11 Burst results for "Karen Lips"

"karen lips" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"karen lips" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Day, and we'll discuss policy issues that impact you coming up Saturday morning Karen Lips, president of the network of Enlightened Women. She discusses how Republican women candidates and incumbents fair in this year's general election, then Black voters matter Fund co founder LaTasha Brown on the roll black voters, particularly women played in campaign 2020. What C SPAN's Washington Journal Live at seven Eastern Saturday morning. Be sure to join the discussion with your phone calls, Facebook comments, text messages and tweets. And welcome to Washington today on C SPAN radio for Friday, November 13th 2020 here some of your headlines. President Donald Trump makes his first public remarks in over a week and since major news networks determined at the presidential election, was won by his Democratic rival, Joe Biden. President Trump giving an update on the development and distribution of an effective and safe Corona virus vaccine is cases, hospitalizations and deaths rise dramatically across the country present, not take many reporters questions, not talking about the election. But in tweets, he continues to challenge the results, tweeting more accusations of widespread ballot fraud and claiming he is the rightful winner. On Capitol Hill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, reacting to that report from a federal cyber security agency, concluding the November 3rd election was the most secure in American history. And today NASA getting ready to make history over the weekend, launching a fully crewed spacecraft from.

President Donald Trump Karen Lips president LaTasha Brown Capitol Hill House Joe Biden Washington Journal Washington Nancy Pelosi Facebook matter Fund co NASA founder fraud
"karen lips" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:50 min | 2 years ago

"karen lips" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Live everywhere on the I heart radio app Karen Travers good morning I doubt it's probably enough to satisfy skeptics but the president did at least explain why he had said I you know sort of downplayed the corona virus thing I don't want to panic the country thank you he was also saying that everything he said was true and that you know everything all of his comments which critics instead we're downplaying it brushing it off or ignoring the potential for this virus is spread here the president said that everything will pan out to be correct you know the virus will go away the country will be there so Hey he was right but on the other hand he was saying that he had to say things a certain way in order to keep the country called he says they don't want panic in the country I could cause panic now some say you can't do that on Saturday which we talked about it you know quit issuing that potential ordered a quarantine a federal quarantine for New York New Jersey and Connecticut without marking the governors of those states I know I personally had friends you are not a new texting me from some of the state thing work going on what can happen in the next few hours only that the president later state it wasn't going to be necessary so no hidden words are very significant and very consequential right now and when he does say something like that either downplaying it or suggesting a big move is to come people are really jumping on that right now so it's very critical the governor stated there's solid communication between the administration and and what's happening on the ground and no doubt I mean that definitely needs to happen and I I think part of the problem is and I've said this over and over and over again the guy is not an eloquent speaker no matter what it's like he he might have the best message possible to put out there but kind of the inability to either put his phrases together or put his thoughts together one of the two were maybe a mishmash of both ends up that things kind of come out you know like he's shooting from the hip and then there for a lot of people you we've kinda watch sometimes on some of the people in his administration the people standing behind him how to get a look like wait what what what with that was what we had talked about they give this look and even though he does come back and clarify it sometimes you're right the words that come out initially sometimes are the ones that do spark the fear whether he probably had no intention to do that but it came out the wrong way and I do think you know it's one thing that's been striking over the past couple of weeks is that the president has really made himself the face of the earth the federal government's response by during the daily briefing every day leave that to vice president pence you could be that two doctors found she and Dr Burke's together a lot of technical questions that reporters are asking that if they were like come under the president's umbrella you know it it gives the experts that would be in charge of this thing but he wants to be there he wants to be the one leading those briefings and you know talk to Republicans who on the outside the White House are saying here that didn't get out on the one hand it showing leadership on the other hand you only S. now you can't bend later say well that was the topic of course that did that you are the federal government's response then you got to take everything that comes with that all right well does he are there more I assume of these daily briefings sort of planned especially after he said alright we're not gonna do that twelve we're gonna do the thirtieth now what the president is expected to show up at today's briefing which is scheduled for five o'clock I think until we're told he's not coming we should assume you coming every day but you know yesterday he brought up some other people that take questions and talk as well but you know the the big headline this week is that this is going to continue you said yesterday the these are going to be very challenging times over the next thirty days the country putting it all on the line and it's important because we have to get back up and running all right Keren thank you so much we'll talk again tomorrow I'm sure have a great day thank you see you see you later ABC's Karen lips sorry about that ABC's Karen Travers and I I do think that it's I mean I I always try no matter what to give somebody the benefit of the doubt and I I don't I thank you know god willing I I would hope that no president had bad intentions or meant to spark anything and I truly believe in my heart he does it but it's the way that things come out I think you could agree with me on that where even if you are his biggest fan sometimes he says things that you're like oh boy you know the palm to the forehead kind of thing but it's he probably inadvertently makes comments that probably he doesn't even want to make that he thought that didn't come out quite right but then again you probably figure figures I can fix that later which she can you can come back and say exactly what he did yesterday you know look I my intent was not to you know I was supposed to call in the country and maybe he thinks that that was the right thing to do and for a lot of people maybe that is what was needed you needed to see the man who was leading the country tell you that everything's gonna be okay in that that's what we do we need a leader in a time of crisis who steps up there and look strong and that kind of thing it was I think it's I think it was the fact that it seemed in some cases like you sort of brushing it off or maybe making it not as big of a deal as it was is that concerned some people or they gave them room to criticize and that was part of the problem so at least he's clarifying why he did what he did and that's not all I mean you gotta take it or leave it and we just move on from there all right let's get back from some of the other stories here's one about Ford Motor Company joining that effort to fill the nation's ventilator needs Ford says five hundred United auto workers members in Michigan I volunteered for the project they're planning to build as many as fifty thousand violators within one Hundred Days and thirty thousand a month after that GM and Tesla also say they're working to help make ventilators we're gonna talk more about this with Ryan burl coming up at five thirty five well at least one LA county jail inmate has the corona virus and a hundred ninety are in temporary quarantine pending the result of their tests assistant sheriff Bruce chase says the affected inmate has been isolated in a medical ward and is in stable condition there have been no you know other inmates or staff that were in that area that are showing symptoms of covert and they're being monitored closely so we'll we'll stay on top of that she says four deputies who work in the jails have also tested positive and are self isolating at home the Orange County sheriff has released a huh at thirty people early as five inmates have tested positive for corona virus served on Barnes says people with non violent crimes in less than ten days are those with medical issues the less than sixty days were released over the weekend our jail population has decreased eight hundred thirty eight bats so it's a loss it's been a little over a decade he says the idea is to stop the spread of the virus by freeing up enough space to keep inmates separated because they're typically kept in dormitory or barracks style housing and if it doesn't we'll go beyond that when they go to the next ten days or we may go thirty days out one hundred fifty inmates have already been isolated in Orange County Corbin Carson KFI news well the country's largest newspaper publisher has announced it's cutting pay and hours of newsroom employees by twenty five percent for the next three months due to a decline in advertising dollars get it media is also requiring five day furloughs for each of those three months the company says the pandemic is because business to shut down that would typically advertise in newspapers Gannett owns more than a hundred daily newspapers including U. S. A. today Macy's Kohl's and gap all have decided to furlough thousands of employees the brick and mortar retailer closed our industry is it's pretty much shut down because of the pick the pandemic step to places like target and Walmart that also sell essential goods a quarter of workers in the U. S. are in retail according to labor force statistics the median age of clothing retail workers is around thirty two a.

president Karen Travers
"karen lips" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:53 min | 2 years ago

"karen lips" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Them to survive in the presence of this fungus Dr Karen lips was speaking to a hundred of mountains and joining us for the rest of this hour is doctor James hands for its research fellow at the institute of zoology in London he specializes in extinctions so I'm the issue of the frogs it's still with us even though this is hope that perhaps they might evolve to counteract the fungus yeah I'm we have a huge problem with the catcher fungus affecting amphibians across the world today but we have a global effort of scientists to try and for such and how we might be able to counteract in understand which species might be able to survive as well but it wasn't human action the cause of this was a natural fungus which involves to attack the frogs what humans didn't invent the fungus or try to creative and anyway but they'll probably responsible for transporting across the world and acting as a vector to impact everywhere from love creating and pandemic of this infection just shows how one little knock to the delicate balance of an ecosystem can have such a dramatic impact absolutely once you start affecting species of animals or plants of fungus is and start changing the makeup of an ecosystem it's so complex that we don't understand how it might spiral out of control change irrevocably over the vast span of these to the planet there be many extinction episodes of many animals have gone extinct as as the phrase goes one of the main threats at the moment which of the species which you would be most concerned about well getting back to the amphibians and the public the catcher fungus I think the something around five hundred species on fifteen have gone extinct and lost fifty is a site about these con exactly be exactly linked to the fungus itself the sudden the other problems associated with it such as habitat transformation climate change and the way humans are impacting the world and if you gonna bring it down to one defining point is probably humans but in terms of the the species which almost a threat I mean we we hear about the rhino for example and but that there must be others that are right there at the top of the threat list yeah I am when you think about extensions we tend to think about these icons that we look at but there are an incredible number that we have to focus on and try to preserve today if you think about a global matter a party Southeast Asia is the biggest target geographically but I'm Fabian's under incredible amount of threat mammals birds everything from efficiency as well Dr James Hansen from the institute of zoology in London for the moment many thanks the next extinction story from the past is arguably one of the most famous for this we're going back to the beginning of the seventeenth century that was when European explorers reach the uninhabited island of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean on it shows they discovered a remarkable flightless bird they named it the dodo and within a few decades it would be completely extinct Simon what's is used written records from the time to chart its fate here is generated the dodo which for shape and read this man taken eyes the Phoenix of Arabia her body is round in fact few way less than fifty pounds our is a sworn and like to diamonds Ronan routing her train three small plumes shorts on in proportionate appetite strong and greedy well they look like birds yes but not like a typical bird that you might see in the in the garden not like a sparrow or a styling these look like very extreme things Errol fuller is the author of data from extinction I call them they look rather like say a a great big fat Turkey if you can imagine that or even a a formula chicken that sort of three times the size the wings were very significantly reduced because this was about the couldn't fly and the most important features this massive head and a great big bait it looks rather on real it is sort of gross fatness why do we think the data you had developed in that way I wanted it lost its wings and develop this this huge belly what we think happened is that the a group of pigeons charged on the island of Mauritius I'll be there were blown by storm what they found a Mauritius when no mammals no catch no dogs no bears nothing that could endanger them also they found plenty of food so the gradually that evolved into bigger heavier things until eventually though too heavy to actually take off into the F. suit basically they involved into a a specialist eating machine yes that would be absolutely the truth so why did they decide to cool this extremely creature of data there are various explanations one of them is that it might be just a fanatic rendering of the birds cool Toda another is a Dutch word dough Dawson which I think meant clumsy or some such thing another explanation is that maybe it was a Portuguese word which meant stupid but really pay money to your choice so it all comes you'll stupid not which is particularly flattering absolutely not it may have been clumsy and stupid but the dodo captured the European imagination it was a popular subject for Dutch painters and at least one life specimen was taken back to England as I walked the London streets I saw the picture of a strange looking for hell hung out upon the cloth I myself with one or two more in company went in to see it it was kept in the chamber and it was a great file somewhat bigger than the law just Turkey caught with Stelter I'm think the keep the cold it's due to but sadly for the due to its very promptness led to its down full to sailors crossing the Indian Ocean the defenseless birds what irresistible although not necessarily tasty there are conflicting stories some writers said that I tasted absolutely horrible thought the fact is to stopping the same and that probably been living on hot biscuits and goodness knows what C. rations for weeks and weeks and weeks from the enemy tasted quite delicious on magic and it wasn't just the sailors who ate the birds the animals that arrived on European ships also fed on the helpless dodo we didn't just settle it by our own presence we have settled it by taking all sorts of mammals their cats dogs monkeys peaks and these creatures they may not be big enough to hold the adult data but they would certainly hunted that checks and might be stolen their aches wraps and things would call their X. so we don't know to what level all of these things because the extinction but the combination of vehicles certainly did it was us that took everything there that brought about the extinction within just a few decades dodos were wiped out on the mainland of malicious the lowest recorded sighting was by a Dutch sailor whose fleet was shipwrecked in the sixteen sixties he source small colony of dodos who'd Kong home on one of malicious is off shore islands one of the ships most of the people manage to struggle a short vengefully although there are various horrible stories or about what happened to them before they go to show some of the most sacrifice to the wives some of them were going to be eaten by the ship mice that didn't actually happen but anyway the whole thing was a bit of a disaster but eventually Stephan Avison managed to stragglers shore onto a an island just off the coast of Mauritius that was linked by so sand bars and things and and he maintained the on the small island there weren't does and like others before him he managed to catch some of these does Nate them one party of us would chase them so they would run towards the other party who then grab them when we had one tightly gripped around a lack he would cry out and then the others would come to its aid and they be called as well and that has now come to be regarded as the lost definite record we have of the dodo to all intents and purposes this bird was extinct within sixty is of the Europeans arrival Mauritius over the next two hundred years the dodo was slowly forgotten them in the nineteenth century natural history became fashionable in the Victorian started wondering about the flightless birds they just came a time when people realize that this creature in these Dutch paintings in these early descriptions could no longer be found so it was assumed that might be it never even existed maybe it was just a a mythical creature they made up and then bones of the dodo were found in immersion swamp which confirmed by and large the early descriptions and the early paintings naturalists were able to reconstruct dodo skeletons from these buttons on the bird featured once again in books and exhibitions then the dodo was immortalized once and for role in the fictional world of Alice in Wonderland Lewis Carroll and the little girl that was to be immortalized Alice used to go for walks around Oxford one of their favorite Wilkes was to go visit the dodos hate in the Ashmolean museum anyway what could have been more natural I suppose when Lewis Carroll's writing this book for this little girl was fantastic does in as one of the characters the dodo sat for a long time with one finger pressed upon its forehead well the rest waited in silence I'd lost the dodo said everyone has won and all must have prizes but who is to give the prizes quite a chorus of voices Aust why is she of course said the dodo pointing to Alice with one finger he gives the FAA anthropomorphic attitude it's adultery died of its innocence and adultery does the yeah yeah and there's a story that Lewis Carroll whose real name was Dodge and penny has some sort of started he's going to that that that that that that that that the lives of my family that's one reason why I identified with the data and it was Lewis Carroll's inclusion of the dog in Alice's adventures in Wonderland the sort of rocketed the dodo to what we might call extinct superstardom because before the publication of that book the dodo was just a footnote in the logical history after it the data was something that was on everyone's lips so it was Lewis Carroll very much that created the cult of the data I'm the cult of the dodo continues the clumsy stupid giant Russian pigeon currently appears in books and on posters mugs and stationery and every child knows that nothing's as dead as the dodo Simon what's with doctor James hands for a research fellow at the institute of zoology is still with me can get very nostalgic about the dodo and is this emblematic bird I one of the first extinctions that people were really aware of I think the danger is probably the most famous extinct animals of the modern era of what we can say from about the seventeenth century but I I have a you know that have beef with the data but Hey pops it gets too much press for my liking I am more interested in some other giant bugs from the Indian Ocean region I've spent my last years of my life for searching the elephant parts of Madagascar which included some of the largest buys the ever lived right describe those then and when.

Karen lips research fellow James
"karen lips" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:51 min | 2 years ago

"karen lips" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Survive in the presence of this fungus Dr Karen lips was speaking to a hundred mountains and joining us for the rest of this hour is doctor James hands for its research fellow at the institute of zoology in London he specializes in extinctions so I'm the issue of the frogs it's still with us even though this is hope that perhaps they might evolve to counteract the fungus yeah I'm we have a huge problem with the catcher fungus affecting amphibians across the world today but we have a global effort of scientists to try and perception how we might be able to counteract in understand which species might be able to survive as well but it wasn't human action the because this was a natural fungus which involves to attack the frogs what humans didn't invent a fungus or try to created in any way but they'll probably responsible for transporting across the world and acting as a vector to impact everywhere ground love creating and pandemic of this infection just shows how one little knock to the delicate balance of an ecosystem can have such a dramatic impact absolutely once you start affecting species of animals or plants of fungus is and start changing the makeup of an ecosystem it's so complex that we don't understand how it might spiral out of control change irrevocably over the vast span of these to the planet there be many extinction episodes of many animals have gone extinct as as the phrase goes one of the main threats at the moment which of the species which you would be most concerned about well getting back to the amphibians and the public the catcher fungus I think the something around five hundred spaces on fibbing have gone extinct and lost fifty is a site about these con exactly be exactly linked to the fungus itself the send the other problems associated with it such as habitat transformation climate change and the way humans are impacting the world and if you can I bring it down to one defining point is probably humans but in terms of the the species which are most attractive mean we hear about the rhino for example and but that there must be others that are right there at the top of the threat list yeah I am when you think about extensions we tend to think about these icons that we look at but there are an incredible number that we have to focus on and trying as of today if you think about in a global matter a party Southeast Asia is the biggest target geographically but I'm Fabian's under incredible amount of threat mammals birds everything from efficiency as well Dr James Hansen from the institute of zoology in London for the moment many thanks the next extinction story from the past is arguably one of the most famous for this we're going back to the beginning of the seventeenth century that was when European explorers reach the uninhabited island of malicious in the Indian Ocean on it shows they discovered a remarkable flightless bird they named it the dodo and within a few decades it would be completely extinct Simon what's is used written records from the time to chart its fate is generated the dodo which the shape and read this man taken eyes the Phoenix of Arabia her body is round in fact few way less than fifty pounds on a is a small warned like to diamonds round in routing train three small plumes shorts and in proportional appetite strong and greedy well they look like birds yes but not like a typical bird that you might see in the in the garden not like a spiral responding these look like very extreme things Errol fuller is the author of data from extinction I calm they look rather like say a a great big fat Turkey if you can imagine or even a a formula chicken this sort of three times the size the wings were very significantly reduced because this was about the couldn't fly and the most important features this massive head and a great big baby looks rather I'm real it is sort of gross fatness why do we think the data you had developed in that way I wanted it lost its wings and develop this is huge belly what we think happened is the a group of pigeons chanced on the island of Mauritius I'll be there were blown by storm what they found a Mauritius when no mammals no catch no dogs no bears nothing that could endanger them also they found plenty of food so the gradually that evolved into bigger heavier things until eventually though too heavy to actually take off into the air soon basically they involved into a a specialist eating machine yes that would be absolutely the truth so why did they decide to cool this extremely creature of day today there are various explanations one of them is that it might be just a fanatic rendering of the birds cool Toda another is a Dutch word double Dawson which I think meant clumsy or some such thing another explanation is that maybe it was a Portuguese word which meant stupid but really pay money to your choice so it all comes you'll stupid neither of which is particularly flattering absolutely not it may have been clumsy and stupid but the day to day captured the European imagination it was a popular subject for Dutch painters and at least one life specimen was taken back to England as I walked the London streets I saw the picture of a strange looking for hello hung out upon the clock I myself with one or two more in company went in to see it it was kept in the chamber and it was a great file somewhat bigger than the law just Turkey cult what's the altar I'm thinking the keep the cold it's due to but sadly for the day to day it's very promptness led to its down full to sailors crossing the Indian Ocean the defenseless birds what irresistible although not necessarily tasty there are conflicting stories some writers said that I tasted absolutely horrible thought the fact is to stopping the same and that probably been living on hot biscuits and goodness knows what C. rations for weeks and weeks and weeks from the enemy tasted quite delicious I imagine and it wasn't just the sailors who ate the birds the animals that arrived on European ships also fed on the helpless Thursday we didn't just settle it by our own prisons we on settled it by taking all sorts of mammals their cats dogs monkeys peaks and these creatures they may not be big enough to hold the adult data but they would certainly hunted that shakes and might be stolen their X. wraps and things would go there right so we don't know to what level all of these things because the extinction but the combination of old seventy it was us that took everything there that brought about the extinction within just a few decades dodos were wiped out on the mainland of Mauritius the lowest recorded sighting was by a Dutch sailor whose fleet was shipwrecked in the sixteen sixties he saw a small colony of dodos who'd Kong home on one of malicious is offshore islands one of the ships most of the people manage to struggle ashore eventually although there are various horrible stories about what happened to them before they go to show some of the most sacrifice to the wives some of them were going to be eaten by their ship mice that didn't actually happen but anyway the whole thing was a bit of a disaster but eventually Stephan Avison managed to stragglers shore onto a an island just off the coast of Mauritius that was linked by so sandbars and things and and he maintained the on the small island there weren't does and like others before him he managed to catch some of these does need them one party of us would chase them so they would run towards the other party who then grab them when we had one tightly gripped around the lack he would cry out and then the others would come to its aid and they be called as well and then as now come to be regarded as the lost definite record we have of the dodo all intents and purposes this bird was extinct within sixty is of the Europeans arrival Mauritius over the next two hundred years the day to day was slowly forgotten them in the nineteenth century natural history became fashionable in Victorian started wondering about the flightless birds they just came a time when people realize that this creature in the stopped buying jeans and these are the descriptions could no longer be found so it was assumed that might be it never even existed maybe it was just a a mythical creature they made up and then bones of the Duggar were found in immersion swamp which confirmed by and large the early descriptions and the early paintings naturalists were able to reconstruct dodo skeletons from these buttons on the bird featured once again in books and exhibitions then the dodo was immortalized once and for role in the fictional world of Alice in Wonderland Lewis Carroll and the little girl that was to be immortalized Alice used to go for walks around Oxford one of their favorite Wilkes was to go visit the dodos head in the Ashmolean museum anyway what could have been more natural I suppose when Lewis Carroll's watching this book for this little girl was fantastic done in as one of the characters the dodo sat for a long time with one finger pressed upon its forehead well the rest waited in silence I'd lost the dodo said everyone has won and all must have prizes but who is to give the prizes quite a chorus of voices Aust why she of course said the dodo pointing to Alice with one finger he gives it a very anthropomorphic attitude it's adultery data it's innocent ten dot three does the yeah yeah and there's a story that Lewis Carroll whose real name was George seven pound has some sort of stocks and he's going to that that that that that that that that does for you that's one reason why I identified with the data and it was Lewis Carroll's inclusion of the dot on in Alice's adventures in Wonderland that sort of rocketed the dodo to what we might call an extinct superstardom because before the publication of that book the Duggar was just a footnote in the logical history after it the data was something that was on everyone's lips so it was Lewis Carroll very much that created the cult of the delta I'm the cult of the dodo continues the clumsy stupid giant Mauritian pigeon currently appears in books and on posters mugs and stationery and every child knows that nothing's as dead as a dodo Simon what's with doctor James hands for a research fellow at the institute of zoology is still with me can get very nostalgic about the dodo and is this emblematic bed I one of the first extinctions that people were really aware of I think the danger is probably the most famous extinct animals of the modern era of what we can say from about the seventeenth century but I I have a you know to have beef with the data but a pop to gets too much press for my liking I am more interested in some other giant bites from the Indian Ocean region I've spent my last years of my life for searching the Addison pads of Madagascar which included some of the largest buys the.

Karen lips research fellow London James institute of zoology
"karen lips" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"karen lips" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was the edgy album when we fall asleep where do we go created by a brother and sister in a small bedroom and that and I hope that swept the board at the Grammys winning eleven on a specific the Irish and videos thank you so much was my first Grammys I never thought this would ever happen in my whole life she took home five golden statues including once the song record and album of the year just eighteen she's the youngest artist ever to have done that Phineas who co wrote and produced the album to come six Grammys making him the top winner the night BBC news hello this is the history our with Max Bisson where this week we're looking at the history of some recent and not so recent extinctions how they've happened and what we've learned about what humans can do to preserve the planet's biodiversity we've got the story of the dodo of course how early warnings about human activity might have saved some species how the recording of whale song might have changed attitudes and how a cryogenic program launched in the nineteen seventies may offer hope of saving species from the brink of extinction but we begin by looking at a relatively recent extinction episode in the nineteen eighties scientists started to notice the frogs would dying in huge numbers and hundred mountains has been speaking to doctor Karen lips who helped to establish that the amphibians were being killed by a deadly fungus in what's now recognized as the greatest loss of biodiversity in the history of our time we sort of get a double whammy it's the worst disease and it's also one of the worst invasive species biologist Karen lips is a professor at the university of Maryland in the US one of the key scientists that on Bravo the enigma the story begins in nineteen eighty nine when she was a grad student and doing her and Phoebe and research in Central America on the top of the mountain that straddles the border between southern Costa Rica and Panama I rented a small shack from a a Costa Rican family who had a farm up there and I lived in one of their pastors further away from the house about a about an hour hike and it was a small shack no running water no electricity no cell phone access and this is high elevation so it's very cold its cloud forest so the clouds come in it's very wet and it is very lush what's the mall so it's wet and drippy with many many species of animals and plants because it's a protected area looked relates had gone to Costa Rica to learn about a species of frog I was there to study a small frog that eventually would be called a small Hyla calypso and this is a small front but the size of your thumb it's been right metallic green on top with big fleshy splines who looks a little bit like the mossy the green moss that covers all the plants there and so it's probably a way for to blend in so no predators can see it I.

"karen lips" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"karen lips" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It was the edgy album when we fall asleep where do we go created by a brother and sister in a small bedroom and that and I hope that swept the board at the Grammys winning eleven on a specific the Irish and videos thank you so much was my first Grammys I never thought this would ever happen in my whole life she took home five golden statues including once the song record and album of the year just eighteen she's the youngest artist ever to have done that Phineas who co wrote and produced the album to him six Grammys making him the top winner the night BBC news hello this is the history our with Max Bisson where this week we're looking at the history of some recent and not so recent extinctions how they've happened and what we've learned about what humans can do to preserve the planet's biodiversity we got the story of the dodo of course how early warnings about human activity might have saved some species how the recording of whale song might have changed attitudes and how a cryogenic program launched in the nineteen seventies may offer hope of saving species from the brink of extinction but we begin by looking at a relatively recent extinction episode in the nineteen eighties scientists started to notice the frogs would dying in huge numbers and hundred mountains has been speaking to doctor Karen lips who helped to establish that the amphibians were being killed by a deadly fungus in what's now recognized as the greatest loss of biodiversity in the history of our time we sort of get a double whammy it's the worst disease and it's also one of the worst invasive species my only just Karen lips is a professor at the university of Maryland in the U. S. one of the key scientists that unravel the enigma the story begins in nineteen eighty nine when she was a grad student and doing her and feed and research in Central America on the top of the mountain that straddles the border between southern Costa Rica and Panama I rented a small shack from a a Costa Rican family who had a farm up there and I lived in one of their pastors further away from the house about a about an hour hike and it was a small shock no running water no electricity no cell phone access and this is high elevations so it's very cold its cloud forest so the clouds come in it's very wet and it is very lush what's the mall so it's wet and drippy with many many species of animals and plants because it's a protected area looked relates had gone to Costa Rica to learn about a species of frog I was there to study a small frog that eventually would be called is small Hyla calypso in this is a small frown but the size of your thumb it's been right metallic green on top with big flesh she's fine so it looks a little bit like the mossy the green moss that covers all the plants there and so it's probably a way for to blend in so no predators can see it.

"karen lips" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"karen lips" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Speak myself I realize I haven't got the foggiest idea more from business daily tomorrow see you then on the BBC world service witness history with me Alexandra Martin's today would go back to nineteen ninety eight the site is finally sold the devastating mystery and identified what was causing the disappearance of dozens and dozens of species of frogs and other amphibians around the world this is the greatest loss of biodiversity from a disease so you sort of get a double whammy it's the worst disease and it's also one of the worst invasive species mileages Karen lips is a professor at the university of Maryland in the US one of the key scientists that on Bravo the enigma the story begins in nineteen eighty nine when she was a grad student and doing her and Phoebe and research in Central America on the top of the mountain that straddles the border between southern Costa Rica and Panama I rented a small shack from a Costa Rican family who had a farm up there and I lived in one of their pastors further away from the house about a about an hour hike and it was a small shack no running water no electricity no cell phone access and this is high elevation so it's very cold its cloud forest so the clouds come in it's very wet and it is very lush what's the mall so it's wet and drippy with many many species of animals and plants because it's a protected area Dr lips had gone to Costa Rica to learn about a species of frog I was there to study a small frog that eventually would be called is small Hyla calypso in this is a small front about the size of your thumb it's been right metallic green on top with big fleshy splines what looks a little bit like the mossy the green moss that covers all the plants there and so it's probably a way for to blend in so no predators can see it.

Alexandra Martin professor US Central America Costa Rica Dr lips BBC Karen lips university of Maryland Phoebe Costa Rican
An Eyewitness to Extinction

Short Wave

08:30 min | 2 years ago

An Eyewitness to Extinction

"Today a scientist who found herself in the middle of disturbing bring scientific mystery. It's the early nineteen ninety s and Karen Lips is a graduate student studying frogs in in the mountains of Costa Rica. And I had set up camp in this little shack that had no running water or electricity so this is in old growth both oak forest cloud forest. So it's moist and there's Moss everywhere and Amphibians love it. Karen lived alone spending her days studying the reproductive behavior of its Mahala Calypso. A tiny tree frog the color of emeralds and then a couple of years into her research Karen found some dead frogs and seven is not very much. She wasn't too worried about it but she couldn't figure out why they died so she sent the frogs off for essentially a frog autopsy. Then she headed home for Christmas break and when I got back I expected to see the beginning of the rainy season season. which is usually when you see the greatest number frogs and I kept waiting and waiting and the rains came and there just weren't very many frogs at all and so i? I started questioning myself like well. Maybe I disturbed them. Maybe the flashlight for two two years one little flashlight bothered them and they went away. Or maybe maybe maybe it's not raining enough. I just simply could not imagine what could have caused them to disappear. Yeah it was not the flashlights fault. Not According to the FROG autopsy results. They said we don't know why they died. They seem fine. They got something weird in their skin. Now at that point there was nothing known that would kill a frog. Doug that was something quote weird in their skin. Coming up on shortwave. Scientists untangle scientific mystery of the Amphibian World the one that goes from kind of weird to devastating support for this. NPR podcast comes from Sierra Nevada. Brewing Company family owned operated and argued over since nineteen eighty proud supporter of Independent. Thought whether that's online over over the air or in a battle more at Sierra Nevada dot com. Here's the thing you need to know right away about Infineon's there's a lot of them and that's important because they live right in the middle of the food web they are food for all the mammals and the birds and the snakes and the predators and they are the predators predators of all the insects and flies and mosquitoes. So those two things mean that they are really like a key linchpin in the entire ecosystem so when in groups of Amphibians start disappearing scientists. get nervous by the time. Karen had noticed those dead frogs in Costa Rica. They're already been these reports of frogs disappearing being in large numbers around the world and reports kept coming but nobody knew what it all meant. Nobody knew why are they disappearing. Where are they disappearing disappearing from? how quickly do they disappear? You know what what's the cause of it years. After Costa Rica Karen set up another field site in the cloud forest Panama. At first it was wonderful. Hundreds of frogs every night all kinds of different species and then it wasn't two or three years later later I went back and They would be acting very weird frogs that were supposed to only come out at night. We'd find them during the day. Frogs that would you sit. We're supposed to sit only on the leaves and the plants we see them on the ground until we pick them up because we always measure them and identify them and then let them go and a lot of times we'd pick these things up and they wouldn't struggle. They wouldn't try to escape. And oftentimes they'd make one jump and then they dead. WHOA and this happened? We were there for like three weeks weeks and in three weeks we found fifty some dead or dying frogs. Had you ever seen anything like that before. No the scene part is important written because typically researchers would get to a field site and all the frogs would just be gone nobody really witnessed them in the act of dying. Rarely even saw the the bodies but this time Karen had a front row seat more importantly she had a lot of evidence to work with and so on the one hand it is horrible horrible and sad on the other hand. You're like this is it. We have evidence no matter what we've got something we can take back. We can collect then we can preserve them we can send them to a lab and they can look at them and see what they have. Karen said the dead frogs off to a pathologist to be tested and again the vast majority of them seem to have something weird in their skin and he said that I said I have heard this before but Karen Still L. had no idea what the weird skin thing was and she wasn't alone. Scientists from all over working in countries thousands of miles apart. Were also trying to figure it out they didn't realize yet. Just how connected it all was. And this is where the media comes in a New York Times reporter interviewed Karen and some other scientists about the disappearing Amphibian problem and the report published a picture of this weird thing in the skin and then a team here in. DC at the National Zoo saw the picture and they wrote us and they said we have the same thing and we know what it is it took a bunch of scientists from all over the world help from the media and several decades needs to figure it all out but they finally had it. The culprit is a fungus kindred fungus. We're not talking like mushrooms. We're talking infectious fungus. This that burrows into the skin of an amphibian and messes with their ability to breathe and stay hydrated and regulate their body temperature. The infection can be passed directly from frog frog or it can travel through water today. What we know is that there is at least one kind of kitchen fungus almost everywhere in the world? Wow we know that globally something like like forty percent of amphibians are in decline. Now not all of that is from the kid trud but I suspect that probably quite a bit of it is in fact from kindred. Because it's many of the extinctions have occurred in Amphibians are recent like in the past twenty or thirty years which is win this kindred we believe sort of emerged spread around the reason why it's spreading now isn't entirely clear. Karen says it's probably because of us. Humans worshiping things from one place to another faster than ever before which makes it easier for organisms like kitchen fungus to hitch a ride and infect vulnerable habitats hundreds or even thousands of miles away this year the journal Science published a report estimating that has resulted in the greatest recorded loss of biodiversity diversity. Ever caused by a disease. The sad truth is there's no feasible way for us to get kicked out of the environment and that's a tough pill to swallow So how do you wake up every morning and do work on this knowing that you are fighting a losing battle. Well yeah I mean after a while it's incredibly demoralizing moralising to know that you've spent twenty five some years on something and you have not actually saved a single frog on the other hand you know for me as a a biologist. I know that evolution works and having studied human attempts to intervene and save things. Were really good. Would it sort of really discreet. Problems like saving the the condor or things where there's a discrete problem. We can attack it these diseases that are invisible so and spread. Globally are very difficult. And so what what gives me peace is knowing that things evolve off whatever made it through epidemics. They are survivors and they have something that allowed them to to get through the worst of it and so- evolution happens and I suspect that the frogs will figure it out before people do

Karen Lips Scientist Costa Rica Frog Infineon Sierra Nevada Graduate Student NPR New York Times Doug Brewing Company DC Reporter National Zoo Three Weeks Forty Percent Two Two Years
"karen lips" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

08:50 min | 3 years ago

"karen lips" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Us Karen lips from the network of enlightened women. And we had the opportunity to care in a decade ago. Dion, thanks to former GOP chairman Murray, Clark hand of Indiana GOP before you were married, baby. When you were just a pup. You guys when you were doing. This is a side hustle. Starting your blog and right nut and look at how much your organization has grown you. Now the network of enlightened women now has a compilation book called, she's conservative stories of trials and triumphs on America's college campuses. And so you're obviously the main editor as the founder of network of women. But you've included twenty two essays from women who are talking about their experience, being conservative women on college campuses sucks like the dream this. It's great. It was a great opportunity for us to showcase these women and show what conservative young women look like today and sound like today and what the challenges, they face are, and one of the themes that emerged, which I find a little scary is that a number of them made a decision before they even stepped foot on campus that they were going to keep their views. Quiet just because they were conservative. Gosh, that is so hard break. Taking I worried that that was going to be the same. You know what I mean? Like even before we had this conversation. I thought everything is so dire. I mean everything is going in the wrong direction. It seems like on college campuses, that I worried that, that would be the thing because they're afraid they're going to be treated as outcasts weird or something. You know exactly the minority now and they worry it's not just the grades. But they worry about the social pressure that are not going to make friends. Wow. And that's heartbreaking, right? Like that's like something you're thinking about like in kindergarten. Nervous about it, and they're just worried. They're not gonna have that community. They're not gonna have friends, so they didn't. They didn't talk about a mash, lady, and they weren't very active about their conservatism. A lot in college, and they just got through it is that kind of how they dealt with it. Well, these were the spunky monkey decided enough was enough for them. They got involved in our organization and found that community. And in through that, I think they found the peers and the friends and then spoke out good for them. He spoke out very loudly, which is speak to us a little bit about new and what new dies and how that works on college campuses and whatnot. So new is organized as women's leadership chapters on different college campuses, run over thirty campuses around the country. I got it started at the university of Virginia now must fifteen years ago, and we still got a strong chapter there, which is excellent. And in addition to the chapter. So that's a great way for us to build community on campuses help them. Get. Trained, professionally. So we help them get jobs and internships to get more women in the conservative leadership, pipeline important. We also have a national conference. We do. And in this book came out of our she's conservative campaign where we give our women hot pink shirts like the one year wearing. Saying this is what a conservative looks like. On the liberal shirts say a feminist looks like we should be just as loud and proud pay our time. And that's the matters. You know people having them buttons on. Backpacks. Say things like creates that social pressure and not community. And so we want our women to feel confident in their views and to know that they're just as valid as those on the left. They should speak out love that. I love that. So but, but it is a problem, right? Because like even for people that aren't on a college campus. I mean, we hear stories about people who are afraid to wear a maga- hat, right? Who are afraid in any, I'm afraid to put bumper stickers on my car anymore because I don't want it to get, you know, so, so in this book that has these twenty two essays is there a story that, that, you know, strikes you particularly awful when it comes to how some of these women have been treated on campus. One of our students need to at Cornell University. She went on FOX. Thanks to talk about a class that was comparing Obama and President Trump. And of course, vary unfairly, one was like the evil dictator as the savior area, very unfair and the student newspaper wrote about it. She faced a ton of peer pressure on campus, people calling her names, and it was just a really a really negative experience. But she emerged from it, and now she's a reporter in Washington. Good for her. I think it shook her up, but she she took it in stride and learn from it, and now and now is stronger advocate for conservative. That's real empowerment, right there. Right. That's what it really looks like. So how what are the recruitment efforts like? How do you get your name out on college campuses? And then what do the chapter leaders, I guess, due to, to either work alongside other conservative group? There's teepee USA. There's all these young Americans. I mean, there's all kinds of different conservative griffis. It's not like a sorority where you can rush people sorority though, you know what I mean. It kind of is like that. Yeah, exactly. I only wish we could get every like freshman woman. Yeah. Take ten minutes with with the left agree with you. Does that work? I don't even know how that how, how do you do? A lot of tabling on campus. You put out the tables, and the t shirt. You know, and then a number of women, what happens is they have that moment where they. You know, right in a paper about conservative us and their professor comes out them or they speak up in a in a meeting for another club. And people come after them. They're like I need something like women who think like I do out, then. Yeah, we go to. The conservative political action conference will recruit there, so other big conservative event. Because there's somebody young people there. People follow on Instagram and Facebook. And atten lightens women and we have a big Twitter account, so okay, good. On social media say that again, at enlightened women is that okay? Yes. That's our Facebook and Instagram Twitter is at new network. Okay. So we're being joined by Karen lips who founded the network of enlightened women now on thirty college campuses. How that's amazing is. And so do you. I mean, how does how does somebody how do they find you? And if they're not on a college campus, for example. If your organization is on a college campus and someone is there and they're looking for an outlet, they're looking for a way to have the community with, like minded people. Do are they finding you? How does that even work when they're not a presence on campus? I think through one of our national events, so at our national conference, each summer, we hold that in DC, but we open it up to the DC area, interns. So you'll have interns from all the all the seats from different offices. Come to it, and that's a great way for them to have like a I kind of step with our organization and they wanna take that back to campus. Also, we've actually had a number of parents and grandparents who've heard about new somehow through media and if shared it with daughters and granddaughters. That your listeners have daughter granddaughter in college, who you think is looking for some conservative women to hang out with and grow with we'd love to get them involved. And I'm happy to give. My Email is Karen K. A R, I N at enlightened women dot org. I'd love to connect with them. And last question I just want to ask like, if there's not a chapter on a campus. They could do that. Like they do like sort of charter yet. Making. Okay. We end that they find some friends. So we've got an executive board to work when there, but we're happy to work with the chapters and we wanted to go in a direction that they think will work the best on their campus. So some of our chapters organize Moore's reading grew groups, some do more policy discussions. Some do more resume Lincoln workshops. Yeah. So we want it to fit the campus atmosphere, feel the need. That's that's needed. They're what a wonderful organization, just so excited the book again and you gotta get it. It's called she's conservative stories of trials and triumphs on America's college campuses edited by our good friend, Karen, lips of network of enlightened women, thank you so much for being with people can get the book on Amazon. Dare. So..

Karen America GOP Facebook Instagram Indiana Karen lips Dion Twitter Cornell University editor chairman Obama university of Virginia Murray Karen K. founder Moore executive
"karen lips" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:06 min | 3 years ago

"karen lips" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"From the network of enlightened women. And we had the opportunity, Karen, like a decade ago. Yon thanks to former GOP chairman Murray, Clark and of Indiana GOP before you're married, baby. When you were just a pup. You guys when you were doing. This is a side hustle. Starting your blogging. Right. Not. And look at how much you're orgnization has grown you. Now the network of enlightened women now has a compilation book called, she's conservative stories of trials and triumphs on America's college campuses. And so you're obviously the main editor as the founder of network of women, but even -cluded twenty two essays from women who are talking about their experience being conservative women on college campuses this. It's great. It was a great opportunity for us to showcase these women and show what conservative young women look like today and found like today and what the challenges they face are. And one of the themes that emerged, which I find a little scary is that a number of them made a decision before they even stepped foot on campus if they were going to keep their views quiet, just because they were conservative, gosh, that is so hard braking. I worried that that was going to be. The name, you know what I mean. Like even before we had this conversation, I thought everything is so dire everything is going in the wrong direction. It seems like on college campuses, that I worried that, that would be the because they're afraid they're going to be treated as outcasts weird or something. You know exactly the minority now and they worry, it's not just the grades, but they worry about the social pressure that knocking to make friends. Wow, that's heartbreaking. Right. That's like something you're thinking about like in kindergarten nervous about it. And they're just worried. They're not gonna have that community. They're not gonna have friends, so they didn't. They didn't talk about much they, they weren't very active about their conservatism. A lot in college, and they got through it is that kind of dealt with it. Well, these were the spunky monkey women decided enough was enough for them. They got involved in our organization, new, and found that community and through that, I think they found the peers and the friends and then spoke out good for them spoke out very loudly, which speak to us a little bit about new. And what new does and how that works on college campuses and whatnot. So new organized as women's leadership chapters on different college campuses, run over thirty campuses around the country. I got it started at the university of Virginia now fifteen years ago. Wow. And we still got a strong chapter there, which is excellent. And in addition to the chapter. So that's a great way for us to build community on campuses help them. Get trained professionals that we help them get jobs and internships to get more women in the conservative leadership, pipeline important. We also have a national conference. We do. And in this book came out of our she's conservative campaign where we give our women hot pink shirts like the one year wearing. I say this is what a conservative looks like of lay on the liberal shirts, that say this feminist looks like we should be just as loud and proud our time. And that's the matters. You know people having them buttons on. Backpacks that say things like mitt creates that social pressure and that community. And so we want our women to feel confident in their views and to know that they're just as valid as those on the left high. They should speak out love that. I love that. So but, but it is a problem, right? Because like even for people that aren't on a college campus. I mean, we hear stories about people who are afraid to where maga- hat, right? Who are afraid in? I'm afraid to put bumper stickers on my car anymore because I don't want it to get, you know lies. So, so in this book that has these twenty two essays is there a story that, that strikes you, particularly awful when it comes to how some of these women have been treated on campus. Hey, what our students need to chandy at Cornell University. She went on FOX to talk about a class that was comparing Obama and President Trump and of course, very unfairly Riley, one was like the evil dictator as the savior area, very unfair and the student newspaper wrote about it. She faced a ton of peer pressure on campus, people calling her names, and it was just a really a really negative experience. But she emerged from it, and now she's a reporter in Washington. Good for her. I think it shook her up, but she, she took it in stride and learn from it, and now now is stronger advocate for conservative views. And that's real empowerment, right there. Right. Yeah. That's what it really looks like. So how what are the recruitment efforts like? How do you get your name out on college campuses? And then what do the chapter leaders, I guess, due to, to either work alongside other conservative groups? Teepee USA. There's all these young Americans. I mean, there's all kinds of different conservative. It's not like a sorority where you can rush people. That's like a sorority though. You know what I mean it kind of is like that. Yeah. Exactly. Only wish we could get every like freshman woman. Yeah. Take ten minutes with us and Iran minutes with the left. I totally agree with you, because how does that work? I don't even know how that how, how do you a lot of tabling on campus? Okay. You put out the tables, the t shirt. You know, and then number of women, what happens is they have that moment where they, you know, right in a paper about conservative us, and their professor comes out them or they speak up in a in a meeting for another club and people come after them. They're like I need something like women who think like I do about that. Yeah. Or we go to the conservative political action conference and will recruit there. So another big conservative event Bahij because there's so many young people there and people follow on Instagram and Facebook at lightens women. And we have a big Twitter account, so okay, good. And find us on social media say that again at enlightened women. Is that okay? Yes. That's our Facebook and Instagram ten are Twitter's at new network. Okay. So we're being joined by Karen lips who founded the network of enlightened women now on thirty college campuses. Wow, that's amazing is. And so do you. I mean how does how does somebody? How do they find you? And if they're not on a college campus, for example. If your organization is on a college campus and someone is there and they're looking for an outlet, they're looking for a way to have a community with, like minded people. Do are they finding you? How does that even work when there is not a presence on campus? I think through one of our national events, so at our national conference, each summer, we hold that in the but we open it up to the DC area, interns. So you'll have interns from all the all the states from different offices, come to it, and that's a great way for them to have, like a I kind of step with our organization, and then they wanna take that back to campus. Also, we've actually had a number of parents and grandparents who've heard about new somehow through media and if shared it with daughters and granddaughters. I need your listeners have daughter granddaughter in college, who you think is looking for some conservative women to hang out with and grow with we'd love to get them involved. And I'm happy to give. My Email is Karen K. A R, I N at enlightened women dot org. I'd love to connect with them. And last question I just wanna ask if there's not a chapter on campus. They could do that, like they could do like sort of charter making started doing, okay. We assume that they find some friends. So we've got an executive board to work when there, but we're happy to work with the chapters and we wanted to go in a direction, they think will work the best on their campus. So some of our chapters organized Moore's reading grow grooms, some do more policy discussions. Some do more resume linked in workshops. Yeah. So we want it to fit the campus atmosphere, feel the need. That's that's needed. They're what a wonderful organization, just so excited, the book again and. You gotta get it. It's called. She's conservative stories of trials and triumphs on America's college campuses, edited by our good friend, Karen, lips of network of enlightened women, thank you so much for being with people can get the book on Amazon. Fair. So having me on Karen, y'all. Stay with us. It's going to be hot this weekend. And if there's even a shred of sunshine, I know I'm going to spend some major quality time on my floating redneck raft. And my Royal spot tubs, part of my weekend spring, and summer routine. Even when the weather warms up, we are constantly in that Royal spot us to our kids hanging out in the roads hot tub and since we're out in the country, we can turn the heat down turn the tunes up and make a party out of it. And I love the every inch of our Royal spa was customized for our family. That's how they all are. And they're all made right here in Indiana. Non some far off factory south of the border with Royal spas, you get a forty year guarantee on a customized gorgeous hot tub, and.

Karen Indiana America GOP Royal spa Twitter Facebook Instagram Yon Karen lips Cornell University editor chairman mitt Karen K. Iran university of Virginia Murray founder
"karen lips" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"karen lips" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"They're good people. They're good people. Karen by Karen lips from Indianapolis. And she now heads up the network of enlightened women also known as new enlightened women dot org. This is. If I were to say that this is a response to the idea that the only way to be a woman in America's to be a liberal would. I be accurate. You would be accurate. Look at me. Look at me talk to me about the organization going on started the organization when I was on a college campus at the university of Virginia and realize that all the women's groups where pushing a liberal agenda in that wasn't me. And I didn't think that was a lot of young women. And so started it as a counter to these liberal women's organizations because I've got conservative views deserve to be heard too. So when when you see these things on campus, I've always discussed the fact that it's harder for women who are conservatives to run for office and do things like it's harder for people who are black to run for office on the political, right? Because when they do they're called trader they do they're called a traitor to your gender trade or to to your race. You know, you're not a real woman. That's the the one that I always talk about if you're a woman in your conservative, and you're not you're not a real woman. You don't understand real women's issues? You're you're you're stepford wives. It goes on and on. Did you is that what you encountered it? University of Virginia that is widespread across the country. I would say there's a special vitriol reserved for conservative women defining that there's something that the left fines. Deeply problematic. And I think they find it. Challenge because the left is controlled women's issues and being the women's voice for so long, and they use that as a tool of the push through progressive policies and liberal policies. And so they're very worried when there's all these amazing strong, conservative women, speaking out and try to try to stop us down. You mentioned. I mean, I've always felt like when conservative women speak up the left, basically says like you're not a woman anymore. You you don't count right? Like, even in the last election. What Hillary Clinton said about about women that you know, when it you didn't vote for her that their husbands or their fathers or friends told them how to vote that's wrong conservative women think for themselves. They're extremely thoughtful. But it's it's a caricature they like to create it is it is. And they do it. They're they're affected out of talking to Karen lips of the organization network of enlightened women, and there's a book again talk about culture today. She's conservative stories of trials and triumphs on America's college campuses. And so you put out the call for, hey, if you're a woman, and you're on a college campus, tell me about your experience and tell me about what you what you did too. Was it to let people know or or just what you stand for. Well, this is part of a hashtag campaign. We do tax she's conservative and give young women searched. The this is what a conservative looks like. And encourage them to tweet out why they are conservative, and we did that a couple years, and then started collecting FASt from college women about why they are conservative and realize that we had some amazing women who had great things to say about what they faced on campus. Conservatives in why they are conservatives, and so we were motivated to share those stories, especially because we hear so often that conservative women feel so lonely on campus that this is a way for us to show conservative women who are proud to speak out for their ideas. And we hope this inspires more women to speak out. Karen lips? She's conservative is the book, and it is a subject that we've addressed before we've gotten.

Karen lips university of Virginia America Indianapolis Hillary Clinton