17 Burst results for "Kapatid"

"kapatid" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

Stories Philippines Podcast

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

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"kapatid" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

Stories Philippines Podcast

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

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"kapatid" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

Stories Philippines Podcast

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

"Modern on any luggage. least..

"kapatid" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And you start bringing up in like, for instance, prescription drugs have these, you know, prescription companies out there that they're spending billions of dollars pouring money down a hole in research and development to develop great drugs. And what happens when you go to Medicare for all? And you say, look, we're cap, and you you guys aren't going to get paid anything for this. Are they going to still go out and research these drugs? I I don't know, you know, they're going to have to get some kind of return for their investors. I mean, that's that's kind of a problem with Medicare for all, man. Thank you very much Jamal Simmons. There's a lifelong democrat in Des Moines. There's Matt saying, you know, none of these Democrats are really giving me the truth. This is a two-dimensional pitch. I want all of it too. Is the challenge right? One of the things when President Obama pushed Obama. There is they never quite identified who was going to pay the cost the argument was you can have your health care if you want it, and it's going to save money over time. It was sort of an argument like we could eat chocolate every day and not get fat and not work out. Right. Like at some point. There's some you got to pay the Bill. So I think what the caller saying, which is right is the Democrats do have to kind of deal with the cost side of the question. And I think people are putting on the table again, these tax plans that could help alleviate the cost, but let me make one argument that I hope that people who are a little more conservative with buy into the average American today will change jobs twelve times their lifetime people at their job five years or less. We have got to create a system of care in the country or a social safety net. That allows the Beth people to choose the jobs, not Kapatid's. They want move in and out of these jobs without losing all their benefits every time they make one of these choices as companies compete around the world, and they're let tenor to their communities and let the country the. Countries are going to have to fill in the gaps of. I'm a business owner actually should want something like a public option or Medicare for all. Because it means that I don't then have to administer health care for my employee's, which oughta make my company more competitive. I don't understand why corporations more.

Medicare President Obama Jamal Simmons Des Moines Matt business owner Kapatid five years
"kapatid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Do you think that the open sharing of information improves, the creative experience of writers and Farid would strict rules stifle at expression almost all my workers. Available that way, I've had publishers who vetoed it for a couple of books. So just to be clear. It's almost everything available that way, I think that there will never be a time that we can imagine in which acquiring information without paying for it. If you choose. Not too will be harder than it is today. Right. There will never be a time in which hard drives are less Kapatid's or or more expensive than they are now than ever be a time in which networks are slower or in which searches worse. There will never be a time in which fewer oh AP's have been retrained their local library to type movie Namespace bittorrent into Google if they choose not to watch a movie, and so in that world every payment for creative work is ultimately voluntary payment. Anyone who really doesn't wanna pay doesn't have to and the likelihood of being caught in any kind of enforcement mechanism is so close to euros makes no damn? So there's almost no rational expectation of having any kind of consequence visited on you. If you choose not to pay. And so in that world, you need to find a way to convince people to pay and one of the ways that we tried to do it as coercion. Right. We try to scare people. We make the consequences of taking material without paying extremely dire. Peter Mandelson famously cooked up this idea where he would get to be the Lord high executioner of the internet in Britain. And if you were accused of three acts of copyright infringement without proof you and everyone who.

Peter Mandelson Farid Google Kapatid Britain
"kapatid" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"You. You're listening to the Paul finebaum show podcast. Phyllis is up next. Hey, Paul how you doing? Okay. Can I ask you something? Did you hear the remarks that cowherd made earlier? I think it was on his show. Channel. Sadly, I do not get a chance to listen to him very much. You know, eight for him to make fun of people in Alabama, but not being intelligent or anything. Well, what did he say? So that would maybe help us better understand. About Alabama not not being they should not be there at Alabama. Of course is not played anybody of going door beat Alabama. We just got through beating Georgia for just remind Colin cowherd. That he picked he picked your Phyllis. You take Gus malzahn beat Nick Sabin two years ago. Addicted Alabama and ghost. What are you? Phyllis. Could you slow down for one second? Let me throw something that you joke about Gant's divers how. Jordan how about oh. My God, I could nine nine AM bad. But not the just you know what? Kanter you stick your head Apolo crafts, take a good deal. Because that's how you get out families back and made them along scare exactly where they need to be. And if they get beat they get the, but it won't be because a your mind jealous map shut your middle. Countered mouth at get away from Alabama stay away from us down your way, don't need you wrote down captured. Thanks ball. Pile is in West Virginia. Kyle welcome to the program. I know it's a miracle that I was wondering your expert opinion on Ilisu till two seven. What teams would they need to Liz in order to get back into the final four. Did you say LSU? Yeah. LSU? LSU's not going to get in the playoffs there. There's no there's no there's no route for them to make it to the college football playoff. They're not going to play in the championship game. They they don't have anything left on the schedule. That is really significant the beating Arkansas won't help beating AM to four loss team. I mean, they're done to be so fatalistic here. But that's the truth. But there's gotta be a way. No, there's there's no way get over. Kyle. Kapatid's under understand LSU's not going to the playoffs. This year. Appreciate your your your holding a torch for red ores, you're on thanks for the call much more to come. Go tigers. Thank right. We'll see. I really it's only four o'clock in the afternoon eastern time zone. But I don't know what I've ever needed a drink more than this first hour after some of these calls that Phillips ran on Cohen Calvert, which I still don't understand. But that call. Was number one in stupidity. Listening to Paul finebaum show podcast. Always our weekly stateful at this hour talking to south welder about the analytics of what we learned last night. And what it means is we move forward. Always great to talk to you. I ask you about LSU. Randy was just making reference to go about the questionable ranking any any explanation for that? I realize you don't do it. You just you just analyze everything talking about the fan having this Mike college football playoff ranking? I'm a little more interested in the college football playoff. Yeah. I think so you know with LSU. I guess it's it's funny. I was looking at their numbers. We don't we give them like a two percent chance to make the playoff at this point, which might sound like to too many points to most people. But I suppose that's extraordinarily unlikely. I guess they're just getting respect for the schedule losing Alabama. I guess the committee's thinking, well everyone's gonna lose to Alabama. If they have to plan, let's get to the real nitty gritty 'cause LSU is not a factor. But Michigan and Georgia are many wondering about that many. But some wondering how Michigan ended up where it is ahead of Georgia any explanation for that. Yeah. I wasn't surprised to see Michigan four. But I do think that there would be a pretty good case to put Georgia. They're at at four spot. Georgia's better enough PI, they're better strength..

LSU Alabama Paul finebaum Georgia Colin cowherd Phyllis football Kyle Michigan Kanter Gus malzahn Jordan West Virginia Ilisu Gant Pile Liz Arkansas Kapatid
"kapatid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Royalty to the state. And I think that that's kind of why we saw so much emphasis on it. During the Bush era like turning nine eleven into patriot day bushy in conservatism really was loyalty to the state that had a Kapatid's view of the nation. Right. But and that's perfectly compatible with whatever because like, you could Jewish American could be patriotic American. And I think in most cases absolutely is right. But what what does nationalism as opposed to patriotism mean in America? Right. Because we don't like what could it possibly mean? It it's interesting because you know, Stalin, his theory of how the Soviet Union was to work is he made and some of the people within stones made the analogy to an apartment building. So every culture would have your -partment you'd have like you could wear your national dress, and you could speak a variation of your national language, but. You know, the Soviet Union is the concierge the Soviet Union owns the building the Soviet Union controls the front door, the Soviet Union controls like who gets in and who gets out, and that was how how nationalism within the Soviet Union was supposed to be kind of limited and constructed one that didn't work, and that kind of fell away to some extent and resulted in a lot of tragedy and turmoil. But also, this idea that nationalism is something that you can put into a box and control has never been true that has never worked at and we're we we see the ramifications not just in Europe, but see the ramifications in Africa's well where you see a conceptualization of what it yet. We saw pan-africanism which is a movement of people in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties during the independence movements new crew and others who are voicing this ID like African countries can come together and that movement, then sort of shifted and you see an. Individual African countries idea that we want to reject westernization. We want to reject what we believe to be western influence, which is why in countries like Tanzania, you are seeing that on this coming Monday people want to start reporting LGBT people that they know to the state and you saw that in Burundi as well. And you see that in other countries where this idea that there is something apart at something western about LGBTQ people. And so I think that this idea that nationalism is something that can be kept controlled or kept under a certain aegis of okay, you can be a nationalist. But up until this point where it's safe for everyone. I don't know if that's ever been historically true. I think that generally it is true that you don't get to control the passions you inspire when those passions rely on the sense of collective enough ability invulnerability that happens when you get people together in large crowds fee. Feeling the crowds are the important part like something that just got clarified for me. And what you're saying. Jane is for all the talk about how Brock Obama was so powerful as speaker because of the positiveness of his rhetoric like that's fair. But Donald Trump's rhetoric to his followers is very positive winning. Now, we've never been winning before everything. So great. It's also the Obama made it clear that he was inspiring people on an individual level that he was like as kind of transcendent as the vibe that often happened like early Obama rallies where like people would faint, and that kind of thing often was the actual rhetoric was you as an individual person part of the American story in the actions that you as an individual person, take matter and that mitigates substantially collective mentality of somebody at one of those rallies. Whereas if you're saying the reason that this is a special experience because everybody here is to. -gether which is the vibe that the kind of repeat frump rally goers, really go for is the right? You know, it's all RT, and that makes it really special. You don't get to control where that ends. You. Don't get to control who is defined as outside of that team. And how far people are willing to go. And like that's not just a Trump problem. It's not just a conservative problem. I don't even know that it's just a nationalist problem..

Soviet Union Brock Obama Donald Trump Kapatid Stalin Tanzania Burundi Europe America Africa Jane
"kapatid" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Talking Politics

"I just wanted to pick up on something that Sarah said towards the end of that last question in that the idea of America, I in that the United States doesn't necessarily need to come to Europe's defense or to get involved in European affairs was as she said, a really bipartisan movement, and it was the majority opinion in the United States in the nineteen thirty nine hundred forty nine forty one because there was no clear motive for self defense. The United States didn't need to protect itself against Nazi Germany. There's no way that Germany was going to invade the United States. There's no way Japan was going to invade the continental United States. And if those were the terms on which these issues would be decided than people like Lindbergh with his antisemitic and fascist views, but also really thoughtful anti interventionist like Herbert Hoover. Who is not an anti Semite who is not a fascist who is a small democrat or Republican politician who said if we get involved in Europe, actually in order to defend liberty in some Kapatid's fuzzy abstract way, what we're going to do is imperil liberty at home because we'll vest the executive so much power in order to which or that we're going to cartel America American liberties at home, and so Sarah said, they were pacifists, socialists. There are all sorts of all sorts of people. So just because the America first committee was really popular in nineteen forty forty one doesn't necessarily mean the fascism was on the cusp of winning the White House or taking control of American politics say it was probably less likely to nineteen forty despite the large presence of American fascism actual fascism in America than it is today in some respects. So one of the great Harrah's view book woman. Dorothy Thompson who's Perino Perty well-known today. She was a journalist. She was the most prominent women journalists in America, she Littman between them kind of coved up the space of being the person you listen. To find out what's really going on. But she wasn't early and staunch Warna against the threat that America had plenty of notes. Absolutely. She was in Europe in the twenties as a foreign correspondent and watch the rise of hush in Italy in Vienna. And in Germany to as the first American reporter to get an interview with Hitler. And she was also the first American to get kicked out by Hitler in nineteen thirty four which pretty much made her a celebrity and international celebrity and be will did accuser off towards having underplayed because she said he's a little man with with nothing to say is she wasn't the only one to make them. So. We should be really terrified of his. Never underplayed Nazism. So what she said is at the end of that book. So there's this one line where she says he seems like this foolish kind of guy. And I can't believe that people are falling for this. But she says these dark forces have been unleashed. So she's not in any way underplay. Why would this guy they have we should be really afraid, and she was very clear that it could happen in America. So she came home to this incredibly influencial syndicated column where she began writing columns like it can happen here. Calling out these fascist organizations talking about America, for of course, it can happen here on what she said. And again, this I think is to Andrews points about in some ways were more risk now than we were in the thirties, which I agree with. But we need to note as well that there were as he says not only outright American fascist movements in the thirties. There wasn't American Nazi party in the thirties, which was proved by Hitler and has and became quite influential. It had big rallies in Madison Square Garden, and you can see some of the footage online. It's really chilling stormtroopers in Madison Square Garden people giving the Nazi salute where you know, picture of George Washington is flanked by the swastika and Dorothy Thompson winter one of those rallies and shouted bunk. Which sounds funny, which of course, means BS, right? But if you think about what it would mean to walk into a room full of twenty thousand fashion. Hosts as a woman and shout Bs at the top of your voice, you actually get a sense of how gutsy she was one of the things she warned about over and over and over again was she said.

America Hitler Dorothy Thompson United States Europe Nazi Germany Sarah Madison Square Garden Herbert Hoover Japan Germany Lindbergh Harrah White House Vienna Warna Italy Kapatid Andrews executive
"kapatid" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"So Kapatid's is to be essentially meaningless but like non narrative right? And my point at the time was like video online video, especially was not yet a mature medium because it was or our interaction with video was was not yet immature medium because it was mostly. It was mostly fiction. It was TV at narrative step TV and movies and stuff. And I said, well, what are you saying that? Like eighty percent of movies are going to be documentaries and it's like, no, no, no, no, no, that's not it. It's that our interaction with video with motion graphics with what have you is going to be so far beyond TV and movies per say that like it's going to enter our lives into. It's going to enter our lives in ways such that eighty percent of it is is nonfiction, and that quote, unquote, nonfiction, whatever that means is not narrative is non sort of storytelling content. And that's definitely, I mean, that's definitely the case. If you like, scroll down the red at homepage and watch some of the animated. You know, some of the animation, the enemy of graphics that go down. That go down that like, that's, you know. The nonfiction after fashion, and and and it's not TV, right? But it is, you know, screen practice, you know, if you can think of like screen practice, which is a term from from film studies, right? Like stretching back to like shadow puppets, you know, to to the like camera, obscure, sort of magic lantern type of stuff and that like, you know, it's it's evolved now to like the little dancing emoji on my apple watch. You know, like that that you know screen practice now now is all around us and nothing. Everything is a screen and nothing is not a screen anymore, which is depressing and makes me feel old. It doesn't have to be depressing, and you probably would have felt old anyway. So. Three. Hey, before we before we before we wrap it up, let's. Go back and do a couple of, let's go back and do a couple of listener comments. I've I've neglected to highlight on some of the some of the previous episodes so I want to, I'm going to go back all the way depths at five hundred thirty two. The dragon bookmark on which Joseph commented. It's not every day you hear a one liner that you know will haunt you for ages who ominous right? Who what could it be? Joseph says, I thought about Pete's comment that the history of America is the story of coordi- quest to find a way into the human body all weekend. You should have some vegetables that way. You can clear it outcast. No, I hear ya. I hear ya. I mean all credits Michael Paulin for presenting that epic that image book. Worst dilemma in the divorce dilemma, there's he does kind of is slightly perversely but he makes the argument, you know, reasonably compellingly that corn has domesticated us. Yeah. Everything. Everything is corn and nothing is not corn. Episode, five hundred thirty three. It'll make sense. When we start playing clay Schultz writes the discussion about how drawing foreign. Sorry, allows you to skip the board made me think of other ways to game the board game rules. I realized I've been doing this with monopoly for years exploiting the banks, limited amount of houses which prevents other players from building up or in in. All right. That was that was like, oh, you jerk. Well, wait till you hear this in clue. I always falsely accused the character of murder to force them to move to a different location. It's super mean, but it's it's not. That's how you're supposed to play. That right now at the guys. There's a golden window right now for being extra dick moves in scrabble because recently updated the.

Michael Paulin Joseph Kapatid apple scrabble murder clay Schultz America Pete eighty percent
"kapatid" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on The Editors

"Is that I think right now we can't call these winds yet. It's only a win if you if you just believe breaking the taboo about the taboos that have surrounded free trade for the last twenty years are wins in themselves. I I do, but Trump has not made progress on the trade issue that everyone agrees is the issue and that he Amazon in the campaign which is China. We need actual progress with them. I, I would say, even we've gone into reverse because China's now trading more into North Korea and kind of breaking down the sanctions regime. So let's hit a few other things. Before we go, Luke even listening to a podcast called up in vanished. I have, yeah, I've been trying to branch out from just news podcasts. This is. A podcast by Atlanta based documentary production team. It's the second season of this particular show, and it's about young woman who disappeared in Colorado under some nefarious circumstances. It has really high production values and they do a lot of the old kind of radio, play style of suspense creation without at all, exploiting demeaning the very serious subject matter they've done. In addition to the first season, they put out a series on the Wayne Williams murders the Atlanta child murders from the late seventies early eighties. That's pretty compelling stuff. Michael. You've also been listening to a podcast is it doesn't want to do anything else here known? No, not really been driving a lot. Puckett's they're really like and listened to every week when it comes out is the spectator books. Podcast. It's hosted by Sam leaf who is the literary editor of the London spectator, and it's actually just a even spectator kind of has a of you. I would say Kapatid's toryism to it. I would say that this podcast and its subjects just range over everything and it's a, it's a great break from thinking about politics all the time, and it just makes you feel smarter to listen to it somehow. Charlie, have you been listening to a podcast about brisket or actually consuming brisket just consuming Briscoe. I feel on this podcast that I've become this parody. Imigran talks about football and alligators and brisket and all this stuff. But now I went to an event the night and somebody had slow cooked brisket for hours and hours and hours and hours. We don't really have this in England this this barbecue culture. We certainly don't have brisket. I was just shocked how good it is. It's one of those things that you see every time I say on Twitter that I've had barbecue somewhere. I stopped this huge civil war between different states so that you know that barbecue is terrible. The all barbecue's good ole barbecue's good. I'm brisket is is especially good. And yet another reason to love the United States, so Charlie should should up your game and get certified as a barbecue. Judge I. Oh yeah. And I can pronounce on state or area has the best barbecue. I have a relative who's a judge, and he can tell you in great detail just when you pull the brisket exactly how much less Tissot and snap back at it should have to be considered a high quality brisket. So my light, I've lied item is annoying marketing at the supermarket, which is entirely just intended to grab the attention of your kids and make them impossible to handle and get out of the store without grabbing what whatever the product is. I had this experience we were in in an aisle a couple of days ago and my daughter, she calls like every beverage juice. So she points and she's like, incredible juice, incredible juice. And there's this package. I think it was a milk product of that had incredible too. Wrapping what's incredible GPS. We don't. We don't know, incredible juices. We've never had incredible juice and she was. She said, I like it. So the those marketing dollars were were worth every penny. So let's before we go hit. Some editor's picks Michael..

China Atlanta Charlie Michael North Korea Trump Wayne Williams Amazon Puckett Luke Colorado United States Sam leaf Kapatid editor literary editor Imigran Briscoe
"kapatid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:27 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Brownlow recalled a certain smugness amongst British people when they were confronted with the pulse ability of the United Kingdom succumbing to fascism, it could never happen here. They tell him, we would let it we would have fought them in the streets with broomsticks quoting church. Oh, we would never surrender, but there was no arguing. This problem with collaboration would have been primary. It was a period people said, who who lived through Kapatid's they was extremely boring. And even if you were selling newspapers on the street corner, you were collaborating because you oversee selling the newspapers, the authorities wanted you to sell, so you could write volumes on the subject and it is absolutely fascinated. We decided. The heroin is going to be someone who had was able and just wanted to get back to normal. And that I think is in most people felt when one's entire reality has been thoroughly rewritten, there's bound to be some confusion over what qualifies as the normal full. The film's central character Pauline, a district nurse, the pursuit of a quiet life takes to the safe anonymity of London. After witnessing a string of horrific deaths determined to keep herself out of trouble. She takes a nursing job and Steve's well clear of politics politely declining, any notion of joining these so-called resistance. But when the stakes vis high, what constitutes complicity east, anyone truly a political because it's so long, people have actually forgotten. Fascism stood for what knots is stood for. In fact, when we may. Making the film, we felt even then we'd never been told what we fighting against and the none of films told you, they just field not as being thoroughly unpleasant frothing at the mouth and screaming against the Jews. So they didn't tell you the politics, and we tried to put that into the picture and that got us into an awful trouble. In fact, United Artists refused to release it without Cussing that sequence out the scene in which the fascist we felt they condemn themselves out of their own. MAs is ideal, but that wasn't shown publicly. If you just more turned who contracted some disease Clifton paralyzed as well. He might would. He then be just waste too should because we do. No, no, no member as the is in the position of privilege of to protect a used as a person is used as because he's used as not because he happens to be related to somebody useful the existence of such. I would want to take into my own hands anyway, Kevin eight seems as the while Pauline starts off as staunchly apolitical. She soon discovers that in what becomes her new reality, everyone takes a stake in something. Everyone has a stake in something and so everyone has to stand for something. I think that's probably true everyone. But look, you would just twenty six when this film was released. You now eighty two. You think people today feel as though they too have a stake in modern politics concept. I do know from anything else, an awful lot to avoid polish. Tics because it's it's getting more and more unpleasant. And so you have a political, huge number a-political people, and it's more number of extremists who will eventually make them worry about politics, but that's what seems to be the moment. Those missing scenes unpicking the ideology behind fascism have since being restored and are included in the British film institute's recent release of the film mauve and fifty years after it premiered the film's implication that fascism and other oppressive political regimes can. In fact, rise anywhere may not in itself seem as controversial an idea as it did in the mid nineteen sixties. It's moral probing, the what we all do in such a situation, however, remains Ereli prescient for monocle. I am Ben Ryland and the beer foes restored version of eat happened here, results now on DVD and Blu Ray. You're listening to the list. Now time for a roundup of the stories, making news in the technology world. I'm pleased to say that I'm joining the studio by Monaco's tech among David field and welcome to the program. Let's start with with news from something. Some things, large screen phone note, seven didn't exactly go according to the plan as many flyers. No, like they were even warnings planes. Yes, that's just carrying them and seven was was a fantastic phone apart from one little downside that it caught fire executive buttery. In fact, the very day that the first one caught fire, I happen to be an e further Berlin trade show, which will come to baps in a moment..

Pauline Clifton Brownlow British film institute United Kingdom Kapatid heroin United Artists London executive Steve MAs David field Monaco Berlin Ben Ryland Kevin Ereli Blu Ray fifty years
"kapatid" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Horizon of power and progress and here's where he brings in cars he uses carson's framework of finite and infinite games to think about types of ramps or visions of technological progress and this is a major reason some ramps are better than others he argues quote here's how i'd like to put it good technology connects people in new and deeper ways while bad technology merely grants people more raw power once you have the fastest car the biggest bomb the most kapatid's computer what then it is an empty form of ambition a drive for pure technological power is not only a finite game but often a destructive one and he writes quote improving computation for its own sake instead of for the cause of empathy results in misfortunes like the plague of fragments we're now enduring and also quote and approach to any underlying technological capability that solely expands human powers will probably lead to evil who and i really think about this in the context of the conversations we had earlier this year about social media like think about how the pure open minded drive toward expanding the power of a social media platform like facebook ended up manifesting in terms of horrible finite games like get as many users as possible onto the platform and then monetize you know like that is a finite game and that is a very destructive finite game alternately right because it it's in so many ways limiting of what good is actually possible through technology so alternately i think lanier is saying that if we want technology to serve us we can't just make it more powerful because technology that in a blind way is just made more powerful will tend naturally towards becoming tool in a series of increasingly destructive finite games played by the people who have the most power to wheeled the technology instead as technology progresses we have to have an ethic of.

carson facebook lanier
"kapatid" Discussed on BBC Let's Talk About Tech

BBC Let's Talk About Tech

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on BBC Let's Talk About Tech

"Okay so i have the answers your question does that help but this addition to it usb see for my coming out you what do you do just getting the death before it you you can get you can get up to the us spec looks different it's a small connector it has one has a couple of benefits it can be plugged in either way rounded symmetrical socket so it doesn't have to get it the right way round like you do with the standard usb two or usb three now generic uspa so you can't get them to for it it's really you got to think about what what you're going to be plugging into for the most part in the near future barry mind if you thinking about a year or two down the line then by then you know the price of all the handle the capacity of these drives would have changed the price going down the capacity where going up so that time if you're gonna use usb see in the future then by in the future by one by one that doesn't need an after now that will meet your needs a usb three one and then you can eat again adapted for all by by much much faster more kapatid's your spec drive in the future get now i would i would like to ask that if if the if the the us three competitor is compatible with tablets so yes no usually will you need to use an adapter safe the if the tablet is an android tablet it will need to support standard called usb otj which means usb on the go and you an adapter and that means that you can plug it and his good for transferring files across or using it for backup storage there are proprietary devices that will work with apple all that is as you probably prochet apple that make it easy there are ways of doing with apple as well but what you can do with it when it's tach is is let's use oh for example you can't store applications on it on an iphone but you can use it to put your music collection on but usb and tablets then not an ideal mix because again it sticks out particularly within damped so if you tablet that's got micro st card slot built into it or.

us apple barry
"kapatid" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Smart est way to hire and now now my listeners can post jobs on ziprecruiter for free that is fairly inexpensive free just go to ziprecruiter dot com slash daily wire that's ziprecruiter dot com slash daily wire one more time to try it for free go to ziprecruiter dot com slash daily wire you won't even have to spell clave in and ziprecruiter is the smartest way to hire today what i would like to do is read a piece of epstein is good writer conservative columnist rights in all the conservative papers that weekly standard wall street journal um and he wrote a piece yesterday in in the op ed page on the op ed page of the wall street journal that really struck me and i'm going to read a fairly substantial portion of it it is worth listening to and then i want to address some of the stuff he says it's called the only good thing about donald trump is all his policies and he starts out my son mark who's mind is more kapatid's subjective and generous than mine nicely formulated the donald trump problem them for thoughtful conservatives i approve of almost everything he has done and i disapprove of almost everything he has said i second the motion i approve of the neal gorsuch appointment the moving of the us embassy from tel aviv to jerusalem through removal of often strangling regulation from set much commerce the opening of the keystone pop pipeline the tax reform law and more i disapprove of the bragging tweets the touching this the crude putdowns of anyone who disagrees with him little marco insecure oprah sloppy steve and the rest the unrestrained vulgarity america has had ignorant corrupt vein lazy presidents before but in donald trump we have the first president who is a genuine bore in many realms of life a bores rude unmannerly nature can be forgivable a uae stockbroker who makes his clients lots of money might get away with being a bore a borish winning football coaches liveable if not likeable showbiz has never been without its bores from jet george jessil to whoopi goldberg even a.

epstein wall street journal donald trump steve america president george jessil whoopi goldberg writer us jerusalem marco uae
"kapatid" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on On The Media

"Capacity's for attracting and influencing individuals what are they the protest itself has a capacity for changing the narrative like the ferguson protests they got our attention on something that had been going on for a while in this country but was not a priority for people outside affected communities protests are social lomas can also have disruptive capacity that's when you have largescale civil disobedience and you say we're not gonna let things go on the same way before they can also have 'electoral institutional capacity and that's the capacity to threaten politicians occupy and black lives matter both have ample narrative capacity unarmed men and boys being shut down by police was about his vivid as it gets ninety nine percent under the heel of 1 percent is a pretty compelling elevator pitch therere square taking on a dictator who knows what costs all quite dramatic but compared to let's say the massive will disobedience in india under british colonisation or the civil rights movement of the '60s would you say that occupy and black lives matter are otherwise on kapatid's well see i don't want to say that day didn't matter because they were cures important and in many ways the shades people's lives and it's just very new rate is so who knows how much more effect they will have the thing is though in the past you can think of the protest as an exclamation mark at the end of a long sentence rows right now it's just the first word in a potential sentence and i think that's the key lesson of my book is not that current protests are unimportant in fact i've march in protest at my whole life and will continue to do so but they are no longer an indicator the way they were in the pass the occupy movement was very interesting in its ability to tap into a deeply resonant and hugely important issue inequality which has been increasing since bumped by its politics it was very resistant to use.

india kapatid ferguson shut down civil rights ninety nine percent 1 percent
"kapatid" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Slate's Working

"When you think about doing a kind of work that we call queer theory do feel obliged to define queer itself this term i do in that i i i i hear what you're saying about it it can sort of mean anything dissident or anything de constructive um and sort of stopped meaning anything at all and so for instance in my second book time binds you know i i hugh pretty closely to an idea that queer ought to have something to do with sacks you know that it and that we can expand our definition of sex we can find things are kind of unrecognizable as sex inquiries theory but that there's there's has to be some has have something to do with with bodies and their contact in the imagination about what we can do with bodies um i think there's another version of queer that that you know it means a kind of relentless questioning of hetero normativity you know the idea that had such rallies natural and inevitable um that may not always means saxon i'm i'm pumped you know i i i'd like to hold that intellectual space open as well but i think that's always been the trick is to have a definition of credits could've kapatid's enough to do unpredictable kinds of work um but not so kapatid's that it can mean everything so in the book uh if we can talk about practicalities for a minute in that book time binds that you alluded to your second book you're talking in part about notions of time notions of chronology to to some extent your argument there is a critique of will you call a krona normativity i think that's the term using this this notion that the ways that we can construct the schedules through according to which was a postal live our lives from birth through maturation to marriage and so on f something to do with the construction of maybe sexuality itself um but uh mesker maybe a a flip in question about that do you queer your own schedule a or do you have a head of cronin nor normativity to your own academic working la that surly great question um.

cronin kapatid
"kapatid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"kapatid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Edward out even target exit bites anymore retarted zada bites of data flipping around debts that's pretty impressive you can complain all you want about slow broadband and and skype dropouts and hang out drifting and all of this but think about it folks going back to that laptop were you felt kapatid's because you had ten megabytes store hinged feel the power to be worried exert of bites of air advisor i actually looking forward to they were and get his that abide harddrive i'd say what a days probably closer than we thank and as the eighty percent you've got to figure that's not only the popularity of video in the bic what he of it but also the fact that will we're going to continue to get bigger higher quality being delivered over any and all of that ports of the inner okay i am and that's a big puerta cisco's calculation here is you know all video becomes hd at this point for the most part and then a four k and hd are video starts to increase quite a bit finally microsoft confirmed it has acquired an israeli startup called heck's that night which uses artificial intelligence to identify and protect against attacks microsoft says heck's that i will be folded into its security efforts for commercial windows ten users specifically windows defender advanced threat protection heck's that i can detect and stops small issues on its own raising larger ones to human teams when necessary that takes the pressure off his people more time and and has been shown in test to prove response time to security threats idc estimates the enterprise will spend nearly eighty two billion dollars on security software this year.

Edward kapatid advisor cisco artificial intelligence windows security software skype microsoft windows defender eighty two billion dollars eighty percent ten megabytes four k