20 Burst results for "Karen Brown"

"karen brown" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:56 min | 5 months ago

"karen brown" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Restaurateurs will have to sweeten the pot offer bonuses and better benefits. Some will have to drive their prices up. What concerns then do you have Karen for the restaurants that you work with? Yeah, I think, um We are fortunate in that are you know we do have some very, very strong brand presence has specifically in Chicago, and we are leveraging that so one of things were really doing is maybe even building progression programs across the restaurants. Um, but, you know, when you look at things financially, um the labor percentage is that all of us are used to. I think people are gonna have to devote A little bit more leaning feet in terms of labor is part of your budget, and the other thing was done at one off hospitality, and I would encourage others to do with We have to be creative in terms of bringing in alternative revenue sources. And we have to keep those revenue sources going even when our restaurants are back to full capacity. So you know one off we created national Many in the industry have revitalized there to go programs. Those continue to be important channels as we navigate these difficult times ahead. It's Karen Brown, CEO of one off hospitality money. Do you want to give you the last word here? What's top of mind? Going forward. You know, providing the exceptional guest experience to all our guests and making sure we Finish. Malik, his restaurant owner of Rue Chicago, Karen and Manish, Thank you both for your time. I'm coming.

Karen Brown Chicago Malik Manish Karen both Rue Chicago one
Restaurant owners across Chicago struggling to hire back employees

John Landecker

01:16 min | 5 months ago

Restaurant owners across Chicago struggling to hire back employees

"Enough applicants to fill new job openings. Your drug. Nestor is general manager at Corcoran's Grilling pub in the city's Old Town neighborhood. I have so many different ads out and if I get if I put up 20 different things Have one person that will respond to me one person, maybe two. And maybe one of those people will show up Fernando View and you don't have kitchen staff have to have my food runners. My Buster's bartenders, servers hospitality employment website, culinary agents dot com reports a 100% jump in restaurant job postings with a 50% drop. And applicants from pre pandemic levels. The restaurants had their bills that they needed to pay on DNO. Now we have to try and make it as enticing for people as possible for them to come and work for us. With very limited resource is. Restaurant owners say some former employees are still waiting to get a covert 19 vaccine. Other owners say they wonder if people are choosing to stay on unemployment. One off Hospitality is an industry recruiter, Its CEO Karen Brown, particularly we're finding back of house positions. Very challenging, defined line cooks, prep cooks sews and chefs overall are incredibly scarce right now. Northbrook based Lou Malnati is

Corcoran's Grilling Pub Fernando View Nestor DNO Karen Brown Northbrook Lou Malnati
"karen brown" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"karen brown" Discussed on KCRW

"News I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin what does life look like for a college student today there are no lecture halls no labs no dorms for many of this year's anything but what they expected New England public radio's Karen brown teaches journalism at UMass Amherst she turned her students into reporters on their own lives they recorded scenes from where they ended up in lock down from Texas to Spain I'm sitting on the ground with my mom and she's cutting my dog's hair he looks very amused kind of have a look he looks good we can see his eyes I'm here in my kitchen following my mom's baking brownies one describe your journey chopping onions meeting this challenge for yes my brother I think he's playing Grand Theft Auto what do you what he thought was the Asian to me so now my brother and I who share room are going to restock our beds because my mom hates when both of us are here Kate so cluttered the streets are almost send it is only a few cars restraints to come back to McDonald's what's it like this and found my mother's sitting in her room scrolling through Facebook like a screening injure now we've turned on CNN and we're waiting for trump's press conference mom are you excited UP so I am here.

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Amherst Texas Spain Kate McDonald Facebook CNN trump New England Karen brown UMass Theft
Police Offering Drug Recovery Help: 'We Can't Arrest Our Way Out Of This Problem'

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:06 min | 1 year ago

Police Offering Drug Recovery Help: 'We Can't Arrest Our Way Out Of This Problem'

"To address soaring opioid overdose as police officers trying to tone down the law enforcement to offer recovery help and in Massachusetts which has the country's ninth highest overdose death rate the approach may be catching up with convention drug users to accept help it's not easy for me when the public radio Karen brown reports Emily LaTavia test to sign visitors into her recovery program in a grand Victorian house K. R. Y. N. K. A. R. E. N. and she's been living here since getting out of detox last fall we get twenty four forty eight seventy two hour passes every weekend at twenty nine she doesn't mind the restrictions she's grateful she's alive to follow them after a decade of addiction I had gone down a pretty dark path at that time look obvious traces her turn around to a nine one one call last year high on heroin she'd stolen her mother's car and when she returned it a few hours later officer John Cassella of where Massachusetts was waiting in the past he might've immediately read her her rights because for the longest time the whole idea was no arrest arrest but that's not what happened he gently tapped on the car window and said he was there to help and he wasn't the stereo typical officer who was going to arrest me or get me in trouble slowly learning that we can't arrest a way out of this problem I sat in my car actually close the window on him a couple times and then I opened it a crack like what do you want and he stood there patiently and he said you know I'm here to help you I want to help you and I would roll out my window and look the other way through the glass officer Cassell explained he was part of a new partnership between police and public health and asked if he could try another time he came back to my house again and again and again Cassell is used to rejection he was the first in his small towns police department to get trained in this approach the idea is when officers get a drug related call could be fast could be an overdose they put aside the hand cuffs and just offer help anything from a warm bed for the night to a ride to detox at the very least they'll give out the overdose rescue drugs nor can and talk about how to stay alive it's kind of weird for a police officer to be talking to somebody Hey if we can use heroin for use drugs use it this way to make sure you're not alone make sure there's knocking on hand weird or not more than a hundred cities in Massachusetts have developed versions of this approach many with state or federal funding there are a handful of similar programs in other states but even as police get used to this non judgmental role it's not always an easy sell to drug users some people are very open and I'll talk to other people when I get out of here I don't want to help you know stupid cops get out of here whatever Jeffrey Goulet is an officer in south Hadley Massachusetts not everyone's at that point in their life whether they want to stop so that's another thing that we learned just the way people think as far as the people who are using addiction researcher Alexander Wally is evaluating the approach for the centers for disease control he says it's important not to push treatment too quickly especially right after an overdose when the brain is in withdrawal to have that revelation usually it's gonna take a little more time and and a little more reflection that can mean weeks or months if ever before someone accepts an offer of help they almost all say yes but I would say about half of them actually mean at the beginning there was a lot of me chasing people around officer Cassella eventually talked Emily look obvious into meeting him at a donut shop where he introduced her to a recovery coach name Susan and they stayed in touch but a few months later she overdosed at her father's house she saved herself by using the nor can they left with her and that's when she agreed to let them help her get into rehab for me it was like a tornado went through and all that was left in the center was me in like a vassal land of ruin you know and having Susan and officer Cassella there it's life

Massachusetts
"karen brown" Discussed on James Miller | Lifeology

James Miller | Lifeology

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"karen brown" Discussed on James Miller | Lifeology

"Welcome to life allergy. Im James Miller your host a licensed. Psychotherapist I'm looking forward to spending miss time with you. As we learned some pretty amazing life lessons. Let's get started. Thank you so much. Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule.

"karen brown" Discussed on Mere Mortals Unite

Mere Mortals Unite

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Mere Mortals Unite

"Means they're still saying oh I'm all good it's all you know yeah Oh bell up and and you know what our culture is what I say it is but it didn't really work everybody could have done so much more right if they weren't so afraid of them and so it's a great interview because he just comes full circle yeah and everybody has to have their moment I I work with some company knees that I find this especially in family owned businesses they have a business it's their business it's been Haina floating along as it is they could be twice as much but they don't WanNa do any of the work yeah right so they just stay where they're up that's okay but even those businesses that are successful in spite of themselves like I look at them and just go oh I don't even know how you are successful it's a mirror recall have to have no competition our little competition yeah but does this this really I want to dive into this a little bit more because this this is deep in my heart about what I'm going to say or blind leaders right so I've seen a experiment that I love of which I'll share with you in a minute because everybody can check it out and take part and see what she thinks but I think this is a an imperative that has has to happen and change in the very near future you know the percentage blind leaders so because you know right because who do you share your work experiences with when you go home at the end of the day absolutely all of those people I just mentioned right and because no one around that tyrant CEO that you talked about will say anything to them it just keeps promulgating that behavior right only what happens is there's a higher turnover rate every year in the organization because people just get burned out and they leave right but that tyrant never never sees it well I wanna dig into that deeper and have you explained to us that experiment you talked about but right now I we're going to hear from my friends.

CEO
"karen brown" Discussed on James Miller | Lifeology

James Miller | Lifeology

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on James Miller | Lifeology

"It was okay and so scary. I didn't have the first clue about what I would do or how then get there right when you come across that kind of dream that has such a visceral feeling for you. That's the one that's absolutely the One and have you found that as you conquered that ironman which opposite congratulations I'm I'm so overwhelmed with that. That's awesome. Did you find that your next dream was even bigger than that one. Yeah Oh yeah what I what I discovered in just two short years of actually crossing the finish line at the ironman world championships from from what I began to pursue it is that it was merely then a gateway to my true potential to what what I was really capable of. It's sort sort of like the ironman world championships in as big as it is was just a a starting point which you know that sounded absolutely we nuts to me at the time that I was pursuing that race but then I went full tilt into the ultra endurance world and then for for the next eight years did races that compared to an iron man make iron man look really short. Wow It's also I think a very very powerful data point as well as when you did go into those higher dreams you could look back and say when I was younger that most terrifying dream that I accomplished was the Ironman and without if I did that and how I've grown and developed now I can now conquer these these current dreams as well absolutely right yes that that is how it permeates every part of our lives right because here's the other fascinating thing about our unconscious mind so if you think of a spectrum <hes> <hes> and on one side is limiting beliefs and on the other side is literally our ability to carry out anything we can think of this. That's -At's that's wet you access when you tap into a big dream and then you actively conquer and transform your limiting beliefs because I can also say this every level that I elevated on my way to an after the iron man with those elevated levels came new limiting beliefs so this is this is yeah. This is not something that it's a one and done like okay. I'm done with that. I'll never I know you will because patterns of the unconscious mind right not it's actually just our unconscious mind trying to keep us safe and alive breath but once you realize that and you you know how to change them transform them then it becomes your new pattern and then it shows up as a thought and you go up. I know what this is. This is more than a limiting belief all right. Here's what I do you do it and then you eradicate eradicate that limiting belief are transform it and that causes you to be much more supportive of that capability and it honestly it makes it hundred times easier. I mean like I said before there is no way I would have at age forty four as a total amateur athlete. It's been able to get to finish the ironman world championships without doing what I did. Yeah I mean you could have trained as much as you wanted to but if you didn't really conquer your perception of self perception of your abilities and yes it doesn't matter how much trained if you didn't emotionally set your mind and your body to do that to to enact that dream or to jeff accomplish your dream it doesn't really matter because you didn't have that emotional or mental buying and that's what we definitely need in order to move on to the next level of her life absolutely lutely and let me let me just expand upon that a little bit for the listeners <hes> so what happens is once you make that mental shift your unconscious unconscious mind changes how it seed or how it proceed your identity so. I went from Oh. I'm the total recreational additional nobody remarkable athlete to hey. I am an Ironman triathlete and I know probably the listeners. That sounds like a big leap. It's not though when you engage the power of your unconscious mind because all that has to happen is your unconscious mind gets behind and goes out. Okay yeah all right. That's who we are now all right and then you start seeing through your <unk> particular activation system you start seeing the things you're going to need and recognizing opportunities to get there whereas they were completely closed off to you before or like you said in the beginning. They were blind spots for you. You never even saw them in. Your identity is what you become another words what you say all the time and what you perceive is who you become so if I continually say I'm this no good person or I'm. I'm never successful that unfortunately forcing. That's what I become absolutely yes. I can't believe her time out..

Oh jeff eight years
"karen brown" Discussed on James Miller | Lifeology

James Miller | Lifeology

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on James Miller | Lifeology

"Miller Life Dot Com and click on the page work with James Fill out that form to get started today <music> identifying core beliefs. We often think we have some pretty good introspection and understanding of who we are a normally normally. We're right about that however there are times in her life when we don't realize that perhaps with a particular subject matter or certain situation our core beliefs may do not be what we think they are. Have you ever done something that you're embarrassed about or you do something that you're ashamed of. If you ever stop and listen to what your thoughts are you might be surprised. I if you were to take a moment to reflect on that you might hear yourself say you're so stupid. I can't believe you did that. What's wrong with you? You always do those types of things doc or simply saying stupid or dumb or ugly or worthless those types of thoughts that we have a really how we see ourself either in that moment or or with that particular subject matter the reason why it's important to identify what your belief is is because when you strip away everything that you are you'll see that that's your foundation condition usually the core beliefs that we have are related to our childhood either somebody would continually say this to you or a situation happened and in that moment you you internalize it that you were less than that. You're not smart that you're dumb that you're ugly worthless etc and when we're older where in certain situations that for whatever whatever reason trigger US in other words cause us to think back to the younger version of ourselves which unfortunately replace that were not good enough and when that happens happens unfortunately those thoughts that we have reinforce that were not good enough and that is why it's a core belief because it's at the center of who you are if you're able reflect on that and perhaps hear what you say it's important to stop for a second and ask yourself. Is that really true. Am I really dumb. Am I really stupid in my worthless in my ugly when you can look at the data which disproves what you are thinking in other words you look at the reality of the situation. You'll see that the core belief oh you originally created for yourself is not true at all. It's just simply something you were told or something you thought for so long that it has now become your truth so after you ask ask yourself if this is true then the next step is to say well if I'm not stupid than what am I if I'm not ugly. Then what am I when you can replace those negative core core beliefs in other words the thoughts that we think over and over and over again it starts to change core belief and when you change your core belief it starts to change how you see a yourself it starts to create confidence starts to create trust within yourself your core beliefs are the foundation for who you are.

Miller Life Dot Com James
"karen brown" Discussed on Women Worldwide

Women Worldwide

16:12 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Women Worldwide

"Right. Yes, you're absolutely right there. Yes, it starts with that conscious thought of I wanna do. I wanna do X, right. I wanted to do the ironman world championships. And then well, while you're in that conscious thought thinking, things like will can I do that? What would that be? Like those are actually gateways into your unconscious mind. Yeah. So then your unconscious mind, engages, you know, when you ask yourself questions like that. What would that be like, what would it what would it feel like to do that? What's involved with that? And it also includes that comparison bias that I mentioned earlier. So we compare ourselves to other people who are doing that. I compared myself to Julie moss or other situations like what we want to achieve and go on. Wait a minute. Gosh, there's this big cows. Awesome between what I'm doing now. And what I want to do. Yikes. And then it's, it's that emotional hook that is a doorway into the unconscious. Then our unconscious mind takes over and goes away. Wait. No, no, no, no, no. That's going to put us out risk something. We never we've never done. No, we better not do that. So is that comparison by is that just human nature? Ovo were always told that, you know, competition is good competition. Can be healthy. So how do we make that less about the comparison bias and the healthy competition that will want engage in for ourselves to be? Yeah. Absolutely. So first of all know that your unconscious mind that sets up all these patterns is nothing more than the most simplistic yet powerful machine. So it's almost like your computer. It'll do whatever you tell it if you tell it, you can't do something, it's going to go. Yeah. Deirdre can't do that. We're not going to do that. We're afraid of that. No, no, no, no, no. And if you say, I am going to do that, like one of the ways that I conquered this was every time this thought came up from me, this limiting belief, I would stop dead in my tracks no matter where I were was no matter what I was doing. And I would say out loud, I will compete in the ironman world championships. Because your unconscious mind, also, here's that, right. So it'll, it'll believe and carry out anything that you tell it that it can or cannot do right this fascinating. So you actually have a book that is cold limiting beliefs on limiting your beliefs. And there are seven techniques in the book, if I'm not mistaken. Would you be able to you can't share all seven although I'd love to extend this episode because we could talk for hours. But what, what stands out for the reader as? What is maybe one of the most important, or useful, or I staff as far as the unlimited? Okay. So first of all, just to be totally clear, the name of the book is on limiting your beliefs, because honestly, this is what holds everyone back. I've been able to do a lot of research. And this is the number one thing that I found that holds everyone back, regardless of gender, regardless of situation, regardless of role or level, hold all of us back because we're all human beings with unconscious nights. Okay. Then I would say conquering limiting beliefs is a three step technique. And at the end will share, you know, information on how your your listeners can get that those recept rate. That's great. Okay. So that, that's the most important thing I would say, that's number one. Number two, then is related which is tapping into the dream. Right. You've gotta tap into this big hairy gargantuan dream that, you know, quite frankly. People are gonna laugh at there were ton of people that laughed at me. You know, when I said, I'm going to compete in the ironman world championships. My own husband at the time said and this is a story in the book and big enough to read it. He said you don't have what it takes. You will never get there. Yeah. Okay. So that's, that's another whole chapter but tapping into that dream. And there's a specific way to do it through those emotional hooks that I mentioned that open those doors to your unconscious minds. You can harness the power of it. K as your, your unconscious mind is infinitely more power than your conscious mind tape, and then I would say there's two other really quick ones that I, I think are so topical in our society. Number one is do whatever it takes. Because there are always things that we discover, after we embarked upon a lifelong dream things that may be if we knew that we were going to have to do them before we set off on the journey. We might not have done it. But now you've made a decision and you gotta do whatever it takes. Otherwise, you will not get there. Right. So it's doing whatever it takes and during that time it's having no discipline. And I, I mean, an oh, no discipline. And this is a purposeful play on words. It's the ability, and I guess the, the decision that you make to say no to the distractions. The things that are going to get you off track from cheating that lifelong dream because there are plenty of them. And you know, it really is. And this is probably the first thing we also work on with clients in leadership. There's so many things vying for your time, and trying to distract you and get you off track that once you really get those under control, you identify them, you get them under control, and you're able to say, no, because we are in a society of not saying, no, especially in a leadership role. We're used to saying, yes, as yes, you say yes to everything, and then you're ineffective at everything that's right. Yeah. Yeah. No is powerful for. Well, the Caroline, my chills have chills. Okay. That when they talked to light bulbs are popping in my mind. So I'm sure listeners all of you out there feel the same way. Karen, we're going to die back into the discussion once again, but I'm gonna ask you to hold your thoughts because we are going to shift our focus to our sponsor of today's episode. And that's Rutledge publishing. I, I don't know if you know, Rutledge, but they are one of the world's leading publishers of academic books, and journals, and they're also they just happen to be the publisher of mine new book, it's answering modern communicators. Thank you, a guide to back to business communication, and Karen, this book is a Q enable. So I've answered over one hundred fifty questions for modern communicators. I just thought it would be really fun. If you answered one of those questions, so I hand, fixed a question for you. But yet it's. Are you ready? I'm ready. Okay. So near question is question. Number. Anyone? Why is speed back? Yeah. Yeah. What a great question. Okay. So first of all. I replace the word feedback with perspective. Also, the small little insignificant company called Microsoft did the same thing. Because what they discovered is that feedback because of how are brains work as human beings feedback is always tainted with our own personal filters values, and essentially, then what causes that feedback to merely be our perspective about what's going on. Right. It's like a those Inc dot ink, blot paintings, right starts with a G. I can't remember the name. But everybody knows what I'm talking about. Right. It's, it's when, you know, three people look at the same exact thing, and they see things. Sure shah. Yeah. Or shot. Yeah, exactly what I said. Yeah. Well, that is perspective. Right. So we, you know, first of all, if you've got a feedback system in your company change the title of it to perspective. That's actually an accurate description of it. Okay. Because it's only another person's perspective of you, your behavior, your performance, etc. Right now, the reason it's a gift is because it exactly is it is exactly that it is someone else's perspective on the same thing. Right. So and it's only through other people's perspective and I should say, it's, it's the best way for us to see things in a different way to look at it from the opposite side of it may be inside out. And in that way, it is a gift because then we get to see something that we didn't see before that causes us to be able to grow and change. And it's in that growth and change that honestly, we usually discover the best stuff. And that's why we need more women at the boardroom table or anywhere because of their perspectives. It's diverse into include them. Yes. A great point. Absolutely. And let me tag onto what you just said with that. You know this other interesting behavioral pattern that I've noticed is in the board room a setting like that. Right. Where it's all high level leaders women will typically hold their thoughts back until they're positive that they have completely thought through from beginning to end what they're going to say. Right. Whereas men don't do that. They'll, they'll just talk on the fly doesn't matter, whether it's a fully baked concept or not bell. Just, you know, start talking come right out with it, and even if at the end they feel like, oh, I don't. That was the best idea. They won't say that. They'll just come out with it, and then own it, and hey done merely matter what happens with it. So you're right. We need women and we need them to show up and just open your mouth and start start sharing your ideas in your concepts, whether or not, you think that they are fully baked or they're the best answer. Who cares contribute? You stream of consciousness along. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And I do want to go back to something you asked me earlier, which I did not fully cover which is comparison bias. Oh, yes. And you know what? Let's just thank Rutledge. Yes. Thank you Rutledge. For sponsoring the show today with Karen what let's dive back in comparison bias, please define. Yes. So remember how I said earlier your unconscious mind is the most simplistic powerful machine. Yes, it is. Also a judging mechanism. And I don't mean judging in a bad way, like, oh, I I'm judging this person has less than I am. I don't mean that what I mean. Is it are unconscious mind had to immediately size up situations when we were cave people running around as to whether they were friend food or foe and get us to take immediate action that would again. Keep us alive. Another day. So it's, it's ingrained it's an inherent behavioral pattern within us. Right. That's something we're not going to Aratu Kate, like we can Aratu Kate, conquering beliefs by changing that pattern. But this is this is. Part of our DNA. Right. We will never change it. But what we can do is no. That, that is operating system works. And once we know that we can be aware of it, and as we are judging things going. Oh, wait a minute. I'm comparing myself to her, or I'm comparing my thoughts to the thought that somebody else at the board room table, just shared, and I think my thoughts are lesser or inadequate or whatever we assigned to them. We're really only in competition with ourselves. We're not in competition with anyone else. No. And, you know, sometimes when I do speeches folks will run up to me after and they'll say, hey, what was your time at the ironman, and I'll tell them and they'll say, we'll out is that rank and I'll say I truly don't know nor do I care. This was all about me competing against me and bringing out my best and bringing out my potential and learning my purpose so that I could. Share that with the world. And you know do that on a daily basis. This didn't have anything to do with me competing against the other 1999 athletes that were in cona that day. Yeah. That's amazing. Yeah. Nor does it nor is it a competition at work. I mean we're all on the same team. We're looking to achieve something great. We're also looking to do that in our lives. So it's really just that inner competition. Right. And once you know, yourself better and you know how your unconscious mind works how these behavioral patterns are formed. It's so much easier to change them to something that serves you better. I wish more people would look on the inside. I think they look externally for that gratification, for the competition to be better here so much about it in the workplace, where it's so cutthroat you're dealing with the politics, gene feel that the Noro science in these behavioral. Techniques is this something that's new to executives in the corporation. Is this a hard sell people understand this? Yes or no? It is somewhat knew. However, there's a I in probably the last five years, especially there's been more and more information data examples out there. I mean this is some of the work that Brunei Brown is doing. Yes. A book. Yeah. I've read all three of them. They are incredible. Yeah. However, this has been around for hundreds of years, you know, this goes back to folks, like Richard Bandler, and Albert Einstein, and Carl Yang. And Fritz pearls and yeah, it goes back a long way hundreds of years. And I mean this is what Tony Robbins and his predecessors, you know, started to bring forward, you know, it's, it's built on the same kinds of premise, only he incorporates, different -ociety, different model with it, but it is really all about human behavior. And you're right. Human beings. Especially our US culture really gotten into a place of the quick fix the immediate answer. You know, I wanna pill to fix that, you know, if you look at the nutrition and health industry gosh, that's pervasive instead of looking inside. Hey, wait a minute. What's what in my? Behavior. What in my head is really causing me to do this or to not be able to do it. Right. And because we're so, so distracted these lovely things. You know, it's like all of our thoughts are fragmented. Now I mean I work with leaders. Also on just being presence, you know, being present in the conversation with another leader. Because normally what happens is while someone else's talking. We're mentally processing, four five six eight ten things right. And then we come away, we first of all, don't give our best to dot com station because we really don't have any.

Rutledge Karen Julie moss US publisher Aratu Kate Tony Robbins shah Microsoft Deirdre Richard Bandler cona Brunei Brown Albert Einstein Carl Yang five years
Plotted From A Prison Cot, Wrongly Accused Man Whips Smoothie Dream Into Reality

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:55 min | 2 years ago

Plotted From A Prison Cot, Wrongly Accused Man Whips Smoothie Dream Into Reality

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from NBC's new drama the enemy within Erica shepherd betrayed her country. Now, she's the FBI's only hope in stopping America's greatest enemy. But can she be trusted Mondays beginning February twenty fifth on NBC? A man went out of prison and into business. Mark Shand spent almost three decades in Massachusetts prison for a crime. He did not commit New England public radio's Karen Brown reports on his effort to make up for lost time. Heavily tattooed and muscular, Mark, Shan, pours, a freshly blended pineapple and coconut smoothie into a plastic Cup. He lets it overflow into the dome lid and passes it to his five year old granddaughter recap. Wait a minute use two hands. She passes it to a customer at shands smoothie cafe Sweetwater. So you go. Welcome. This year old Connecticut business is meant to reboot a career. Shan says was stolen from him at the age of nineteen in the months before he was arrested for murder he'd been preparing to open his first clothing store sign. The lease got LLC had not been locked up. Where would I be known, Shan? Now, fifty four always insisted. He was nowhere near the nineteen Eighty-six nightclub shooting in Springfield, Massachusetts that killed a young woman in two thousand thirteen new evidence convinced a judge to let them go. But as an exonerate Shand was not eligible for job training housing or other reentry services offered to people on parole. So we had to take manual labor jobs with long hours dictated by boss. It wasn't exactly the same as prison, but it wasn't different enough plan on the person. Again, if I could help it but to start his own business he needed money, and he says, no Bank would. Him alone. So he turned to a Massachusetts statute that compensates the wrongfully convicted at that time, the maximum was half a million dollars. He thought the state would right? It's wrong without a fuss. But he ended up spending three years in a legal fight for that money. Some might look at say, well, if the court it to release this person, then why don't you just write the check? That's massachusetts. Attorney general Maura Healey whose office represents the state against exonerates, but the statute only permits recovery if that person has established has proved actual innocence as is common in many states exonerates have to go back to court to prove they didn't get out on a technicality, which takes time and resources we found that the lot wasn't working the way we expected it to Massachusetts state Senator Patricia Jalen co wrote the compensation law in two thousand four and last year, partly because of Mark Shan helped rewrite it the cap on. Restitution was doubled to. Million dollars, plus attorneys fees and claims are now fast-tracked Massachusetts is one of nine states that have recently expanded or created new compensation laws, according to Rebecca Brown of the innocence project, but seventeen states still offer nothing pushing for monetary compensation for very small constituency is politically very difficult across the country. Restitution ranges from eighty thousand dollars per year in prison to no money at all what Brown would like to see in every state is immediate cash and services and a less onerous process to get full compensation when people come out of prison, they have nothing. So they're really in this no man's land in limbo waiting for. You know, just the most basic subsistence when Mark Shans case finally settled a couple years ago, he ended up with three hundred thousand dollars that's about eleven thousand per year in prison and while that paid for startup costs on his smoothie business. He doesn't look at compensation. As a start over grant. It's a moral debt. They should become something because they've wronged him. And it can't give you years back. So the fact that they yanked me and incarcerate me for thirty years the money. They gave me means nothing. Shand also filed a separate civil lawsuit. But that could take years for now he relies on his business acumen to make a living his best selling smoothie is called. Belinda and John Thomson after the lawyers who helped get him out of prison. Russia's whine up green apple ginger last year. He opened a second location. Eventually he'd like to hire ex inmates coming out of prison. Both the innocent and the guilty for NPR news. I'm Karen Brown in Springfield, Massachusetts. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

Massachusetts Mark Shan Mark Shand Rebecca Brown NPR NBC Springfield Erica Shepherd Shands Smoothie Comcast FBI Karen Brown John Thomson New England Connecticut Mark Shans America Murder Russia
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Vegan chocolate chips and nut butter hundred percent natural nut butter, and they're like candy to me only. I don't have to eat as many, and they don't bother my waistline and actually helped me, you know, stay fit and active and strong. Also, I very much appreciate. A lovely glass of wine, and I could have you know, before said to three or four glasses bottle of wine. But no, it feels better to just have one. And you know, just really pick a good one. I'm a big fan of talian French wines now 'cause I traveled there for two big races recently last year in the year before and you know, I I love discovering new things. So that's what those wines are for me and just reflecting on the day. And you know, the connections the conversations I've had talking about new concepts. I I really that whole thing all of that a love it beautiful. Well, as we finish up here just wanna earn skew to leave a listener of us with something. That's the piece of principal guidance. That you could give them something they can put into action preferably in the next twenty four hours. But certainly move the next few days. What would that thing be? What would you say to them? Tap into the dream. So this is another thing that's in the book along with a couple of other things that we really rolled by very quickly that you just brought up organically. I didn't even prompt you on them. I thought oh, he's read the book. Yeah. And tapping into the dream really is this this premise that. Picking the largest scariest day shis ridiculous seeming dream that you can think up like think iron cowboy right or think Ultraman or Iran will championships or something along those lines. That is so big that it causes you to break out in a cold, sweat because you have no idea how you can achieve it. But you have an emotional connection to it run with that tap into that that is the gateway, and I mean, it's been proven over and over and over interview after interview situation after situation that that is a gateway to higher levels of performance. I would say especially for our business colleagues out there CEO's who were looking to go to that next level. And really don't know how why don't you look at that area? I think that is somewhat a blind spot for leaders in America. Look at that give it some time give it some attention give it some credence. And you know, when you find that thing that just makes you want to jump off the couch and do something and also makes you break out in a cold, sweat 'cause you have no idea how you do it. That's what you should do. Friend tested. Thank you so much. Karen, please till view is on us. Whether can find out more about you, and all the wonderful resources that you offer wonderful. Here's where you go. The name of my company is velocity leadership consulting dot com. And if you put forward slash at the end of that with lead loyal, which is the name of dub show you can connect with me. You can read about the book, you can get the. Transforming limiting beliefs document that I talked about and a lot of other cool things, and you can share them with other people for thank you so much, and it was a real pleasure on having your thank you so much all that. You should feel wonderful insights in your clarity. Thank you. Thank you. What a pleasure. And for you to listen to remember as always information is what the whole in the Dona transformation comes from application. So don't just listen put it into use take action on what it is. You've learned today. Remember, you can chat about this show any about past episodes by going to our community inside Facebook, just go and search Facebook dove, baron leadership and loyalty podcast, and we can champ each other right there. Remember, the research consistently shows that the biggest challenges facing even the most successful companies is somewhat counter intuitive in these fast growing companies often need point where they realize that they're spending a fortune attracting training and developing the talent to have them leave an alarming rate.

Facebook Karen Iran principal CEO America twenty four hours hundred percent
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"What's what's what's one of your movies? But you would the if you. What your movie what would be you can pick a recent one or an old one? Yeah. I'll pick a recent one. So I saw first man when it came out with Ryan Gosling, who is one of my favorite actors. Let's let's say he's my celebrity man crush out. There is a Canadian is already coupla noches up. You know, exactly. Also, I've read a lot about Neil Armstrong. I'm a huge space buff space. Geek, whatever you wanna call it. And so the way he was able to portray the dichotomies living within Neil Armstrong. I thought was absolutely extraordinary. And I often think you know, in another life, I probably would have been an actress. And so I just really get into, you know, not only the facts about and my favorite or always transformative stories, which this is and and true stories, so and so I just really dive into all the facts the story of it the person again because I love human beings with them. So then, you know, then you have the landscape of outer space and the moon and doing something for the first time in critical. So. Is the thing that brings you joy l-. So you'll guilty pleasure. Or is that something else? My guilty pleasure. Do you have something specific in mind? Whenever is guilty of you. You know, I really shouldn't. But I love to. It's a guilty pleasure. Yeah. So guilty pleasure for me. Now, I I was a sugar addict for a long time. I'll just be real with everybody that was part of my developmental work. And so my my typical reaction to that would be guilty pleasure is eating something with sugar in it something in Nogent, you know, something very rich. And honestly, I'm going to sound like a total like nutritional geeky right now square, but I've replaced that now with something called protein bites that are like protein and organic maple syrup organic.

Neil Armstrong Ryan Gosling Nogent
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"And I think that when we rely upon the people in our organization to help us with feedback. Right. It's called three sixty assessment. It's a very popular tool. I have yet to see one that is actually true neutral on biased feedback because you know, what I'm sorry. But even if their peers in your organization, they they are usually projecting their issues onto you their fears onto you, or what whatever you want to insert into that sentence. That's what happens their biases by Z's. Right. So and I think even worse there's a whole segment of our leadership popular population. That is pointing everybody else. Saying, oh, I'm great everybody else needs work. And you know, we're seeing a lot of low level of retention, and it's a it's a constantly revolving door, and no one in the organization, we'll tell us the truth because they're afraid they're afraid of reprisals. They're you know, they have to put food on the table for their family. They have their livelihood etcetera etcetera etcetera and coach orally, unfortunately, we've backed ourselves into a corner here where we don't want to invite conflict with anyone, you know. So we'll say, oh, you know, it really is the boss that needs to go and do some developmental work and needs to make some some improvements. But you know, I shouldn't be the one to tell them, right? Although figure it out or they'll hear it from their peer group or whatever. But it's much. No, right. They no, no. They don't know. So this is an experiment that I'm running. Okay. So go to. Too bad leader, good leader dot com. And you can just follow the instructions there. It's very very simple. And I don't even wanna know chapter and verse the whole story or anything about that. What I do want to know is. If you know of a leader who no one will share the truth with and they get use some improvement. They could use this opener. They need to hear the truth because they can be better. They can make a bigger impact better impact. Right. Or even the leader who has taken those first steps to improve. Hey, let's give them some reinforcement. Right. Because if you've done any developmental work like Devon, I have just talked about it. It's work. It takes some time. It takes a big amount of energy. And you're right. You make improvements and then you sit back a little bit. And then he makes them more improvements and just look back a little bit. And it's a constant consistent thing. Okay. It's a commitment. Right. And so I want to also applaud leaders who are taking those stops obsolete. They are making progress and the people in their organization are seeing it and are so thankful for it. But it's probably those people in the organization that are not going to say, hey, I've seen you making some changes could job, right. They're still afraid. They don't want conflict. We're happy to conduct this experiment and make a difference in that space for forever. That's interesting. How definitely going to look at that sounds like a very cool place to go. So as we draw towards the end here, tell us what what is it brings carom Brown. Joy. Well, first of all a big movie buff. I my first job was in a movie theater being a movie theater. Usher. And so I see every new movie. And then I my favorites. I watch over and over it, you know, it's my it's my favorite thing to do to actually turn my brain off and truly relax at night when I'm done for the day to immerse myself in a great movie, and I'm also veracious reader. So I love that too. The other thing that I really still love is. I'm a student of human beings. I read a book actually read two books on vacation recently, one of which is called joy ink by rich Sheridan, and I loved the human element of it. I still just that, you know, scientific person who is fascinated with human beings. And how we behave and what makes us tick. So any, you know, anything I can I can learn on that subject. I always just all over it. That's so that brings me a lot of joy..

Devon carom Brown rich Sheridan
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Will and the patterns that they create over time because what happens is as we develop as human beings as we mature, especially as we develop and and go forward and pursue higher levels in our personal and sorry professional leadership lives, those things really come out. And that's what I see all the time in our work with leaders. You know, we'll our point of entry is always solid business. Hey, this is what I want to achieve its higher level than I've ever been before. I want to do something different than I've ever done before. And so I'm going to work with you. Great. So we start peeling that back, and it's very simple to identify. Okay. What's the pattern here? What's the common thread? What's the root cause of it? And it's amazing when we can actually do that for each other whether it's in a coaching professional capacity, or it's just a human to human capacity, right? Because this this is I think what is the biggest gift we can give each other is being able to stand in that arena with each other and ask those questions and be there for one another for the answers because sometimes they are ugly, and sometimes we don't want to acknowledge them, right? But it's in that area that we can work where we can make the biggest progress in growth. I couldn't agree more. And I think that's part of the trap of leadership is that if you've got an all the answers, then you've got to be perfect. Nobody's perfect. And every leader. I know is is who is an exceptional leader is involved in their own evolution. It's not something that happens on the sidelines. Something that they're actively in the process of evolving themselves and ask such I like to ask my guests this question because I think it's it's very easy to look at the the Karen Brown of the world. The Dow bama's of the will, you know, the Brian traces, whoever is and say, oh, you know, I'm not bam. Like, you will looking at those ultra athletes. I'm not them. They've got their shit together. You know, I've got this whatever it is going on in the background. And nobody knows about it. But one of the things I like to to point out is any decent leader any not even exceptional Beason. But any certainly exceptionally is constantly working on themselves. What is something that you'll still working on new? What is something that you'll still growing into developing in yourself that you'll look in going, you know, I'm looking to break through that pot of who I was..

Beason Karen Brown Brian
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Because I think we've got so much limiting belief about Genda and leadership roles as a pace that was a great piece of research that I've cited in some way writings about women in leadership, and how that can the only two thousand some research was done by one of the major universities. I'm sorry. I don't remember that was right now and saying that women had failed as leaders in the assessments, and in the general assessment that women was shown to be great leaders, but where they failed and why men was saying. They wouldn't believe 'cause women wouldn't create a vision for the organization, and then when they done data later on, of course, Costa back in later on and what they found us wouldn't create a vision because they didn't believe that it should be vision. They were collaborative. So there was no I'm not gonna create business not my vision. And that was seen as a weakness today, we understand that. That is one of the great strengths of leadership elite who is collaborative and women, naturally, socially, conditioned wise. I understand still natural. But it's still socially conditioned of is that women understand the power of collaboration. And I think that this is another. So a societal our cultural limiting belief that we need to break through your thoughts on that. I completely agree. Yes. And I do think that women are natural collaborator collaborators absolutely now. I also see a little bit different evidence out there in working. With female CEOs versus male CEOs is very interesting to me, and I've got some articles out there and a couple of speeches that I do on this topic. And I call it the oxygen masks Andro. Which goes like this if I'm working with a male CEO. They're they're quick to make a decision and they're quick. And I'm not saying that this is the right thing in every single circumstance. But my in large they will make a decision. And if that decision means they have to put themselves I to do something to improve to change, whatever it is. They will usually make it very very quickly, and they won't have to check with someone to do it. Like, oh, you know, I need to run this past the board or whatever they'll say, okay. This is the road. I need to do this the impact and the benefit of this is going to be monumental. And I'm going to do it. And I'm just going to figure out a way to make it work right now, their female counterparts will go through the same initial thought process, but they stop themselves. And this is where the gymnasts comes in. They stop themselves putting themselves first and they put everybody else. I wait. I've got I've got to do this for my team. I and we've got to finish these projects. I and on and on and on everybody everything else is first. Whereas if they were on a plane and the the pressure was lost. They would be dead because they would put everyone else's mask on first. And they won't have there's on. Now, I bring that up it's in their face sometimes, and they see it. But I think women have been slow to change. This have been slow to recognize it and slow to change it. And I think it it goes right back to caveman times because you know, women are the nurturers they're the caregivers. And so that comes naturally to us. I get it. And when we're talking about leadership, I think that's a critical piece of self assessment that has to be more pervasive for women to be successful as leaders. The ability to to step into the Hodder decisions. Without being so worried about what everybody will think. Yes. Now, that's that's fascinating. So I'm seeing evidence that it's changing I would just like to support it to change faster. You re too. Again. I just think we so desperately need women Lee desperately if you look at the political situation on the Wilton oh that. However. Leadership is an evolution. What do what it was something that you did for a long time that actually blocked you from from the level of success? You have now which is quite extensive. Oh, goodness..

CEO Costa Lee
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Dream and my business or my leadership performance. I thought those are two separate things. I couldn't have been more wrong, actually, pursuing and achieving the iron man opened up everything in my leadership performance it caused me to be able to self assess and identify those blind spots specifically in my business in my leadership in my professional performance that I was still blinded to prior to that. It also helped me see how could elevate all of those. Those things and how I could elevate the performance unlocking that for my team members running I had a level of belief a new level of belief about their performance what they were capable of. And when I actually got out of their way as a leader and gave them that belief and help them think at a higher level. And by what their purpose was what their higher level looked like what it would be for them to elevate. I watch them flourish. Like, I never thought they could I never knew that they could run, and I was able to elevate far past levels of leadership that I thought were possible prior to that because you know, what? After the iron man, I discovered there was something bigger than that called the ultra man, which is truly off the rails. It is a three day three hundred twenty mile triathlon. Omar goodness at first that blew my mind. This is what is relevant to the cease week. People listening right now. Okay. Whatever's blow on your mind right now, it is absolutely possible. There is a pathway to it. You just haven't figured it out yet. It is possible. The easier thing is to just say, oh, it's a fact we can't do that. It's not possible or it's not possible in my industry. Gosh, if I had a dollar for every time somebody said that I could have retired three times over now. Not that's fine for that industry. But not mine. Exactly. That's crap feeling that you have that. It is possible like way deep down inside. Let's just be real here leaders because we know on top of that feeling is what we covered up with which is oh that's just not possible. Right. But what's below that is what if that is possible? And I just haven't figured out how to do it yet. Or I can't figure out how to do it. Right. Those are called blind spots, and those are the doorway to elevating success and leadership and professional performance. These unconscious limiting beliefs. I think it's important to know that as a leader that you you do have them even though you've excelled an even though other people might look at you and go show as you you're gonna have them because they existing site all of us. But the the other level of this is to look at how you and this is just what Karen was guiding us towards is that we do this who are the people. We put those limiting beliefs on teams, and we say well Susie is not really capable about. Bob is never going to step into that. And these become a Biasi for how we say people. And and again as Karen talked about Olea, we often projecting limiting beliefs onto other people in this. You're going to elevate your leadership. Then you've you've got to elevate those you lead this of you know, it's a simple thing that most people forget you're going to elevate ill leadership. You must elevate. The people you lead. An all too often. We don't elevate. The people relate me elevate. Our ego me elevate status. We elevate alpine. But we don't elevate the people that we lead and that is vitally important for you to see the greatness in the people that you lied to get beyond your bias. And you know, we this. I think is probably coming to the full more than it has in decades. You know, as we're seeing this with women leadership, which I as, you know, Karen yuno, as listener view that I'm a big supporter of women's leadership. I actually think it would be a wonderful idea to change out. Swap out every male high level later would a female leader. Even if it's for two years, just and then let let everybody's find their own spice up to that. Because some people won't wanna be that. And some people are like, okay, good. I'm glad I'm out in other people who like no I need to be back in that role..

Karen yuno Olea Omar Bob Susie three day two years
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"You hate it. It's still you can predict it, and it's the same. So every time you go to something different that feels to the unconscious mind like a threat. And so here's the deal. If you if I'm you'll close buddy, and I hang out with you. And you're going to go run an ultra marathon. And I'm sitting on a couch watching binge-watching net flicks. And eat my potato chips. I'm gonna stop feeling bad about that. So I don't wanna feel bad about my potato chips. Netflix. I actually wanted things to remain the same. So I'll crap on you. So that you'll e potato chips with me. And now we can all live happily miserably ever after. So that's an really just gave you is. You know that saying misery loves company. Misery doesn't just love company. Misery, actually bombs company. If brings us together, we get bonded and misery. And if you threaten to pull away from that, then I feel like you're abandoning me and people who love your will say, oh, you think you'll Ben in the main now don't you and they'll say shit like that. It's got nothing to you. Don't have time for me. Now, you're too. Time for me. Now. You're leaving me behind. No. You're staying where you are. That's you. You'll stay. I'm inviting you on the bus, but you don't wanna come. Okay. Yeah. What is interesting about that, though is if people keep seeing you, and you are staying the course, you are consistent you keep doing it. You keep doing it. Keep doing it. And every time there asking you. Hey, how's that going? It's going really. Well, hey, you know, I learned a couple of things I failed forward, and I pick myself up and I'm still moving forward. And I bought this next race coming up or whatever the the update was that. I would give them it actually did end up bringing them along too. I mean, there were ultimately very few people in my life that just planted roots where they were refused to move forward. And I did leave them behind. They just stayed where they were and I moved forward and that that's the heartening thing for me. Another reason that I wanted to put this book out there because you know, our potential is really unlimited and really the only thing that hold us back. Ourselves. That's the other thing. I learned in two thousand ten when I had this awakening I thought. Wow. Nobody's holding me back from this. But me, and that's all that's been happening. This whole time this twenty eight years. So let's let's bring this into the context of leadership because we can all I think every one of us can grasp this, maybe the postal level. We all have a sense of I'm capable an I mean, most of the people who listen to this show watch this show, the high level achieve most of eight personalities that C suite at high level executives. You know, the people who are driven in lives. But I think even when we're at that level, particularly when we're level. There's a pot of us that you know, we know that something bigger room we can go for so at the same time though. It's very easy to say. Yeah. But listen, I am telling my game. I'm the CEO. I'm the founder, I I've studied three three multi-million dollar corporations. I've, you know, done this dumb that let's put it into the context of leadership. Tell us about elevating leadership using the unconscious mind. Well, first of all we all have these things called blind spots. Right. And just like my pursuit of the iron man and this limiting belief. This thing called limiting belief was my blind spot for twenty eight years, right? Because during that time, I was very hourly successful, I was a corporate executive. I was a great leader. I always brought good a great results. You know, like, I'm sure all of your audience members are and they're thinking about that right now. However. What I'm happy to report is that my blindspot was pursuing the iron, man. It was this. Big hairy scary. Outrageous, ridiculous audacious dream called the iron, man. And at the time..

Netflix CEO founder executive twenty eight years million dollar
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"It doesn't have enough button. No. But seriously, this takes five minutes or less, honestly, because the processing speed of your unconscious mind is far faster than your conscious mind. So this goes really fast once you sit down and distraction free environment. So that's up one Sept two is ask yourself that question that I just route there what is stopping me from achieving X your dream your goal your big hairy audacious goal. Your purpose. Whatever that is. Then jot down what comes up exactly how it comes up. Don't wordsmith. It don't marketing phrase, it don't judge. It just jot down k then that seeing it on paper. And that's a key to this. You have to do it on paper you committed to digital later. But do it on paper that is a key to unearthing the unconscious mind, then carry that with you that builds the awareness, you see it on the page. Age go. These are all my limiting believes. So then the next time you have that that limiting belief. Sorry. You recognize it. That's when it becomes conscious. And you catch it. Then the last part of it step three is changing it in that moment. Actively changing that thought pattern that you've had for in my case twenty eight years, and then you're telling your unconscious mind. Nope. This is what we're going to think. Now. So what I would do in the moment is I would change it to the unlimited version of that limited belief, which was I will compete in the ironman world championships. And I told myself that out loud in front of strangers. Now, you gotta realize I got some strange looks. But it also led to some really great transformations and others because when I would share my story, and what I was doing it brought them along it helps them. That's another reason. I wrote the book so that didn't a nutshell three steps less than five minutes. And you basically just have to commit to making the change again..

five minutes twenty eight years
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"That ultimately, they peeled back the layers they under the evidence, they put it under microscope and ultimately found a wait a minute. What I what I felt inside that nagging feeling that. Yes, I could do that. I had what it took to accomplish. That was right. It wasn't that. I couldn't do it. It was that. I could oftentimes catalyst for awakening. Because of the said limiting belief is knowledgeably fact until. We have some capitalistic insight some moment that goes this is bullshit. I'm so, you know, this is nonsense. I'm making up. What was that for you at in your full TS to go? You know, what I'm not a sideline athlete I can compete in an ultra marathon. You know, what was it that said I can go past the limiting beliefs of my age. Oh, my category of an athlete. What was the catalyst? There. It was actually the intersection of two things and those were number one. I got sick and tired of that nagging feeling being so big that every time I would go to the next level in my career in my life. I would bump up against the ceiling of that nagging feeling might come on. Karen, you can do more than this. You know, you can there's more than this out there. So I got sick and tired of that. And second of all I actually discovered the science behind limiting beliefs that they that is a real thing. And I I am covered. What actually was going on how my unconscious mind was working to create that limiting belief, and once I saw that and the antidote slit unlimit, those beliefs first of all how do I de it basically began with okay, what is stopping me from achieving? Pursuit of the ironman world championships are competing in the ironman world championships that is the opener which I like to call them to the discovery of what my limiting belief was. So asking myself that question and paying attention to what came right away that initial reactive thought of well, they're up here. I'm down here. I can't possibly compete that was a limiting believe. Now what I also discovered after walking through that is that I had a whole page of limiting belief. I had an eight and a half by eleven she to paper of these things that I was hauling around with me. Now, those were truly unconscious because I never knew that I was carrying those around too. So all of that stuff. You know, it's kind of like playing tug of war with yourself. Yeah. You just keep going back and forth while I I think I can do this. I want to do this boom. You stop yourself. And that just keeps going in a pattern. So let let let's talk about the the invisible elephant in the room, which is what I just spoke about saying that, you know. The problem with unconscious stuff meaning limiting beliefs, which they just in the unconscious mind is the prefix at which is unconscious. So, you know, the challenges I mean, I have to say people in my womb, a very large of my work is to make your unconscious conscious to us because then you can make a change. So let's let's you sort of look that for a moment and say, okay, so. Somebody has this nagging sense that the something greater you know, what I call the greatness, the something greater within them the capable of that Nagy's. You talked about it. The the sense of something greater. Where where can they start to become aware of the just the first step in that awareness of unconscious? That's a great question. So actually on my website. I make this available to everyone for free because this is so important and my mission with this is actually to radically limiting beliefs and transform the world because I truly believe that when we all are capable we all engage in Iraq decaying are limiting beliefs and making them unlimited. We will from ourselves and our lives and the world. So it's available and there that addresses available in shown show. I'm sure we'll go through that later, but it's an actual form that takes you through this technique that first of all is sitting down in a distraction free environment. Now, I know this can be challenging because. Inactive. We always have these things with us that chime in bell in vibrate. And all that fun stuff of them for most people is to put your iphone away. Exactly. What do you mean put it away? What do you mean? Turn it off..

Iraq Karen Nagy
"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"karen brown" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"What is this that compels these people to do this to go all day in the grueling heat and wind and sometimes rain and cold and everything else to put it all on the line and two to four some selves to go beyond their perceived comfort zone far beyond their perception of their comfort zone. So that was number one. And number two was that I had this nagging feeling deep inside when I watched the ironman that let if I have what it takes to do that. I'm not tapping into it. If I am living, a small safe life only doing what I know. I can accomplish. And that that feeling started to sicken me and it started at row over those twenty eight years, right? Because you know, that that feeling had some emotions tied with it. And ultimately, I know everyone can relate to this that I thought I could do it. And that's what was causing those feelings and that emotional reaction. Interesting because you put up several things because. For you. You and I understand limiting beliefs the psychology limiting beliefs, but I think that. First of all unconscious. Limiting beliefs problem with that is there unconscious and second of all is is this is that unconscious limiting beliefs called limiting beliefs. I called fax to the person who holds them. So the fact is I'm forty six years old. I can't enter in an ultra marathon. The fact is when I'm swimming in three foot end gonna drown out a Helmer supposed to swim all that way of never on a marathon. And you know, and I've never even been on a road bike, these are all facts to the mind, so as viewers and listeners listening in you know, they may not be aware of quote limiting beliefs as such while they're aware of is their disabilities that inabilities that facts about who they are and what they're capable of based on history, which is also reinforced the crappy believes so so even to get to that place you had to overcome. A certain belief or even around because you said, you're in your forties. When you when you first did it, what was the first of endeavoring to confronting those beliefs about what you're capable of great question. So here's how this worked and how it worked for me. And also why I wrote the book about this because I wanted everyone to have this information. I wanted it to be acceptable to everyone because this is the way everyone's unconscious mind works. It's exactly what you said that we think these things are facts. But in reality, they are these things limiting beliefs. So it would work like this for me where for twenty eight years, I would say to myself and this came from a limiting decision that came from comparison when I was very young. And it went exactly like this. Well, those people on TV doing the iron man, they are elite. They are athletes that are at a very very high level. Oil and I am down here. This lowly recreational amateur athlete that can't swim. And can't write a road. Bike etcetera hasn't run a marathon. So how can I possibly compete against these people Ryan that is the essence of a limiting belief, and it's a decision that we make that is really are unconscious mind just trying to protect us from something that it interprets as a threat or dangerous, right? That might be a threat to our life or our way of life. And so it just steps into protect us know who've. Nope, not not going to have what it takes. I compared myself to the elite athletes at the world championships. And I'm not like them. I can see the gap between us, and then the unconscious mind interprets as fact that as evidence, right? So then I just started carrying that with me every single time. I would see the iron, man. I have that same limiting believe coming from the same limiting decision until and that's nothing more than a habitual thought pattern, right? Yeah. But we think it's fact and therefore that it's hard evidence. There's nothing we can do about that. But here's why I think this topic. And this piece of information is so compelling because it is not fact, and I was taking that as fact for twenty eight years, and I know people who have done the same thing in their life or their business or something similar for longer than twenty eight years to.

Helmer Ryan twenty eight years forty six years three foot