20 Burst results for "Karen Hopkins"

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:55 min | 4 d ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds. Science I'm Karen Hopkins. The statues on Easter Island are among the most mysterious objects made by humans. We still don't know how they were moved why they were placed particular sites around the island and why they were made in the first place. Now, researchers think they have at least some answers because a new analysis fines that the statues are located near sources of freshwater. The study appears in the Journal plus. It's believed that the residents of revenue the indigenous name for Easter Island began constructing these carvings in the thirteenth century the statues called Moai which sit upon stone platforms called who are the very definition of monumental, most way between twenty and thirty tonnes and of the thousand on the island about four hundred have been moved from the quarry where they originated and placed on all who located elsewhere. But those locations aren't necessarily everywhere there in some places and not others. And the questions that we started to ask ourselves was, why do we find these out who and why some places on the landscape but not others Carl, Lipo an anthropologist at Binghamton University in Central, New, York he says that most of these sculptures are found along the coast but some are inland and they're not necessarily in obvious places. For example, we don't find out WHO and statues located on the tops of hills places that we might expect to find them if. These things were symbolic representing ancestors where you wanted to show off to the world or the itself, the fruits of your creation these statue. So the statues are more than just towering talismans to be admired from afar indeed lippo and his colleagues noted that people spent most of their time living in working around these sites which made the researchers thing that the statues might be located near a valuable resource. So the question was what resource was water freshwater marine resources. Or Division places, which of those which combination of those best explained locations of who on the landscape and their statistical analyses pointed toward potable water, which Lippo says made sense every single time we found a big source of freshwater. There would be a statue in and out who emmy facilities over and over and over again in places where we didn't find freshwater, we didn't find statues and I hope now that doesn't mean that the sculpture served as markers like sign saying. Here. But rather that the community themselves were connected to those resources and thus their investment in statues was done around that resource because these locations had the resources that they needed survive. It seems that many of these massive sculptures are where they are for totally pragmatic reasons we'll build here because here is where we wanna be. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty seconds science I'm Karen Hopkin..

Easter Island Lippo Karen Hopkins Karen Hopkin Journal plus Binghamton University in Centr Carl York
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:54 min | 3 months ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science I'm Karen Hopkins. The supermarket trying to choose a right tomato when behind you, you hear. If you're like most people, you probably hold your breath. Tighten your mask an hope. You don't catch whatever patient zero is spraying all over the fresh produce, and if you're like most people chances are you're overreacting? Because a new study shows that we're not very skilled when it comes to diagnosing infectiousness based on the sound of a cough or sneeze. The work is in the proceedings of the Royal Society Biological Sciences. Previous studies have shown that folks can tell when someone's sick based on how they look, or in some cases how they smell, so it's only natural to wonder whether the same would hold true for an assessment with our ears, so researchers asked volunteers to listen to audio clips of people, hacking and sneezing half of the cost and sneezes were produced by people with an infectious illness like flu or the common cold in. In half were produced by benign causes like eating too much cinnamon, all at once or sticking q tip of their noses Nicholas lack a Grad student in social psychology at the University of Michigan. We clipped these sounds from youtube videos in which people told their audience that they were sick. Many reported having been diagnosed by medical professional. All this said we could not directly confirm whether people in our sound clips were infectious. Infectious or not, and what he found across four studies of over six hundred participants in total on average people guest, four out of ten sounds correctly, which is consistent with random guessing in other words, they weren't very good at judging whether the sounds were infected, but being bad judges didn't dampen their confidence when asked how sure they were about their guesses on a scale of one to nine participants reported an average certainty. Certainty of seven, interestingly, we didn't find any evidence that people who were more certain about their guesses were any more or less likely to guess correctly, so what made them so sure that certain sounds warped sure signs of disease well, the cities they figured made noises that seemed the most gross, the more disgusting. They perceived a sound, the more likely they were to judge it infectious, even if the sound wasn't infectious, so. Might be deemed more contagious than. Depending on your own personal nasty ometer, all that's to say even if it seems like you can tell whether a cough or sneeze is infectious based on how disgusting it sound that feeling has the potential to mislead you in other words. You can't judge a book by its cover. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty seconds science I'm Karen Hopkin?.

cough Karen Hopkins Karen Hopkin youtube Royal Society Biological Scien University of Michigan Nicholas
Can people ID infectious disease by cough and sneeze sounds?

60-Second Science

02:46 min | 3 months ago

Can people ID infectious disease by cough and sneeze sounds?

"This is scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science I'm Karen Hopkins. The supermarket trying to choose a right tomato when behind you, you hear. If you're like most people, you probably hold your breath. Tighten your mask an hope. You don't catch whatever patient zero is spraying all over the fresh produce, and if you're like most people chances are you're overreacting? Because a new study shows that we're not very skilled when it comes to diagnosing infectiousness based on the sound of a cough or sneeze. The work is in the proceedings of the Royal Society Biological Sciences. Previous studies have shown that folks can tell when someone's sick based on how they look, or in some cases how they smell, so it's only natural to wonder whether the same would hold true for an assessment with our ears, so researchers asked volunteers to listen to audio clips of people, hacking and sneezing half of the cost and sneezes were produced by people with an infectious illness like flu or the common cold in. In half were produced by benign causes like eating too much cinnamon, all at once or sticking q tip of their noses Nicholas lack a Grad student in social psychology at the University of Michigan. We clipped these sounds from youtube videos in which people told their audience that they were sick. Many reported having been diagnosed by medical professional. All this said we could not directly confirm whether people in our sound clips were infectious. Infectious or not, and what he found across four studies of over six hundred participants in total on average people guest, four out of ten sounds correctly, which is consistent with random guessing in other words, they weren't very good at judging whether the sounds were infected, but being bad judges didn't dampen their confidence when asked how sure they were about their guesses on a scale of one to nine participants reported an average certainty. Certainty of seven, interestingly, we didn't find any evidence that people who were more certain about their guesses were any more or less likely to guess correctly, so what made them so sure that certain sounds warped sure signs of disease well, the cities they figured made noises that seemed the most gross, the more disgusting. They perceived a sound, the more likely they were to judge it infectious, even if the sound wasn't infectious, so. Might be deemed more contagious than. Depending on your own personal nasty ometer, all that's to say even if it seems like you can tell whether a cough or sneeze is infectious based on how disgusting it sound that feeling has the potential to mislead you in other words. You can't judge a book by its cover.

Cough Karen Hopkins Royal Society Biological Scien Youtube University Of Michigan Nicholas
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

03:24 min | 5 months ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkins. You can tell a lot about people's general state of mind based on their social media feeds. Are they always tweeting about their biggest peeves or posting pics of particularly cute kitties? Well in a similar fashion, researchers are turning to twitter for clues about the overall happiness of entire geographic communities. What they're finding is that regional variation in the use of common phrases produces predictions that always reflect the local state of well-being. But removing from their analyses, just three specific terms, good love and L. O. L. Greatly improves the accuracy of the methods. We living in a crazy Kobe nineteen era, and now more than ever will be using social media to adapt to a new normal land. Reach out to the friends and family that become meet face to face. Tokyo Judaica studies computational linguistics at the National University of Singapore but a woods aren't. Just to understand more, we as individuals stinking feed, they are also useful clues about the community we live in one of the simpler methods that many scientists used to parse the data involves correlating words with positive or negative emotions, but when those tallies are compared with phone surveys that assess regional wellbeing. Jessica says they don't paint an accurate picture of the local Zeitgeist to find out why jet got her colleague Yohannes Istat of Stanford University analyzed. tweets from around the United States, and they found that among the most frequently used terms on twitter are ll love and good, and the actually throw the analysis of in fact when we moved the three words alone be managed to improve upon the simple word, counting methods and obtain better, if not perfect estimates of happiness why the disconnect well, Jessica says one issue is in donate languages, really different beast than regular, spoken or language. We've adapted words from the English or capillary to mean things in different situations take for example L. O. L.. I've tweeted the word. To Flood Express irony, annoyance companies just feel surprise when the mature for mentioning. As a market of happiness included in the nineteen nineties, it still laughing out loud well. There are plenty of terms that are less misleading, says shed are models. Tell us that words like excited. Fun Grades. Opportunity interesting fantastic. Those a better words for measuring subjective OBI looking at the data, their work appears in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences being able to get an accurate read on the mood of the population is no laughing matter, and is particularly important now in the time of covert where we're expecting a mental health crisis, and we're already seeing in survey data, the largest diminishment and subjective oh being. Ten years at least if not ever no doubt we could all use more fantastic opportunities for great phone excitement. Give or take yellow. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin..

twitter Jessica Karen Hopkins Karen Hopkin National University of Singapo National Academy of Sciences Kobe Stanford University United States Yohannes Istat L. O. L.
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

03:23 min | 6 months ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkins. If there's one thing we know about viruses it's that they love to spread the novel. Corona virus is happy to use US humans as its host other viruses fancy bees but like us B.'s. Fight back in the case of one particular virus called Israeli acute paralysis. Virus study shows honeybees. Actually use a form of social distancing to prevent transmitting the infection within their own colony of course not to be outdone. The virus manipulates the bees in a way that spreads the infection to the colony. Next door move studies in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Honeybees live in large communities that contain tens of thousands of related individuals in close quarters so researchers got to wondering how can keep infections from spreading like wildfire while a graduate student. At the University of Illinois Champaign Urbana Tim good not developed an automated system for continuously tracking the behavior of thousands of individual bees and he watched what happened when he introduced infected bees into the hive. Entomologist Adam Dozo. Who worked with good Described what they saw. We found in this study that within their own Colin context when they are interacting with their nest mates usually they're sisters. Infected fees experience fewer contact behaviors fewer mouth to mouth feeding contacts than bees. Who are not infected. The researchers also saw the same sort of social avoidance when instead of infecting the bees with virus they artificially activated the bee's immune system so the behavior is driven by the virus but by the bees own immune response which Dole says make sense if honeybees are going to protect their colony in their queen from disease sick. Bees need to keep their feelers to themselves. They have to they live in these really large colonies. Where everybody's touching each other all the time. They're all closely related joke. That honeybees have been doing social distancing for millions of years at the same time beezer under no pressure to keep infections from spreading to other colonies. And that's where the virus gains the UPPERHAND. Amy Jeffrey who worked on the project. As a graduate student found that the guard bees from other colonies were actually less aggressive toward incoming infected bees than they were to uninfected bees as a result that infected beezer accepted into the colony at about twice the rate of control bees or immune stimulated B.'s. The virus it seems alters the chemicals that bees produced to communicate who they are and where they're from and so we think that One way that the virus could be gaining entry to these other colonies is by changing the bees physiology in a way to make it more acceptable to other colonies on guard bees. Let's bad news for beekeepers who tend to keep tens or even hundreds of hives right next to one another to really ripe situation for bees to be able to move between colonies relatively easily and bring pathogens and parasites along with them. Seems you gotTa Carefully Mind Your Beeswax. And keep kept colonies. Healthily socially distanced for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin..

graduate student National Academy of Sciences H US Karen Hopkins University of Illinois Champai Karen Hopkin Adam Dozo Amy Jeffrey Colin Dole
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkins. They say that Marie Antoinette's hair turned white the night before she lost her head to the guillotine but constraints really have such a dramatic effect on hair-color a new study in mice concludes at Ken and credits overactive. Nerves with stripping the color from the animals locks and possibly hours researchers at Harvard Stem Cell Institute. Were interested in these stress and hair color issue so they decided to take a closer look at the stem cells that give rise to Milan. Ascites the cells that pump pigments into each hair follicle stem cells. Were an obvious target. Because changes in the stem cell population translates to try and justify hair color which very visible and easy to identify. Jacek sue the study senior author to start. She and her colleagues subjected mice to some rodent sized stressors like having their cage tilted their bedding dampened or their lights left on all night. So what did we find? We found stress indeed leads to premature hair grain in mice by took a long time for us to actually narrow down how occurs first they thought it could be the immune system attacking the millennia site stem cell population however mayes lack immune cells steel. Shell premature here graying under stress than they thought the key factor could be cortisol. The quintessential stress hormone the one way removed from the mice so that they cannot produce quarter so like her mows. The hairstyle turned gray under stress. That's when they turn their attention to the sympathetic nervous system which or constraints the body's overall reaction to stress including the classic fight or flight. Response those nerves reach out to our muscles organs and yes even our hair the nerve terminals wrap around each follicle like a ribbon and sooner team cut. Those connections the stem cells were spared and the animals kept their shiny black coat even in the face of minor discomfort. The findings appear in the journal Nature. It's unclear whether the same sympathetic nerves make us gray as we age but the results provide hope that we may someday be able to fight to hold onto our natural hair color and avoid that monthly flight to the hairdresser. Thanks for listening. For Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin..

Harvard Stem Cell Institute Marie Antoinette Karen Hopkins sympathetic nervous system Karen Hopkin Ascites cortisol Milan Jacek Ken mayes
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkins. It may be one of the Doggone doggies things a dog he can do chasing down a sticker a ball and then bring it back. But when it comes to playing fetch. Perhaps the apple doesn't fall all all that far from the evolutionary tree because a new study shows that some Wolf pups demonstrate the same innate fetching skill a finding that suggests that an ability ability to playfully interact with people might have been around in ancient wolves before they transitioned into domesticated dogs. Some fifteen thousand years ago. The work is in the Journal Journal. Science researchers were interested in understanding how domestication affected canine behavior so they raised several litters of both wolf and in dog puppies and ran the little furball through a standard series of behavioral tests in one of those tests. A puppy assessor someone. The animals never before met would toss a tennis ball across the room and encourage the puck to retrieve it. Wolf pups in the first two litters tested showed little interest in playing ball but three of the six POPs in the third letter caught on quickly to wolves named Elvis and Lenny brought the ball back in two out of three throws while the intrepid little sting knocked it out of the park and carried carried the ball back all three times. These results were actually unexpected. The researchers had thought that the ability to socially engage with unfamiliar humans was something that likely arose after dogs were domesticated the fact that a few of the wolf pups were up for some fun suggests that the potential for a connection between canines and people could've been present from the get-go giving some wolves a leg up or maybe even multiple legs up in becoming our best friends for scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin..

Karen Hopkin Karen Hopkins Journal Journal apple tennis Elvis Lenny
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

03:37 min | 10 months ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkins Parasites live on or even inside another organism awesome and some can even change the behavior of their host to boost the odds of their transmission. Take the single celled Taco Plasma Gandhi mice infected with at this bug appear to become attracted to the smell of cat P and odor that uninfected mice. Smartly avoid the infection thus raises the chances that a mouse will wind up in the cat's mouth. Obviously bad news for the mouse but good news for the parasite which needs a kitty to complete. Its life cycle and spread to additional hosts Devious indeed but it turns out this cunning scheme may be less precisely targeted than it initially appears because a new study finds minds the Tuxedo. Plasma doesn't specifically eliminate a mouse's natural aversion to cats rather the infection makes them generally less anxious and more adventures which which makes them more curious about cats and pretty much everything else. No Work Appears in the Journal cell reports the story about the Plasma Gandhi manipulating relating the the behavior of its host is Simply fascinating biologists. Yvonne Rodriguez of the University of Geneva one of the study senior authors. It was funny. cally intriguing for us to understand how the Perez Zaide achieves specific alteration of the neural circuits quits involved in the response towards few line creditors. Something that has never been elucidated so Rodriguez and his colleague set out to determine the molecular mechanisms. That underlie this legendary feline fatal attraction for their first step. We decided to perform quite broad panel of behavioral April essays within victimizing order to get an overview of how a virus it's host we clinically observed. And that's infected mice word anxious were more explorative erected to quality control mice when confronted with a potential. Aw threads for example mice infected with TACO plasma. Were quicker to check out. The far reaches of an elevated as than their uninfected comrades they interacted directed with the human investigators hands and were unperturbed when an anesthetized rat was plunked into the middle of their cage an event that caused uninfected mice to to freeze in their tracks. The infected mice in this study did indeed show an attraction to the urine of Bob Cats but they were even more interested in the sense of foxes this and Guinea pigs of course whether or not infected mice are drawn specifically to the smell of cats parasites still gets. What it wants says Rodriguez? The the end result is to favor. Detroit mission of the infected rodents to the cats as to the mechanism. It appears that the parasite triggers a general inflammation of the brain. One interesting finding is that we observed a correlation between the level of inflammation and severity of Behavioral Alterations Medley. A GRADUATE STUDENT IN THE RODRIGUEZ LAB. She and Rodriguez will continue to explore. How Neuro Inflammation sends mice to their almost certain doom does it render these mice blind to danger or endow them with the kind of curiosity that's usually associated with their feline foes? Thanks for listening. For Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin..

Yvonne Rodriguez Bob Cats Karen Hopkins Karen Hopkin Perez Zaide University of Geneva Journal cell GRADUATE STUDENT Detroit Guinea
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkins. When we think about pets? We often considered dogs to be overly attentive and cats. Well a bit more aloof. But a new study shows the cats can become attached to their humans. And we'll turn to that person for comfort in times times of stress the findings per in e journal current biology although kitties are a popular pet more people own cats than dogs here in the. US There are few few studies that examine how the furtive felines feel about their owners. There has actually been relatively little research into the cat human bond especially when we compare it to the number of research studies with dogs in humans. Kristen Batali a post doctoral scholar at Oregon State University to explore the Cat Caregiver Connection Battalion or colleagues colleagues turned to a test. That's been used to assess bonding behavior in puppies apes and even infants the researchers would show a cat and its owner to an unfamiliar room and leave them there for two minutes. At which point the owner would depart leaving the cat on its own. We know that in human infants attachment behaviors toward their parents. It's our heightened in response to a frightening or novel situation so in this case the experience of the cat being in the novel room alone. Axes are strange. The situation in allows us to observe the cat directs any attachment behavior to the owner. When they then come back to the room when the owners returned battalion company would observe their reunion and they saw the feelings displayed a variety of categories says some cats greeted their owner and then they returned to exploring the room while periodically Riyadh going back to their own? Ah for attention. These kids are apparently secure enough in their relationship. Let's some quick reassurance. Was All they needed before continuing to pursue do their perusal of the room on the other Pau some were real scaredy. Cats other cats behaved in an insecure way in excessively clung to their owner side. And then there were the cats that lived up to their reputation for supercilious stand-offishness other cats avoided their own are when they return to the room. These securing an insecure patterns of behavior are actually the same as what we observe between dogs and their owners and even human infants in their caregivers. In all three of these populations nations the majority of individuals are actually securely attached to their caregivers indicating similarities across these species. Although snubbing is generally considered classic classic conduct the majority of cats in the study around sixty five percent actually use their owners a source of security one could even describe right. Those cat human relationships as Don. Thanks for listening. For Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin..

Cat Caregiver Connection Batta Karen Hopkins Karen Hopkin Kristen Batali Riyadh Pau Don Oregon State University sixty seconds sixty five percent two minutes
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm karen hopkins when it comes to the ritual. Act of dating participants often have very different expectations some hope to meet their soulmate others see companionship. Some are looking good time and think that spring for a meal entitles signals them to one and now a new study finds that some women say that now and again they just want to score lobster tails the findings in the journal social social psychological and personality science. You're probably wondering how he came up with this. Idea bryan collison a social psychologist at zoo's a pacific university in california collison says he's always been intrigued minute scientific sense by romantic relationships so when one of his co-authors trista herald also it is a pacific told him about this interesting new phenomenon that maxim magazine had nicknamed of foodie call curious to explore how often women the men for food rather than relationship now in this study. The researchers focused on heterosexual women in part because based on long standing cultural expectations men often pick up the tab particularly on a first date eight in a pair of online surveys. The researchers asked more than a thousand women. Have you ever agreed to date someone. You're not interested in a relationship with because he might pay for your meal. We found that approximately twenty three to thirty three percent of women surveyed had engage necessity call of those who admitted to having swiped right for the free eats the majority jordy claimed to have done so only occasionally or rarely but about a quarter admitted accepting the restaurant outings with greater frequency the respondents most likely to engage in this type of the dating for dinner behavior. We're those who endorsed traditional gender role beliefs and who scored high on a personality test designed to detect what's called the dark triad the dark triad refers to sub clinical levels of psychopathy which is a lack of remorse and empathy and perspective taking monkey volume which is where you purposely manipulate others.

bryan collison lack of remorse jordy karen hopkins maxim magazine trista herald california thirty three percent sixty seconds
Certain Personality Types Likely to Make a "Foodie Call"

60-Second Science

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Certain Personality Types Likely to Make a "Foodie Call"

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm karen hopkins when it comes to the ritual. Act of dating participants often have very different expectations some hope to meet their soulmate others see companionship. Some are looking good time and think that spring for a meal entitles signals them to one and now a new study finds that some women say that now and again they just want to score lobster tails the findings in the journal social social psychological and personality science. You're probably wondering how he came up with this. Idea bryan collison a social psychologist at zoo's a pacific university in california collison says he's always been intrigued minute scientific sense by romantic relationships so when one of his co-authors trista herald also it is a pacific told him about this interesting new phenomenon that maxim magazine had nicknamed of foodie call curious to explore how often women the men for food rather than relationship now in this study. The researchers focused on heterosexual women in part because based on long standing cultural expectations men often pick up the tab particularly on a first date eight in a pair of online surveys. The researchers asked more than a thousand women. Have you ever agreed to date someone. You're not interested in a relationship with because he might pay for your meal. We found that approximately twenty three to thirty three percent of women surveyed had engage necessity call of those who admitted to having swiped right for the free eats the majority jordy claimed to have done so only occasionally or rarely but about a quarter admitted accepting the restaurant outings with greater frequency the respondents most likely to engage in this type of the dating for dinner behavior. We're those who endorsed traditional gender role beliefs and who scored high on a personality test designed to detect what's called the dark triad the dark triad refers to sub clinical levels of psychopathy which is a lack of remorse and empathy and perspective taking monkey volume which is where you purposely manipulate others.

Bryan Collison Lack Of Remorse Jordy Karen Hopkins Maxim Magazine Trista Herald California Thirty Three Percent Sixty Seconds
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin. All everyone knows what it's like to which and the sensation can drive you mad or if you're Yengo son of the Chinese Academy of sciences. It can drive you to explore how the brain tells you it's time to scratch. Our study is aiming to understand the burn mechanism data promote that you just quieting cycle. Itching can be caused by a number of irritants from allergic reactions and abrasive textures to bug bites skin conditions infections or drugs, the usual solution is to simply scratch, but this cycle of scratching if it continues unabated connection damaged tissue like if you scratch yourself, raw and sun notes that effect to treat them for chronic h is still lacking this is largely due to our limited knowledge about the enormity of age over the past ten years. Scientists learned a lot about how the ignore is carried from the skin to the spa. Final chord in contrast when the were little about how the information is processing the brand and how the bring can dynamically modulate the processing of each son in his colleagues focus their attention on the Perry. Akwa ductile gray a brain region known to be involved in handling the closely related sensation of pain. They started by exposing mice to histamine or the anti malarial drug chloroquine both of which trigger scratching, and they found that this issue inducing treatment activates a particular set of neurons within the Perry AC with Dr gray neurons, the produce neuro chemical called Tak one when the researchers eliminated this set of neurons scratching was significantly diminished. And when they activated the neurons, even in the absence of a chemical irritant, the scratching resumed son, thus thinks of these tech one expressing neurons as the ignorance and the brain getting these neurons firing makes animals itchy and gets them to scratch his findings appear in the journal nor on physician yards in the burn can be a potential central therapy. Target for breaking the wishes issue squatting cycle associated with chronic age, which could be a big relief for many irritated people. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkins.

Karen Hopkin Chinese Academy of sciences Karen Hopkins Perry histamine chloroquine sixty seconds ten years
You Gotta Scratch That Itch

60-Second Science

02:16 min | 2 years ago

You Gotta Scratch That Itch

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin. All everyone knows what it's like to which and the sensation can drive you mad or if you're Yengo son of the Chinese Academy of sciences. It can drive you to explore how the brain tells you it's time to scratch. Our study is aiming to understand the burn mechanism data promote that you just quieting cycle. Itching can be caused by a number of irritants from allergic reactions and abrasive textures to bug bites skin conditions infections or drugs, the usual solution is to simply scratch, but this cycle of scratching if it continues unabated connection damaged tissue like if you scratch yourself, raw and sun notes that effect to treat them for chronic h is still lacking this is largely due to our limited knowledge about the enormity of age over the past ten years. Scientists learned a lot about how the ignore is carried from the skin to the spa. Final chord in contrast when the were little about how the information is processing the brand and how the bring can dynamically modulate the processing of each son in his colleagues focus their attention on the Perry. Akwa ductile gray a brain region known to be involved in handling the closely related sensation of pain. They started by exposing mice to histamine or the anti malarial drug chloroquine both of which trigger scratching, and they found that this issue inducing treatment activates a particular set of neurons within the Perry AC with Dr gray neurons, the produce neuro chemical called Tak one when the researchers eliminated this set of neurons scratching was significantly diminished. And when they activated the neurons, even in the absence of a chemical irritant, the scratching resumed son, thus thinks of these tech one expressing neurons as the ignorance and the brain getting these neurons firing makes animals itchy and gets them to scratch his findings appear in the journal nor on physician yards in the burn can be a potential central therapy. Target for breaking the wishes issue squatting cycle associated with chronic age, which could be a big relief for many irritated people. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkins.

Karen Hopkin Chinese Academy Of Sciences Karen Hopkins Perry Histamine Chloroquine Sixty Seconds Ten Years
"karen hopkins" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on KPCC

"Well it's been happening since nineteen eightysix big crowd of athletes young and old lacing up their running shoes and hitting the streets in the la marathon now as healthy as it is to be so athletic all of those people leave behind an awful lot of trash as they make their way from dodger stadium across town to santa monica but the la marathon is working to clean up its act kpcc's sue carpenter has our story this sunday more than twenty five thousand people will subject themselves to the la marathon plotting mile after grueling mile from dodger stadium to the pacific most will run many will walk but all of them will experience something they'd rather not see yeah he said something about trash i can talk about trash that's karen hopkins of santa monica she'll be running the marathon for the fourth time this weekend she spoke with me during lunchtime walk this week it it really bugs me when i see people just throw their cups down because there's trash cans right there most of us out there we're just doing this to finish we're not gonna win a prize we're not the elite runners so if it takes you two seconds to throw it in a trash can you should do that yes to run the la marathon is to run a gauntlet of throwaways and there's also like yeah the gel packs there is so close that's usually picked up leftover food half eaten food a lot of which is now being picked up donated composted or recycled as part of the la marathon goal of being more sustainable it used to be that most of this stuff was thrown away but in two thousand fourteen the la marathon started to clean up its act last year the marathon diverted sixty two percent of its waste this year it hopes to divert seventy five percent or really recycling as much of the material that we can says jaime nack she's president of three squares the environmental consulting firm in santa monica that designed.

la dodger stadium sue carpenter jaime nack santa monica karen hopkins seventy five percent sixty two percent two seconds
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans, sixty seconds, science. I'm Karen Hopkin. All nature may be read in to thank law, but one plucky caterpillar dresses in orange and black to avoid becoming somebody's lunch. What's really surprising though, is that this distinctive set of strives can service both a warning or is camouflage depending on how far away It is from the viewer animals can deploy color as a defence mechanism and a couple of ways. Some shades and patterns help potential pray blend into the background. Whereas bold markings often serve as a signal that an animal is unpalatable. For example, chock full of toxins. Resolution and often seen as mutually exclusive, an alternative mechanisms, but on natural conditions is distinction is less clear-cut. Jim Barr head of the University of Bristol, who led the study to explore whether the same coloration might do double duty, allowing an animal to be obvious under some conditions, But unseen in others. They focused their attention on the caterpillars of cinnabar moths these larvae sport, bright orange and black stripes. Their vivid appearance was believed to remind the birds who may have eaten others of their kind that they are none-too tasty. Thanks to their diet of alkaloid rich ragwort plans. The researchers snapped photos of the caterpillar's in suburban green spaces around Bristol, and they used a visual muddling program to give them a bird's eye view of what the caterpillars look like. Either close up lower from farther away. Firm. Fringe constraints are highly conspicuous these rights colors distinguish it quite easily from direct with background, but were viewed from distance big blend together to form a color, which is actually quite difficult to discern from the background color. So what we think is going on is that the caterpillar is getting the best of both worlds close up the stripes sake keep your distance, but from a distance, They allow the caterpillars to hide in plain sight. The results can be seen in the Journal Royal Society, open science. The finding is a reminder. Don't forget to step back and see things from a different perspective. Thanks for listening for a scientific Americans, sixty seconds, science. I'm Karen Hopkins.

Karen Hopkin Karen Hopkins Bristol Jim Barr University of Bristol Journal Royal Society sixty seconds
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans, sixty seconds, science. I'm Karen Hopkins, all the rise and technology, particularly for information and communication is radically transforming lifestyles. For example, many people can now work from home and still be an almost constant contact with the office, or maybe you prefer your own couch for watching a recently released movie rather than trekking to the local Theater. This technology used lifestyle changes ethic POW, be Blue consume energy, and ultimately ethic. The unity demand off the nation, a Chauque say car A post-doctoral fellow at the University of Texas Austin to assess how are changing Use of technology might alter our energy. Consumption sake are in his colleagues. First set out to determine how much more We're in our homes than we were in the past. For more than a decade. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics has surveyed how American spend their time each day more than eleven thousand citizens respond to the survey each. Cheer grunting the numbers from this survey, The researchers found that Americans are definitely logging more hours in their living-rooms when compared to two thousand three the year 2000 fellow Americans spent eight days moored at home that seven fewer days spent in non-residential spaces And one less day spent traveling per year. Can that's on average, the younger generation exhibited even stronger home buddy tendencies. The population aged eighteen to twenty four spin Greeks motor home and glucose and twelve compatible doesn't The to seventy percent higher chains than the average population in that shift in location translates into surprisingly large energy savings. The researchers calculate that Americans are reducing energy used by one thousand two hundred trillion BT use by not hopping in our cars and were saving a thousand trillion BT used by skipping public appearances at the mall movie theaters and the office. The study is in the Journal Jewell. That's J O U L E, which like the b- to you is a unit of energy. Now, obviously, we still use energy while at home, but not all activities are equally draining when it comes to our dependence on the power grid activities at home, an avid sticks lists, energy, put Munich comebacker fame spend in your car or commercial buildings to save even more energy sake, or suggests we focus on improving the energy efficiency of home appliances than consumer electronics. The stuff we use more one were working from home all day in our pajamas. Let's see. We even save the energy. We'd otherwise expand getting dressed. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds, science. I'm Karen Hopkins.

Karen Hopkins US Bureau of Labor Statistics BT University of Texas Austin Munich sixty seconds seventy percent eight days
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm karen hopkins all in the united states there's a holiday that goes hand in hand with romance so much so that nine months later there's a spike in the number of babies born valentine's day wrong it seems that people in the us and other predominantly christian countries have been having some very merry christmas is indeed that's according to a study in the journal scientific reports scientists have long wondered why in western countries birth rates spike in september and early october revealing our qantas reduce phenomenon postulates theories of logical of tuition to the solar cycles luiz russia of indian university coled the study he notes that nine months before this baby boomlet is the winter solstice and when the day's grow shorter than the night grows long while human seem to turn to procreation for recreation however visser qantas was built scorn observations pretty much restricted to northern hemisphere countries and also culturally christian countries and some data suggested there might be something cultural going on so for instance in israel it was previously observed that the communities or associated with different religions have birth peaks and at different times of the year to try to separate the cultural from the biological russia teamed up with each one a gun solved saw of the gulbenkian institute of science in portugal together they come through data on a planetary level comparing countries in the northern and southern hemispheres and countries with predominantly different cultures in this case christian and muslim but they didn't look it when babies are born they look to see when during the year people around the world google the word sex you wanna saw what we fouled first visit holco searches for sex off whole vehicle proxy for sexual epa at sexual sexual interest in when revoked the close one hundred thirty countries have onto world what we saw with each country as a particular signature peaks and valleys interest in sexual content sauces with those patterns were most similar for countries the cheered a similar culture this means that if you leave in a culturally christian country whether you're leaving the northern hemisphere in the southern hemisphere you are more likely to have a new cuisine sexual appetites around christmas but if you live in a muslim country the are much more likely to conceive of on either healthier than at the at than at the.

united states israel russia karen hopkins valentine luiz russia gulbenkian institute of scienc portugal google nine months sixty seconds
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm karen hopkins all if you've ever checked out the restaurant reviews on yelp you know if these little missiles can tell you whether a bistro is overpriced door understaffed are just nothing to write home about but they may also be able to tell the local health department whether an establishment has been serving up salmonella researchers at columbia university in new york city were looking into an outbreak of food poisoning at a local restaurant a few years ago when they got the idea of using social media to track gastrointestinal disturbances during the investigation the department of health noted that patrons have reported their own says on yelp reviews but had reported in this one the season official reporting service computer scientists thomas f lindh who led the study previous investigations had shown that monitoring social media for keywords associated with illness was a good way of rapidly identifying outbreaks of infectious diseases such as the flu so f lindan his team built a similar system for stomachs does the department of health started using it in two thousand twelve the tours by sifting through the recent yelp reviews for new york city restaurants each day to identify potential reports of foodborne illness yelp reviews gets scanned for a telltale terms such as vomit diarrhea foodpoisoning pence sick flagged entries than get passed along to epidemiologists for a closer look the systems produce some false positives for example from reviews that stated things like the food had a weird chunky consistency hopefully we won't get sick tonight and then also missed a few posts like when the writer misspelled diarrhea a challenging word to write down even when you don't have it but overall the results are nothing to sneeze at nor in this case who are fat we found that using your data has helped the health department identified approximately 1500 complaints foodborne illness in new york city each year in total the system is found eight thousand five hundred twenty three complaints since july two thousand twelve resulting in the identification of 10 outbreaks the studies and.

columbia university social media official flu writer karen hopkins salmonella new york department of health yelp sixty seconds
"karen hopkins" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"It's it's next up we have mr kurt fuller who talked about many times on the show he was a miracle mile an hour vaira mistress of the dark as well as the running man and as we said earlier this is also slightly abridged i didn't miss too much of this but i just wonder set it up a little bit he's talking about his fall back career in case acting doesn't work out being a real estate agent so on who i don't want plan b two b dina waiter because he's you know if you don't give me so i thought you will say roussin peanut he bagging didn't work out i could still pursue the chronicle june hours now be this will you want about sixty hours a week you really do but there your own hours on so it allowed me paul you know go to reversals in deep theater i didn't have an agent with me hugging line years relieved again nate i mean i will illusion i will lower rio you know i was i was hanging who reject a law and god it was just sat lucky boy of getting that play almost argo offline neighbor ari gross who was one of my closest friends the time and he was hoping steven berkoff to produce this play m e convinced me to go audition for i was not gonna i wasn't now it was just a series of rocky events and i was tired all the time i didn't sleep very much uh i was young fish un gish at the time and i couldn't do it now but i could do it well on on i was full of uh a full of ambition i'm in law i was i will say i was a super ambitious very competitive person i can class what kept me acts were kept me going on but just the level during the girls tell me what do you remember about being on the running man i will living in in an apartment in hollywood and my neighbor was an actress who is in he man plays uh rich dolphins food righthand grown and karen hopkins she's also wrote a couple a couple of good movies but at the time she was an actress and the director paul michael graves or they were looking for some by the sort of a bag somebody just for the book they and even.

real estate agent ari gross hollywood paul michael graves mr kurt fuller nate steven berkoff karen hopkins director sixty hours
"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"karen hopkins" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans 62nd science i'm karen hopkins all the why did the chicken cross the road not not so philosophical pickled but if you want to know why chickens don't get cross at people why they're content being kept in their coupes science can help optimistic species interesting because their genetic makeup has changed dramatically as paul the process of going for went to domestic lease allude and of lucien geneticists dan anthropologists at the university of oxford and cambridge and indeed who had people have compared wooden domestic any with their wild relatives they've identified genes that do show signs of strong reasons selection one such gene is thyroid stimulating horror receptors otherwise known as tsa r in chickens variant of this gene that is widespread in wooden nations has been shown to directly coast chickens to be less fearful of humans and also result in reduced to aggression towards collins specifics but what exactly did this election for these trades and therefore this variant take place it's been suggested because of the potential usefulness of these traits in domestic setting that selection of this gene must have happened when chickens where first domesticated around six thousand years ago in east asia but in an evolutionary time scale this is just a blink of an eye and we just don't know and don't have the resolution to tell when exactly between six thousand years ago and now this selection happened using data from nations but with dna from all article material we can follow what happened with a gene full time and in theory spokesman changes in a population a cure loop in her colleagues examined tsa george gene sequences in the ancient remains of about sixty chickens found in europe an estimated that selection it this tsa john okay this happened only around one thousand years ago at medieval times that is five thousand years after the initial domestication of chicken.

east asia karen hopkins paul university of oxford cambridge collins europe six thousand years five thousand years one thousand years