17 Burst results for "Karen Musalo"

"karen musalo" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

04:58 min | 5 months ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Are here because you are there with your financial support, especially In these tough times. If you are doing okay, please pledge for somebody who is not. Russian President Vladimir Putin today congratulated Joe Biden on winning the presidential election. The Kremlin had said earlier that Putin would hold off until the winner was officially confirmed. Putin said he's ready for interaction and contact with Biden. Mexico's president under this, Manuel Lopez Obrador also congratulated Biden. He also said he had waited until the electoral college vote before writing to Biden and Mexican columnist and former diplomat described Lopez Obrador's letter as rather cool and stand offish. The letter also held out a seeming tentative offer that Mexico might continue to act to stop. Central American migrants were fleeing poverty or persecution from Reaching the U. S, which it did under the Trump administration. And there has been no such request from the incoming Biden administration. Also, congratulations from Brazil's gyre both sonar. Oh, he was sometimes dubbed the Trump of the tropics. He tweeted his greetings to Biden and said he hopes the U. S. Continues to be quote the land of the free and the home of the brave. What did you do that well. The Trump Administration issued sweeping asylum rules last week to strip what remains of existing protections for refugees seeking asylum in this country. Immigrant defense advocates say they intend to challenge the administration's latest attempt to gut a silent protections with litigation. Before Joe Biden assumes the presidency. Chrisley filed this report the new rules bar women fleeing domestic violence or rape and LGBT two persons fleeing persecution from seeking asylum in the United States. The rules also reject asylum claims from immigrants threatened by gangs and nearly any asylum seeker who's been residing in the United States for more than a year. Karen Musalo is director of the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at UC Hastings College of Law. So the Trump administration has really tried to totally shut down immigration across the board but again focusing on asylum seekers. They really tried to end any possibility that people fleeing persecution could make it into the U. S and qualify for protection. This is an administration that does that It's coming to an end, and it's trying to do as much, Dan Midge and lock is many things in place as it possibly can. The rules were released last week as final scheduled to go into effect January 11th you know, nine days before the inauguration of a new president, the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies, is one of three immigrant defense groups. Who together plan to mount a legal challenge against the Trump administration's latest asylum restrictions. New, Salo says If their legal challenge is successful, it could buy some time for the next presidential administration to roll back these policies. Many of the Trump administration's asylum rule changes have been previously stayed by the courts. Last month, U. S District Judge Susan Illston in San Francisco granted a preliminary injunction to prevent the federal government from implementing a rule that would bar people who are previously arrested from seeking asylum in the United States. Kate Mahoney is litigation director of Dolores Street Community Service is one of the four groups that successfully challenged that rule, even in an administration that's trying to really push through these regulations quickly we see in this year that that takes, you know 10 12. In some cases longer, even more months, and so they're trying to get these regulations into place so that when the new administration comes in, it will take a lot of time and a lot of effort and a lot of will within the administration to actually take on that project and undo these changes, while directors and executive orders issued by the Trump administration can be handling overturned By the incoming Joe Biden administration, such as the executive order issued in March, temporarily halting asylum under the pretext of preventing community spread of coronavirus. Mahoney says policy changes have more power and will require greater political will to reverse. Immigrant rights groups say conversations have begun with the Biden Harris transition team to reinstate due process rights for people fleeing persecution. Observers say many who flee Central American countries like El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras have reasons that a rooted in American interventionist foreign policy I'm Chris Lee, reporting for KPFK. Have fun..

Trump Administration Joe Biden Biden administration Vladimir Putin Biden Harris president United States Manuel Lopez Obrador Center for Gender and Refugee Mexico director Kate Mahoney KPFK Brazil Judge Susan Illston U. S Salo
"karen musalo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:49 min | 6 months ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Okay, then. Okay. I remember Rambo close. Yeah, very with them. I don't bother anyone. No man in his own like that. I don't understand. Muster. All right, put me on the lady. Oh, little No bet it is like that of my most me on the letter. The letter is that human Independent man live. Mm. I may sell my dad getting messed up. You bet it is only like that up, man. Sam posted. All right, let's do a little better. Chambliss. Mm. Myself. It would be my documents getting their message tomorrow. You know what happened? There must be Oh, Damn bro. No better later. He does nothing. He said. He said I'll give up heaven time. Let me spy story up. Stacy, Let me smoke one God like that. My London for me. Begins by one by one. I'm gonna be there. Look out for me. Oh, I see. Am I got something way. Bc Lamis my daughter. Oh, my God. Oh, my God. How much? You don't love me? I got you by Thanks, honey. Yeah, Like you never saw me play PC? Yes. One day, old man. Don't touch me. Yeah. Yeah, but I always see you. Yeah, but what about later? I don't get that then my boy, Tommy. You okay? Exit doors knowing they say's one dozen commas mostly got mass body that Karen Musalo Rolo community take. Oh, yeah, next single..

"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:50 min | 10 months ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Leader, a crowd of demonstrators around the outside of the Capitol building in Hartford. He opposed a bill aimed at lifting the current protection afforded police officers from civil suits unless they've engaged in willful and wanton conduct. Retired Sergeant Andrew Matthews is executive director of the Police union. Every single cop in the state should not have to worry about being arrested and prosecuted or being financially bankrupt because they're doing a job for the employer. One author of the bill says the measure would incentivize municipalities. To shed officers that use excessive force for NPR news. I'm Frankie Graciano. That's congressional Lawmakers wrangle over details of a proposed new round of Corona virus relief for jobless Americans. White House has dropped its plan to cut Social Security payroll taxes. The attacks could have been opposed by some top Senate Republicans on Wall Street. Today, the Dow was down 353 points. This is NPR. Live from KTVT News. I'm Devin Katayama, a San Francisco refugee legal centre is applauding a Canadian courts decision striking down an agreement that sends asylum seekers back to the U. S. If they show up at the Canadian border. As his immigration editor, Tiki Hendrix reports the court found conditions in U. S immigration detention are inhumane and violate people's rights. Since 2004 Canada has returned asylum seekers who first passed through the U. S because the United States is a so called safe third country. But the Federal Court of Canada ruled this week that the U. S. Is not safe for people seeking refuge from persecution. That's because immigration authorities here lock up asylum seekers, sometimes without heat, food or medical care, and with very little access to legal help. Karen Musalo, who directs the San Francisco based Center for Gender and Refugee Studies, testified in the case. And she said the ruling should be a quote. Wake up call about conditions in the US asylum system. I'm Tiki Hendrix. The news. The Alameda chief of police, Paul Real, Eri is planning to step down. His resignation comes three months after Alameda police officers arrested a black man for dancing and exercising in the street. The rest was caught on video. I miss White is the lead organizer of a C L U people Power in Alameda. He says The chief's resignation allows the city to move forward and making a decision. He creates space for our community to now re imagine our public health. And wellness and now to examine the police department and its budget with the more anti racist you In a statement, Relayrides said it was the appropriate time to move on. And Giulio. I'm Devin Katayama for the news. Support for NPR comes from Heather,.

Devin Katayama Alameda KTVT News Tiki Hendrix NPR United States San Francisco White Police union Center for Gender and Refugee Sergeant Andrew Matthews Karen Musalo Federal Court of Canada Frankie Graciano Hartford Senate White House executive director Canada
"karen musalo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:39 min | 2 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Show governor Cuomo opposed mayor de Blasios proposal for a millionaire to fund the MTA, but we have a millionaires tax. It's the second highest in the United States of America. So he's afraid people believe the state unless you want to be sitting in this state where it's me and you and for listeners on next program, mayor de Blasio joins us murders. Friday segment the Brian Lehrer show at ten AM on WNYC. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene at NPR west in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC, President Trump left little doubt that a cancelled flight for house speaker Nancy Pelosi was an act of reprisal one day after Pelosi suggested delaying the state of the union speech. The president called off her secret military flight to Afghanistan. Other government flights are continuing amid a partial government shutdown Pelosi. It said the state of the union speech should be delayed because it is a high security event and key security officials are off work or going unpaid needless to say, none of this addresses, the substance of reopening, the government or the presidential demand for a wall that triggered it. NPR? Congressional reporter Kelsey Snell has here for the latest version of groundhog day. Kelsey good morning. How did this story unfold yesterday? Well, we congressional reporters and people in the capital found out the policy was going on this trip in the letter from. The president saying that he was cancelling the trip that's partially because most of the time these kinds of congressional trips particularly towards owns like Afghanistan are not revealed beforehand security reasons. Absolutely. I was actually talking to one Senator who's been on many of these. And he told me that he's typically told the only person he can tell about the trip is his spouse. So the president Ed revealing that this trip was going to happen was really a surprise to a lot of people in fact Pelosi and the rest of the delegation headed to Afghanistan in Brussels were already on the bus to their plane one. This letter went out they had to turn back and go back to their offices. It was a total scramble, and and you reporters are some reporters were able to watch them get off the bus if I'm not yes. They watched them watch the bus leave watched the bus come back and watch them go back to the capital. It was a really remarkable team. So is the state of the union truly truly off? Well, what they need to have an invitation the president can't come and speak on the house floor where this data the union usually happens without an invitation from the speaker. And speaker Pelosi essentially rescinded that she did give the president the opportunity to submit his remarks and writing or come back after the shutdown is over she said that she doesn't have any doubt that the federal workers who secure events like this could do the job, but they should be paid to do it. Okay. So a little bit of hardball being played here. How concerned are the people around the president as the shutdown completes about four weeks here? Well, it's kind of a mixed bag. You have Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell saying that he will not vote on any spending bills to reopen the government unless less the president says he'll sign them. And he's been putting that firmly in the lap of Democrats and the president to work that out McConnell is more or less removed himself from this negotiation altogether. But that has some moderate Republicans really concerned we've seen bipartisan group trying to work together to get something done. But over and over those bipartisan groups groups that have involved Lindsey Graham of South Carolina or Susan Collins of Maine Lamar Alexander. Retiring from Tennessee, they have tried and they say that they keep hitting a wall. And that wall is the same thing. President Trump needs to be able to sign it for the majority leader to bring a Bill to the floor are people other than the president inside the administration beginning to grow alarmed about the effects of the shutdown. It's hard to tell. But one of the things that I think people may have noticed this week is that they're talking about bringing it back. I r s workers to process returns that is an effort to blunt, the impact of the shutdown and typically you these negotiations have wanted some sort of big impacts the whole point of a shutdown is to inflict pain, right because it makes people come to the negotiating table. So as they're trying to blunt, this effect it is making it. So that the shutdown. He doesn't have greater if the great effects that usually are negotiating tool, meaning the White House is realizing the political impact on the president. Who is blamed by most people for this shutdown could be getting quite serious. Yeah. I mean, the polls have shown that end. The White House seemed to be reacting to those polls Kelsey good to see a thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's Kelsey Snell. Now, the government shutdown began with President Trump vowing to stop Central American migrants with a wall along the southern border and almost a month later, there is still no agreement on that wall. But another effort to stop the flow of migrants is taking hold judges are increasingly denying them asylum under a new administration policy NPR's Joel rose has this report on one woman's case. And just a warning some parts of her story are disturbing when the young woman from Nicaragua got off the plane in south Florida. She hadn't seen her parents in more than a decade. She says they looked exactly like they did when they left their tiny Central American town to find work in the US her eyes light up as she describes their reunion at the airport on the V saddle when I saw the Iran to hug them. I felt the huge joy when I saw them again. And I knew that I was going to be here protected. We're not using the woman's name because her parents are undocumented and she's trying to get asylum. And stay in the US. She fled Nicaragua with her infant son to get away from the boys. Abusive father, finally in Florida. She felt like she had escaped his grasp. I felt safe here. I was far away. But she may not be allowed to stay in the US for long. The young woman arrived at a moment. When immigration is paralyzing American politics. The president wants to build a wall on the US Mexico border and keep asylum seekers on the other side of it. The young woman from Nicaragua has the dubious distinction of being one of the first to be denied asylum under new Trump administration policy Evelyn Cologne is her lawyer. So this is the file. And the first thing is that submit alone shows me a stack of papers more than five inches high. The file details years of sexual and physical abuse. Her client described to her had this woman's asylum hearing been held earlier by even a few weeks Cologne thinks she would have won I feel in my heart. That had this case been before. I don't be we would have had a different outcome. Even days before he what she's talking about. Here is a court ruling known as matter of AB issued last June by then attorney general Jeff Sessions who oversees immigration judges it says in most cases migrants fleeing from domestic abuse or gang violence. Do not qualify for asylum. Cologne says some judges have begun denying all domestic violence cases. I don't think they take the time to listen to the clients even in the hearing he just have their script in her hearing last June. The Nicaraguan woman told her immigration judge that her boyfriend. Increasingly violent after she got pregnant one day. She says he showed up drunk and started banging on the door. Meal. Don, I was scared because he was screaming very loud. And he was banging on the door saying open, it you're my woman you have to open he kicked the door. So many times that the door fell. The woman says her boyfriend raped her that night, she was seven months pregnant. She believes that's why her son was born prematurely a month later. Her immigration judge said he found her to be very sympathetic still he denied her request for asylum, citing the new ruling from Jeff Sessions, Mark Metcalf knows how gut wrenching these cases can be he used to be an immigration judge in Miami. It's very difficult analysis. It is not easy for the judges. I've been there. I know it's not easy to say no to people in order to get asylum in the US, you have to show that you've been persecuted because of your race, religion or other characteristics and Metcalf who is now a prosecutor in Kentucky says just being the victim of crime doesn't qualify. Head to look a person. In the eye and tell them I believe you were telling me the truth. I just don't believe your claim is rewarded with asylum based on the fact that you've given to me today after the ruling from sessions last year judges have increasingly denied asylum claims. Now, they reject nearly seventy percent of all claims, but many immigration lawyers say sessions was wrong. They say some migrants fleeing gangs and domestic violence should get asylum because their own governments did nothing to protect them. That's why the woman from Nicaragua should be allowed to stay here argues, Karen Musalo, she directs the center for gender and refugee studies in San Francisco. She suffered horrendous abuse she went to the police really to no avail and tried to escape him. And that's really the classic facts of a case that should have been granted. Back in Florida. The Nicaraguan woman picks up her son from a neighbor's apartment. He's three years old now and outgoing little kid with a patrol backpack soon after he was born. She says her boyfriend started to hit him to develop. That's when I decided to go to the police, but the police in Nicaragua never arrested the boyfriend or even talk to him. She says and the boyfriend he was furious. Male Basit gay. He told me that I was never going to leave him that I was going to be with him forever because I was his property. That's when she took her son and fled to the US, she's appealing the judge's decision in her asylum case, I asked which will do if she loses the appeal. She said she doesn't know, but she can't go back to Nicaragua. Joel rose NPR news. The African Union has advice for the Democratic Republic of Congo. The African Union is a kind of United Nations for the continent and its leaders voiced concern about Congo's disputed presidential election. They're calling on that giant country to hold off declaring final results because of doubts about the integrity of the outcome. NPR's February Quist arcton reports Congo's electoral commission declared Felix you say giving the provisional winner of the presidential vote. An announcement immediately contested by another opposition front-runner Maktum for you. He alleged vote fraud and has challenged the results in the constitutional court for you new place second, but says he won outright and has accused she said, Katie and outgoing President Joseph Kabila of agreeing a deal to squeeze him out for you has welcomed the African Union. Unusually strongly worded statement expressing grave doubts and calling for a suspension of the final. Presidential election result declaration. More. So. It's a good thing. If the goal is to get to the truth of the ballot boxes. Are you adding he believes African leaders are on the side of the Congolese people. The AU is to dispatch a high level delegation to Congo Monday to try to resolve the post election crisis and initiative, the authorities that cannot lightly. Dismiss but information minister Lamberth Mindy Omalanga says no one has the right to dictate how Congo's constitutional court should precede. Perhaps the African Union has information. We're not aware of says the minister, otherwise nothing has changed the presidential inauguration is scheduled Tuesday or Fabiola Stockton NPR. News johannesburg..

president NPR United States Nicaragua President Trump Nancy Pelosi Kelsey Snell Congo African Union Afghanistan Florida Cologne Jeff Sessions Steve Inskeep Brian Lehrer Joel rose mayor de Blasio
"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In just a few minutes from now Ted Anthony will be here with the first. Commute update of the morning. Isabella rossellini. Yes, the Isabela Rossellini is doing a circus show in San Francisco with her dog people might have just known me as a model, and so they magin that Dino aware a lot of makeup, and I only talk about facial. But I just do what is interesting to me from cosmetics to animals, I'm Brian watt linked link circus today on morning edition. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene at NPR west in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC, President Trump left little doubt that a cancelled flight for house speaker Nancy Pelosi was an act of reprisal one day after Pelosi suggested delaying the state of the union speech. The president called off her secret military flight to Afghanistan. Other government flights are continuing. I met a partial government shutdown Pelosi. It said the state of the union speech should be delayed because it is a high security event and key security officials are off work or going unpaid needless to say, none of this addresses, the substance of reopening, the government or the presidential demand for a wall that triggered it. NPR? Congressional reporter Kelsey Snell is here for the latest version of groundhog day. Kelsey good morning. How did this story unfold yesterday? Well, we congressional reporters and people in the capital found out the policy was going on this trip in the letter from the president saying that he was can't. Celing the trip that's partially because most of the time these kinds of congressional trips particularly towards sounds like Afghanistan are not revealed beforehand security reasons. Absolutely. I was actually talking to one Senator who's been on many of these. And he told me that he's typically told the only person he can tell about the trip is his spouse. So the president of revealing this trip was going to happen was really a surprise to a lot of people in fact Pelosi and the rest of the delegation headed to Afghanistan in Brussels were already on the bus to their plane one. This letter went out they had to turn back and go back to their offices. It was a total scramble, and and you reporter to some reporters were able to watch them get off the bus if I'm not yes. They watched them watch the bus leave watched the bus come back and watch them. Go back to the capital. It was a really remarkable. So is the state of the union truly truly off? Well, what they need to have an invitation the president can't come and speak on the house floor where the state of the union usually happens without an invitation from the speaker and speaker. Oh, she essentially rescinded that. She did give the president the opportunity to submit his remarks and writing or come back after the shutdown is over she said that she doesn't have any doubt that the federal workers who secure events like this could do the job, but they should be paid to do it. Okay. So a little bit of hardball being played here. How concerned are the people around the president as the shutdown completes about four weeks here? Well, it's kind of a mixed bag. You have Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell saying that he will not vote on any spending bills to reopen the government in less the president says he'll sign them. And he's been putting that firmly in the lap of Democrats and the president to work that out McConnell is more or less removed himself from this negotiation altogether. But that has some moderate Republicans really concerned we've seen bipartisan groups trying to work together to get something done. But over and over those bipartisan groups groups that have involved Lindsey Graham of South Carolina or Susan Collins of Maine Lamar Alexander Marley, retiring from Tennessee, they have tried and they say. That they keep hitting wall. And that wall is the same thing. President Trump needs to be able to sign it for the majority leader to bring a Bill to the floor are people other than the president inside the administration beginning to grow alarmed about the effects of the shutdown. It's hard to tell. But you'd one of the things that I think people may have noticed this week is that they're talking about bringing back I r s workers to process returns that is an effort to blunt, the impact of the shutdown and typically you these negotiations have wanted some sort of big impacts the whole point of a shutdown is to inflict pain, right because it makes people come to the negotiating table. So as they're trying to blunt, this effect it is making it. So that the shutdown maybe doesn't have greater if the great effects that. Usually are negotiating tool leaving the White House is realizing the political impact on the president. Who is blamed by most people for the shutdown could be getting quite serious. Yeah. I mean, the polls have shown that end. The White House seemed to be reacting to those polls Kelsey good to see it. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's. Kelsey snell. Now the government shutdown began with President Trump vowing. To stop Central American migrants with a wall along the southern border and almost a month later, there is still no agreement on that wall. But another effort to stop the flow of migrants is taking hold judges are increasingly denying them asylum under a new administration policy and peers Joel rose has this report on one woman's case. And just a warning some parts of her story are disturbing when the young woman from Nicaragua got off the plane in south Florida. She hadn't seen her parents in more than a decade. She says they looked exactly like they did when they left their tiny Central American town to find work in the US her eyes light up as she describes their reunion at the airport. Got out I saddle when I saw them. I ran to hug them. I felt the huge joy when I saw them again. And I knew that I was going to be here protected. We're not using the woman's name because her parents are undocumented, and she's trying to get Silom and stay in the US. She fled Nicaragua with her infant son to get away from the boys. Abusive father, finally in Florida. She felt like she had escaped his grasp missing I felt safe here I was far away. But she may not be allowed to stay in the US for long. The young woman arrived at a moment. When immigration is paralyzing American politics. The president wants to build a wall on the US Mexico border and keep asylum seekers on the other side of it. The young woman from Nicaragua has the dubious distinction of being one of the first to be denied asylum under a new Trump administration policy Evelyn Cologne, her lawyer. So this is the file and the first thing is that we submit alone. Shows me a stack of papers more than five inches high. The file details years of sexual and physical abuse. Her client described her had this woman's asylum hearing been held earlier by even a few weeks Cologne thinks she would have won I feel in my heart. That had this case been before. I don't be we would have had a different outcome. Even days before he what she's talking about. Here is a court ruling known as matter of AB, it was issued last June by then attorney general Jeff Sessions who oversees immigration judges it says in most cases migrants fleeing from domestic abuse or gang violence do not qualify for asylum. But Cologne says some judges have begun denying all domestic violence cases. I don't think they take the time to listen to the clients even in the hewing just have their script in her hearing last June. The Nicaraguan woman told her immigration judge that her boyfriend got increasingly violent after she got pregnant one day. She. Says he showed up drunk and started banging on the door. Melania K? Don, I was scared because he was screaming very loud. And he was banging on the door saying open, it you're my woman you have to open he kicked the door. So many times that the door fell. The woman says her boyfriend raped her that night, she was seven months pregnant. She believes that's why her son was born prematurely a month later. Her immigration judge said he found her to be very sympathetic still he denied her request Silom citing the new ruling from Jeff Sessions. Mark Metcalf knows how gut wrenching these cases can be he used to be an immigration judge in Miami. It's very difficult analysis. It is not easy for the judges. I've been there. I know it's not easy to say no to people in order to get asylum in the US, you have to show that you've been persecuted because of your race, religion or other characteristics and Metcalf who is now a prosecutor in Kentucky says just being the victim of a crime doesn't qualify to look a person. In the eye and tell them I believe you were telling me the truth. I just don't believe your claim is rewarded with asylum based on the fact that you've given to me today after the ruling from sessions last year judges have increasingly denied asylum claims. Now, they reject nearly seventy percent of all claims, but many immigration lawyers say sessions was wrong. They say some migrants fleeing gangs and domestic violence should get asylum because their own governments did nothing to protect them. That's why the woman from Nicaragua should be allowed to stay here argues, Karen Musalo, she directs the center for gender and refugee studies in San Francisco. She suffered horrendous abuse she went to the police really to no avail and tried to escape him. And that's really the classic facts of a case that should have been granted. Back in Florida. The Nicaraguan woman picks up her son from a neighbor's apartment. He's three years old now outgoing little kid with a patrol backpack soon after he was born. She says her boyfriend started to hit him two days fellow policy. That's when I decided to go to the police, but the police in Nicaragua never arrested the boyfriend or even talk to him. She says and the boyfriend he was furious. Mellon gay? He told me that I was never going to leave him that I was going to be with him forever because I was his property. That's when she took her son and fled to the US, she's appealing the judge's decision in her asylum case, I asked what she'll do if she loses the appeal. She said she doesn't know, but she can't go back to Nicaragua. Joel rose NPR news. The African Union has advice for the Democratic Republic of Congo. The African Union is a kind of United Nations for the continent and its leaders voiced concern about Congo's disputed presidential election. They're calling on that giant country to hold off declaring final results because of doubts about the integrity of the outcome. NPR's ofeibea Quist arcton reports Congo's electoral commission declared phillix she's giving the provisional winner of the presidential. Put an announcement immediately contested by another opposition from for you, he alleged vote fraud and has challenged the result in the constitutional court for you play second, but says he won outright and has accused she said gave an outgoing President Joseph Kabila of agreeing a deal to squeeze him out for you has welcomed the African Union and usually strongly worded statement expressing grave doubts and calling for a suspension of the final. Presidential election result declaration. Shows. Is to get to the troops. At the battle. Talks are you adding he believes African leaders are on the side of the Congolese people. The AU is to dispatch a high level delegation to Congo Monday to try to resolve the post election crisis and initiative, the authorities that cannot lightly dismiss but information minister Mandel. Melinda says, no one has the right to dictate how Congo's constitutional court should precede. Perhaps the African Union has information. We're not aware of says the minister, otherwise nothing has changed the presidential inauguration is scheduled Tuesday or have yet to Stockton NPR. News johannesburg. This is NPR news. Next morning.

president NPR President Trump US Nicaragua Kelsey Snell Nancy Pelosi Florida Afghanistan Congo African Union Isabella rossellini Jeff Sessions San Francisco President Joseph Kabila Joel rose Steve Inskeep Brian watt
"karen musalo" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:28 min | 2 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KCRW

"Seven now back to morning edition on KCRW. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene at NPR west in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC, President Trump left little doubt that a cancelled flight for house speaker Nancy Pelosi was an act of reprisal one day after Pelosi suggested delaying the state of the union speech. The president called off her secret military flight to Afghanistan. Other government flights are continuing amid a partial government. Shutdown pelosi. It said the state of the union speech should be delayed because it is a high security event and key security officials are off work or going on paid needless to say, none of this addresses, the substance of reopening, the government or the presidential demand for a wall that triggered it. NPR? Congressional reporter Kelsey Snell is here for the latest version of groundhog day. Kelsey good. Good morning. How did this story unfold yesterday? Well, we congressional reporters and people in the capital found out the Pelosi was going on this trip in the letter from the president saying that he was cancelling the trip that's partially because most of the time these kinds of congressional trips particularly to war zones like Afghanistan are not revealed beforehand security reasons. Absolutely. I was actually talking to one Senator who's been on many of these. And he told me that he's typically told the only person he can tell about the trip his spouse. So the president Ed revealing this trip was going to happen was really a surprise to a lot of people in fact Pelosi and the rest of the delegation headed. Afghanistan in Brussels were already on the bus to their plane one. This letter went out they had to turn back and go back to their offices. It was a total scramble. And and you reporters are some reporters were able to watch them get off the bus, if I'm not, yes, they watch them watch the bus leave watched the bus come back and watch them go back to the capital. It was a really remarkable team. So is the state of the union truly truly off? Well, what they need to have an invitation the president can't come and speak on the house floor where the state of the union usually happens without an invitation from the speaker and speaker Pelosi essentially rescinded that she did give the president the opportunity to submit his remarks and writing or come back after the shutdown is over she said that she doesn't have any doubt that the federal workers who secure events like this could do the job, but they should be paid to do it. Okay. So a little bit of hardball being played here. How concerned are the people around the president as the shutdown completes about four weeks here? Well, it's kind of a mixed bag. You have the Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell. Saying that he will not vote on any spending bills to reopen the government in less. The president says he'll sign them. And he's been putting that firmly in the lap of Democrats and the president to work that out McConnell is more or less removed himself from this negotiation altogether. But that has the moderate Republicans really concerned we've seen bipartisan groups trying to work together to get something done. But over and over those bipartisan groups groups that have involved Lindsey Graham of South Carolina or Susan Collins of Maine Lamar Alexander. Retiring from Tennessee, they have tried and they say that they keep hitting a wall. And that wall is the same thing. President Trump needs to be able to sign it for the majority leader to bring a Bill to the floor are people other than the president inside the administration beginning to grow alarmed about the effects of the shutdown. It's hard to tell. But you'd one of the things that I think people may have noticed this week is that they're talking about bringing back IRS workers to process returns that is an effort to blunt, the impact of the shutdown and typically you these negotiations have wanted some sort of big impacts all part of a shutdown to inflict pain, right because it makes people come to the negotiating table. So as they're trying to blunt, this effect it is making it. So that the shutdown maybe doesn't have greater at the great effects that usually are negotiating tool. Meaning the White House is realizing the political impact on the president. Who is blamed by most people for this shutdown could be getting quite serious. Yeah. I mean, the polls have shown that end. The White House seemed to be reacting to those polls Kelsey good to see you. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's Kelsey Snell. Now, the government shutdown began with President Trump vowing to stop Central American migrants with a wall along the southern border and almost a month later, there is still no agreement on that wall. But another effort to stop the flow of migrants is taking hold judges are increasingly denying them asylum under a new administration policy NPR's Joel rose has this report on one woman's case. And just a warning some parts of her story are disturbing when the young woman from Nicaragua got off the plane in south Florida. She hadn't seen her parents in more than a decade. She says they looked exactly like they did when they left their tiny Central American town to find work in the US her eyes light up as she describes their reunion at the airport on the. The. Title when I saw them. I ran to hug them. I felt the huge joy when I saw them again. And I knew that I was going to be here protected. We're not using the woman's name because her parents are undocumented, and she's trying to get asylum and stay in the US. She fled Nicaragua with her infant son to get away from the boys. Abusive father, finally in Florida. She felt like she had escaped his grasp this and what I felt safe here I was far away. But she may not be allowed to stay in the US for long. The young woman arrived at a moment. When immigration is paralyzing American politics. The president wants to build a wall on the US Mexico border and keep asylum seekers on the other side of it. The young woman from Nicaragua has the dubious distinction of being one of the first to be denied asylum under a new Trump administration policy Evelyn Cologne is her lawyer. So this is the file. And the first thing is that recent Cologne shows me a stack of papers more than five inches high. The file details years of sexual and physical abuse. Her client described to her had this woman's asylum hearing been held earlier by even a few weeks Cologne thinks she would have won I feel in my heart. That had this case been before. I don't maybe we would have had a different outcome. Even days before he what she's talking about. Here is a court ruling known as matter of AB, it was issued last June by then attorney general Jeff Sessions who oversees immigration judges it says in most cases migrants fleeing from domestic abuse or gang violence do not qualify for asylum. But Cologne says some judges have begun denying all domestic violence cases. I don't think they take the time to listen to the client even in the hearing. They just have their script in her hearing last June. The Nicaraguan woman told her immigration judge that her boyfriend. Increasingly violent after she got pregnant one day. She says he showed up drunk and started banging on the door. Menam meal. Don, I was scared because he was screaming very loud. And he was banging on the door seeing open. It you're my woman you have to open he kicked the door. So many times that the door fell. The woman says her boyfriend raped her that night, she was seven months pregnant she believes that's why her son was born prematurely a month later. Her immigration judge said he found her to be very sympathetic still he denied her request for asylum, citing the new ruling from Jeff Sessions, Mark Metcalf knows how gut wrenching these cases can be he used to be an immigration judge in Miami. It's very difficult analysis. It is not easy for the judges. I've been there. I know it's not easy to say no to people in order to get asylum in the US, you have to show that you've been persecuted because of your race, religion or other characteristics and Metcalf who is now a prosecutor in Kentucky says just being the victim of a crime doesn't qualify. Head to look a person in the eye and tell them. I believe you were telling me the truth. I just don't believe your claim is rewarded with Silom based on the fact that you've given to me today after the ruling from sessions last year judges have increasingly denied asylum claims. Now, they reject nearly seventy percent of all claims, but many immigration lawyers say sessions was wrong. They say some migrants fleeing gangs and domestic violence should get asylum because their own governments did nothing to protect them. That's why the woman from Nicaragua should be allowed to stay here argues, Karen Musalo, she directs the center for gender and refugee studies in San Francisco. She suffered horrendous abuse she went to the police really to no avail and tried to escape him. That's really the classic facts of a case. They should have been granted. Back in Florida. The Nicaraguan woman picks up her son from a neighbor's apartment. He's three years old now and outgoing little kid with a pop patrol backpack soon after he was born. She says her boyfriend started to hit him two days, Philip policy. That's when I decided to go to the police, but the police in Nicaragua never arrested the boyfriend or even talk to him. She says and the boyfriend he was furious. Noah Miller, Basit gay. He told me that I was never going to leave him that I was going to be with him forever because I was his property. That's when she took her son and fled to the US, she's appealing the judge's decision in her asylum case, I asked what she'll do if she loses the appeal. She said she doesn't know, but she can't go back to Nicaragua. Joel rose NPR news..

president Nicaragua President Trump US Nancy Pelosi NPR Kelsey Snell Florida Afghanistan Mitch McConnell Joel rose Jeff Sessions Steve Inskeep David Greene Washington Culver City
"karen musalo" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KCRW

"This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. Nelson chain with days to go before the midterm elections. President Trump is ratcheting up his rhetoric on immigration. He continues to focus on the caravan of Central American migrants heading north through Mexico. Here's what he said at the White House yesterday, the current influx if not halted threatens to overwhelm our immigration system in our communities and poses unacceptable. Dangers to the entire nation. Immigration experts say the president's remarks about migrants and asylum seekers were riddled with false and misleading. Statements statements meant to stoke fear of immigrants and drive. The president's supporters to the polls join me now to fact, check some of Trump's claims is NPR's Joel rose. Hey, Joel Elsa. So I the president says there's a crisis at the border. That's his word is crisis. A word you would use to describe what's going on. Well, I guess crisis is in the eye of the beholder the number of people apprehended at the border is down from the Obama years, and it is way down from the record highs of the nineteen ninety s and the two thousands. But the administration would argue that it is a crisis today because it's a different mix of people who are showing up at the border a generation ago. It was mostly migrant laborers coming across mostly alone. Now, you see many more families, many more children, and those groups have many more protections under the law and get to stay in the US while they fight in immigration court to win their asylum. Case was the president says he wants to deny asylum to migrants who don't present themselves at official ports of entry. Can you actually do that? Well, if he does try to issue an executive order like that it will certainly be challenged in court the law of the land, the immigration and nationality act says that any migrant who is physically present in the US Ken claim asylum, quote, whether or not at a designated port of arrival, unquote. But the president could argue that he has a right to shut the border for national security. He made a similar argument in support of his travel ban executive order number and he did eventually win before the supreme court. Trump also says he wants to hold asylum seekers indefinitely intense cities can his administration do that. There are strict rules about the treatment of migrants in detention, especially children and immigrant rights activists say that massive tent cities would certainly violate those rules, but the Trump administration seems undeterred. In fact, it is already fighting in court to roll back those protection. So it does not seem to be backing down from fight on that listening to his recent remarks. I mean, the president has always taken a tough stance on immigration. That's nothing new. He's used harsh rhetoric before. So do you see this is more of the same or do you sense actually shift in tone? I do feel like there is a new level of intense. That we're seeing this week. I mean just look back at the week on Monday. He sent thousands of troops to the southwest border on Tuesday. We got a report that the White House wants to do away with birthright citizenship on Wednesday. The president tweeted and inflammatory ad that compares migrants. In the caravan to convicted cop killer who entered the US illegally years ago and yesterday in his speech, he said repeatedly that these are tough people, unquote. And and really that we should be afraid of them. I mean, obviously, the president is ramping up this intensity to try to rally his base. But do you do you think that these tactics could backfire with some voters? Well, certainly critics say that this is all just fear mongering and political theater days before an election. I talked with Karen Musalo at the center for gender and refugee studies in San Francisco. She says this migrant caravan is largely composed of women and children who are making a dangerous journey together. Just for self protection. There's a deep irony is sort of a tragic irony. Characterizing the fact that they're coming together that they're this marauding army rather than these are very vulnerable. Individuals desperately fleeing violence who has come together as a group to really have the protection and the solidarity of each other. Then who really it should be pointed out are still, you know, hundreds of miles away from the southwest border and won't even get there for weeks. That's NPR's Joel rose. Thanks, joel. You're welcome. By this time next week. We will hopefully know which party is going to control the house and Senate for the next two years candidates and their surrogates are making closing arguments all over the country here is what President Trump had to say last night in Missouri. This election is a choice between Republican results and radical resistance. It's a choice between great this and gridlock. It's a choice between jobs and mobs. And it's a choice between an economy that.

President Trump president US Joel Elsa Joel rose supreme court Ari Shapiro White House NPR Nelson Obama Ken joel Mexico Karen Musalo San Francisco executive Missouri
"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. Nelson Chang with days to go before the midterm elections. President Trump is ratcheting up his rhetoric on immigration. He continues to focus on the caravan of Central American migrants heading north through Mexico. Here's what he said at the White House yesterday, the current influx if not halted threatens to overwhelm our immigration system in our communities and poses unacceptable. Dangers to the entire nation. Immigration experts say the president's remarks about migrants and asylum seekers were riddled with false and misleading. Statements statements meant to stoke fear of immigrants and drive. The president's supporters to the polls join me now to fact, check some of Trump's claims is NPR's Joel rose. Hey, joel. Hey, also. So I the president says there's a crisis at the border. That's his word is crisis. A word you would use to describe what's going on. Well, I guess crisis is in the eye of the beholder the number of people apprehended at the border is down from the Obama years, and it is way down from the record highs of the nine hundred ninety s and the two thousands. But the administration would argue that it is a crisis today because it's a different mix of people who are showing up at the border a generation ago. It was mostly migrant laborers coming across mostly alone. Now, you see many more families, many more children, and those groups have many more protections under the law and get to stay in the US while they fight in immigration court win their asylum case, well, the president says he wants to deny asylum to migrants who don't present themselves at official ports of entry. Can you actually do that? Well, if he does try to issue an executive order like that it will certainly be challenged in court. The law of the land, the immigration and nationality act says that any migrant who is physically present in the US can claim asylum, quote, whether or not at a designated port of arrival, unquote. But the president could argue that he has a right to shut the border for national security. He made a similar argument in support of his travel ban executive ordering member and he did eventually win before the supreme court. Trump also says he wants to hold a Silom seekers indefinitely intense cities can his administration do that. There are strict rules about the treatment of migrants in detention, especially children and immigrant rights activists say that massive tent cities would certainly violate those rules, but the Trump administration seems undeterred. In fact, it is already fighting in court to roll back those protections. So it does not seem to be backing down from a fight on that listening to his recent remarks. I mean, the president has always taken a tough stance on immigration. That's nothing new. He's used harsh rhetoric before. So do you see this is more of the same? Or do you sense actually, a shift in tone? I do feel like there is a new level of intense. City that we're seeing this week. I mean just look back at the week on Monday. He sent thousands of troops to the southwest border on Tuesday. We got a report that the White House wants to do away with birthright citizenship on Wednesday. The president tweeted and inflammatory ad that compares migrants in the caravan to a convicted cop killer who entered the US illegally years ago and yesterday in his speech, he said repeatedly that these are tough people, unquote. And and really that we should be afraid of them. I mean, obviously, the president is ramping up this intensity to try to rally his base. But do you do you think that these tactics could backfire with some voters? Well, certainly critics say that this is all just fear mongering and political theater days before an election. I talked with Karen Musalo at the center for gender and refugee studies in San Francisco. She says this migrant caravan is largely composed of women and children who are making a dangerous journey together. Just for self protection. There's a deep irony is a tragic irony. Any to characterizing the fact that they're coming together that they're just rotting army rather than things are very vulnerable. Individuals desperately fleeing violence who has come together as a group to really have the protection and the solidarity of each other. And who really it should be pointed out are still hundreds of miles away from the southwest border won't even get there for weeks. That's NPR's Joel rose. Thanks, joe. You're welcome. By this time next week. We will hopefully know which party is going to control the house and Senate for the next two years candidates and their surrogates are making closing arguments all over the country here is what President Trump had to say last night in Missouri. This election is.

President Trump president Joel rose US NPR supreme court Ari Shapiro White House Karen Musalo Nelson Chang Obama Mexico executive joe San Francisco Silom Missouri
"karen musalo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:37 min | 2 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In our communities and poses unacceptable dangers. But experts say the president's statements are false and misleading. We'll have a closer look coming up. Plus, the Trump administration is pushing for a change in behavior in Iran and ahead of Tuesday's midterm election. WNYC's Karen rouse reports. From New Jersey's third congressional district after news headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. The Labor Department issued its final monthly jobs report before the midterm elections today. And it is a blockbuster NPR's. Scott Horsely reports employers added a quarter of a million jobs in October White House. Economists thought they might see a slowdown in hiring last month has results of hurricane Michael. But employers shrugged off those headwinds adding jobs across a wide range of industries unemployment held steady at just three point seven percent. The lowest level in nearly half a century. But why does it kinda most Kevin Hassett says there's still room for additional growth as more than seven hundred thousand new people and the job market in October. There's still more job openings, and there are available people. And so if you're a discouraged worker, then Dido remove the discouraged part in go back to beat a worker. Employers are having to pay more to fill those openings over the last twelve months average wages grew just over three. Percent. The biggest jump in nine years. Scott Horsely NPR news, Washington. The US says it is reimposing all of the US sanctions on Iran that were halted under a two thousand fifteen nuclear deal, which the Trump administration pulled out of secretary of state, Mike Pompeo says the targeted sanctions aimed at Ron shipping, financial and energy sectors. Did you take a fact Monday new sanctions hit core? Areas of Iran's economy there necessary to spur changes we seek on the part of the regime. In order to maximize the effect of the president's pressure campaign. We work closely with other countries to cut off oil exports as much as possible US will penalize countries that don't stop importing uranium oil as well as foreign companies that do business with blacklisted Iranian entities. New joint statement today. Members of the European Union. France, Germany and Britain said they regret Washington's decision voters in dodge City Kansas will have only one place to vote Tuesday. It'll be outside the city limits. A mile from the nearest boss. Stop rank of member station case, you are reports of federal judges denied a motion to open an additional polling location in that town of twenty seven thousand dodge city is a meat packing town and predominantly Hispanic this fall county clerk, Deborah Cox, moved to towns only polling station to an expo center. South of the city limits. Cox said it construction project planned near the old pulling place could interfere with access, but the project hasn't started the American Civil Liberties union went to court to force Cox to allow voting in both new and old. Okay. Nations. But now a judge has ruled that adding polling location so close to the election might confuse voters and do more harm than good. He noted the Cox sent out notifications about the new polling location. The city local Democratic Party and voting rights groups say they'll help drive voters to dodge city's loan polling site for NPR news. I'm Frank Morris. Stocks ended what has been a brief session of op moves market faltering amid concerns about earnings reports from device maker apple among others. Blue chips fell one hundred nine points today. The NASDAQ was down seventy seven points. You're listening to NPR and this is WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd. The FBI has recovered a second packages sent to billionaire Tom Steiner similar to pump bombs mailed to prominent Democrats and CNN the package was recovered last night at a postal facility near San Francisco star has campaigned for months for President Trump's impeachment. He had previously been sent a similar package that was intere-. Perceptive last week fifty six year old Caesar CEO cash charged with sending fifteen explosive devices to prominent Democrats he's currently being held in Miami. While he awaits transferred to New York for trial and as New Yorkers head to the polls on Tuesday. Those with disabilities may face a barrier to voting being able to get into the building WNYC's Gwen HOGAN reports advocates for people with disabilities. Say the city's board of elections has made some progress largely due to an ongoing lawsuit. But still about twenty percent of the city's polling sites have yet to be surveyed. Meaning that at those locations, the board of elections doesn't know if they're accessible or not. Here's the head of the board. We don't know, but presumably some of the as yet unserved sights will reveal some accessibility issues at sites where it has identified issues. The city's board says it's installing more than five hundred temporary ramps across the city. And a woman who has lobbied mayor de Blasio at his gym for more housing for the homeless says she is not giving up. She called into the Brian Lehrer show today to make her case we need help for the peace of the most group is calling on the mayor to set aside. Ten percent of his affordable housing plan for the homeless. A new Bill introduced in the city council calls for fifteen percent of rental housing to be set aside. But the mayor says he is not changing his mind. They've asked a town hall meetings is said, no, they've asked at press conferences, I've said no, I don't know how many times to say this. I don't believe that's the right policy approach mayor says he advocates abroad plan that benefits low to middle income New Yorkers his plan sets aside five percent of housing for the homeless tonight showers and otherwise mostly cloudy, low around fifty degrees. Currently, it's sixty eight degrees. It's overcast at six oh, six support for NPR comes from the Walton family foundation where opportunity takes root. More information is available at Walton family foundation dot org. From NPR news. This is often considered. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Days to go before the midterm elections. President Trump is ratcheting up his rhetoric on immigration. He continues to focus on the caravan of Central American migrants heading north through Mexico. Here's what he said at the White House yesterday, the current influx if not halted threatens to overwhelm our immigration system in our communities and poses unacceptable dangers to the entire nation. But immigration experts say the president's remarks about migrants and asylum seekers were riddled with false and misleading. Statements statements meant to stoke fear of immigrants and drive. The president's supporters to the polls join me now to fact, check some of Trump's claims is NPR's Joel rose angel. Hey, also, so I the president says there's a crisis at the border. That's his word is crisis. Word you would use to describe what's going on. Well, I guess crisis is in the eye of the beholder the number of people apprehended at the border is down from the Obama years, and it is way down from the record highs of nineteen ninety s and the two thousands. But the administration would argue that it is a crisis today because it's a different mix of people who are showing up at the border a generation ago. It was mostly migrant laborers coming across mostly alone. Now, you seem many more families many more children, and those groups have many more protections under the law and get to stay in the US while they fight in immigration court win their asylum case, the president says he wants to deny asylum to migrants who don't present themselves at official ports of entry. Can you actually do that? Well, if he does try to issue an executive order like that it will certainly be challenged in court the law of the land, the immigration and nationality act says that any migrant who is physically present in the US can claim a Silom, quote, whether or not at a designated port of arrival, unquote. But the president could argue that he has a right to shut the border for national security. He made a similar argument in support of his travel ban executive order number and he did eventually win before the supreme court. Trump also says he wants to hold asylum seekers indefinitely intense cities can his administration do that. There are strict rules about the treatment of migrants in detention, especially children and immigrant rights activists say that massive tent cities would certainly violate those rules, but the Trump administration seems undeterred. In fact, it is already fighting in court to roll back those protection. So it does not seem to be backing down from a fight on that listening to his recent remarks. I mean, the president has always taken a tough stance on immigration. That's nothing new. He's used harsh rhetoric before. So do you see this is more of the same or do you sense actually shift in tone? I do feel like there is a new level of intense. That we're seeing this week. I mean just look back at the week on Monday. He sent thousands of troops to the southwest border on Tuesday. We got a report that the White House wants to do away with birthright citizenship on Wednesday. The president tweeted an inflammatory ad that compares migrants. In the caravan to a convicted cop killer who entered the US illegally years ago and yesterday in his speech, he said repeatedly that these are tough people, unquote. And and really that we should be afraid of them. I mean, obviously, the president is ramping up this intensity to try to rally his base. But do you do you think that these tactics could backfire with some voters? Well, certainly critics say that this is all just mongering and political theater days before an election. I talked with Karen Musalo at the center for gender and refugee studies in San Francisco. She says this migrant caravan is largely composed of women and children who are making a dangerous journey together. Just for self protection. There's a deep irony is sort of a tragic irony. Any to characterizing the fact that they're coming together that they're this marauding army rather than these are very vulnerable. Individuals desperately fleeing violence who has come together as a group to really have the protection and the solidarity of each other. Then who really it should be pointed out are still hundreds of miles away from the southwest border won't even get there for weeks. That's NPR's Joel rose. Thanks, joe. You're welcome. By this time next week. We will hopefully know which party is going to control the house and Senate for the next two years candidates and their surrogates are making closing arguments all over the country here is what President Trump had to say last night in Missouri. This election is a choice between Republican results and radical.

president President Trump NPR US Iran WNYC Deborah Cox Scott Horsely Washington New Jersey Joel rose Jack Speer San Francisco hurricane Michael Kevin Hassett October White House Labor Department dodge city
"karen musalo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:54 min | 2 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I think baby. I would say better than it's ever done. We have a lot of new companies moving into the United States, but former President Barack Obama my counter that the economy had already been showing robust gains while he was still in office. As President Trump was addressing reporters outside the White House on his way to a campaign rally in West Virginia. Obama was charging up the democratic base in Miami. Florida Obama had a lot to say about the current political climate. Well, we have not seen the way we're saying, right? Politicians just blatant. Repeatedly. Trump. Meanwhile is expected to energize Republican voters in West Virginia. On behalf of GOP candidates by touting the economy's improvement and immigration, including mentioning the approaching caravan of Central American migrants, which has become a lightning rod at Trump's campaign rallies. The administration's restoring sanctions on Iran back to full force as of Monday, but it's giving eight governments some more time to cut back on their imports of Iranian oil. Here's NPR's Michelle Kellerman, even before the sanctions, formerly go into effect. They are making a difference. According to secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, Iran's oil exports are down by a million barrels a day, and the currency has dropped dramatically. It is aimed at depriving the regime of the revenues that it uses to spread death and destruction around the world as of Monday, the US will punish anyone doing business in Iran's, energy shipping and banking sectors, eight jurisdictions that import oil will get a temporary reprieve though as long as they cut down on their money and oil imports and Pompeo says two of them have promised to. Go to zero Michelle Kellerman NPR news, the State Department. This is NPR and this is WNYC in New York had four zero four. I'm Jamie Floyd, the Florida man accused of sending pipebombs two prominent Democrats and critics of President Trump has agreed to face the charges in New York attorneys for Fifty-six-year-old Caesar CEO said at a hearing today in Miami federal court, they would not seek his release on bail for now. Federal prosecutors in New York's southern district have accused of sending fifteen improvised explosive devices to high profile Democrats as well as to CNN's Manhattan headquarters, none of the bombs exploded. And no one was injured say faces nearly fifty years in prison. If convicted the final debate of the twenty eighteen New York governor's race was last night up in Albany, and all of the candidates showed up except one governor Andrew. Cuomo. Karen DeWitt reports the candidates Republican Mark Mullen narrow green party candidate. Howie Hawkins the libertarian party's Larry Sharpe and independent. Stephanie miner described how they would handle issues including economic development, schools, taxes, sexual harassment and gun control. The candidates criticized the incumbent governors policies, but it was Hawkins. So use the strongest terms to describe the governor's absence. Shame on Andrew Cuomo for not coming here. Yeah. Cuomo's campaign says the governor will spend the rest of the time until November sixth talking directly to voters though, not in a debate forum and two of the east coast. Smallest owls were rescued blocks apart from one another near Lincoln center this week, according to Rita McMahon of the wild bird fun. She took in both northern Sawyer towels after New Yorkers spotted them in the area. Mcmahon says both have I Andrews likely from flying into tall buildings. They seem okay for now. First year, I may come to the city they haven't seen skyscrapers. And so it's a learning experience. So school of hard knocks them McMahon says both birds are first year females currently sixty nine degrees. It's cloudy in central park at four six support for NPR comes from Fidelity Investments taking a personalized approach to helping clients grow. Preserve? Ervin manage their wealth. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. Fidelity brokerage services LLC. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. Meltsa Chang with days to go before the midterm elections. President Trump is ratcheting up his rhetoric on immigration. He continues to focus on the caravan of Central American migrants heading north through Mexico. Here's what he said at the White House yesterday, the current influx if not halted threatens to overwhelm our immigration system in our communities and poses unacceptable dangers to the entire nation. But immigration experts say the president's remarks about migrants and asylum seekers were riddled with false and misleading. Statements statements meant to stoke fear of immigrants and drive. The president's supporters to the polls join me now to fact, check some of Trump's claims is NPR's Joel rose. Hey, joel. Hey, also. So I the president says there's a crisis at the border. That's his word is crisis. A word you would use to describe what's going on. Well, I guess crisis is in the eye of the beholder the number of people apres hinted at the border is down from the Obama years, and it is way down from the record highs of the nineteen ninety s and the two thousands. But the administration would argue that it is a crisis today because it's a different mix of people who are showing up at the border a generation ago. It was mostly migrant laborers coming across mostly alone. Now, you see many more families, many more children, and those groups have many more protections under the law and get to stay in the US while they fight in immigration court win their asylum. Kids was the president says he wants to deny asylum to migrants who don't present themselves at fischel ports of entry. Can you actually do that? Well, if he does try to issue an executive order like that it will certainly be challenged in court the law of the land, the immigration and nationality act says that any migrant who is physically present in the US can claim a Silom, quote, whether or not at a designated port of arrival, unquote. But the president could argue that he has a right to shut the border for national security. He made a similar argument in support of his travel ban executive order number and he did eventually win before the supreme court. Trump also says he wants to hold asylum seekers indefinitely intense cities can his administration do that. There are strict rules about the treatment of migrants in detention, especially children and immigrant rights. Activists say that massive tent cities would certainly violate those rules, but the Trump administration seems undeterred. In fact, it is already fighting in court to roll back those protections. So it does not seem to be backing down from a fight on that listening to his recent remarks. I mean, the president has always taken a tough stance on immigration. That's nothing new. He's used harsh rhetoric before. So do you see this is more of the same? Or do you sense actually, a shift in tone? I do feel like there is a new level of intense. City that we're seeing this week. I mean just look back at the week on Monday. He sent thousands of troops to the southwest border on Tuesday. We got a report that the White House wants to do away with birthright citizenship on Wednesday. The president tweeted an inflammatory ad that compares migrants. In the caravan to a convicted cop killer who entered the US illegally years ago and yesterday in his speech, he said repeatedly that these are tough people unquote, and really that we should be afraid of them. I mean, obviously, the president is ramping up this intensity to try to rally his base. But do you do you think that these tactics could backfire with some voters? Well, certainly critics say that this is all just fear mongering and political theater, you know, days before an election. I talked with Karen Musalo at the center for gender and refugee studies in San Francisco. She says this migrant caravan is largely composed of women and children who are making a dangerous journey together. Just for self protection. Eight irony is sort of a tragic. Eragny to characterizing the fact that they're coming together that they're this marauding army rather than these are very vulnerable. Individuals desperately fleeing violence who has come together as a group to really have the protection and the solidarity of each other. Then who really it should be pointed out are still hundreds of miles away from the southwest border and won't even get there for weeks. That's NPR's Joel rose. Thanks, joe. You're welcome. By this time next week. We will hopefully know which party is going to control the house and Senate for the next two years candidates and their surrogates are making closing arguments all over the country here is what President Trump had to say last night in Missouri. This election.

President Trump president NPR United States Obama Andrew Cuomo White House West Virginia New York Joel rose Trump Florida Miami Iran Rita McMahon Andrews Howie Hawkins Michelle Kellerman GOP
"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Abajian drug cartels i'm the police drug cartels and politicians but also indicated on the sausage the gang members and people carrying out these hits carrying out these blinds to try and understand what's driving them and why they're doing it in one example of a guy tool to who carried out contract killings that yet murders and people who are paying into those hits in honduras politicians themselves so you get politicians themselves are paying these people to commit von action you gotta love that cross latin america so this comes in very importantly i think to the asylum cases i this really challenges the ruling by jeff sessions he was saying well it's just generalized violence we help people around the world just because there's violence in that country's but what you have done the info with these criminals then the government is self persecuting people so if you're in a conference it can be in honduras it can be in mexico and you have a hits on you buck cartel but com hell has connections with the police on what titians then you really have no protection and that's why some of these cases people can't go to the police in mexico or the placing on do that when now salvador they run now also in many cases it looks like we lost the line with you yohan karen musalo the other thing that we heard besides the fact that there is official corruption gang proliferation all hernandes touched on this but also poverty and one of the things that has been suggested that drives migrants is just their economic situation i do you do you feel like the violence piece of this that drives people is overblown and that really people are coming here to seek better lives economically yeah i think that i think that the violence piece of it is not overblown as i said at the top of the hour these are countries that have the highest homicide rates in the entire world these are countries with the highest femicide rates globally and so when you have those levels of violence i it just defies logic to say that those aren't the the motivating factors there are other countries that are equally in poor economic conditions in in central america we don't see the numbers of people seeking asylum and nicaragua would be a good comparison point where you have somewhat equivalent levels of poverty but you absolutely don't see the exodus of individual so i don't think there any doubt by anybody who's given a thoughtful look to the information about these countries to say that it is you know that that the push factor is economics rather than these horrific levels of violence that people are confronting karen.

honduras mexico america nicaragua karen musalo official
"karen musalo" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Women who come to the united states fleeing domestic violence no longer have grounds for asylum this according to a new decree from attorney general jeff sessions this week sessions calls domestic violence in most countries a common crime committed for personal reasons and thus never a reason to claim persecution requiring asylum women's rights advocates have been working for decades to get domestic violence considered a serious offence battered women's suffering and the systematic indifference of their home countries to it rises to the level of persecution argue supporters karen musalo is a law professor at hastings who represented women in two of the most influential cases she likens the attorney general's decision to tossing us back into the dark ages quoting here these aren't just private criminal acts when you have a society that marginalize women and allows them aside and severe by elation of women's rights with imp puny appeals are expected but will take years meanwhile abuse victims already immigrated here could be deported and women fleeing such situations will have fewer legal avenues protests took place in dozens of cities across the country last week against the crackdown that is separating thousands of children from their asylumseeking parents at the us mexico border meanwhile thousands of migrant families fleeing violence hunger and poverty continue to try to enter the united states under the trump administration strict zero tolerance policy all migrants crossing the border without papers are subject to criminal prosecution parents are sent to jails and their children are placed separately in detention some parents who have been separated from their children have later been unable to locate them even if they decide to give up their asylum claims and returned to their home countries together rallies organized by the campaign families belong together are demanding the trump administration immediately halt the practice of splitting up immigrant families although trump's new policy is having a devastating effect breaking up migrant families seeking asylum follows along american tradition of separating families of color dating back to the practice of selling away the children of enslaved people generations of native american children were placed in boarding schools and forced into white homes many japanese americans were taken into internment during the world war two and countless black families are decimated today by mass incarceration and the practice of separating immigrant families is happening right here in.

united states professor hastings trump attorney karen musalo mexico
"karen musalo" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Here but the process can take months or years and tens of thousands of people live freely in the united states while their cases went through the courts so what happens is they come here they say i'm something's happening to me i'm fleeing gang violence i'm fleeing government oppression i'm fleeing my husband is hurting me and then we say well you're gonna have a a hearing in then we let them free to go to the united states they live in the united states while this is happening some of them show up for their hearing some of them don't president trump has mentioned all of this and people treated as if it's some kind of oh well you know that's that's what happens part of the system ms mr sessions decision overturns a precedent set during the obama administration that allowed more women to claim credible fears of domestic abuse and it's gonna make such arrangements such arguments more difficult to prevail with that argument in in court sessions said the obama administration created powerful incentives for people to come here illegally and claim a fear of return advocates like the woman who by the way karen musalo the woman who they quoted to back to the dark ages the washington post used her quote in their headline to describe this policy i just did a quick look up for her on twitter karen musalo twitter feed she's to the director of the center for gender and refugee studies the woman that they allowed they outsource the headline in the washington post to her she described trump is a dictator i just went down her twitter feed just a couple of a couple of tweets down she refers to president trump is a dictator and jeff sessions as positively cruel an undeniably racist just to give you an indication that's the washington post headline reflects her views do you would you think she's an objective observer of the news she says jeff sessions is demonstrably racist and trump is a dictator.

united states trump obama administration washington post director president twitter jeff
"karen musalo" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"The headline from the washington post back to the dark ages it says at the beginning of the headline back to the dark ages sessions asylum ruling reverses decades of women's rights progress critics say now the washington post outsource their headline to someone who commented in the article they took a quote in the article from karen musalo director for the center of gender and refugee studies at the university of california so the this is something that happens just from a media perspective when you see the washington post a well respected i read that irregular headlines for the new york times and the washington post washington post has as its headline of a new story a quote from someone they interviewed she happens to be the director for the center of gender and refugee studies you never see it doesn't matter the publication i mean it doesn't matter if it's the right wing publication you could find almost nobody outsources their headline to a a conservative activists they wouldn't put that as their headline routinely the washington post and the new york times and america's what's called the mainstream media gives the definition of the story they they let the activist that is featured in their article right the headline of the story in which is what they did with this woman her name is karen musalo and she said that the policy of reversing though the obama era policy something that's only happened just a just a few years ago we changed our asylum policy to allow it a greatly expanded version of what constitutes someone seeking asylum and as i told you it resulted in an increase from five thousand people claiming persecution to ninety four thousand over the course of less than seven years now rolling back obama era decisions should probably result in a headline that says trump reverses obama era decision but almost nowhere in the prestige you see the trump reversed a decision a fairly recent change in the way in our immigration law and i don't even think it's law it's more principle of the principles that are followed by the justice department but as the new york times says session says domestic and gang violence or not grounds for asylum again misleading headline in.

director new york times washington post america washington karen musalo university of california obama seven years
"karen musalo" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Stomach when she was eight months pregnant her child was born prematurely and with bruises he told her it was pointless to go to the police because quote even the police and judges beat their wives she did go to the authorities who recommended she leave him but when she did he tracked her down raped her threatened to kill her she then fled to the united states where she finally want asylum but on monday attorney general jeff sessions overturn the precedent set in her case ruling quote claims by aliens pertaining to domestic violence or gang violence perpetrated by nongovernmental actors will not qualify for asylum he said immigration lawyers have condemned the ruling which could have sweeping affects not only for women fleeing domestic violence but all people fleeing gang based violence karen musalo of the center for gender refugee studies at the university of california hastings college of law said quote what this decision does is yanked us o back to the dark ages of human rights and women's human rights it's unquote this comes as the washington post is reporting that the honduran asylum seeker who died by suicide after border patrol agents forcibly separated him from his three year old child had come to the united states with his family fleeing violence the honduran consulate says marco antonio munoz and his family fled honduras after muna's brotherinlaw was murdered after they arrived in the us they voluntarily surrender to border patrol agents and said they wanted to apply for asylum but when agents told mona's he will be separated from his three year old son he appears to have had a panic attack the agents than rip the boy out of his arms transported muna's to texas joe where he was found dead by suicide the following morning a newly published open letter signed by over a thousand mental health professionals and organizations has condemned the trump administration's practice of separating children and parents at the border writing quote we cannot afford to forget that there's a history of separating children from their parents during slave auctions during.

united states washington post honduran consulate marco antonio munoz honduras muna mona texas attorney karen musalo university of california hasti three year eight months
"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is well now this yon thin three lovey they lamar it was a matter of life and death she says if i stayed he would have killed me alvarado applied for asylum in us immigration court back then her lawyer karen musalo had just founded the center for gender and refugee studies in san francisco sallow argued that women like alvarado deserve asylum because they've been persecuted by their husbands and ignored by their own governments when you have someone who wakes you up in the middle of the night with a knife at your throat and tells you that he can kill you and nobody would care and then when you go to the police repeatedly and they laugh at you this is clearly a situation deserving of protection at first some courts rejected this theory in alvarado's case immigration judges agreed that her story was brutal but they ruled that the system of asylum was not intended to protect survivors of domestic violence it's a grave pervasive chronic international problem but this is the wrong tool to solve that problem michael hetman is a lawyer at the immigration reform law institute he was on the opposing side writing briefs against the stand karen musalo was taking asylum is not some sort of global make a wish foundation but alvarado and sallow didn't give up you sallow kept pointing to that phrase particular social group and insisted that domestic violence survivors do fall into that category eventually her argument one out and immigration lawyers have successfully argued for an even broader interpretation of asylum law to include women fleeing genital mutilation for instance and people facing persecution for being gay for a while the seem settled that is until jeff sessions became the attorney general vague insubstantial and subjective claims have swamped our system this is sessions speaking to immigration judges last year the attorney general favors a strict interpretation of the language crafted back in geneva in nineteen fifty one sessions emphasizes that asylum laws protect people based on certain characteristics race religion nationality or political opinion that's what it's for they were never intended to provide asylum to all those who fear generalized violence crime personal vendettas or lack of job prospects sessions is moving to limit who can get asylum and he's questioning whether domestic violence.

karen musalo alvarado law institute attorney geneva lamar san francisco michael hetman
"karen musalo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"karen musalo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For ten years with machetes with his fists it was torture she says is aflame well now this is yon terrapin thin three lovey they lamar tip it was a matter of life and death she says if i stayed he would have killed me alvarado applied for asylum in us immigration court back then her lawyer karen musalo had just founded the center for gender and refugee studies in san francisco sallow argued that women like alvarado deserve asylum because they've been persecuted by their husbands and ignored by their own governments when you have someone who wakes you up in the middle of the night with a knife at your throat and tells you that he can kill you and nobody would care and then when you go to the police repeatedly and they laugh at you this is clearly a situation deserving of protection at first some courts rejected this theory in alvarado's case immigration judges agreed that her story was brutal but they ruled that the system of asylum was not intended to protect survivors of domestic violence it's a grave pervasive chronic international problem but this is the wrong tool to solve that the problem michael hetman is a lawyer at the immigration reform law institute he was on the opposing side writing briefs against the stand karen musalo taking asylum is not some sort of global make a wish foundation but alvarado and me sallow didn't give up you sal kept pointing to that phrase particular social group and insisted that domestic violence survivors do fall into that category eventually her argument one out and immigration lawyers have successfully argued for an even broader interpretation of asylum law to include women fleeing genital mutilation for instance and people facing persecution for being gay for a while this seemed settled that is until jeff sessions became the attorney general vague insubstantial and subjective claims have swamped our system this is sessions speaking to immigration judges last year the attorney general favors a strict interpretation of the language crafted back in geneva in nineteen fifty one sessions empathy sizes that asylum laws protect people based on certain characteristics race religion nationality or political opinion that's what it's for they were never intended to provide asylum to all those who fear generalized violence crime personal vendettas a lack of job prospects sessions is moving to limit who can get asylum and he's questioning whether domestic violence survivors.

karen musalo alvarado law institute attorney geneva san francisco michael hetman sal ten years