18 Burst results for "Karen Rouse"

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on W. N. Y C. I'm David First. The last jobs report of 2020 showed all of the net job losses were two women and a disproportionately high number of them Black and Latina. As we await the first jobs report of this year due Friday, w N. Y C is Karen Rouse spoke with two black women on either end of the economic spectrum one year ago. Don't Yes, Amina Duncan landed a job as a client coordinator for a medical company. She had been out of work for eight months. So getting this job felt like the blessing she had been praying for. I was stealing, you know, light. I was like, Oh, my God. I got insurance. And you know, just silly and much better about everything. Her job was operational, meaning it had to be done on site not remotely. Duncan was 50 and Black was scheduled to start March 16th of 2020 days before the region went on a full lockdown. They basically gave me a separation agreement. Because basically I was the last to come in first one to go out. So because of Cove it they basically let me go. Duncan has been out of work. Ever since she's gotten unemployment. A friend gave her money to cover the rent on her East Orange apartment. She even tapped her life insurance policy for the unemployment to come through. Duncan also received two weeks. Pay is part of her separation agreement, and she spends her days applying for clerical jobs for the morning and you know, I see something I'll just apply for it. It's like I'm a serial A plier. She has a little savings in the bank. But now she's one month behind on her rent. The good thing is that I'm getting food stamps. So that helps, you know, Duncan Story is just one of thousands among Americans who have lost jobs in a market that has been particularly devastating toe, women and women of color in particular. Come look.

Amina Duncan David First Karen Rouse coordinator Black
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Okay. The sentence has steadfastly refused to consider a statewide mask mandate in Florida and has issued an order preventing local governments from enforcing local mandates. Mayor Gilbert says that's created a big problem for Miami Beach. We gave out 1000 masks, citations. But it's hard to tell somebody to give them a citation. If you can't actually have any enforcement of it. Gilbert believes that the Santis is quietly pursuing a herd immunity approach, allowing those at low risk of complications to become infected. Status hasn't addressed the herd immunity charge directly, but says Florida strategy in combating the virus is to focus efforts in protecting the elderly and most vulnerable. Other Republican officials in Florida support the governors approach. Democrats feel he isn't being honest or transparent about his plans for controlling spread of the virus. A Democratic leader in Florida's house, Evan Jenny, says he no longer trust the state's reporting on covert 19. At this point, we really don't know how many people have actually died in the state of Florida due to Corona. You know, you could look at some of the job. Johns Hopkins numbers with Deaths over flew from last year, and that number grow significantly from that 17, or 18,000 number that the states currently reporting in response to repeated questions from the media. The senator's spokesman says the governor will hold a briefing very soon. Will likely focus on the positive. Yesterday he was in Washington, D. C for a serious of meetings on when and how Corona virus vaccines will be made available in Florida. Greg Allen. NPR NEWS Miami Tomorrow on all things considered a look at the different ways. Churches in Maine have responded to covert 19 outbreaks among their congregations. You can hear that story by asking your smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Coworking industry was growing at the beginning of this year. But when the pandemic struck office workers didn't just flee traditional workplaces. They fled those co working spaces to now the industry is trying to figure out how to Lord workers back. W. N. Y. C is Karen Rouse reports We have in House Cafe where Equality Pretty WeII have conference room. Kenneth Miles, is giving a tour of third space and office sharing company he co founded about a year ago in downtown New work. His potential client, Norris Allman is eyeing the modern, brightly lit space as a possible launch pad for his start up a company that helps seniors with household chores and light repairs. Don't really need a full time office, but I didn't need the space. But I got a correspond with clients and toe. Also interview potential workers. His wife has health issues, and he doesn't want to expose her to covert 19. So he's impressed with the safety features like the new Plexi glass dividers in the open seating areas, ever questions about how you can open the door. You could use a guy like that somebody's touching. No touch doors, hand sanitizing stations and strict rules about wearing masks are among the measures. Co working spaces are taking to reassure members. They're safe. Theater based vice is a research associate with the University of Michigan Ross School of Business who studies co working space is a lot of Corky space supply in the real estate market. And now that the man has Essentially evaporated overnight. Coworking spaces were skyrocketing in popularity before the pandemic, based by says they began in San Francisco in the mid to thousands with software developers. The space is also offered freelance writers, filmmakers and entrepreneurs who didn't have a traditional office a chance to rent an office. Or a desk in an open seating area. What they needed Woz. Sort of, you know, the social reinforcement that comes from being part of a team. He says the coworking industry is now rethinking layouts, entry points and air circulation flows to make sure members feel safe. He also says traditional companies may want an alternative to a long term lease in a corporate setting, but they have a headquarters in Matt happened, But maybe you've got a cluster of workers in Brooklyn and maybe you have some that lived in New Jersey. And so maybe it becomes, you know, more cost effective to scale down space you have in Manhattan. The instant Group, a London based firm with an office in New York tracks the Coworking market. It found that work near home spaces dropped in New York City by 12% since the pandemic started, and 39% in Manhattan. Every angle is the founder of Work and play in South Orange, New Jersey, a business that combined co working space with a big care. It was thriving before the pandemic we had, you know, just celebrated five years with a big party in February and thinking about expanding other areas in northern New Jersey, looking at new spaces and Bloomfield. Her model no longer worked under the new rules of the pandemic. We don't have that much real estate people were sitting close together and open seating area that once fit 10 Coworking members could now only allow up to three Her revenue plummeted. 80% before work and play finally closed in May Cold would definitely changing the game with everybody. That's miles from third space in Newark. He's been reaching out to the owners of other co working spaces to exchange ideas, he says. Most places are shifting away from selling memberships to the common seating areas. Renting private offices. Seating in the common area starts at $285 per month. But with social distancing requirements, companies can't sell us many memberships. So there's less of a return. Private offices, by comparison, are $1785 per month. But miles fears that shift may price out budding entrepreneurs, including many of the black and Latino creatives in new work. It speaks to entrepreneurs of color, perhaps missing out. One networking with other people who Are in business. It may take away the space too greedy For now, Like thousands of traditional office workers, they'll have to work from home. Karen Rouse w N. Y C.

Florida New Jersey Corona Karen Rouse Mayor Gilbert NPR New York City Miami Beach Johns Hopkins Manhattan Greg Allen Maine New work Miami Kenneth Miles Norris Allman senator San Francisco
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You could use that somebody's touching. No touch doors, hand sanitizing stations and strict rules about wearing masks are among the measures. Co working spaces are taking to reassure members. They're safe. Theater based vice is a research associate with the University of Michigan Ross School of Business who studies co working space is a lot of Corky's space supply in the real estate market. And now that the demand has Essentially evaporated overnight. Coworking spaces were skyrocketing in popularity before the pandemic, based by says they began in San Francisco in the mid to thousands with software developers. The space is also offered freelance writers, filmmakers and entrepreneurs who didn't have a traditional office a chance to rent an office. Or a desk in an open seating area. What they needed Woz. Sort of, you know, the social reinforcement that comes from being part of a team. He says the coworking industry is now rethinking layouts, entry points and air circulation flows to make sure members feel safe. He also says traditional companies may want an alternative to a long term lease in a corporate setting, but they have a headquarters in Man happened. But maybe you've got a cluster of workers in Brooklyn and maybe you have some that lived in New Jersey. And so maybe it becomes, you know, more cost effective to scale down space you have in Manhattan. The instant Group, a London based firm with an office in New York tracks the Coworking market. It found that work near home spaces dropped in New York City by 12% since the pandemic started. And 39% in Manhattan. Deborah Angle is the founder of Work and play in South Orange, New Jersey, a business that combined co working space with a daycare. It was thriving before the pandemic. We had, you know, just celebrated five years with a big party and February and thinking about expanding to other areas in northern New Jersey, looking at new spaces and Bloomfield. Her model no longer worked under the new rules of the pandemic. We don't have that much real estate people were sitting close together and open seating area that once fit 10 Coworking members could now only allow up to three Her revenue plummeted. 80% before work and play finally closed in May hold would definitely changing the game with everybody. That's miles from third space in Newark. He's been reaching out to the owners of other co working spaces to exchange ideas, he says. Most places are shifting away from selling memberships to the common seating areas. Renting private offices. Seating in the common area starts at $285 per month. But with social distancing requirements, companies can't sell us many memberships. So there's less of a return. Private offices, by comparison, are $1785 per month. But miles fears that shift may price out budding entrepreneurs, including many of the black and Latino creatives in new work. It speaks to entrepreneurs of color, perhaps missing out. One networking with other people who are in business. It may take away the space to create for now, like thousands of traditional office workers. They'll have to work from home. Karen Rouse w N. Y C news W N. Y C supporters include Rosman Orthopedics with insides from decades of research. They offer all orthopedic specialties in North Jersey and New York. Learn more at Rossman and why.

New Jersey New York City Manhattan University of Michigan Ross Sc research associate San Francisco founder of Work Rosman Orthopedics North Jersey Brooklyn Karen Rouse Newark London Deborah Angle Corky Bloomfield
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The elastic that holds the masks in place W. my sis Karen rouse reports the demand for that stretchy stuff is keeping two sisters in new York's garment district in business back in March Karen Alden a tech worker based in Virginia spent an entire weekend searching for elastic all right cleared out about six different fabric stores of as much quarter inch elastic as I could find and quickly realized the elastic was going to be our chokepoint Alden and her siblings had a goal of making thousands of masks for the elderly and health care workers across the country a dearth elastic threatened to stall their project then a bridal store worker shared a tip try panda international in new York's garment district and I haven't run out of elastic yet Korean immigrants David Kim opens the tram and notions store in nineteen ninety three on west thirty eighth street it's it's under a red awning that has a panda as its logo it's a fashion designer's playground scissors and snaps glues them garment bags mannequins and sewing machines after Kim died five years ago his daughters twenty eight year old Veronica and twenty four year old Deborah took over they remember playing there as girls yeah we used to have like iron on rhinestone Z. doing little projects with the kids put it on our teachers after governor Cuomo issued a stay at home or in March the Kim sister stock they would have to shut down completely the store could no longer serve walk in customers and they laid off eight of their eleven workers but then the phone started ringing and they're normally sleepy eBay traffic was up like what's going on people are messaging as to get a laugh out or not you can import the elastic from India and China as well as factories in the United States then they cut it to length digit and send it everywhere over the all over the lake California Indiana he your online elastic sales have made up for some though not all of the retail business they lost it's also allowed the Kim sisters to re hire two of the workers they laid off Karen rouse W. NYC news it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Noel king and David Greene throughout this pandemic TV has been helping so many of us passed the time at home right it's this constant in our lives that feels reassuring right now but the entertainment industry is feeling the effects of coronavirus two actually the virus is fundamentally changing the TV business here's a pair Sam Sanders in one big way this moment has been great for TV millions of people all stuck at home with so much more time to watch broadcast TV ratings had been in decline for years but since the pandemic they've been up double digit growth in March and April compared to previous year that's according to Nelson Nelson also found that minute spent streaming compared to this time last year more than doubled so far it seems Netflix might be the biggest winner the company added about sixteen million new subscribers in the first quarter of this year that is Blake covers entertainment for the LA times she says that's huge that's the biggest quarter in the entire history of the company and that's largely due to people being locked up locked down at home and wanting stuff to watch and hearing about tiger king or hearing about cheer the place also says all the subscribers are getting now it's like what he was gonna be signing up in November somebody who's just in a cave for five years I don't know even with high ratings and increase subscriptions the industry is bringing in less money ad revenue is down in part because all of the Big Spring and summer sporting events where commercials cost a lot of money those events are canceled and with so much uncertainty all the big players are pretty wary about going ahead with any plans for new stuff but events really they're going to have to get back on set what would that look like Netflix is still producing in places like Iceland and South Korea countries that are already pretty good at rapid corona virus testing and contact tracing and there are already plans in the works to make socially distance production sets in the US a reality the hope is they'll be able to open restart some shows and July or August but my guess is it'll be closer to the fall that is Jessica her shattered she does a camera work on TV and movie productions in Atlanta there's a technical explanation that's rather long winded but I essentially control the focus of the camera Jessica has been working since early March and she says all the folks who used to work with they spent a lot of time now talking about how to make sets in the U. S. safe without widespread testing vaccine she read an article in The Hollywood Reporter full of a lot of ideas remembers feigning gloves and masks they had talked about actors who are in intimate scenes shooting their coverage at different times from each other they talked about you know hand sanitizer and watch stations and temperature checks when you walk in they had the idea of separating departments and limiting who is on site but Jessica says a lot of those ideas just don't make sense if you have a truly socially distant sat how did you hear how did you make up how do you get the perfect shot Intel we have an actual vaccine it's gonna be really hard so maybe prepare yourselves for fewer things to watch down the road or at least more stuff.

Karen rouse new York
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC I'm John Carlson for some people crises create opportunities and this pandemic is no different W. my sis Karen rouse reports there is a rush to trademark words and slogans having to do with the new coronavirus Jeffrey Lee Castel says the pandemic got him thinking a lot about love so much so that the Long Island native plans to launch an online forum where people can discuss how covert nineteen has altered their ideas about love and relationships trademark your love in the time of corona as well as love in the time of Kobe nineteen it's a play on the famous Gabrielle Garcia Marquez novel love in the time of cholera may tenth in doing this was having a form where people you know can share and explore the energy that we call love and how it can and should be expressed more than two hundred applications have been filed with the US patent and trademark office since February a Washington DC woman wants to trademark the words corona virus free to put on hospital scrubs well a California company wants to put the opposite corona virus infected on T. shirts Christine Haight Farley a law professor at American University says applicants typically hope to gain exclusive rights to the words or slogans but there are limitations nobody owns a word you know that the company apple doesn't own apple and they don't get to prevent other people from using that word they get to prevent people from using the word apple in limited circumstances such as when another company would use that to confuse consumers into the source of their goods Farley says the rush to capitalize on a pandemic could also backfire if it's seen as a greedy attempt at exploiting a painful event when other people are suffering from exactly the thing that you're trying to exploit economically Castel says his proposed online forum love in the time of coronavirus this isn't about making money it's about giving those very people who are suffering a place to interact in the midst of a trying time Karen rouse W. NYC news it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin kids in Spain went outside for the first time in six weeks on Sunday the government there is allowing children out for one hour a day with an adult reporter Lucy have been a few days as many didn't follow the rules in videos posted to Twitter dozens of people can be seen strolling along Barcelona's board walk their children on bikes and scooters and adults chatting some without face masks and failing to maintain a six foot distance but in the town of Maria about an hour and a half from Barcelona eight year old Bruno and four year old Olympic data right their bikes in a completely empty streets their mother Edie's and board says they will finally get.

Maria Twitter reporter Rachel Martin NPR California Washington US Gabrielle Garcia Marquez Long Island Karen rouse Edie Bruno NYC Barcelona Lucy Spain Steve Inskeep apple American University
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Gov-. Right. I know who that is then you have, and I know Steve Sweeney and she knows the big names in Trenton like the governor Emba Senate president. It's the maims of the local lawmakers that stump her the, you know who your legislators district. Now, I don't my legislator let's say and she's not alone. Rob Gregory of Warren county plans to vote in the primary. If I don't go out and vote and represent my views and support those people that share my views and I don't know, I'm not doing my civic duty the way I feel as to voting for. Let's see. To be honest that sounds terrible. But I can't tell you, the, you know who who's there. Not on new Jerseyans radar. Ashley coning is director of Eagleton center for public interest polling at Rutgers University. She says most New Jersey and struggle to identify their local lawmakers. Very, very quiet primary. Very quiet November this year's elections are being held in an off year. No, federal or gubernatorial candidates, but toning says there are consequences with such big issues being debated in Trenton tax, marijuana property taxes and hack nation in general voters will also candidates for sheriffs mayors and municipal councils, New Jersey has closed primaries, so you have to be a registered member of a political party to participate. Polls are open tomorrow from six AM to eight PM. Karen rouse, WNYC news music festival. Goers in New York City were.

Trenton New Jersey Ashley coning Steve Sweeney New York City WNYC Karen rouse Rob Gregory Warren county Eagleton center president Rutgers University Gov-. marijuana director
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"E D, Morita law goes has more PG filed for bankruptcy protection in January, citing the tens of billions of dollars that will likely have to pay out to victims, including those and Butte county who survived the campfire. Now state fire. Investigators have officially determined that equipment owned by PG any sparked to blazes that grew into the largest and deadliest firing California history. The full investigation is not being made public. It was handed over to the Buchanan district attorney who's leading a criminal probe into the fire. The law goes reporting financial markets. Asian markets were mixed by the closing bell the Nikkei in Japan on more than a half percent. You're listening to NPR news. And this is WNYC in New York. I'm should meet the best sue marijuana legalization in New Jersey will now be left to voters in twenty twenty after legislation stalled in the state Senate. But lawmakers say they will move forward on a Bill to clear the records of people with low level possession convictions. WNYC's Karen rouse reports. State Senate president, Steve Sweeney says there wasn't enough support in the Senate to legalize weed. But there is support for the expunge measure. The legalization Bill had been paired with he says the legislation gives some people with marijuana convictions a second chance and ACLU report found that blacks are three times more likely to be arrested for marijuana. Use compared to whites even though usage rates are similar Sweeney says he expects the expunged. Bill to pass along with a separate measure to dramatically expand the state's medical marijuana program by June thirtieth. The MTA is facing another lawsuit for not installing elevators, when it renovate subway stations, WNYC Stephen Nessin reports this class action suit follows a federal ruling earlier this year that the agency has violated the Americans with Disabilities Act. The lawsuit filed Wednesday on behalf of three plaintiffs and a coalition of advocates is not seeking any money what they want is for the to go back and install elevators or ramps at dozens of stations. It's renovated, since the nineteen ninety s and to ensure that every time it renovate a station. It includes an elevator or ramp, the MTA says, part of its fast forward plan is to ensure writers are no more than two stops from an accessible subway. Stop by installing elevators at fifty stations, but the MTA has yet to secure the forty billion dollars needed to implement the plan the student newspaper at Rutgers. The university is in danger of shutting down after a student vote slashed funding for the paper daily target editor in chief Priyanka, Bunsen, all says, since the paper became independent of the school in nineteen eighty student fees have been the publications primary source of funding where definitely like shocked and trying to figure everything out right now. But we see things optimistically waste evenings as way every structure and reshape our organization. Our company, Bunce says her main priority is to keep publishing and to maintain the papers independence from the university. The daily target was founded in eighteen sixty nine it's the second oldest college newspaper.

marijuana Bill MTA Senate WNYC Steve Sweeney Butte county Morita California NPR Japan Buchanan district New York Nikkei Bunce Karen rouse New Jersey editor in chief
"karen rouse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:58 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Jersey. Reporter Karen rouse is with us to discuss where the state stands on recreational marijuana, and why race has been a sticking point. Karen, welcome to the takeaway. Thank you, Dan Zena. So let's start with the basics. What is the state of pot in New Jersey today? What's legal, and what isn't so New Jersey has medical marijuana? That's been legal for about a decade, but they wanted to make recreational marijuana legal and the idea behind the stated purpose behind that has been that they want to address disparities in arrests between blacks and whites and Brown people. So in New Jersey, according to the ACLU black people are arrested at as much as three times or more the rate of white people from marijuana use low level possession or distribution. Even though usage rates are similar. So advocates have said that they want to legalize and that would take away the ability of law enforcement to target black people with these arrests. Of course, Murphy has also talked about this being a big revenue raiser and a job creator. I'd love for if you could explain to us what the sticking points are for both parties on this issue. Because at first glance, given what you just described it feels like it could be something that's good for business, and for some sort of criminal Justice reform if you will. Will. So how partisan of an issue has this become the division is not so much partisan as it is probably more on moral grounds. Because when you look at how it breaks down you have older black legislators, you have younger black legislators. You have some white legislators who are very much against this people have very deep personal beliefs long held beliefs personal convictions about this. And it's not something that they are easily willing to give up. You know? It's not like something where you can say. Like, hey, if you support me, you know, we'll give you something for your district. This is a very personal to them. And it's interesting because you have that argument that this will be something that helps black people from those who are advocating. But then some of those older black legislators or those who are opposed they come from some of the most hardest hit urban areas in New Jersey places that have been hit hard by the war on drugs, and they see this as something that will create more harm to those neighborhoods. That already are hit with alcohol or tha. Tobacco ads. They don't want to see cannabis businesses in their downtown. They feel like it will create more addicts. So there's a real split there. What about younger legislators are? They in favor of it is this more generational divide. I think as a whole, you know, the young people are a little bit more accepting, but I have seen younger legislators who are opposed to this now on the Republican side. You know, there is some opposition more on the tax issue. They feel like the taxes too high to really run out the black market, but other than that, I see more of this being a moral issue. The entire assembly is up for election member. So they're concerned about how they're how they're voters are going to look at this if they support it. So there are a lot of issues at play here in terms of the morality. I mean New Jersey's also state that that allows a certain amount of gambling. They're doing a lot of online gambling. So how does that morality play play out with the citizens of New Jersey? Well, I think the thing is that you know, if you're talking about gambling. You can just pick yourself up and go to the place where there is gambling. Whereas with marijuana legalization, it's really going to impact life. Whether you are a user or not, you know, there will be businesses that are set up marijuana cafes. For example in the downtown. There will be marijuana advertising. The Bill allows for that during certain hours on your television. So it's something that people are concerned will more infiltrate their life. There's a lot of concern about young people. You know, we know that facing is up among young people. There's this concern that making it legal sends the message to them that. Oh, it's okay to do it now that it's legalized and they're very much concerned about that. Karen governor Phil Murphy has called this or he wants to make this a quote, social Justice issue. What does he mean by that? I wanted to say that that term is not really a neutral term, that's term. That's really been used by advocates of marijuana legalization. Folks, like, the ACLU civil rights organizations use that term because they see it as an opportunity to mitigate the damage from all those arrests. You know, you get an arrest on your record. It's very difficult to get a job. It's very difficult to find housing and Murphy has framed this campaign to legalize marijuana as one that will sort of remove the the discrimination the targeting by law enforcement. But you know, that's a term that I've seen in the last couple weeks as this vote came closer yesterday. I've seen a lot of pushback on that. And some of it is from the black legislators who feel like this is not a social Justice. They feel like this is something that's going to harm their communities more. I'm speaking with WNYC's New Jersey reporter Karen rouse about the latest stumbling block for marijuana legalization in New Jersey. Karen, we need to talk about race. Obviously. Let's take a listen to governor Murphy from a press conference. You were out. The fact is given what we know. Now this week alone more than six hundred new Jerseyans, the majority of home will be persons of color will be arrested for marijuana possession. And we'll have a criminal record that will hurt their prospects of getting a job. We're getting an education. Karen, this is something that we hear quite a bit particularly when it comes to marijuana. Reform and legalization that communities of color were disproportionately impacted continued to be disproportionately impacted by the criminality of things like marijuana, whereas white communities tend to sort of skate under the radar there. What's your response to that? The problem really Tanzi not is not marijuana. It is that there seems to be some sort of targeting in the way the arrests are happening. There seems to be some sort of discrimination. That's playing out. That's the reason. Black people around people are being arrested at higher rates, and so one of my questions to governor Murphy was what else are you doing to try to stop that to close that gap is marijuana legalization the only way because this is a law enforcement issue. I want to know what other things are being done to address that Karen rouses. The New Jersey reporter for WNYC and she's been covering the effort to legalize marijuana in New Jersey. Karen, thanks for being with us. Thank you tansy. Coming up. We're talking about the new federal ban on bump stocks and a hunger strike protesting gun violence in Miami. But we're also watching another story the impact of gun violence on mental health. This is in the news after to parkland students and the father of a sandy hook victims reportedly died by suicide tomorrow on the show. We'll talk to experts about the.

marijuana New Jersey Karen governor Phil Murphy Karen Karen rouse reporter governor Murphy ACLU WNYC Dan Zena Brown cannabis Miami Jerseyans
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Plan. The proposal would charge drivers entering Manhattan below sixty. I treat official. Say the plan could bring in a billion dollars a year, which would go to the MTA. Susan leeann Eddie lives on ninety sixth street and attended yesterday's forum. She says she's concerned about traffic increasing in our neighborhood and wants to know how the MTA will spend the money a massive amount of money. They're talking about another additional tax on living here. And is it really going to have the effect that they say well, governor Cuomo said he would like to include congestion pricing in the state budget, which is due April first, but it's currently does not support needed to pass the state legislature a Bill to legalize recreational marijuana in New Jersey's head to a vote in the state legislature. It's unclear there. Whether there's enough support WNYC's Karen rouse says democratic governor Phil Murphy's going to be spending his time trying to get support ahead of the vote. He's reaching out to legislators, but he's also reaching out to faith leaders. He's talking about what this duck for social Justice trying to sway them over Murphy's fellow. Democrats. Senate president Steve Sweeney says he'll also be on the phones to get support for the measure the vote is scheduled. For monday. And if you missed that big gorgeous moon visible in the sky early this morning, you still have more time to see it. Nasa says the third and last superman of two thousand nineteen will be visible tonight. Just in time for the spring equinox. The moon reached its closest points earth yesterday afternoon, but won't be completely full until nine forty three. Tonight. A super moon is when the orbit of the moon brings it into the closest approach with earth during a full moon, sunny skies today, highs near fifty two degrees right now, thirty nine degrees in New York..

Phil Murphy MTA Susan leeann Eddie governor Cuomo Manhattan Steve Sweeney Karen rouse official New Jersey Senate Nasa marijuana New York president thirty nine degrees fifty two degrees billion dollars
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"FOX entertainment business closed this morning. The deal gives Disney control of the studios behind FOX programs such as the Simpsons and X men industry. Analysts say the purchase allows Disney to launch its streaming service Disney plus later this year, Disney and FOX are corporate sponsors of NPR. This is NPR news. And this is WNYC in New York. Good morning. I'm Richard Hake. State legislators in the Senate and assembly passed a Bill that greatly expands. The number of speed cameras near city schools and the hours in which they operate WNYC's. Stephen Nessin reports the new Bill increases the number of cameras from one hundred and forty two seven hundred and fifty and they'll be on from six AM to ten PM on weekdays the previous school camera. Bill expired last year when the Republican controlled Senate failed to renew it. Governor Cuomo and mayor de Blasio worked out in a -mergency measure to get the camera's turned back on before the school year started last fall drivers who are photographic seeding. The speed limit by more than ten miles an hour face a fifty dollar fine. The new camera law expires in twenty twenty two New York. Lawmakers have agreed to spend forty million dollars to help the census, but as community organizations await governor Cuomo's final figure, they say the state is already behind schedule. W S H Charles lane has. More Cuomo says he's waiting for a report from a state commission before you offers a final number. But he also says the budget is tight and there's no new revenue coming in Nova Miller is leading the census initiative for the association for a better New York. She says California started last year and has already dedicated three times as much as New York. We're behind the curve is forty million enough. Probably not Miller says the money will go towards marketing and also door to door canvassing by community organizations to persuade New Yorkers who may be mistrustful of government a Bill to legalize recreational marijuana in New Jersey is headed to a vote in the legislature. But it's unclear whether there's enough to support it WNYC's. Karen rouse has democratic governor Phil Murphy's going to be spending. A lot of time whipping up support ahead of the vote which is currently scheduled for Monday reaching out to legislators, but he's also reaching out to faith leaders. He's talking about what this spill dot for social Justice trying to sway them over. In addition to legalization the Bill includes measures to expand. Medical marijuana and the expunging of criminal records for people previously convicted of marijuana possession, Murphy's, fellow Democrats. Senate president Steve Sweeney says he'll also be hitting the phones to wrangle support for the measure.

Governor Cuomo New York Bill WNYC Disney Senate FOX marijuana FOX entertainment Phil Murphy Nova Miller NPR New Jersey Richard Hake Steve Sweeney Stephen Nessin Karen rouse
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At least three people. President Trump is expected to meet one of his big fans today, the president of Brazil, Jade Wilson auto NPR's, Philip brave says the crisis in Venezuela will be high on their agenda a full army captain from the far right's took power in Brazil, January as an outspoken admirers of Donald Trump. The two mentioned many of the same views the same hardball campaign tactics on the same habit of posting incendiary tweets for years leftists, Brazilian governments viewed Washington with suspicion Bolsonaro set out to change that yesterday. He became the first Brazilian president to visit the CIA headquarters today, he's due to be Trump at the White House among other things they'll discuss regime change in Venezuela. Both the leading players in the international campaign to oust President Nicolas Peduto which began eight weeks ago, it is yet to succeed despite Venezuela's economic collapse for NPR news. This is NPR. This is WNYC in New York. I'm Richard Hake. The man charged with killing the reputed mob boss of the Gambino crime family came to his court hearing with slogans written on his hand proclaiming his support for President Trump. Anthony Kamala was arrested Saturday in New Jersey. He's charged with killing Francesco Cali last week in front of his home before a hearing in Tom's river camello, flashed his left handed journalists on it scrawled pro-trump phrases, including maga- forever. An abbreviation of the president's campaign slogan. A package of bills to legalize recreational marijuana cleared Senate and assembly committees in Trenton last night WNYC's. Karen rouse reports more than one hundred people turned out for the meetings, and many waited as long as six hours before they began. That's because what could become New Jersey's marijuana legalization law with being drafted in a mad scramble behind the scenes lawmakers the governor's office and staff raced to fix issues like how to tax the flower or address the meat. Of people currently in jail on we charges by eight fifteen pm the committee's approved bills to tax wheat at forty two dollars an ounce and clear any prior convictions for possession and feeling up to five pounds of marijuana. Opponents said the Bill would add to an already depraved society. It could come up for a vote before the full legislature as early as Monday, a Staten Island activists who climbed the base of the statue of liberty to protest immigration policy will face no prison time, a federal judge in Manhattan, sentenced Therese, Patricia Kumo today to five years probation and two hundred hours of community service for the incident last July fourth she was convicted last year of trespass disorderly conduct and interference with agency functions. She entered the Manhattan federal courthouse today with clear tape over her eyes and mouth in a white headband that Red.

President Trump Venezuela NPR Bolsonaro President Nicolas Peduto marijuana president Brazil Patricia Kumo New Jersey Anthony Kamala Manhattan federal courthouse Philip brave Jade Wilson Richard Hake Francesco Cali Manhattan Karen rouse WNYC
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:08 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Longtime New Jersey assemblyman, Michael Patrick Carroll is known as one of the more conservative and outspoken members of the state legislature. Now, the Republican is retiring from Trenton, but plans to run for a seat in the Morris county government WNYC's Karen rouse reports. The Democrats are hoping that changes in the county will work against him in two thousand and eight New Jersey lawmakers voted on a resolution that would have the state officially apologize for slavery, Carol opposed the measure, in fact, he said black people should be grateful for slavery because it eventually resulted in them getting American citizenship. He then went on to NPR and defended his views to host Michelle Martin, something that you were quoted in an article as saying that if slavery was the price that a modern Americans ancestors had to pay in order to make one in American when should get down on one's knees every single day. And thank the Lord that such price was paid. Did were you quoted accurately and didn't really believe that. That I wrote it. So that he couldn't get it wrong. The next couple Carol went on to say that as the descendant of Irish immigrants. He benefited from his ancestors being forced out of Ireland reached by phone this week, Carol stood by his comments being an American is a huge benefit. And if your ancestors had to pay a high price to get to that. I mean, many of them fought like hell to get here. Chip Robinson is chairman of the Morris county democratic committee has been one of the most right wing members of our legislature for many many years, but not for long Carol is retiring he says, he's tired of being in the legislative minority. And he's running for Morris county surrogate that's the county official who oversees wills estates and guardianship issues. But Democrats like Robinson are hoping Morris counties, increasing diversity and a shrinking number of Republicans in the area will send Carroll the way of another local GOP fixture. Former congressman Rodney freeling highs. The elections have gotten a lot more competitive. And I just there's election for surrogate will be very capacity. As well. Ronald Phillips chairs the Morris county Republican committee, he declined to comment on Carol slavery argument or to endorse him this early in the campaign cycle, but he says Republicans of the county are in good shape, having swept most of November local elections, so far Carol is the only Republican who has announced plans to seek the surrogates position. But there is still time. The filing deadline is April. First, Karen, rouse, WNYC news. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Michigan state university's failure to protect students and athletes apparently extends well beyond the Larry Nassar scandal over sexual assault. The US department of education says that in a new report it shows. Michigan State University repeatedly failed to report of a riot of crimes as required. Michigan radio's Kate wells is covering this story. Good morning hasty. I guess we should note. This is not strictly about crime. It is looking at a failure by the university or university officials to report crimes that they heard about what happened. Well, so yes, it is about reporting. But the report points out here as well that when it is a matter of students and athletes and even minors going to people who work for the university coaches administrators trainers insane in the case of Larry Nassar. Hey, I think this is sexy. Abuse. If those people don't report it or don't even know that they should report it you're basically able to let a serial sexual predator get away with it for twenty years. And that's that's what this report found. Wow. And so we have the Larry Nassar example, this horrifying example, involving many many women and people who are even girls at the time. But does it go beyond Nassar himself when we talk about crimes that were not reported? It does go beyond Nassar. This report not only finds new instances in which additional athletes that we didn't even know about until now had reported Larry Nassar to as high up as an associate athletic director as recently as twenty sixteen. It also finds that when there are other kinds of primes growing going on like burglaries or robberies MSU did not do what it's federally required to do. Which is let the campus. No that there could be an ongoing safety threat here. Oh, I should have at least I don't know what Senate Email around and said, by the way, we have a security situation, which is something that happens in many workplaces. Yeah. In twenty thirteen to give you an. Example, there was a rash of burglaries happening, and nobody could figure out how it was going on somebody who was getting into campus dorm rooms that were locked the insane anything, and it turns out later that the suspect had actually master key sat, and that's how this person was getting into rooms. But as each victim didn't know that this was ongoing the police were just responding individually there. There was no warning on campus. I'm trying to think about why it would be that various coaches or other campus officials would fail to report. I remember with the Larry Nassar case, there were people who just didn't quite believe that this esteemed and respected. Doctor could be doing the things that he was accused of of doing. But that can't be the case all the time. What are some other reasons that people would not spread the word? These are great questions Steve. And I think the report raises that specifically the, you know, the most damning terms that they use in here and our federal terms that sound really boring to us, but they're big deal in terms of federal funding lack of. Of institutional control lack of capability to essentially follow the federal regulations, and this this could have real serious implications for Michigan State University, which gets four hundred and twenty three million dollars a year in federal funding. I think you also said in passing earlier some people maybe didn't know is that really true. There were people who didn't know they were required to do something. So this report definitely finds that. There was not a good system for letting essentially mandatory reporters know that the they were mandatory reporters, and how do you know, what to do when that happens when they get a report, but it even found you know, we were talking about the incident in two thousand sixteen a former athlete calls up her strength and conditioning. Coach says Larry Nassar touched me.

Larry Nassar Carol Morris county Nassar Michigan state university NPR Karen rouse Michael Patrick Carroll Steve Inskeep New Jersey Morris county Republican commi Michelle Martin Trenton WNYC US department of education Chip Robinson Ireland Rachel Martin Michigan Ronald Phillips
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Annual women's March just like in two thousand seventeen the March was organized to protest President Donald Trump and to advocate for women's rights. LGBTQ rights immigrant rights and more. Most of the early rivals and freedom plaza have come bearing signs in support of these issues and many are wearing the pink hats that have become a signature of the annual women's March. Perfect Ellis NPR news. From washington. You're listening to NPR news. And this is WNYC in New York. I'm David I New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy's top attorney says he didn't tell the governor about assault allegations against a state official until after the story became public WNYC's. Karen rouse reports chief counsel, Matt Platt Kim says he believed the female state employees when she told him last March that she was raped by her colleague out Alvarez plaque and told the legislative committee investigating the matter that he told Alvarez he had to leave his job with the administration. But he didn't tell the governor or push for an investigation, and he didn't try to stop Alvarez from pursuing a job at Rutgers Alvarez left his state job last October. But only after the Wall Street Journal called about Katie Brennan's allegation. Platt Kim testified Friday that Alvarez denied the rape allegation and never applied for the job at Rutgers more than a year since New York City. Promised to hand out more violations to restaurants that use e bikes delivery workers are the ones taking the hit Gotham missed editor Christopher Robin says when it announced the crackdown in two thousand seventeen the de Blasio administration promised to target employers at the top of the food chain. What actually happened is? You know, the police ended up giving three times as many tickets to individual cyclists as they did to businesses over. The course of two thousand eighteen a spokesman for the mayor's office did not respond to Gotham request for comment next week. The city council is holding hearings on a package of bills that would legalize all e bikes and e scooters despite current restrictions in state law. The governor's office has recently proposed allowing local control on the issue. New Jersey has declared a state of emergency effective at noon today, while New York City officials have issued a hazardous travel advisory that goes into effect this evening..

Rutgers Alvarez Matt Platt Kim WNYC NPR Donald Trump New York City New Jersey New York Gotham Wall Street Journal President washington city council Rutgers Karen rouse Ellis Katie Brennan chief counsel assault
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"If we can get it done through the budget fine. There's lots of revenue questions if we get it done through freestanding legislation fine. The people of New York state just want us to get the work done that citizens budget commission. Expressed concern that komo's plans for increased spending are based on rosy economic projections that don't take into account the possibility of a downturn in New Jersey Governor, Phil Murphy, gave his first state of the state speech, but WNYC's Karen rouse says Murphy spend much of yesterday looking back on the year that was think most people were expecting to hear some new policy priorities rather than a roundup of this year's press releases. So they may have to look towards his budget address in March fifth also worth noting. There was no mention of the sexual assault scandal that has pretty much rock to the administration in recent months. Murphy press lawmakers to act on legislation that would fulfill to his central campaign promises raising the state's minimum wage to fifteen dollars an hour and legalizing recreational marijuana of federal judge in New York has struck down the Trump administration's attempt to add a question about citizenship to the census in New York southern district court yesterday. The judge said the question would be constitutional but commerce secretary Wilbur Ross did not follow proper procedure in adding. Several cities and states, including New York is joining immigrant rights groups to bring the case against the Trump administration the arguing that the question when discourage immigrants firm participating in the census. Support for NPR comes from WNYC members. And from indeed used by over three million businesses for hiring where employers can post.

New York Phil Murphy Trump administration WNYC New Jersey Wilbur Ross komo assault NPR Karen rouse marijuana fifteen dollars
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thousand performances of the musical. Hello dolly. She died this morning in California at the age of ninety seven. This is NPR news from Washington. This is WNYC from New York. I'm Richard Hake. Governor Cuomo unveils his proposed budget for the coming year today. WNYC's Fred mogul says the roughly one hundred fifty billion dollar plan will spill out how to pay for some of his ambitious agenda. Cuomo says he wants to legalize marijuana, but he's been vague on where the tax revenues would go. Now, I'll have to say how much marijuana officials expect to be bought and sold when the law takes effect, and how the state plans to spend what's likely to be a multimillion dollar windfall. Lawmakers and transit officials will also learn how Cuomo wants to pay for much-needed MTA repairs and education advocates. We'll be looking closely at what the governor proposes for school funding on the surface the legislature supports Cuomo's agenda, but many individual lawmakers say they'll stand up to Cuomo. If he proposes spending too much or too little New Jersey Governor, Phil Murphy also delivers his state of the state address today, the speeches so. Supposed to lay out the governor's priorities for the new year. But as WNYC's Karen rouse reports repairing his relationship with the legislature might be the governor's biggest challenge Murphy's signature campaign promises. Legalizing weed and raising the minimum wage to fifteen dollars an hour fell flat. When he couldn't see eye to eye with state Senate president Steve Sweeney, Bridget Harrison is a political science professor at Montclair state university. She says when it comes to relationship building Murphy could stand a lesson from his predecessor Republican Governor, Chris Christie who within days of getting elected reached out to the Democrats Sweeney. And he said, let's well for steak dinner, you know, I'm buying and let's figure out how we can work together. Harrison said an overture to Sweeney in Tuesday speech could go a long way for the governor. And both New York and New Jersey speeches will be streamed live on our website this afternoon at two o'clock, WNYC dot org. Congressman Josh got Heimer says he's working with local health departments in his northern New Jersey district to increase food. Inspections and help plug the gap during the fourth week of the federal government shutdown the food and Drug administration has had to scale back on most of it's routine. Inspections. Got Heimer says he spoke with the FDA Commissioner about how local governments get involved. He could really use the help right now from AllState facilities for all states extra effort, how close the gap where there is a Foyt for food safety inspection. The FDA says it will resume inspections for risky foods such as cheese produce an infant formula as early as today a mostly sunny day today. Highs near thirty eight degrees right now, it is twenty six degrees with fair skies in New York support for NPR comes from WNYC members.

Governor Cuomo WNYC Phil Murphy Congressman Josh got Heimer Steve Sweeney New York New Jersey Bridget Harrison NPR Fred mogul marijuana FDA California Richard Hake Montclair state university Washington AllState Chris Christie Karen rouse
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the way to come out to this floor and talk about a meeting in a manner that did not take place in there. Is disturbing to me despite Trump's claims of Republican solidarity over the border wall demands, at least three GOP senators say they support reopening the government while the talks continue stocks finished modestly higher on Wall Street extending a four day winning streak. The Dow rose ninety one points up four tenths of a percent. This is NPR. And you're listening to WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd in New Jersey too key members of governor Murphy's administration say they knew of allegations that a Murphy aid had raped a fellow staffer while they both worked on the governor's two thousand seventeen campaign, but they say they let others handle the situation. WNYC's? Karen rouse reports at a legislative hearing in Trenton, the governor's deputy chief counsel paramount guard testified he didn't push for an investigation when Katie Brennan told him she'd been raped because he figured his boss would handle it. Meanwhile, a camp. Pain lawyer never followed up to make sure that the alleged perpetrator out Alvarez left. The state payroll is planned the aid Jonathan Burke on said, he figured the administration would handle it. Michael Critchley, the attorney leading the legislators probe said there was too much finger pointing everybody points someplace else. Don't talk to me talk to the campaign. Don't talk to me talk to the state. It turned out Alvarez remained in office until October mayor de Blasio announced legislation today that would guarantee, hey, leave to an estimated five hundred thousand employees citywide if it passes in the New York City council businesses with more than five employees would have to pay their workers for up to ten days off per year. The Blasios says he believes the legislation would actually benefit businesses making for a stronger workforce. Overall, we think it will lead to employees who are more rested who are more effective or more accurate who have better, morale, etc. The proposal is expect. To meet with considerable opposition. However, Catherine wild of the business group partnership for New York City said the plan could strain small business owners and immigrant entrepreneurs who she says already face rising rents and online competition and after more than thirty years of moving from theater to theater, the off Broadway theatre company MCC is getting a building of its own Robert LuPone, one of MCC's artistic directors was emotional. Add today's opening of the thirty eight million dollar, Robert W Wilson theater space in midtown. The first time in our history. We are home. The theater on west fifty second street contains two stages and will open with its first show the light on January twenty third tonight, mostly cloudy dropping to around thirty two degrees. Currently forty one degrees and partly cloudy in.

Michael Critchley governor Murphy Alvarez New York City Robert W Wilson theater MCC Jonathan Burke Katie Brennan Trump Blasios GOP NPR Catherine wild New Jersey Jamie Floyd Karen rouse Pain Trenton Robert LuPone deputy chief
"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"karen rouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Metre-plus taking a shot at Republicans for chipping away at healthcare. The mayor says the city is doing just the opposite. When this is fully implemented. It will be the most comprehensive health system in the nation. NYC care will launch this summer in the Bronx, but won't be available citywide for another two years altogether. The city aims to cover some six hundred thousand New Yorkers to key members of governor Phil Murphy's administration say new of allegations that Murphy aid had raped a fellow staffer while they both worked on the governor's twenty seventeen campaign. But they say they let others handle the situation. WNYC's? Karen rouse reports at a legislative hearing in Trenton, the governor's deputy chief counsel paramount guard testified he didn't push for an investigation when Katie Brennan told him she'd been raped because he figured his boss would handle it. Meanwhile, a campaign lawyer never followed up to make sure that the alleged perpetrator. Al Alvarez left. The state payroll is planned the aid Jonathan Burke on said, he figured the administration would handle it. Michael Critchley, the attorney leading the legislatures probe said there was too much finger pointing everybody points someplace else. Don't talk to me talk to the campaign. Don't talk to me talk to the state. It turned out Alvarez remained in office until October. The number of measles cases in Brooklyn and Rockland county are continuing to climb Rockland county reports there are now one hundred five reported cases that's up from ninety month ago in Brooklyn, fifty five cases have been confirmed more than half of those are in borough park, while twenty others are in Williamsburg, two cases, have been confirmed in Benson hurston Midwood health officials in New York City are urging anyone travelling to Israel where there's currently an outbreak of measles to get vaccinated. Anyone who has the virus will be contagious for four days before and four days after a rash becomes visible?.

New York City Al Alvarez Rockland county Michael Critchley Phil Murphy Brooklyn Katie Brennan Jonathan Burke Karen rouse Bronx deputy chief Williamsburg Trenton Benson Israel attorney four days ninety month two years
Suicide Bomber Kills 3 at Libya’s Foreign Ministry, Officials Say

BBC Newshour

00:46 sec | 3 years ago

Suicide Bomber Kills 3 at Libya’s Foreign Ministry, Officials Say

"Sooner army that devastated. Parts of Java and Sumatra on Saturday four hundred twenty nine people are confirmed dead. Some hush me reports. Heavy rains are hampering rescue efforts with one hundred and fifty people still reported missing. The government has now tone its attention on providing relief to thousands of people who have lost their homes. Several centers have been set up to collect food and clothing. It is unclear when the new system will be installed. But if twenty eighteen has shown anything it's thought in a country at SAS meekly active as Indonesia it is much needed. Samia? Hush me, the Tunisia and journalists has died after setting himself on fire apparently in protest at worsening economic conditions in a video published before his death Abderazek Sergei said he was planning to act on behalf of the people of the western city of Cathrine, and he described as having no means of subsistence thousands of protesters took to the city streets and clashed with police on Monday night. Well, news from the BBC. This is WNYC in New York. I'm Richard Hake. With governor Cuomo in state legislative leaders voicing support for legal marijuana. Supporters of the move are sticking out positions on shaping the Bill in the new year. Donna Lieberman from the New York. Civil Liberties Union would like to state to decriminalize marijuana for everyone above age eighteen we know alcohol prohibition, simply forces drinking underground and rather than ensuring commit crimes over to get access to marijuana. We should not repeat the mistakes of the past. The governor lawmakers so far favor in age cutoff of twenty one county. Health officials across New York oppose legalizing marijuana for medical and behavioral reasons, but they say if the state's going to do it. Anyway, the law should at least direct some of the tax revenue tour programs that monitor the effects of long term, use New Jersey spends about three point four billion dollars a year on health care for eight hundred thousand public employees and retirees and that's expected to climb in the new year as WNYC. Karen rouse reports. Governor Phil Murphy is pushing for savings Murphy state health benefits task force says plan administrators should help employees manage diseases or other chronic conditions that keep them from landing back in the hospital. And there needs to be better use of data Hetty Rosenstein is the state director for the communications workers of America, and a member of the task force evaluate what the spend was charging more on what your outcomes which are better and with what's out of network, and what is in network all of those things you have to really evaluate the task force also called for an increase access to mental health services

Marijuana New York Wnyc Governor Cuomo Abderazek Sergei New Jersey Samia Phil Murphy Hetty Rosenstein Karen Rouse Indonesia Richard Hake Tunisia Civil Liberties Union Donna Lieberman BBC Cathrine Director