy so you know. Also it's over over time to do the next thing. Yeah and I think your lessons are learned. You know you gotTa Develop Ella Discrimination. But but you don't want to think about this much. I think your lessons are learned in to Italy. And when you make a mistake I think you feel. Will you feel the hurt stab. You won't go to the same place so I kind of gathered. Just if you're seeking out people like Robert Egger Sean Baker that you're a pretty voracious film watcher like in your in your spare time or Yes yeah I like film I. It's like I seldom watch TV because because there's too many films dicit. Yeah Yeah but but I know I know plenty of my friends have more film culture than I do. I'm always a little embarrassed on There are holes in my film knowledge. Yeah so I'm not as ferocious as some you know I I. I do other things as well. I really lot when I prepare for things Or I try to not develop projects when I'm thinking about projects that are down the Pike I tend to like to read and Belated material did you read any fascinating fascinating light housekeeper lower about quickies ident- have do so much because Robert Eggers so damn good at research and he loves it so much..

"karina longworth" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"I I also believe that you guys make an effort to see as many films cancer too while you're at these festivals. Is there anything on on the festival circuit this follow that you were really particularly delighted by that. You're pulling for in the Oscars this year. Yeah well actually. I mean the only festival where I was a ED time to see anything with Toronto but I saw few things other than knives out and I mean two of my favorite movies of the year so far movies I saw there. And that would be marriage story and uncut gems. UH-HUH I like the uncut gems. People were at the governor's awards the other night but the room was so big that I never saw them. So I'd like I. I knew the Safdie after you brothers a little bit for. When I was a journalist I did a story about them for their film daddy long legs in the La weekly which was kind of the first big story I did for the La Weekly? So now I haven't been able to see them Like on this uncut gems tour so josh and Betty. I really loved the movie. You're listening to you that they are they got an Oscar. Track movie feels feels like somehow unlikely to me. Still even in cajones is great. Well I'm super excited for them. And I hope it's an Oscar attract movie you know. I I hope that Adam Sandler at least gets nominated because I think he's super deserves it. Let's let's circle back to the south and Katie and I were having the sexual mini-debate before before we hopped on the call with you which is Should Song of the South be available. And if so in what form should be available for or any kid to stumble upon a Disney plus should it be available for historians to show you know with that context that we were talking about You know or should it just be bolted forever. What do you think so I would do is hung of this out that same thing I would do with birth of a nation and arguably like maybe there are other movies? You could do it too as well but I would would try to create some sort of situation where like you can't watch the movie until you can watch a documentary about it and like the documentary doesn't necessarily have to be from a super liberal point interview it just has to be historically factual is there any kind of documentary that exists. That would actually give you that information or is it. Do you have to listen to this podcast. In the meantime as a first song of the South I think it's it's the podcast. Yeah Yeah Right. Well that's their curriculum that we're GONNA it's really fascinating. I mean I'm a huge fan one of your podcast. Generally but just you know there's just so much that you think you know and you don't know or even ever even thought to wonder about That you're presenting in this series and in this particular season and so yes everyone listen And thank you for for doing it Carina. Thank you guys. I love your podcast too. So Richard. Now let's listen to the conversation that you had with Willem dafoe the star of the lighthouse. So I'm imagining was much more pleasant to be with in person than his character in the lighthouse. Well A he was great. But you know Brett our producer and I had to check up to Maine and take a boat to this island and it was really exhausting ten. It's frightening actually Yeah once we got there You know defoe is you know we've had on before he's he's just a thoughtful interesting actor who picks movies movies very. Interestingly like he has interesting taste and to be kind of got into that kind of what what interests him And then yet talked about the lighthouse which is quite a towering performance formats from him. Well I have the distinct pleasure of being in studio today with the Great Willem Dafoe. Thank you for being here. Thank you so I'm just going to get right right there at the top of things and ask the lighthouse. What is what is.

"karina longworth" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Code who. That's a three hour home cleaning for just twenty nine dollars. That's what the cleaning plan at Handy Dot com slash who promo code who terms and conditions apply. Visit Handy's website for more information handy. It's the most reliable name in house cleaning before we let you go back to a better evening than this impossible. We're GONNA play a game called. You must not remember this okay. Tom Title we've reached the end of the decade and every website every publication is pushing pushing out best of the decade content. So we thought we would do the same. But with you with a twist and we're seeing what you do and do not remember from gossip of the past ten years our aim so we the question for every year of the past aid. And maybe you'll remember things maybe you won't you but these are things that you probably shouldn't remember things that we should not be remembering and yet bobby I remember everything useless. You Start Bobby. So let's start with twenty ten. In August twenty. Ten Paris Tilton was charged with felony drug possession when cops found point eight grams of cocaine in her bag during a traffic stop. How did she explain away the cocaine while in court a she thought it was gum be she thought it was chapstick? See she thought it was Mints D. She thought it was advil. Wow she could think it was any of those through I'm GonNa. NSA SEE men not gum. It was I. I was thinking when I was thinking of the other options for this question. I was like well. That doesn't really have the consistency of cocaine. But then I was like neither does gump there. I don't really know what she thought we would believe but she tried. It didn't work. Did she has wrapped in foil. Who gave but to her was she like? Oh can I have some gum. And they gave her like. There's no reason that she would think it was It doesn't make any sense. This this story is what I'm also thinking. Currently the the whole that whole thing was a big mess. Twenty eleven twenty eleven in August. Twenty Eleven Kris Humphries and Kim Kardashian Marion lean hugely publicized ten million dollar ceremony. The tabloids repeatedly referred to as the wedding of the century. Well how many days did their marriage bridge last. God this is tough. I feel like it's either. Oh Oh you're going to give me multiple. Oh Yeah I would never do that. Yeah was it sixty seven seventy a two eighty one or eighty two. Bobby Eighty one eighty two so I feel like people knew it was within the three month. Reign okay okay months okay. Okay so I actually like was about to say that I thought it was either eighteen or eighty one. So I'm going to say eighty-one was seventy two although you do not not need to get that correct because these numbers were so close together did you just as just your own speculation. Do you think that whole thing was a publicity stunt. But it's it's a very obvious interleague. It seems like a publicity stunt but do you think there was ever anything real in that marriage. I didn't I wasn't really paying that close attention then like I didn't get into the Kardashians until I got into the Kardashian so yeah I don't know but it seems like it was just for the show. No now I think so. I think I just feel like you know. Sometimes the the Kardashian heads will argue about that and I just wanted to see. I was watching a youtube video. That was the woman interviewing people on the red carpet. Kim's twenty-seventh Birthday Party and they were interviewing Aubrey. O'Day her best friend at the time. Apparently he said I really hope. Oh Kim gets married this year wishes. I hope she gets married. Because she's such a mommy and she didn't seem very very very very the script. Birthday wish for Kim Kardashian was that she got married. I was like wow. This is incredible document. Okay this okay. Eight twenty twelve. This is ridiculous in the summer of twenty twelve just months before the release of the final twilight movie Kristen Stewart was caught quote unquote cheating on Robert Robert Pattinson with a director named Rupert Sanders. Witch non twilight movie. Did he direct Kristen Stewart. Was It on the road. The runaways ways. Welcome to the Riley's member that I don't or Snow White and the Huntsman Snow because every headline was so the huntsman directors and adding to the dramas sanders wife played kristen's mother in the snow. White movie that her husband directed and before where she pulled down her twitter account tweeted and Instagram of snow. White drinking from what looks like a liquor bottle and wrote not so pretty or so pure after all this Swiss a crazy tabloid story. When I was I was looking up? All the photos of this. And it's like this was on the cover every like I forgot how big this was. Meanwhile wild today if there were a headline saying Kristen Stewart was making out with someone Rupert Sanders. Everyone would laugh at all because I mean so. He turned her gay. Thank afraid but just she was having this highly like this. This huge the a love triangle with two men now is just wild thing to think about. She is like the Leonardo di Caprio of Lesbian. Now like how thin was she even part of this like. It's amazing. I also think I also I think that the Senate confirming. I think that this was a publicity stunt because the photos when you look at them. They're just they are extremely staged. So made nick. Maybe they were just is trying to drum up publicity for both of the movies but anyway twenty thirteen. Do you want me to do power through these. Sorry wait bobby long okay. An hathaway made headlines in the spring two thousand thirteen for changing her Oscar address. Last minute explaining that quote it came to my attention late Saturday nights there would be address more into the Oscars. Oscar de remarkably similar to the Valentino. I had intended to wear and so I decided it was best for all involved to change my plans. Though I love address I did wear it. Was a difficult lasted decision as I. So look forward to wearing Valentino in honor of the deep and meaningful decision relationship. I have enjoyed with the house and with Valentino himself. I deeply we regret any disappointment. This caught who. Where did she write that? It's like the most it's the most peak and hathaway statement like I end. All my statements ever need to write a statement. Yeah Okay so the question is it was later revealed who the other dress belong to. Who Was it was it Jennifer Lawrence? Amy Adams Amanda safe read which I always was pronouncing correctly or Jessica chastain. See Fred C.. Suki free cell. I mean this was probably the Les Miz also and so it would be like super caddy and weird if it was Amanda Siegfried But I'm GONNA say Jennifer Jennifer Lawrence. Apparently the rumor was that it was Jennifer. I but then people confirmed was Amanda and then after after all the drama trauma came out where it was like their feuding. Amanda just tweeted fact. I love you an but the thing is if she actually loved her she would call her Anne right right because you know she gets anxious any just love that Anne hathaway statement before serenity came out and and people didn't like it she released like a like I don't know a pre shape she was. She released a statement the day before it came out saying like people aren't going to like this because what it's art at very long inscription anyway. She's he's great at captions. Inmates One thousand fourteen Jay Z and salons knowles got into a fight inside an elevator at the standard hotel after us at attending the met gala. We've seen the video. We've heard the explanations sir. Can you remember what the metal theme was. That year was Charles James Beyond Fashion Alexander McQueen savage beauty punk chaos took a tour or China through the looking glass. Bobby I would never get this two thousand fourteen S. Yes I mean say Alexander it it was that was thousand eleven. It was Charles James Beyond fashion. It's just funny that I have no memory of this. I don't either not at all. I remember elevator. I think they've gotten better at trying to make the themes a little more viral so long as they're just trying to get to come back. That's the only thing that they can do this point. Okay two thousand fifteen. I know you'll know the answer. This in two Thousand Fifteen Tori spelling fell on a hot grill nyc conic restaurant chain spellings spellings rep had no comment. But according to a source Tori hadn't even started to eat when she slipped and fell she grabbed onto the side of the hot grill and burned her arm at the time. It didn't seem Thomas Beth. The doctors told her it was the next day. which chain restaurant was? She burnt at was it. I just wanted to hear your multiple choices. I don't even know how you would burn yourself at at a cheesecake factory or a Tgi. Friday's or Chili's or Benny Honner. Obviously it's funny. How you are correct? That is my bet. Is the by far the best thing that happened in two thousand fifteen fifteen which is amazing and it's getting easier in two thousand sixteen. Tom Had Allston wore an iconic tank. Top all being photographed at his. Then girlfriend Taylor Swift's fourth of July birthday party. What did the tank top say? Iheart New York Iheart Taylor. Iheart T. S. or Taylor swift is my girlfriend and I love her very much. I think it's see it's either Baresi to yes. That's right IHEART. Tia's that tank tiled arranged terrible Two thousand seventeen so the end of the eight-year marriage between FYRKE and Joshua Mel Sosa if you saw their divorce papers however it would save Fergie as dual Mel's ex-wife's ex-wife's legal name. What is Fergie's given name Stacy Ferguson? What's her middle name? What's her middle name? Do you know now. It didn't say that on kids kids incorporated it Stacey and Ferguson. But you get that one hundred percent and the last one because we don't know that we didn't have the big stories between nineteen yet. It feels like ages ago but it was only last year two thousand eighteen. That's the hook up and then break up of Pete. Davidson Arianna guerande during their short relationship. Davidson got the got three tattoos. Dedicated to Arianna. Uh which one of these did he not get a sketch of Ariana's pet pig piggy smalls h two G. Komo Aka Honest to God. Knock me out Arianna his favorite cartoon Winnie the Pooh or dangerous woman. Inspired Bunny ears I'm GonNa say Winnie the Pooh Pooh and that was a trick question. Because he already had a winnie the Pooh ed just to collect some of the worst tattoos I've ever seen in my full life if you want to check those out sometime eventually. It's actually insane. How many bad tattoos this person has? Can I suggest that you guys in the future do a segment or a game about celebrity liberty. Tattoos called who tat well inquiry gestion taken weekly. WHO TAT TAT? Don't cleanup games anymore. But Yeah and you're you're welcome to use. You must not remember this in case you ever come across garbage that you don't want your listeners to remember that's all all yours remember any of that Is there anything else that you want to plug. I know you're doing a spin off series that people are contributing to and I. I was hoping you would WanNa talk about that sure. Yeah we're GONNA start that's going to start running and at the end of January. It's called make me over and it stories about like Hollywood's intersection with the beauty industry and so it spans from the silent era with the first Hollywood weight loss surgery all the way to the nine hundred ninety indies and like there's a an incredible episode about like black beauty in Hollywood so Yeah so I'm really super excited about that. We have eight in like individual writers.

"karina longworth" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"You still like are obsessed with and looking for ways to put into like a future show or maybe look a little deeper like. Is there any it person that we would find. Maybe waiting in the wings. Yeah yeah I mean like basically one of the first stars I ever knew about was Natalie. Wood She died when I was. It's like a year old and my mom was obsessed with her. My mom thought that I looked like young natalie wood when I was like five years old and so she was just talking about Natalie Wood all the time and of course I didn't didn't really understand the nuances of Natalie. Wood story when I was five years old but It's something that has continued to fascinate me but the thing is like there isn't really a great natalie. Wood biography Raffi. There's still a lot of questions about her manner of death. It feels like the story is an over and I had like at one point. I actually started started trying to do a season that would be about the three stars of Rebel without a cause. That who all died young so it wouldn't be her James Dean and Salma Neo And I started looking into it but like the books about Natalie. Wood aren't good. The books about James Deen Aren't good and so like maybe like down the road somewhere like I. I would write a book about that where I did all new research by. Its I had to put it on the back now. I would love you to because I feel like. We don't don't have like they did. Someone just did a podcast in US weekly. Just do a podcast awful. I stopped listening. They didn't do nothing hap. It wasn't that good and just like such such a bummer. Because that story is so like people would love to hear it now. Robert Wagner is still alive. The story is not over yet so it was nice. The thing is is that like I mean maybe stuff will come out when he dies. I think people still feel like. Don't cross Robert Wagner for some weird reason you guys know the restaurant restaurant in West. Hollywood Dan Tana's yes it's like classic old place I was there went to some friends at the bar. And somebody asked me a question about Natalie Wood and if I I thought Robert Wagner killed her and I was like I don't know and then a guy who was just sitting at the bar drinking whisky by himself turned around and like tap me on the shoulder and was like what like what you say. Rubber Wagner is a killer like I was like I don't know Sir and that he reaches into his Blazer and pulls out his cell phone on and scrolls and then he shows me a Selfie he took with Robert Wagner and he says I don't think so. Oh my God do anything there. Oh my God. Hubbert Wagner defenders crucially sipping whisky behind you at a restaurant. That's like that's like a true horror movie. Legroom House of wishes think accomplish something as a wrestler by true. Oh my God and that that creeps me out so much because like there's something that happened there too that the hopefully fully I mean it has to come out like it has to whether or not foul play like. We don't know what happened on that boat. Yeah but I was GonNa ask you so. She died. Drowning owning Jamesy died in the car. Accident had Salmonella Typhi Salmonella. He was he was killed in an alley in one thousand nine hundred seventies and when he was gay. I don't think he was killed. I don't think he was gay bashed but he he had sort of a secret life and then he was killed in an alley. Oh my God his killed in an alley hikes okay. But we're going to stop right here. Four SEC format break Lindsay. Where's your next trip? Where will you need away next? I Oh thanksgiving probably like going home for Boston. He acts on to be there for a while. Supplies needed pack lake more clothes than usual. got a pack. Your microphone. GotTa pass the microphone in the away. Fortunately the hard shell. That keeps the microphones safe. Yeah thank God we have. You're going to be in a bathing suit in November and Boston's gotTa hot dumb. Are you kidding me. You Bet. Thank God you can fit it in your way back to. y'All away with the pockets on the front..

"karina longworth" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Obviously he's not going anywhere and then here they are yeah. I don't know if I can think of somebody's specific civic offhand but I mean definitely like sometimes you'll look at somebody's IMDB profile and be like. Oh they actually like were around for twenty any five years but I only knew them from this one thing you know Mary Astor is somebody who's Kinda like that where she was just like working working working and then her career kind of ebbed and flowed. ooh You know like a like a Marcia gay harden or something and then she won an Oscar and that kind of transformed things and put her in the Pantheon but she also had this crazy like sex diary scandal. That like happened when she was at a real low point in her career and instead of killing off her career as everybody expected it to do. Because has there was the nineteen thirties. It made her more famous. People were like Mary Astor. Who Knew? Yeah like Kim Kardashian. It's like crazy that we even thought that Paris Hilton and any Kim Kardashians careers would be over or whatever. No one would give a shit about them after their sex days when like it's been proven again and again that people don't seem to care about that and it's not even like were we're prudes or anything of anything we're the opposite. So it's like it's every everything repeats itself even though people you know will say like Oh not this time not this time. We're smarter. Whatever sort of switching gears a little bit? Why do you choose the specific stories that you dive into? What about a specific topic usually calls you towards like making episode about it? Well you I mean over the past few years I've focused on during seasons And so because it's just a lot easier ear to Focus on like a theme that can contain a lot of stories rather than having to start from scratch to research each individual story so the the first thing I look four is when I have one idea is are there other ideas. Are there other things that can connect to this within a container And then usually it's like if I figure you're out that there's like five or six different stories. That could all go together. I basically decide you know. Am I passionate about this or not and usually the thing that kind of sustains my interest because it is a really long time as I said like I started working on this in March y'All episodes are written and recorded right now. But we're still editing them. Obviously I'm still talking about them so you do have to be willing to commit something for a long time You know usually the thing that would make me feel that passionate about it. As if there's something in this stuff steph from past that I can connect to the present day and so you know the song of the South as I said. I wasn't really that aware of Disney. Plus it was more that when I was starting to to research at Green Book had just one Oscar and there was this sort of this conversation about like white people making movies about black people and I. I'd you know. Song of the South is kind of the ultimate white people thinking they're doing something good and liberal and progressive by making a movie about black people and just like not being able to hear hear or understand criticism of it. That was one thing that just reminded me that was. Was it David O cells neck or Victor Fleming. I'm not sure who was in in the mix but I think you said David cells but how he thought he was doing something incredibly progressive by like making little changes to the novel for Gumbo. Yeah we yeah so funny to think of this guy thinking he's making some like huge progressive statement with gone with the wind of all people but that is the Green Book Story. That is Nick Milonga being like hell. Yeah like this is great. This is a good thing I was wondering. Are there any Celebrities or people stories. That you've researched searched come across that haven't fit into your show that who stories you still like are obsessed with and looking for ways to put into like a future show or maybe look a little deeper like. Is there any it person that we would find. Maybe waiting in the wings. Yeah yeah I mean like basically one of the first stars I ever knew about was Natalie. Wood She died when I was. It's like a year old and my mom was obsessed with her. My mom thought that I looked.

"karina longworth" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Night Call

"But they quote him as saying we'll never go to the moon it just won't happen unless like everything changes about our understanding of mass and acceleration it's never going to happen and then they keep quoting people who were like well not never they just can't then who sounds like they know what they're talking about is like absolutely not we stand firmly on the earth and it's unlikely to change for a very very long time there's also a good reason for saying that which is that the idea being don't give up on our planet and uninhabitable person also saying that we absolutely should not just give up on earth because that is like not the cool thing to do right Steven Kane a professor planetary astrophysics at the Riverside said the sad reality is at this point in human history all stars are effectively at a distance of infinity we struggle very hard as a species to reach the Earth's moon do you think we're wherever the point of where it is an ad Astra fast food on the moon and just like freest like like preserve food for like hundred it's of yours so that you can make make the journey I think it's more likely that it will be a wally scenario where we're on giant spaceships that are like urban and just kind of waiting to return to thanks being able to like build a civilization on a planet than it is to like build some kind of space station.

Steven Kane professor Astra
"karina longworth" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Night Call

"And lonely nights. I'm has Lynch in Los Angeles. And with me is special guest Karina Longworth high over in New York, we have as always Malir Shida. Guy. Hi, I'm so excited to have Corina on the show. It feels like it's been long overdue. Yes. Absolutely. And for those of you who do not know who have been living in a cave Creena hosts, you must remember this a really really great podcasts about Hollywood history and scandal and all sorts of juicy stuff that is it's on hiatus right now. Correct. But yeah, but if you haven't listened to it, you can go back and discover a whole wealth of podcast episodes past you should also read her books her newest one, I believe seduction sex lies and start him and Howard Hughes Hollywood. And it's amazing. So you should definitely get that. But yeah, I think you must remember this is definitely like night colleges, and we've all been big fans for a long time. So we're really happy to have green a here. Thank you. I'm happy to be here. I'm a fan of Nicole. Thank you. You. I'm so excited to talk about Radic thrillers. Yeah. It's like, I it's really it's really great. How much this series of ours has brought people out of the woodwork? Like, there are a lot of kind of secret enthusiasts. Who are like, oh, when are you going to do my like my favorite? We wanted to start off real quick just to acknowledge our new superstar the literally the black hole that was image die should say for the first time last week. So this is old news by the time. You're hearing this. But we just wanted to give it a little bit of out. Where were you? When you saw the black hole for the first time the black hole blip. Yeah. Where were you Karina? I think I was I had just turned on the shower, and I was waiting for it to heat up. And I was looking at it on my phone. Nice dangerous. I live way to this black hole has a name. And it's what has a couple names actually, just got a Hawaiian name. But it's it was originally an eighty seven star, you know, who Lara. It took me to realize that MED three the musical act slash band named after a star system. I it took me until I was today years old. Well, it's a really beautiful one. So he puts a good one. But and it's very appropriate. When you think about it because it's very galactic music like you feel very starry eyed when you're listening to I had no idea until like a year ago. So, but yeah, eighty-seven is the new the new hot galaxy in town. I know that there's been a little mini series coming out about it. And like the the the woman who actually was kind of spearheading the entire project to was kinda credited later on down the road. Of course, we tend to lose credit for our women in stem, and astronomy and stuff like that. But that was interesting. But I think like I like just reading what people felt seen for the first time, what kind of reactions did you see I missed this. I think Jezreel had a good post where it was just like they just opened up the comments and said Alice how you feel about the black hole. And of course, a lot of it is jokes. Like a lot of people had a lot of good jokes about the black hole. But I think I think it's interesting because it's something that, you know, you feel like you've seen zillion times because we've seen like re-creations of them inside movies, or, you know, in in a time life science book or something like that. Like, you you kinda know what a black hole is supposed to look like. But actually seeing an actual one is very it is an interesting feeling. I I like it. I like I like to ponder the black hole. It kind of looks like an like an ultrasound image of an eyeball. Yeah. A little bit like all that kind of strata and the lake orangey kind of background. It's a little bit too much for me. I think we've we've now been talking about the ultra black holes on the floor, you know, and now black hole like there's been a whole. Rod cat aren't black holes. Molly's fear of whole. Yes. Little the little holes. After we finish the erotic thrillers..

Karina Longworth Nicole Malir Shida Corina Los Angeles Alice Howard Hughes Hollywood New York Radic Lara Creena Molly Jezreel
"karina longworth" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Bullseye. Jesse thorn? If you're just joining us, I'm talking with the writer Karina Longworth. She's an expert on the history of Hollywood's golden age, she hosts a podcast about it. It's called you must remember this. She also has a new book out it's called seduction sex lies in stardom in Howard Hughes Hollywood, which talk a little bit about Jane Russell because Jane Russell is a star who is much deeper into Hughes life as he became more exploitative and more manipulative and more insane. Tell me about how Hughes and Jane Russell connected. So she was a teenage girl from the valley. She was engaged area football player, and she did some quote unquote, sports modeling, which was just very tame pinup photos of her in a bathing suit, one of these photos was spotted by an agent who knew that Howard. He was looking for a girl to play half Mexican in a movie, he got Howard. He is the head shot. She was brought in for an audition. She was cast was just like a normal way. For Howard Hughes to cast people in movies lick get a picture of somebody. There's a point where he's like literally like getting a picture of somebody than sending somebody to take a picture of that person bringing them to Hollywood on that basis say this would not have been normal for anybody else. But yes, this was normal for Howard Hughes, and especially after Jane Russell, he did develop this process of he. He read every magazine and newspaper. He could get his hands on he'd spot a picture of a girl that he liked the looks of. And then he'd hire one of his personal photographers to go to wherever that girl was and take very specific. He was mandated photos. These photos had to be the actress or the girl was not supposed to be wearing any glamour makeup or have her hair professionally done and the photos were supposed to be head on and simple profile shot. So that he could see what they really looks like. And then if he liked what they really looked like he'd start this whole process of having her come to Los Angeles, and he'd get her either a hotel room or an apartment or a house, and he'd assign people on his staff to drive them around and basically spy on them twenty four hours a day, and put them through acting classes, and all of these things and the whole purpose of this in most cases was so that there could be a girl and a house who was available for Howard Hughes one he wanted to see her and he was almost like a collector of women. He would. Date multiple people at the same time. And would like put them up in bungalows at the at the hotel yet at the Beverly Hills hotel. Let's talk about the outlook the movie that Jane Russell start in tell me a little bit about it as a movie what's it about? It's about Billy the kid. And it's based on a sort of fantasy version of the Billy the kid's story that Howard hawks had once heard which was that his his death was faked and that he actually ran off with this girl and the way that it ended up manifesting in this movie that Howard Hughes made is that Billy the kid is in hiding, and he meets this young woman that's half Mexican woman played by Jane Russell. And she understands that Billy the kid had killed her brother. So she like tries to kill him with a pitchfork, and he rapes her in a hayloft, and then she falls into some kind of hypnotic. Love with him. And basically goes from being of strong women who wants to kill him to being his slave. It's reflective of the relationships that Hugh seem to want to have with women which were very much about power. I mean, he was a guy who wanted to have control over everything and his environment. Absolutely. And you know, I it seems almost like that is as important to him as. You know that that is like the central part of being a playboy with for him. Is that kind of sense of control and ownership? Absolutely. And and that's also where being a collector comes into because he didn't want just one woman with whom he would be forced to have an intimate relationship..

Howard Hughes Jane Russell Howard Hughes Hollywood Howard Karina Longworth Howard hawks Billy Jesse thorn Hughes Beverly Hills hotel writer Hollywood Hugh Los Angeles twenty four hours
"karina longworth" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"I don't think that that's credible. I think that he was her employer and she was under contract to him. And she had to do what he said. But that she didn't like him very much at all. Was he always a jerk? Just to take this. One of the one of the lessons. We learn from Karina Longworth new book seduction sex stardom and Howard Hughes. Hollywood, isn't it turns out Howard? Maybe it wasn't a great guy overall. But was that always the case, I think there were signs that he was always extremely manipulative. And he was never interested in taking no for an answer. And he was never interested in being denied anything. And so when he didn't like situation, he would do whatever he could to get out of it. And if he didn't like the way somebody was treating him or wanted something from that person. He would do what he needs to do to get those things what's an example of his relatively early life. Well, he found it necessary to marry before he moved to Los Angeles. And the the reasoning behind this seems to be that as part of his goal of getting full control over his family's company. He needed to convince them that he was a serious adult man and serious adult men Mary. And so he married a girl, you know, who he apparently had had some kind of childhood crush on. She wasn't interested. She was convinced by her family that she should marry this guy who had a lot of money, and who would take care of her, and you know, on paper he seemed like he would be a good husband. He was young and handsome, and he had a lot of money. And then basically as soon as he got what he wanted from that situation and the two of them were in Los Angeles. He just ignored her. He spent no time performing the functions of a husband and any kind of traditional way and after a few years, she just got fed up and left which was what he wanted more with Karina Longworth after a quick break. When we come back. She'll tell me whether or not writing the book changed her perception of Howard Hughes. It's bullseye for maximum, fun dot org and NPR. I'm bailiff.

Karina Longworth Howard Hughes Los Angeles NPR Hollywood
"karina longworth" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Jason mitchell. Everyone tyrel this is new film in theaters now. It's bowls eye. I'm Jesse thorn. We're kind of fascinated with the golden age of Hollywood, Orson, Welles and Cary Grant and gone with the wind and all that stuff look up the topic. You will find hundreds of books in movies and TV shows bus tours, basically everything that could possibly be imagined. And a lot of times those depictions aren't really subtle. They're usually swept up in glitz and glamour, or they are the opposite of that dark and morose and gritty, but behind the history and the lore of that era. There are real complex stories about actual human beings. People who are household names today. People we've long since forgotten Karina Longworth is a writer and an expert researcher on that era. She's written five books on the topic. And she also hosts the beloved podcast, you must remember this in all the for work. She's nuanced subtle and she. Digs up all the most important information. Her newest book is called seduction sex lies and stardom in Howard Hughes. Hollywood Hughes is of course, one of the most famous twentieth century Americans. Just that's at one of the most famous twentieth century Americans. He's been written about and depicted in films thousand different ways. Maybe you saw the aviator some years ago. Anyway, Longworth spoke talks about Hughes in Hollywood way back when financing movies writing and directing movies at one point running studio but more than Hughes. The book is about a group of women who passed through his life their stories and how they were affected by the weird abusive system that he created to recruit develop and control actresses Karina Longworth. Welcome back the bills. I it's nice to see. Thanks. Thanks for having me. How did you end up thinking about? Howard Hughes and the women with whom Howard Hughes work and with whom Howard Hughes had various types of intimate relationships. Well, the very very first seat of me wanting to do this was that I stumbled across some message board where somebody made a post that was just women Howard Hughes had slept with and it was just a list and most of them were actresses. And there was no other information about any of them. And I read that listen, I just thought wow every single name. There has a whole story just a whole life. And all this guy cares about is that they had sex with Howard Hughes, and that just made me think of ways in what she could use a fact that some people find titillating or interesting because of the fact that it's titillating and have that be sort of a Trojan horse as a way to tell them other things and things that I find more interesting. So then I started doing a couple podcast episodes called the many loves of Howard Hughes about some of the women who ended up in the book such. As Jane Russell, Jean Harlow. And then it just became kind of a no brainer that you could take some of these stories I'd already done and add a lot more research and a lot more stories, and it becomes a book. Let's set a little context for people who have only a tenuous understanding of who Howard Hughes was or who some of the lesser known figures in this story are why was a Howard Hughes rich when he moved to Hollywood. And why did he move to Hollywood his father had invented a groundbreaking literally drill bit?.

Hollywood Hughes Karina Longworth Howard Hughes Hollywood Hughes Jesse thorn Jason mitchell Jane Russell Cary Grant Jean Harlow Orson writer researcher Welles
"karina longworth" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

The Bechdel Cast

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

"Well, let's rate it speaking of you know, how we feel about it zero to five nipples based on its portrayal and representation of women. I am going to give it I would say like two. And maybe it's because I don't really like this movie that it maybe I did let it caught my judgment. But while I do appreciate the female friendship, and how it probably did pave the way for more progressive movies about female friendships to be made. I think that because the goals of the women are defined entirely by and framed entirely around the type of men thereafter. I think also this movie was funded by the diamond industry. Like is that true now probably? But like why it's okay. This is funded by twentieth century. Fuck. But it it does like actually promote the names of several diamond Tiffany's, Cartier. Yeah. So I just got Kaelin like the movie, I didn't like the movie, I do appreciate a few of the things that does it. You know, it does challenge different gender-specific, double standards. It does show a positive female friendship. I don't know. The fact the only thing we really know about them is the type of men that they want in the only thing we see them do is things to either land a man, or in some cases, several different men if you're talking about lower line, which is fine. Hey, if you wanna fuck a bunch of people, do it also Gus is like really possessive of her and like jealous, and he's like you need a chaperone because I don't trust you because you're a woman who's hot and sell. You're probably gonna to be fair. He cannot fuss her that's true. He is not like stereotyping her. Maybe he's just like seeing her flirt with other Jews. And there is that Rufi steam, why would you send like to chopper owns someone like, you know, who's really gonna hold her accountable. Her best friend in the world. Who was like DT f- like crazy. Morning. Let me have the Horta's person. She does this is gonna work out. Great. So yeah, I'm gonna I'm gonna pro this is probably too low, but I'm sticking with two nipples, and I'm going to give one to each gals want to Marilyn Monroe and one to Jane, Russell, cool. Well, I guess I don't know what a five would be. And I don't want to be. Yeah. But I I'm gonna say for cool. I think I'm guess what the death. Do it three maybe three and a half. I I think the something we didn't really create you spoke to a few times was even the way this movie is framed is a little bit different. And not how we're used to seeing. I mean, certainly Marilyn Monroe, and Jane Russell are fully made up in gorgeous, this whole movie, the costumes are incredible. But the male gaze, I feel like this movie is aware of the male gaze and subverts it several times in a way that is like really effective and interesting and definitely not typical of the time the whole ain't there anyone here for love scene. That was like so cool and exciting and hopefully cathartic for Jane Russell who is, you know, for once not the center of, you know, she's controlling the camera and where they Cameron goes instead of being pursued by it and Laura lion. Dorothy. Only ones who kind of break the fourth wall in in the musical scenes, and it just I dunno. They felt fully in control of the movie, and generally the story and we're equipped to solve the problems that they were sent to. Although, of course, you're you're totally right that they're sort of defined by their views of men in the world. So I'm going to do I'm going to do three and a half and give to Jane one in Maryland half toe lady Beekman. She earned it. She worked hard. I'm getting I don't know anything about. We'll carina. Thank you so much for being here. Thanks so much fun. Plug whatever you want. Well, my book in which I read about this film and others made by Jane, Russell seduction sex lies and start them in Howard Hughes's Hollywood. It will be in your local bookstore. Great. I can't wait to read it when working people fall you online, and oh, I'm on Twitter at Karina Longworth, and you can find my podcast, you must remember this on itunes. Yeah. People listen to it. It's so good could three years of listening strong. Thank you. You can follow us on social media at Bechtel

Jane Russell Marilyn Monroe lady Beekman Karina Longworth Horta Twitter Gus Bechtel Maryland Dorothy Howard Hughes Laura lion Cameron Hollywood three years
"karina longworth" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

The Bechdel Cast

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

"My name is Jamie Loftus and my name's Caitlin, Dante. And this is our podcast about the portrayal of women in movies. Is that right? Boy, is it. Ow. No Kraft colloquialisms don't count. Did. I say man, dude and boys so much, and I feel like I need to erase those from my vocabulary this so so instead girl does it has what I meant is do gender-neutral I use it in an gender neutral way. But I know a lot of people who feel that it's masculine and then don't like to be called did fair. Wait, what's our podcast again? So we talk about the representation in portrayal of women and movies. We use the Bechtel test as just a jumping off point to initiate a larger conversation about representation tree. Oh, yeah. If you're not familiar with what the Bechtel test is it is a media tests that you apply usually two movies, but really anything with a narrative was I originated in a book by Alison Bechtel. And I wanted to briefly mention that because a couple of fans of ours. Viola and tie mentioned that the. This was created by queer icon, Alison Bechtel, and then it was actually in the comic strip. It's two lesbians talking about how little representation there is of lesbians in movies. Yeah. So just to throw that out there that we recognize that. And because what's happened with the test? It's kind of been like appropriated by Streep. Yes. So I just wanted to call attention to that that it was specifically the characters in the comic strip are talking about how they see so little representation of acquiring. Yeah. Yeah. For the purposes of artists Goshen, our version of the Bechtel test requires that in a piece of media to women with names, speak about something other than a man for more than two lines of dialogue evening UPC's, very low bar. But if you've heard any of our episodes before you'll note that it is challenging. Oh, yeah. Yeah. John J movies cheat. What do you mean what was the one in? She's all that where they're like. I think you should kill yourself. And these like that's mean in that passes the Bechtel past. But we'll do a better job than that. So demo at Jamie. Okay. Hi caitlyn. Hey, jamie. What's up on nothing? Just saying out with my gals talking about movies. Oh, you know, what this movie made me you have a new appreciation for what's that plush colored shorts? Yeah. There are some male athletes, look nude. Well, now, he's not. Yeah. I broke it. To lie. But oh boy those flesh colored I forgot about the flesh tone shorts. And they really they really came on strong in this loved it, certainly. All right. Well, what's how much further? Do. Let's introduce our guests. We're so excited whereas for our guest today, she is the creator and host of you must remember this podcast and author of seduction sex lies in stardom in Howard Hughes's Hollywood, it's Karina Longworth high highs for having me thank her during the. You we've been fan Girling on the text. Excited and we're excited to talk about this movie in particular today. We're discussing gentlemen, prefer blondes nineteen Fifty-three movie musical comedy directed by Howard hawks. Jane, Russell Marilyn Monroe. We I don't think we've covered movies with either of them in the before. I don't think. So. No. So a big I hear on the Bechtel cast today. Like, it's the only Marilyn Monroe movie. I can think of off the top of my head that where she is basically paired against another woman. Yeah. Right. I'm not I've seen some like a hot. And I like that movie a lot or at least I did pre Bechtel casts to now I have to see it again. And then decide but I haven't seen seven year edge. And I don't really know not familiar with her other work, really. So I grew up with a Monroe appreciating on coal really laid it on thick most likely for all the wrong reasons of and I have seen a lot of a lot of her movies. I hadn't seen this movie in at least ten years, then I remembered liking it by remembered liking Oliver movies editor so I was pleasantly surprised and challenged by this movie at a number of points where. I thought I predicted because of the time it was made at what was going to happen and very often..

Alison Bechtel Jamie Loftus Bechtel Russell Marilyn Monroe Kraft Howard Hughes Howard hawks Caitlin Streep Karina Longworth Viola caitlyn Goshen Girling Oliver John J editor Jane Hollywood seven year
"karina longworth" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"Hello. And welcome to. I think you're interesting on Todd Vandort. The I I think interesting and this week's guest is one of my podcast heroes. I listened to every episode of her show. I love what she does. And how she's carved out his base for herself in the podcast and game. And you know, if you've read the title of this episode, you know, that her name is Karina Longworth. She's the host of you must. Remember, this wonderful podcast about sort of these hidden stories behind the history of Hollywood, she delves into all of their like tales that were told at the time that we're sort of being covered up in the gossip magazines if you will and she has done in essence, what is incredibly in depth dive into the world of old Hollywood in her new book seduction, which just sort of a blown away by I think it's one of the best non fiction type of the year the books about Howard Hughes. Who's sort of us. Of course, was this famous extremely rich, man. He was an aviator. He was a business tycoon, and he was a movie producer of sorts. He's perhaps more famous now for the way he died, which was an extreme isolation and become a recluse and clearly had some undiagnosed mental health issues going on. But during his heyday, Howard Hughes was one of the most powerful figures in Hollywood. And what's interesting about carino's book is the way that she uses Hughes as a prism not just for Hollywood. But for all of these women who came in contact with him some of them came away, you know, better off for having met him like Katherine Hepburn was someone that he was he was very close to for a while. And she obviously had a wonderful career. But a lot of them had their lives essentially ruined by Howard Hughes. And what I love about Green's book is the way that she focuses on these women not as. Pursuits of Hughes as women that he vetted in his sort of playboy image. But as people who had their lives really destroyed by what Hughes did. And I think that that is a really fascinating way to reframe this idea of the billionaire playboy, which is so prevalent in our culture. And anyway, I recommend the book even if you like turn out the episode right now, you should go get the book. But I think the Carina had some really fascinating things to say about Hollywood about these women about Howard Hughes and about like the ways that these systems that he helped perpetuate continue to this day. It's a really fascinating discussion. I could've talked to her for three hours more. So anyway, stick around. I think you're gonna like it. Karina longworth. Thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me. So obviously like the book is about Howard Hughes, but it's about him through sort of a different prism. But for all of our listeners who maybe don't know who Howard Hughes's, which is probably a fair amount of people. Sadly, kind of tell us who the guy was and what this book what prisonment looks at him through. Born in nineteen o five and he was the son of a guy who invented a new drill bit, which basically made drilling for oil much easier, and he became very rich off of this. And then his dad both of his parents died when he was a teenager. So Howard Hughes inherited his father's company and his estate. So he basically can I swear on this swear? So he had he was like a twenty year old kid with fuck you money, and he could do anything he wanted. And when he decided to do was moved to Houston move from Houston to Hollywood, and he wanted to become the greatest motion picture producer of all time as well. As edit the greatest aviator and the greatest Gulf player, and he stopped playing golf, but he got pretty close on the nation front at least like four his era. And then he continued to dabble in making movies from about nineteen twenty five until about the end of the nineteen fifties and over that course of time he had a lot of relationships with a lot of actresses. And he also got into a. A lot of plane crashes and had a lot of head injuries. And especially from the nineteen forties on became increasingly eccentric. And now it's easy to see was suffering from probably mental problems that stemmed from these head injuries. I wasn't alive for the end of his life..

Howard Hughes Karina Longworth Hollywood producer Todd Vandort playboy Katherine Hepburn golf carino Green Houston three hours twenty year
"karina longworth" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:23 min | 2 years ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Terry gross. Let's get back to my interview with Karina Longworth who host the podcast you must. Remember this about Hollywood's first century, her new book seduction is about movie mogul Howard us who was famous for his affairs with many beautiful and famous actresses and turning some of them into sex symbols Longworth says she wanted to tell us a story from the women's perspective in the late nineteen forties around the time of the Hollywood blacklist. When writers directors and actors were being denied work for being accused of having communist ties or sympathies us acquired a controlling share of the film studio are KO pictures. So Howard us was part of the blacklisting. I mean, he tried to purge his studio or K from anybody. Who might have, you know, communist sympathies? Yes, he was one of the most fervent anti communists in Hollywood. During the blacklist era, you know, he had this image of himself as. As being one of the great capitalists. So on some sense. It's just binary capitalism. Cannot coexist with communism. But I also think that there was this thing where he he really thought of communists as an infestation in Hollywood. And then the other side of that is that the studio are KO was not doing well at the time. And there may have been a part of him that just needed to kind of shut down production and create a distraction. So some people think including Paul Jericho who was engaged in a lawsuit with at the time. Paul Jericho was a screenwriter who Hughes fired from our KO after Jericho refused to speak to the house unamerican activities committee, Paul Jericho believed that Hughes had shut down our KO as a publicity stunt to distract away. From the fact that our Cao's movies weren't doing. Well, so in the late nineteen forties. Howard us buys Arcadio. So how did he do as an actual studio head? So most people think that he basically destroyed our KO studios when he bought it. It was profitable. And then when he ended up divesting at in the mid ninety. Eighteen fifty is. It was a shell of what had formerly been throughout the time when he owned and operated it he had a really hard time producing and releasing enough movies to maintain a prophet, and this has to do with his personal perfectionism. He would send a moving into production. And then he would fire director after director. He would be unhappy with the dailies he would make casting changes. And then sometimes movies would be finished. And they would just sit on a shelf for months or even years because he wasn't sure what to call the film like he would change the title over and over again or he would wait for inspiration to strike him in terms of marketing, and he ended up being sued by a lot of the shareholders for our KO because they felt that he was just pilfering away their money and in two specific lawsuits he was accused of using the studio as kind of a shell corporation. So that he could just basically neat women and pay them off. One of the one of the the lawsuits specifically cited Jane Russell as a waste of assets. And another one named for actresses who had been under contract to ARCO, but who had never actually filmed a film for the studio, you suggest, and I think a lot of people suggest this that a lot of his problems came from those plane crashes that they could have affected him mentally as well as physically and also led to dependence on drugs like codeine. Yes. So what are some of the problems? He had both as a filmmaker and just as a person and in his relationships that you think might be traced back to the plane crashes. Well, both the acquisition of our KO and the mismanagement of that studio and some of this compulsive starlet juggling that we've talked about these things like exceleron after the nineteen forty six crashed all of the archaic stuff happens after the nineteen Forty-six crash. But also after that point, it's when he's involved with many women at one time and seems to be pathologically juggling them. He seems to be getting his excitement out of having multiple women who he's telling all kinds of lies to rather than actually getting sexual excitement. Yeah. You describe him living a liking, the Beverly Hills hotel custody could have different women in different bungalows. And they wouldn't know that the others were there other women were unaware of the other women, so he'd have in the central location all these different women for him to choose from. Right. And then he would be telling them all elaborate lies when he couldn't be with them. Or when he would choose to be with another woman. He would be like, I'm in New York. But. I'm gonna fly in tomorrow. And meanwhile, he would be in the next bungalow just on the phone with them. You started a series on the many loves of Howard us before the metoo movement, and your book is being published after the metoo movement has gotten going to the metoo movement change, the context of what you were writing in any way. Like, did you see what you were in covering any differently? Or did it take on new meaning for you? It really didn't at all the book is what I planned to write in two thousand fifteen when I I sold it the thing that has changed is the world that it's being released into. And so I, you know, I think it's good that people seem more interested and more receptive into having these conversations now than they did three years ago as somebody who studies the golden age of Hollywood so to speak. What was your reaction when when when women started coming forward talking about Harvey Weinstein talking about other people in Hollywood who had tried to control them sexually? I think the conversation itself is revolutionary the thing that I've come to understand from studying the twentieth century of Hollywood is that these things have always happened. And they were never talked about publicly. They were things that women were meant to believe that they had to accept as a trade off in order to get the benefits of stardom or working in the industry, and that if they weren't receptive to that trade off they could go find another job. So just the fact that we're having conversation is completely revolutionary the language has changed too. I mean like, you wouldn't use the word playboy and ladies man anymore. But that's so new I mean, it's we have only really stopped using terms like playboy, I think in the past couple of years. Yeah. Me too movement like you. I don't think you use that word right now. Yeah. I mean, when I first started writing the proposal for this book, I think that there was more of an appetite for a book that took a playboy seriously at face value. And and thought that that was something to kind of cheer on a reason to be excited about Howard Hughes. And I was always interested in telling the story from the other perspective. I was always interested in in telling the story of what it would feel like to be a woman who is just on that list of conquests. So the first time I heard your podcast, you must remember this. I didn't know what to expect. I heard it was great. And if you're leveled Hollywood's a great podcast, and I I love old Hollywood's I figured I should try it out, and you were basically like reading an extended essay. And I thought like when does the interview start, and I realized not as not going to be an interview is this is gonna be Carina just like reading, you know, her very well researched essay. Which is very lively written. And that's that's what it is. So it really goes against what like good production values are supposed to be with lots of different elements woven around them. But you know, they those of us who love the podcast like we want to hear you tell the story of what happened to the actors and actresses and directors and movies. So what made you think you could do a podcast with you just like reading what you've written? Well, maybe it's because I don't come from radio. So I didn't know what the rules were. I didn't know that. I was breaking the rules. I started the podcast in two thousand fourteen I had quit my film criticism job. I had a part time teaching job. But I wasn't really sure what I was gonna do with my career. All I knew is that I really did want to refocus and be talking about old movies rather than new movies. And so I just kind of created the podcast as kind of a proof of concept to show that I could do this research, and that maybe there was unexpected or unusual ways of disseminating my research on my writing, and then it kind of took on a life of its own. So yeah, I didn't I didn't know that I was violating the rules of good production. I just heard it in my head. And then I made it. During a longer. Thank you so much for talking with us and for your book and your podcast. Thank you so much Terry Karina Longworth host the podcast. You must remember this about the secret and forgotten histories of Hollywood's first century, her new book is called seduction sex lies and stardom in Howard uses Hollywood after we take a short break will listen back to my nineteen ninety one interview with scan Lee co-creator of Spiderman Black Panther, the incredible hulk and other marvel comics superheroes. He died yesterday at the age of ninety five this is fresh air..

Hollywood Howard Hughes Karina Longworth Paul Jericho Terry gross Jane Russell Harvey Weinstein ARCO Cao codeine Beverly Hills Arcadio director New York Carina co-creator Lee three years
"karina longworth" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"karina longworth" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"And just come at it and say that everybody else is wrong and i'm right and that's why the star wars prequels are fantastic or whatever you know and it's just it's it's click bait it's just there to get people angry about things and it's those usually zero to no thought put into any of that kind of garbage so i don't know is online the best place for foam criticism these days yeah there's some great stuff still being written but it is it's tough to find in there's a lot of garbage outta sift through i mean thank god for you know people like sam and cat who are doing a great job at the you know the daughters of darkness there are people that are doing great work out there but it's tough to find sometimes i was thinking of how for example this is going to picking up from last paragraph i was thinking of how for example karina longworth you must remember this podcast episode on dorothy streghten only went as far as peter bogdanovich is account of strengthens miserable experience of being on the set of william sexes galaxia something which sacks himself refutes on his commentary for galaxy a source which carina didn't consult or refer to yeah that's a trouble some kind of thing isn't it when there are other things out there and you should at least say this is one thing this is another who are we going to believe and then feel free if you wanna pass judgement and say i have a feeling that it's this account that is real but you know that whole thing of there's how ever many versions of the truth there's his version her version gene simmons version alfredo garcia's version all these versions out there and you just kind of have to make up your own mind but it's nice to present different viewpoints i mean that's one of my favorite things especially when i have to interview subjects that absolutely one hundred percent contradict each other you wanna hear in my opinion a great episode where that happens is go back and listen to the electric liden blew up assode where you get these two guys that to writers on the film who used to be partners who used to work together quite a bit and man they contradict each other almost every turn once as black the other one's white.

sam karina longworth dorothy streghten peter bogdanovich carina william sexes sacks alfredo garcia one hundred percent