7 Episode results for "Kansas Third District"

1A Across America: Indigenous And In Office

1A

35:01 min | 1 year ago

1A Across America: Indigenous And In Office

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing more at fly. Dallas dot com slash fast. This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson. Native Americans have had voting rights in federal elections for nearly a century, but an indigenous woman had never won a seat in congress until last year that time for people to not be heard and not be seen and not being listened to or represented. Well. Changes now. That was Kansas. Representative cherise David during her victory speech in November in the midterms. She and New Mexico, congresswoman Deb Holland became the first two native American women in congress female tribal citizens broke ground in many state positions as well including Peggy Flanagan who's the new Lieutenant governor of Minnesota. I want every young person in Minnesota tonight to know black white Brown or indigenous that you can grow up, and you can lead this state. But as Flanagan said, on the campaign trail native women are at best invisible. And at worst, disposable indigenous peoples as a whole don't fare much better. But today, we're bringing together native American women who were settling into their new positions of power as part of our special project one, a across America, joining us from the US capital is Kansas representatives, cherise David's. She is a member of the hotel nation congresswoman David's. Welcome to one A. I am happy to be here. Joining us from Minnesota public radio is Minnesota's Lieutenant governor Peggy Flanagan. She's the highest ranking native American woman in a state executive position. And she is a member of the white earth band of Gibb way Lieutenant governor Flanagan. Welcome. Thanks so much for having me. Also with us here in studio is marked trae hint. He's the editor of Indian country today. Mark, thanks for being here. Thanks. Glad to be here congresswoman David's. Let me start with you. How have your first hundred fifty or so days? Ben going, how did your expectation of what congress? Be like compare to reality. Well, I'm not sure I had too much of an expectation except that I knew that we were going to be on a steep learning curve. And so that, that has that expectation has been met for sure, one of the things because of the topic that we're touching on today that I want to mention is that I'm often telling people that I don't know what this experience would be like, if Representative Deb Jalan wasn't also here at the same time that I am both of us coming in as freshmen members of congress, and, you know, making our way through this very long standing institution and figuring out how we can best use our voice in our lived experience to really add to the conversation as the sole member of the Kansas delegation. That is part of the democratic majority in the house. I definitely think that there are a few things I bring, you know, whether it's the, the voice of the Kansas, third district, or the voice of a. Native woman who has some previous experience and expertise and in federal Indian law and economic and community development in native communities. I think that, you know, the idea of this congress accepting embracing and a lot of times, highlighting some of the work that both Deb Jalan denier doing has been pretty phenomenal. I'm congresswoman David could you tell us a little bit about the third district where exactly is that? What's the demographic like just paint us a basic picture? I'd love to talk about the Kansas third district. So where the Kansas City metro area, we have were on the Kansas side. So Kansas City Kansas, which is in Wyandotte county is its own unique historical place in this country. Wind dot county is one of the full counties that's in the district. The other one is Johnson county which. Which has a lot of suburban suburban parts of the Casey metro area. And then we have a small portion of Miami county where it starts to be a little more rural. And the, the district has you know, I mean I graduated from a community college there, we've got one of the best community colleges in the country, right there. But we've got just this, I'd say strong emphasis on public education, which is, you know, the a huge part of why I've had the opportunities I've had in my life, and I just I was really excited that Kansas got to play a role this year and being part of this history, making class of freshmen members of congress, Lieutenant governor Flanagan. Let me come to you similar questions. First question what have you learned about being a state executive in Minnesota in your first few days in office? Well as a Representative David said, it's it is a steep learning curve. But I think that what I have really learned is the responsibility, the weight of the responsibility. And the overwhelming feeling of being in the room where it happens a think that's the difference that it makes having indigenous women native people at the decision making table. The outcomes that we're able to achieve, I think are more reflective of who lives in the state as a whole and just think we'd get better policy outcomes. When our government accurately represents or more accurately represents the folks who live here. So that has been what has been really powerful for me. Yeah. Would you wrote this, which I you month? Would you expand on that police in terms of who lives in Minnesota because the state, I think? People would be surprised to know is remarkably diverse there's a significant monk population. There is a significant population from from various, you know, countries with a large Muslim population. Talk about the indigenous populations in Minnesota. And what some of their unique needs and concerns are. Absolutely, well, thank you for knowing about the great state of Minnesota, and that we have a really diverse population here, of course, as you mentioned, the monk community. We have a significant Somali population are lat next community is, as large as well, African American and the native population. We've got eleven reservations in the state of Minnesota, as well as a significant urban American Indian population too. And I think, you know, the needs of our communities are, are vast. But it comes down to issues around education, health care. Issues surrounding community prosperity and really the need to ensure. And I think the role of the state is that we are playing a real role in ensuring that government to government relationships with our tribal, nations are strengthened and adhere to so we just have finished. We just finished our first legislative session where we had some pretty significant victories in Indian country around passing a missing and murdered into jenness women's task force. Additional funding for VIP schools are bureau of Indian education schools here, and essentially incorporated, culturally relevant policy-making into the work that we did through the department of human services. And I think that the differences were just making sure that people who are directly impacted by the kind of policies were passing by the budget. We're building are the people who are at the table, making decisions right along with us. More trahan? Let me come to you, and I'm remiss in not mentioning earlier, that you are a member of the shell Vanik tribes. Sorry, I should have said that earlier. We are talking now about native American women during this past election. How much progress have native American men made in politics before now? Well native American men have a lot longer history of being elected office. So this is where the real push this was the first campaign where season where there were more native women running than men across the country and more than thirty got elected to legislators as legislators and to congress, of course, and to state executive office. So it was really remarkable in that sense men were first elected starting in the eighteen hundreds and small numbers. And in either group, whether it's men or women were still far behind population parody in terms of office. I mean, in terms of the percentage of people in a particular region, or district or state who are indigenous and whether that match. Matches their representation in the government that sits loss for them. Correct. We're now at two thirds of one percent in the congress. Now we spoke with congresswoman Deb Holland last October. She was mentioned earlier from New Mexico. We spoke to her when she was a candidate at the time. Here's what she told us at the time in terms of the important issues for native voters, terrible communities, always, always care tremendously about our education system. And so that's something that, that is high on my list as well as well as healthcare. Right. We, we have of our population here in New Mexico's Medicaid eligible that includes the twenty two tribal communities that we have here in the state, and so that's always an important issue as well. That's Deb Haaland of New Mexico during her campaign for congress. Speaking to us last October, Mark, she mentioned education, healthcare, Medicaid, both Lieutenant governor Flanagan and congresswoman David's both mentioned education. Are there? To be very brought about it native American issues or are there just issues that native Americans tend to get annoyed on both? This is the short answer. This is an example, though. I think of where Representative Holland has just been brilliant for years and years, members of congress have rallied around the Indian health service and talked about fund full funding for health service, which has never happened. But if you look at the actual data Medicaid is far more bigger, pick part of the picture than the IHS budget itself. And yet, nobody's going into said this is connected. And these two things have to happen together, and that's where the statement by represented. Holland, was so -ffective Lieutenant governor Flanagan something you said on the campaign trail caught our attention. You said, quote too often are native women are at best invisible. And at worst, disposable unquote, talk a little bit more about the plight of native American women in Minnesota, as you see it in what she would what are you working to have done about that? Well, I think when, you know, I made a statement like that and continue to make that statement because it is changing, but I think it's, it's still accurate. It does come back to education, which we have all talked about in there, too many people in Minnesota and across the country, who don't actually even know that native people still exist as contemporary people. The images that we are bombarded with every single day. The Washington football team chief Wahoo even advertisements that we see Halloween costumes of polka haughty that, you know, in the over sexualization of native American women. These are the kind of images that we see in popular culture. So the sort of view that people oftentimes have of native women is skewed and I meet people even in Minnesota who don't know that native America. Can people still exist? So that is why I think when you a race an entire group of people it, you know, it, it, you know, devastates us but also means that then you don't have to actually pay attention to Hauer investing in these communities. How are working in partnership with them to pass a public policy that improves people's lives? And so, you know, a racer has really devastating consequences for American Indian people. So part of the reason that I even decided to run for Lieutenant governor right because it certainly every little girl stream to be the second most powerful person in the state. Right. But the reason one of the reasons I did clearly was to, to be there with a, a really strong partner and ally in, in governor, Tim walls, but also after we had the tragic death here in the midwest of savannah, gray wind, who is a young native woman who was pregnant and had her. Baby ripped from her womb, and she was left to die disposed of in a river. This is a story. I'm sorry. We, she had her baby ripped from her what ripped from her womb by a neighbor on they stole her baby, and they left her to die. And this is a story and Joshua, your reaction, sort of proves my point. Only in that everyone in Indian country knows this story everybody but national media, frankly, didn't pick it up in the way that they should have. And so this is the danger, frankly of, of being a native woman, we simply disappear. So, you know, I think having cherise and Deb and polit Jordan, who ran for governor of Idaho and serving in this position. It increases the visibility of indigenous women. And I think also means that. People start are going to need to start to really grapple with these issues native women have been leader since time, immemorial that's not new, but it is new that are national popular culture is, is starting to catch up, frankly, with where native communities have been for generations congresswoman David's. I want to carry on with, and there are other issues, I want to talk to everyone about, but I, I don't want us to, to glaze over this one. We got a voicemail from a listener. Nicole in New Hampshire left this, in our inbox state Representative in Hampshire and I'm one of you younger date rats and having a political role. Models me in very important, and the way that I have someone to look for how to act and how to conduct myself in my state. And when I can bring to the table, and they, I feel like role models in the political sector our view. And to me. Thank you for sharing your thoughts with us congresswoman David's before we pause. I'd love your reaction to that. Particularly because you presided over the house during a vote on missing and murdered indigenous women legislation. Talk about that role model role in the house, even if it's just related to generating awareness that this is even happening. Yeah. So I would say, I my response response to the voice mail is those, those are the kinds of messages that when I get them it's, it's a little bit emotionally overwhelming, because I think that sometimes in our day to day and, you know, I don't know if the Lieutenant governor feels this as well, but in our day to day, we're, we're really doing a lot of hard work, and, and I think that the impact that, that's having the, the ripple effects of the work that we're doing. We often don't see that or hear that. And so it's very, it's a very powerful thing for folks to, to let us know that, because, you know, we, we really are doing this, because the in the generations to come. We're, we're we're the first to serve in these positions. But we certainly aren't the last and we know that because folks are lead. Us letting us know. So I did get to preside over the house floor when the violence against women act was reauthorized, and it contained a contained things that address the issues with indigenous women and girls in including, you know, addressing the, the missing and murdered indigenous women. I hate to interrupt you up against the break. I will I promise. I'll come right back to you and let you finish your thought and tell us more about that legislation when we come back we got a pause in the we'll get to some more of your thoughts as well stickers. Support for this podcast. And the following message come from Babbel. Have you always wanted to speak, a new language, whether it's for travel work, or brain training, Babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons will get you speaking confidently in your new language? Choose from Spanish, French, and more, you'll learn through real life, dialogues, speech, recognition, and interactive trainers, and Babbel's space repetition method actually, makes you remember what you've learned, download the app or go to Babbel. B. A. B B E, L dot com to try babble for free. A language was about to die. Once it gets wiped out. That's it. We will have nothing in our language to pass away, children and the people trying to save it, we're still learning how to speak it. And we had to hurry up time was working against as we were like hundred years late. You know it's code switch ULA, low of a listen. And subscribe back now to our conversation about the rise of native American women in American politics, as part of our special project, one, a across America. A congresswoman sorry, I had to cut you off before. Let me let you finish your thought and then I'll let Mark China right now. No, no worries. I am trying to keep this concise here. One of the things that I wanted to mention was, you know, the way the violence against women act, addresses, some of the issues around missing and murdered. Indigenous women is by allowing an information sharing on coordination between law enforcement agencies. And I think that a lot of times, what people don't realize is that there's some there, there are some barriers that exist to tribal law enforcement. And then state law enforcement sometimes federal folks from, from actually being able to help address finding women when they go missing. And so that's some of what the violence against women act is going to do, but I wanted to touch on what the Lieutenant governor brought up about savannah, gray win. And there's two things that, that we're working on here, Savannah's act, which is named named after savannah, gray win. Because it was it was such a huge impactful. And devastating thing for us to see with the long history of native women going missing. But also to have one of our one of our children being removed from, you know, potentially being removed from the from our tribal structures are our communities, and that is something that we've seen for a long time as well. And then the, the not invisible act which addresses really just trying to figure out how we make sure that everybody's working together to identify and combat the violent crimes that are happening in Indian country native communities because a lot of times we just we know that there's a problem, and it feels sometimes like we're running around, waving our arms saying, we need people to pay attention to this, and we now have people who are sitting in, in these various, whether it's state houses, the congress, who. Who are saying we're not, we're not here to tell you what the problems are where here to educate you, but we're also here to listen to make because it is not that people haven't had a voice for a very long time. They have native communities native women have had a voice for a long time and have been in leadership positions decision makers in Washington DC, and state houses have not been listening, and we now have people who are who are saying, we need to listen to what's going on, so that we can help address these issues, Mark. Well, one of the great things about being an Indian country today is we can sit back and kind of look at the entire country. And with this wave of native women who are elected to legislators the first thing they did was to act on missing and murdered indigenous women across the country. You're seeing legislation signed in Minnesota in Arizona North Dakota Montana Alaska, where folks have taken. This is important. And we're now in a position to do something about it, and here's our plan. Let me ask you a little bit more about your background. Tenant governor Flanagan. How how did you make your way into politics? Is there anything in your background that would have hinted at you eventually being where you are today, or does this come as a surprise, even you? Well, I was ready to be at early childhood special education teacher. I majored in child psychology in American Indian studies at the great university of Minnesota. But then during my senior year of college, I volunteered for the Wellstone for Senate campaign, and everything changed and no point did I think I was going to run for statewide office. But I knew that it was critically important to ensure that native people were engaged in politics, were voting and eventually running for office, so I spent much of my career, and it was the first time that I actually was able to work with, with Mark a bit. When I led the native American leadership program at Wellstone action, where retrain, NATO folks how to run for office work on issues that were important their communities. I and I. Think so much of the work, I'm going to give it just a little a little love to, to Mark, and all the work that he's done on native vote really set us up to be in a position in twenty eighteen so much of that is because he laid the groundwork with the stories that he told of highlighting the work that was happening. And, you know, for a long time, native people were voting in elections, but the logical next step, I think is, is for us to, to run for office. So what happened in two thousand eighteen was really important. And I think it's not just a blip in time. It is the foundation on, which we build as congressman Davis just said of clearing a path, and holding the door open for the folks, we're gonna come after us. But I got bit by the bug by working for the late great Senator Paul Wellstone, and served on the Minneapolis school board. And then in the state house of representatives, and that's the pathway that, that led me led me here, but my background and nonprofit work. And so I like to just remind people that it takes folks of. Of all, different kinds of backgrounds and experience to serve in office to make sure that we've got a diverse group of is we're helping us to make decisions for our communities. We are speaking to Lieutenant governor Peggy Flanagan of Minnesota congresswoman cherise, David's democrat representing Kansas and Mark trae half the editor of Indian country today. We'll have more with them in just a moment. Sticklers. Support also comes from NCR. Let's face it, as a small business owner, you wear, so many hats, every day, you rarely have time to focus on activities that drive profitability or bring in new customers. That's why you need a point of sale. That does more NCR silver delivers simple to understand analysis and business building tools like Email marketing and loyalty, so you can get back to focusing on your customers NCR silver. Visit NCR dot com slash silver. I'm Gregory Warner on rough translation. We follow a rescue mission in real time after an Iraqi photo journalist goes missing on the front lines. We don't believe it. I don't believe it leaves his family and his friends to try to save him. When he said, who is this? Who are you? Same respond. We are the Slavic state from NPR's rough. Translation, listen. And subscribe back now to our conversation on native Americans and representation in government congresswoman David's. Let me get into your background for one thing you have experience as a mixed martial artists, which I think is amazing. I think it's very, very cool. We also got a question about your background from amber, who asked on our Facebook page, when you began contemplating your race your political campaign. What were your thoughts on how to deal with people who might use your orientation against you? Did you feel the need to defend yourself at any time I'm asking as an out and proud LGBTQ person in rural America with plans to run for office? Very soon congresswoman. Well, I I'm run you ever, I think I always say to anybody who is considering running do it, so no, I didn't while back up really quickly because I feel like I always have to give all the due respect and acknowledgement that my mom who raised my brothers and I by herself. She was in the army for twenty years and really worked so hard to make sure that I could do whatever it was. I wanted to do and thrive. You know, she, she really she really laid a strong foundation. She also laid a strong foundation for me to really live my life in an authentic way and just be who I am. And so. No, I didn't I never felt as though I needed to. I don't feel like I need to defend my existence to anybody on any piece of who I am. Whether it's being a woman. Or being an out outlets Byan part of the LGBTQ community being a native American person, and in politics, sometimes it's coming from a family that doesn't have a bunch of money, and it's coming from a what I consider to be a very ordinary like common experience, being a I immigration college student. I went to community college took me for years to get an associate's degree and other for years to get a bachelor's degree because I was working the whole time and I think a lot of people know what that experiences like. And it was not an experience that we've seen as much in politics, as we should be seeing not just the folks who are doing the hard work behind the scenes to get folks elected. But also the people who are putting their names on the ballot, and that is a lot of what I was thinking about when, when I was deciding whether I should run or not. And a lot of. Times, I would see, you know, folks would folks would worry about, like, oh, well, you know, you're, you don't have a large network of a very wealthy people behind you. Maybe you shouldn't run yet. And to me that was like, that's absolutely the reason that I should be running, because we need people who are sitting when the government shutdown was going on when we saw. When we saw members of the cabinet of this country, talking telling people that they should go get loans. When you don't have an income that tells me we have people who are making decisions for folks, and they have no idea of the implications of the impact on most of what we all have to deal with. We know we can't go get alone if we don't have income and the fact that we have people sitting in the cabinet who don't understand that. We've got a secretary who I am convinced of education, who I'm convinced did not set foot in a public school until she started trying to dismantle that system. That is not. Okay. And we need more people from broad diverse lived experiences to be to be getting on the ballots and getting elected. I'm trying not to make a joke about being an enemy fighter and now being in congress. I dunno any other way to ask, not to, yeah, so maybe I'll just let you briefly like this. Is there any intersection there, I'm trying not to make a bad joke us where I've tried not to Richard. I'll say this. Running for office is similar to, to getting ready for a fight, and that you have to consciously make the decision to step foot in either the gym, or whatever other, you know, for the gym, but you know, you know, you're going in your, your sparring. You're getting hit getting punched in the face. But you gotta learn from that experience. How do I improve for tomorrow running for office is not that dissimilar you get punched in the face? It's just not physically and you just gotta figure out how do I how do I do a better job tomorrow? And then you just keep working hard before time is up, Mark. I definitely wanted to talk about native American voters. You've written about the increasing difficulties of native Americans casting ballots, as their votes, get more influential, we talked not too long ago, about a voter ID law in North Dakota. We talked about that, right before the midterms. Here's a quick clip from that program with Kerry Levin, who's a reporter from the center for public integrity. The central issue, here is that the law require. Here's an ID that carries a residential street address. That's an issue because on many reservations, that most people don't have that they have PO boxes, they have mailing addresses, and those addresses are no longer sufficient. So if you have ID but it carries a mailing address like a post office box. You can no longer use it to vote in North Dakota in this election. You could in the primary when this law was stayed by the court. But that idea you used in the primary is no longer good for the general election. Mortga wonder how you see this progressing from here in terms of voter ID laws and other policies that many tribes have said, make it harder for their citizens to be properly represented. Well, let me zoom out and start with the big picture is, we have some structural problems with boating, in this country that we need to address. And that's part of it. Part of it's the way we draw districts, I mean, the most successful state in the country in terms of native representations. Montana Montana, worked really hard at representation in districts, and now has the highest percentage of native Americans in the legislature. We need to. Do that across the country where people can think, how are we going to get the most effective proportional representation possible? I know our time is short. But I do want to ask both Lieutenant governor Flanagan and congressman David's what some of the big issues are that you want to focus on coming up. We've already talked about the murders of indigenous women Britney asked on our Facebook page as a mohawk. I'm grateful that we finally have representation in the house. Do what do you plan to do to promote native of nation sovereignty, and treaty rights as a public health professional and researcher, I'm also interested in how you will specifically advocate for indigenous peoples health, so treaty rights indigenous peoples health. There is talk of whether there should be delegates from indigenous peoples in congress. There's a census coming up in twenty twenty what's kind of at the top of your radars going forward, Lieutenant governor Flanagan, let me start with you. And then congresswoman David's I mean, all of those things are on our radar anything at the top of the list, one of the things that, that we did the governor. Just signed executive order nineteen twenty four here in the state of Minnesota. And what that does is reaffirms, Minnesota's commitment to government to government relationship supporting treaty rights, tribal sovereignty in requires every agency Commissioner and leadership throughout our state agencies to go through tribal training to understand more about the indigenous people who live here, and the unique political status that we have an incorporated, and all of that is the need for tribal consultation, and the requirement of every agency to do so. And for the governor's office to do so, so we are, you know, our goal is that when folks look at the state, that's doing it, right? The state, that is working in partnership with our native nations that its Minnesota. So we have, you know, signed this executive order. And now we need to make sure that it happens and. With relations to the census, we gotta get our folks. Counted, it matters tremendously to native people, especially with our relationship with the federal government. And then finally, it would just say as as was mentioned about healthcare. There are certainly Medicaid as as was just talked about making sure that Indian health services funded, but also here, and the state level, we need to make sure that we are delivering healthcare that is preventative. And that is grounded in culture, and culturally relevant for our people, and before yo- congresswoman anything you would add to that list, and our last few seconds, well, the healthcare. Yes, but I also want to touch on chance for tation issues. I sit on the transportation and infrastructure committee. And I think that's a place where we can really see what we can infuse concepts of equity. But also making sure that we're bringing in tribal voices into that process, transportation impacts every single aspect of our lives, how we get to care how we get to school how we get to. Our jobs. And so that's a, that's a place where I've been focusing, a lot of energy to democratic Kansas congresswoman, cherise, David's from Kansas, third district, a member of the hotel nation. Congresswoman, we are really appreciate your time. Thanks for talking to us. Thanks, Peggy Flanagan the Lieutenant governor of Minnesota, a member of the white earth band of Gibb way Lieutenant governor Flanagan. Thank you. Thank you so much, and marked trae Han editor of Indian country today, a member of the shown Banik tribe, Mark. Thanks very much. Thank you. This conversation was produced by James Morrison in collaboration with our one, a across America partner stations. KM UW in Wichita Kansas, and Minnesota public radio it was edited by Miranda. Full more special, thanks to Minnesota public radio's brianna beer, Shbak and Jeff Jones won a across America is funded in part by the corporation for public broadcasting. This program comes to you from W A, M U part of American University in Washington distributed by NPR until we meet again, I'm Joshua Johnson. Thanks for listening. And we'll see tomorrow for the Friday news roundup this. Is one.

Minnesota Lieutenant governor Peggy Flan congress Mark Kansas executive congressman David America Lieutenant governor Flanagan Joshua Johnson New Mexico David NPR Washington congresswoman David Medicaid editor
Trouble In Dallas?

Outside the Lines

24:34 min | 2 years ago

Trouble In Dallas?

"If you're a smoker, you know, switching isn't easy. You've tried vapes. Andy six they just didn't deliver the satisfaction. You expected jewel is different. It's not an e cigarette. It's vapor product that actually satisfies plus jewelers simple to use. And there's no cigarette. Ash, no lingering odor as a smoker, you expect a certain nicotine experience right jewel delivers. Give Julie try check O J U, L dot com slash sports. Switch and be satisfied. Yes. You can't do both. Warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical. What the fans want? Joel. Third. NBA Michigan moving up to number four seen. Michigan. Get that much better week after week. Alabama. Today's election day. I do now things need to change. Dallas cowboys. There has to be a complete overhaul of higher organization. You just can't simply replace head coach Jerry Jones wants to run the team right now. It's not helping and it hasn't helped since the ninety six season. What you see your perception sporting events. Welcome outside the lines on K Fagin, high octane basketball, college and pro is today's big story from studios z last night in Indianapolis do put up one hundred eighteen points, and it's trio of top freshman combined for eighty three points eighty three in the blue devils thirty four point win over number to Kentucky. What? Transition. Is a rock. Just three with all confidence. Get used to that. Swearing. I believe. Those are some stunning numbers posted much of coming from three players the top three recruits in the nation who are likely to be one in done in the college game who are likely to be an NBA uniforms. This time next year in scoring in the NBA at its highest level since nineteen seventy seventy one is also rocking and rolling the increase in scoring due to a confluence of factors. Many of which are very own Brian wind horse wrote about his latest NBA column which dropped today. And here to talk about those reasons is win ESPN MBA reporter and host of the hoop collective podcast, Brian what has led to this historic increase in scoring and NBA. Well, it's been a multi-stage effort that has taken about a decade where you know, ten years ago, Kate we were seeing finals games where their teams breaking seventy points. And so there was some rule changes made. Then you have the fact that the league is gone smaller with better shooting. And now you routinely see five shooters on the court and then the game. Has gotten faster which Mike dantonio and the sun seven seconds for less. Steve Nash have done you put that all together with the fact that this year the officiating they these rules are not new, but they've decided to enforce these rules that don't allow defenses to do any sort of holding you're grabbing freedom of movement. Basically, you put all that together. And the defenses are like running with weights on their ankles. They are behind the offenses the the defense that really you need the play to have any hope in the modern NBA yet to play in all switching defense where every player on the court can switch and guard anybody else. Well, number one. There aren't that many teams that are quick to do that number two. This is not a defense that guys grew up playing. They didn't learn how to play switching defense, which talks takes a lot of communication and a lot of intelligence something that they played the end of games or in special situations, they're just generation behind and we're seeing it a come out on the court every single night with no end in sight. All right switching gears a little bit because this flew under the radar last week. But blink Griffin. Signed a deal with win view. It's a live television sports prediction platform and Blake Griffin is going gonna star in its advertising campaign. Now, how is this next wave of bedding technology impacting the NBA world Kate there isn't a single conversation. I have with an agent or a business Representative team isn't talking about how to take advantage of legalize sports gambling. It is a wave of new money. And while the teams can't run casinos themselves yet see down the line how that develops. This is a whole new wave of of people looking to get their new products and new betting operations in front of fans, and that makes players like Blake Griffin and teams who are willing to put a sign out front a big big billboard opportunity. It's a huge opportunity and a huge revenue stream. The teams are looking to tap in those jersey ads, but you see right there when they installed those jersey ads those are made for gambling operation. So when we see this first generation of jersey ads expire. In the next two or three years. This is all going to be. So when you're watching a game, and you see the guy at the foul line. You're gonna know what apt to go to bed on they were made for that. And it's going to be a hundred million dollar a year business. Just in those ads are going to bounce all around the NBA because while we're all focused on the Lakers Trail Blazers and the nuggets off pretty impressive starts in the west. Why are we overlooking them? Well, partly partially because they don't have big time star players with all due respect to Donna Mitchell in Damian Lillard, they don't make the cut of the top four or five. There's been some teams that we thought were going to be better that have underachieved a little bit the jazz one of them. And it's a naval the the the trailblazers nuggets to kind of move in. We'll say this both the nuggets trailblazers have benefited from somewhat friendly early schedules. The blazers have played more home games than anybody else in the league and the nuggets are second. So that's that's been a big part of it. But they also have gotten great team wide efforts. You know, the the, you know, there was a lot of big splashy moves made in the off season. And the blazers didn't make any of them. But they did make some moves to their second unit. And that's been one of the reasons why they've played so well, they're getting great play from Evan Turner as a backup point guard. Which is a great move from Terry Stotts. It doesn't seem like it's a major thing. But it's really help them get better. And you look at the Denver Nuggets they are team that has a couple of the really bright young players in the league. And they've now been together for a few years. This is the third or fourth year this group has been together. And so now they have the advantage of having youth and chemistry and you saw Jamal Murray. The other night. Have a breakthrough game, you know, scoring forty eight points. And I love what he said to the Denver post about this. You know, he didn't get the basketball because careering through in the stance. He doesn't have. And they said do you wish you had the basketball, and he goes now have another big game? And I think that's what's great about Jomar. He's young. And he knows he's got a great bright future. As always Brian. Thank you for your time today. The latest college football playoff rankings drop last night with one new squad. Welcome to the party Michigan. The wolverines one of seven one loss teams in the top twenty five joined Alabama, Clemson and Notre Dame and the top four university of central Florida undefeated since twenty sixteen came in at number twelve again, this is Michigan. Jim Harbaugh's first time in the top four since week thirteen of twenty sixteen the CFP ranking's always dominate the new cycle this time of year, but some waves made it South Carolina's head coach will must champ was asked if he discussed the mid-term elections in the importance of voting with his players, how do you approach and have you approach voting with your guys in terms of leading up to today and today to say anything to him about it? He'll have any. You know, you know, today's election day, I do now. I'm getting ready for Florida. To be fair. Must champ is not the only college coach oblivious to the larger meaning of yesterday's election. Although he's being held accountable because he's consistently framed himself as eight Molder of young men consider as opening statement from when he was hired to coach South Carolina twenty fifteen as really really exciting. The young man can come on on on this campus. But also in the city of Columbia and have a wonderful experience, a great college experience, and that's really important to me. It goes a lot further and Saturday afternoon with me, you know, we're with them Sunday through Friday in the growing process of the young man future leaders of our country. We are now. Joined by Paul finebaum, host of the Paul finebaum show for all things college football related Paul before we get to must champ. Let's just put a pain in that. Let's start with Michigan. Why does Michigan get that? Number four spot. Because they have gone out and dominated teams Kate. I mean, they they have this rated Penn State the other day, which took almost to the end of the game for Ohio State to win a couple of weeks ago. So that was a very significant win. Jim Harbaugh only has one loss that was to Notre Dame on the opening weekend Notre Dame, as you know, are is ranked number three Michigan has just really turned it up their defensive always been suffocating. But the addition of shape Patterson transfer from this has elevated their game that they may now easily be the favorite to win the big ten. So Michigan's there now. But do you think they're gonna be there when it counts, I still think they have to get over a house day? Jim Harbaugh has not beaten urban Meyer urban Meyer looks wounded right now for all the reasons that we've talked about and the on the field issues as well. But right now, I would probably have to bet on Michigan as much as that may go against the grain of of the narrative of the big ten. All right. Let's get to must champ in obviously, he is not the only college coach who had a react. Action as in like, I didn't talk to my guys about the election yesterday. But as we teed up earlier he was one of those guys who is framed himself as a Molder of men. So what was your reaction to most champs answer to this question about the election? I was embarrassed by it, and I say that someone who is known been friendly with we'll muschamp a longtime sometimes he can outsmart himself and all coaches want to give the impression that they're doing nothing other than getting ready for the next game. It's one thing if very used to play golf on Friday afternoon, I understand that narrative, but the election was extraordinarily important. All you have to do is. They listen, you know, I I don't tell my guys what to do. But I encourage them to be good public citizens. It is a fact that two years ago on the very same day Nick Sabin acted like he didn't know that the Donald Trump Hillary Clinton election was going on which would have been impossible. Just like I think it's impossible for will muschamp in a state like South Carolina, which is very active political state now. To have known. I think coaches sometimes just just think that they're being funny. Instead, I think they're being stupid now being fair in holding college coaches to this kind of standard. I mean, shouldn't we hold them accountable to be speaking to their guys about something like an election? Yes, I do their educators. They work at universities. I always like to try to differentiate that. Hey, we're we're we're the education business. We just happen to be football coaches. And I think they're coaches are so sensitive to the political rhetoric that goes on that they overdo it. But I think we'll have I wish he would sit out and take a look at how he appeared. He's guy as I said, but you know, you just come off looking like a bumpkin when when you give that answer you give the impression that you really don't know what is going on that you don't pick up newspaper. The you don't read your Twitter feed. You don't watch the news. You have no earthly idea what is going on. And that's. Really not what you want want. We'll yep. To be conversant on the issues of the day. Whether it's the the border war or healthcare. I I understand he's a football coach, but as a citizen of this country, he ought to have a clue, and I think he does he was just trying to act like he didn't because the football game on Saturday against Florida was more important. All right. Switching gears here. Former Clemson quarterback Kelly Brian is essentially operating as kind of college free agent right now taking visits as he narrows his decision on where to end up. How do you feel about Bryant approach here? Well, I think he made that decision five weeks ago when when he decided I'm leaving. Clemson. I wanna have another year. So I don't blame him. It does look suspicious every week. He he goes on tour. But but that's that's what he's earned it. I don't really have a problem. He goes to a different campus every week the crowd. Cheers, the coaches swoon over him just like they did years ago when he was a high school recruit. But to me, this is this is part of the business of college athletics. You compare it to the story that you began with with with the Duke three they're not going to be around next year. At least Kelly, Brian is sorting out his time in college and trying to do the right thing. I'll find mom. Thank you for joining us today. A very famous cowboy says his former team needs a complete overhaul. That's next. Smoking always affected my daily life because I was a closet smoker. It really sort of controlled my entire day. My boss is the one that recommended jewel. So I decided to give it a try. You don't get any of the odor of smoking. There's no ash all over your car. I would say give it a try the flavor and satisfaction of smoking without the mess of cigarette. Escher lingering odor, switch to Joel check OJ dot com slash sports. If you don't smoke don't start warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is addictive chemical. Here's some more stuff. That matters. Twenty fourteen Cup champion. Kevin Harvick has been stripped of his guaranteed place in nascar's championship race on November eighteenth in Miami, this after officials discovered in indigo spoiler on his winning number four car from last week in Texas now this weekend and Phoenix Harvick will be vying for one of the three remaining spots for shot at the title. Through Jones is back. That was Texas guard Andrew Jones entering last night's Longhorn season opener his first time on the floor since undergoing treatment for leukaemia Jones who was leading the longhorns in scoring at the time of his diagnosis. Last January is scheduled to undergo another round of treatments in December. More than one hundred million people voted in yesterday's midterm election. And among the winners were former professional athletes cherise David's who wanted Kansas third district trained alongside John Jones as an MA fighter calling Allred will represent Texas thirty seconds. He spent four seasons with the titans and Anthony Gonzales who caught seven touchdown passes from Peyton Manning in five seasons with the colts will represent Ohio sixteen. In the b block. We're precisely midway through the NFL season in the Cowboys with high expectations entering the year are mired in mediocrity at three and five third in the NFC east. With question marks around quarterback deck Prescott was underperform since his stellar rookie year and longtime could stay Garrett whom owner Jerry Jones said will remain at least through the year still at least one famous alarm hall of fame quarterback. Troy Aikman voiced his concern with what's happening in Dallas. Team over a long period of time has been what it's been. And it hasn't always mattered who the head coach is Ben. And so to me dress can me I'd say there has to be a complete overhaul of the entire organization. You just can't simply replace head coaches and say now it's going to be better. No, it's been shown that it's not better. And you have to address how everything is being done. And there's been times where I've heard Jerry say, okay. Look we're going to do it differently. I'm going to do it differently. But it's the same nothing changes. And even more from the NFL former Cowboys star receiver does Bryant a free agent throughout this NFL season has agreed to a deal with the red hot New Orleans Saints where seven in one and the floundering. Baltimore Ravens have decided not to hold practice during their bye week. Coach John Harbaugh said he knew his team was better off resting at this point. Adding that he hopes this time off helps his team four and five to this point get their legs back. Provide context and all these NFL storylines as Washington Post NFL reporter, Mark Maske, Mark conflicting points of view between those inside the Dallas camp and those outside who may once have been inside that would be Troy Aikman. What was your reaction? To minutes words. You know, it's hard to argue at the -bility of what Troy Aikman says. I mean when you look at the Cowboys over a long period of time, it has been quite sometimes it's third Super Bowl tribe with Jerry Jones as the owner of the common denominator and all of that through the different coaches through the different regimes of quarterbacks is Jerry Jones and the way approaches us and his involvement as the owner being his own general manager. So yes, I think Troy Aikman is right. It would behoove Jerry Jones behoove the Cowboys to sort of stand back. Take a different approach bring in general manager to run things have a coach who can do things exactly the way he wants to without sort of having to answer so closely to Jerry Jones and everything but on the other hand, you know, it's not realistic. There are no midterm elections. With the Cowboys at this point Jerry Jones going to do things the way he wants to it's not realistic to believe he's at this stage in his life at this stage in his career. He's going to step back and do things differently. So for better for worse going forward. I think you're the Cowboys operate the very same way Jerry Jones going to be very involved. And if they do get back to another Super Bowl, it's going to be doing it the way Jerry Jones wants to and the way he sort of pushes all the buttons to have it done. All right. The biggest news coming out of the NFL today is does Bryant's agreeing to sign with the saints. Now, what's the reaction around the NFL to the saints playing so well right now possibly rocking their own boat by adding Bryant, you know, obviously there are concerns about that. But when you look at a team that has Sean Payton as coach at has drew Brees as it's quarterback. I don't think the saints will allow that to happen. If this becomes a repeat of Adrian Peterson situation where we saw that not go. Well, you know, they got Adrian Peterson out of the very quickly. They will get Dez Bryant. Out of there, very quickly. If it becomes a problem. But when you stand back and look at from a football perspective, it makes sense for both sides. This sort of validates the approach that does Brian has taken not taking the opportunity hadn't Baltimore not taking the opportunity getting Cleveland. Now, he gets a chance with drew Brees as quarterback to revive as career make himself a viable receiver. Again, could maybe get a better contract. The next time in from the saints perspective, you're talking about a team that behind Michael Thomas had very little depth and very little production wide receiver Dez Bryant comes. He's not a guy you have to count on. It just becomes a complimentary player. The ball is going to go to Thomas, the buzz going to go to Alvin Kamara. But in those rare where defense finds a way to sort of shut both of those off. Is there another direction you can go and Dez Bryant becomes a possibility in that regard. But he's not something that they have to count on end. If things start going the wrong way does bright become sort of a problem divisive force. I think say end very quickly. Yeah. It does justify Brian approach. Now that he lands with the team that most would say are in contention for a Super Bowl. All right in unorthodox approach. Come. Out of your backyard with Baltimore with Harbaugh deciding to give his team the week off. What was your reaction to that? You know? I'm actually surprised you don't see that more often fell particularly when team has its by this far into the season. The those few extra practice you get during the bye, we aren't going to be intense practice anyway are not going to do a lot really the value of the by particularly halfway through the season is to get the players get their bodies rested allow sometimes for the sort of the nagging injuries. A hill up if the ravens we're gonna make a quarterbacks which if they were going to go to Lamar Jackson right now, they would've needed this time on the field. They're not doing that. They're staying the course which oh flacco, I don't think it's a move. That's really going to keep them from getting things turned around. There's a lot of pressure on John Harbaugh right now. There's a lot of pressure on Joe flacco if things don't go well down the stretch, they will probably pay for this for not getting back to the playoffs with their jobs in Baltimore. But it won't be because the ravens didn't hold a few extra practices during the bye week. I. You really don't quibble with what John Harbaugh is done with with giving his players time off during this by we all, right? Thanks so much Mark pre sheet it thank you. All right. Coming up the greatest Olympia in of all time lets us into his world. Wouldn't tracking the domestic bunny? You come to find them hiding under wardrobes next to soak. Due to scurry off what's up the fess meeting, the dust bunny is that ov- o- them not actually sent creatures when they code modernization. Kyko saves people money, but has ninety seven percents customer satisfaction rating of us to them you should switch because Yesler. Switching to Geico is a no brainer. No is the only metro printers on the lung doesn't run the long. After PTI sportscenter at six PM eastern with sage in Kevin the look at LeBron and the Lakers problems the three letters that changed Michigan season and who's the NFL MVP front runner. Sportscenter. Six eastern after PTI on ESPN and the ESPN app are Wednesday nights. NBA double header on ESPN has Sixers taking on the Pacers at eight PM eastern, then the T wolves are at staple center to battle. Lebron and the Lakers. Our coverage begins with NBA countdown at seven on ESPN and the ESPN app. The topic of mental health and sports athletes discussing openly how they've struggled with anxiety, depression, even suicidal thought has started to come to light. You may not be aware that rates of depression, and suicidal thought are higher than they've ever been among college students, and even among college student athletes now the NBA has been at the forefront of this work with all star players like Kevin love and Dhamar Rosen. Speaking about exiled attacks and depression, and these stories trickled down to college athletes in high school, athletes, and everyday people who feel empowered to open conversations with their teammates coaches, France, some of you might not yet have heard about the work swimmer. Michael Phelps the most decorated Olympian of all time is doing in this area, helping to break down the myth that being star athlete is like somehow being a superhero this week. He sat down with Kevin love and loves new show locker room talk. Why do you think it was so important to open up about mental health? Like, I think. Back to when I was really growing up in the sport. And I lived in a bubble basically groomed right to be this athlete does person. And after a while it just got to the point where I didn't like being that. Right. Like I wanted to be who I am. You know, it took me being at the all time lows not wanting to be alive and after sitting in my room for four or five days. I just realized that there other answers out there. And look I still go through these this isn't like it's not going to show for me. It's like how do I manage it? How can I sharpen those tools, right? Like, make sure I'm prepared for every little thing. That's the kind of candidness that makes a different for young, athletes and young people. That'll do it for outside the lines today. I'm Kate vegan NFL live is next. My name is Lauren. I'm thirty three. I didn't want my identity to be the smoking mom my first experience with jewel. I do remember being like distance good. It's it's it's like a cigarette. But not I don't miss smoking. At all. Like, I can officially say it grosses me out jewel is the tobacco alternative that delivers nicotine satisfaction without cigarette. Ashra lingering odor. Make the switch at J U, L dot com slash sports. Warning this paddock's nicotine, nicotine business chemical.

NBA Jerry Jones Kelly Brian nicotine Dez Bryant football NFL Michigan Coach John Harbaugh Kate Michigan Troy Aikman Cowboys ESPN Jim Harbaugh South Carolina Dallas cowboys Joel Baltimore
Post-Election Punditry

The Energy Gang

45:34 min | 2 years ago

Post-Election Punditry

"Hey, everybody, Stephen here before we get started. I have three amazing deals for you. We are approaching the holiday season, repealing thankful for feeling generous here at GT GTM. So we're going to give back to you our podcast listeners first up we're giving you fifty dollars off a yearly membership to our premium service. GTM squared are writers work so hard to give you deep long form analysis for squared that you cannot get anywhere else. And we want to share it with you. So if you go to GTM square dot com and sign up between now and December thirty first use the promo code podcast, and you're gonna get fifty bucks off. Plus, we're also giving away twenty percent discounts to any listener who signs up to our power and renewables conference in Austin, Texas next week or our storage summit in San Francisco on December eleventh and twelfth twenty percent off. Yes, indeed. Just use the promo code podcast at checkout. That's right. The magic word is podcast. It is your best friend going into the end of the year. Treat yourself. With some discounts to GTM, squared and GTM's power and renewable summit and storage summit by using podcast at checkout. Also, a big thanks to our energy, gang sponsor, GE GE's been a major force at our storage conference. And they are a rising force in battery storage GE has a new energy storage system. It's called reservoir. It's a modular lithium ion battery that can cut construction time by fifty percent the product it's new, but it's the result of decades of innovation in software power electronics and system design from the team at GE. Find out more about GE's reservoir battery storage system at G, E dot com slash energy storage. From green tech media. This is the energy gang weekly debates and discussions on energy, cleantech and the environment. I'm Stephen Lacey. Welcome. This week making sense of Tuesday's midterm elections will Democrats do anything on energy in the house. Why did so many ballot initiatives fail? And what does the score tell us about the value of running as the climate hawk? I we're going to look at what happened in states considering major ballot questions on carbon pricing market designing renewables, then how the chairs get rearranged in the house over the next two years and finally some specific races. We were watching and why in Washington is Catherine Hamilton, she's chair of thirty ignore solutions. Hello, catherine. How are you? I'm doing great. Thanks getting ready to go on a big trip to do by tomorrow for the World Economic Forum, so packing my bags in our last episode. You said you weren't traveling for a while. What gives I lied. I travel all the time. Jigger is sitting there just outside of Washington. D C in Maryland. He's the president of generate capital. Do you have any special voting superstitions jigger? I don't vote on election day anymore. I do the absentee ballot or do early voting. Just don't want to bother with the lines and figuring out whether I'll be sick that day, or whatever do you like lick the envelope five times, and then kiss it three times. And then do a twirl before you put it in the the mail. So I do generally drop it off in person, adult generally mail. It just because I find that like I don't want it to get lost. So I like smart, I usually drive it over to the place and drop it off, Catherine any voting superstitions. Well, I watch returns generally in bed with my covers just underneath my eyeballs because I'm always terrified. I don't have any routines necessarily. But in the two years since the twenty sixth. Election any desire to watch the vapid shatter on television news as the polls role in the results role in has been sucked from my body. I this year I just went to bed at a reasonable hour. And then I'd figure, and then I figured I'd hear the most important stuff on a couple of podcast the next day. And I'll tell you it works for brain health. I have to say like, you know, Nate silver is so defensive all the time about his polls. He was terrible on ABC. Right. Like watching him in person be super super defensive was just terrible. Like, I think I'm just going to stick to listening to win podcast. I always watch Steve Kornacki because he's like sweating leg Beto up there with like all these microphones attached to his belt, and it's so inner -taining and he likes digs down so deep. I find him very entertaining to watch. I did not see Nate silver's performance on ABC. But of course, I love the fivethirtyeight politics podcasts. I will say I will. Defend Nate silver for his defensiveness. I agree that he's often defensive. But it's because nobody knows how to read the fundamental statistics behind his analysis, and you have a lot of political journalists who misinterpret the way they are calling races. And so he has to do a lot of re-explain over and over again. So I totally understand why he's defensive of his model while it's not a good look on TV. Okay. Well, if you're feeling like me watching television, welcome let sort through this election together on a podcast to begin. I want unpacked some of the ballot initiatives that dealt with energy and climate stuff, and it was mostly bad night on that front, although the picture is mixed. Recapping very briefly, Arizona voters shut down a constitutional amendment. Expanding the renewable electricity target to fifty percent Nevada voters a halted attempt to deregulate the electricity market there. They did approve a measure to increase renewable electricity targets by fifty percent by twenty thirty so mixed bag in Nevada. Washington voters rejected a carbon tax for the second election in a row. Ouch. We'll talk about that more. Colorado voters said no to new regulations on oil and gas drilling that would have limited fracking and many areas of the state, according to a tally from axios over one hundred million dollars of opposition money from oil gas and utility companies was dumped into those states and. Here's some lesser known ones. Floridians limited coastal oil and gas drilling California's voted to keep the gas tax or go neans specifically in the city of Portland voted in favor of a tax to support a clean energy fund. So we probably can't cover all these in detail. I want to start with the broad result. I triggered I actually tweeted out that this was a pretty abysmal night for these ballot initiatives. There were a couple of big wins. I'm wondering if you agree with that was was it a bad night or not as bad as it seemed. No, I think it was a bad night. I look I think on the ballot initiative side, it it really does go to the science of balance ships. Right. I mean, ultimately Bowden comes to a couple of things, right? One is exactly how the attorney general characterizes the Bowden ship at an era. Zona was characterized as guaranteeing an increase in your lecture city Bill and shutting down the nuclear power plant really in the. Ballot initiative. And then I think, you know, the second piece of it is exactly how it gets characterized in the media. And you know, I think the friends that I have in those states have told me that they heard the opposition message to those about niches ten times more often than they heard the pro to the bow negative. And so the entire thing without initiatives is you're going to an electorate who's not really well prepared to be educated on these issues, and you know, like in figuring out how to characterize it for them. And you know, when we're when we have one hundred million dollars being spent characterizing in a different way, you tend to lose these things. Yeah. Jigger you're totally right. The language on that. Ballot. In Arizona, also said had the words irrespective of cost to consumers. So as there was the specter of your rates are gonna go up if you do this. This is going to be terrible for consumers Ellsworth thing. It's really important who delivers the narrative with the narrative is and then who delivers it. So I get worried when. Someone out of state like Tom style comes into a lot of ads because people who are in states wanna see that. It's a local grassroots effort not something that's coming from funded or coming from somewhere else. Although, of course, the oil and gas companies are also not there and their funding this since you brought up Tom style. Why is Tom Steiner picking those fights? Why is he going into those particular states and shooting for a fifty percent RPM when legislatively there's already all this momentum to beef up renewable portfolio standards, and in fact, Zona public service, which spent thirty million dollars opposing his ballot initiative has said that they support that level of increase through legislative action. And that they want to work with lawmakers to improve the target. So why even pick those fights when the momentum is there? Well, let's start by just saying that no one trusts on a public service. And when I say, no one, I mean, no one what came out of this particular processes that era Zona public service in order to defeat this initiative burned. Every. Every bridge. They had near Zona to the point where their approval rating in Arizona amongst our own ratepayers is down in the teens. And so I like I hadn't actually seen polling after the elections like we're free pre election. Yeah. It was a pre-election poll. But yeah, no Arizona public service is basically becoming hated in radioactive in its own state. And so from that perspective, I think about it was a huge success. There's an public services, you know, has ruled that stay with an iron fist. And it's the reason why rezone is such a terrible place to do business for renewable energy. But I think that, you know, the tide is turning, and I do think that there's more likelihood of getting a state legislature to pass this clean energy Bill now because we've so weakened there's a public service. Well, hold on shouldn't the goal not be making a public service hated but getting them to the table that seems to me to be a pretty terrible goal. If if you just want the end result to be people and rape. I hate the Tilleke. It's the same thing right with remember. We had our first our PS slash solar. Carve out in Arizona in nineteen ninety eight at a two percents solar mandate. Arizona public service has been thwarting. The will of the people and the legislature for over twenty years, right? The notion that we're going to go in to a state like Zona where the ACC commissioners, basically, our employees of Arizona public service and get something done without actually leveling. The playing field is ludicrous. Yes. So I would say in a state where commission nurse our elected you need the onus is going to be on elected the right electing the right commissioners. I think that is super important. And I think that's where they need to focus. We I don't know. I'm still having a hard time wrapping my head around. Why stiers group would pour so much money into these kinds of efforts when you have legislative action. And I I get the regulatory capture piece, and there are a lot of people who believe that you need to force. A lot more strongly which brings us to Nevada where there are a lot of concerns about the coziness between envy, energy and regulators. And so there was a ballot initiative to open the state up to market competition and the a deregulation ballot initiative that passed in the last election cycle did not pass. This time Nevada has a law where you you in order to pass about initiative, you have to pass it in two election cycles in a row with that said they did expand the RPM to fifty percent by two thousand thirty and that needs to pass a second time for the state to move forward. So Nevada a slightly different story, but a very similar regulation story, which is why we saw this push for deregulation. Jigger any comments on that? As it relates to your comments on Arizona's. Yeah, I think that the the broader theme here is that solar power today is. Far cheaper than almost anything else that the utility can do any states like Arizona, Nevada, they are moving so slowly because they had made investments in technologies that are much more expensive years ago. And they just don't want to be forced to put more solar power on the grid. When they don't need the power yet. But I just think that when you look at Nevada, for instance, Nevada in order to defeat this amendment that was going to be passed twice the second time right on the competition piece. They cut deals with the Sierra Club. And and RDC who actually ended up backing envy energy. They put out six awards for solar power right before the ballot initiative fight was initiated to prove the bona fees. And now, I think the state legislature is gonna take this second bound initiative on the RPM s and probably just pass in the legislature. So it ends up being good news. But I think the notion that this was going to happen without the fight is crazy right envy. Energy. Is only doing what it needs to do to protect itself. It's not doing this. Because it finally realizes that they need to be part of the solution. Yeah. I mean, there's a little bit of context because for any of these initiatives they have to pass twice. So the deregulation one passed in two thousand sixteen and lost this year. It was funded in large part by Adelson who owns casinos and was. Title. Settle Sheldon Adelson who is a big GOP donor and runs all these casinos in wanted has been wanting to break away from envy, energy and has done. So but has had to pay a price for it. So he was funding. It it is a very blue state right now they won the governor's race. They have both houses of their legislature. And so as jigger says, they're probably going to for the RPM s get the fifty percent by twenty thirty not even by having to go to twenty twenty to vote for it the second time, but to just put it into statute and and make durable. So I mean, it it on the whole it's going to move everything forward. I think this initiative was tricky because of the way it was set up the deregulation. And I don't think that is the biggest item on their plate. I really think it's it's renewables that's gonna be the driver here. Right. But Catherine I think that the point of my comment here is around white time, Starwood put money in and I don't think envy energy or a PS is viewed by anyone in our industry as being forward looking. Around deploying renewable energy, particularly when the federal IT is slated to start declining after twenty nineteen down twenty six percent. Twenty two percent. They should be front and loading as much solar as they could possibly put in to benefit ratepayers. And I think Tom stars money in the end will be crucial to actually changing the playing field and getting APS and envy energy to do the right thing faster more than anything these ballot initiatives prove that self interest and economics completely Trump any kind of visionary policy on climate change or renewable energy. So Sheldon Adelson really hardcore Republican who's a major GOP donor sawed in his best interest to disconnect itself from envy. Energy go procure energy on its own and support with tens of millions of dollars about initiative to deregulate the state, and you know, what Sheldon Adelson companies probably gonna go out and source a ton of renewable. Energy. Meanwhile, you had oil and gas companies dumping tens of millions of dollars into Washington state, Arizona and Nevada to try to tear down these ballot initiatives because it is in their self interest. And I saw numerous reactions similar to mine yesterday on Twitter, and my reaction was it doesn't matter. What Exxon Mobil says if it puts a million dollars a couple of million dollars behind a carbon tax fight. It doesn't matter if shell comes out with his future energy scenario. It doesn't matter if utility stands up at a conference in talks about customer engagement in the future of the pro Sumer, what matters is when their direct economic interest is at stake, and they need to put money on the line. I do think the details matter at Washington state, though. I okay, let's go there. Then that's that's a good segue. Let's head on over there. I I find Washington state to be quite troubling. And I actually saw governor Inslee Monday night and. You know, we had part of this conversation. I I think what happened in Washington state between all the progresses basically pooh-poohing initiative seven thirty two two years ago that was going to do basically a carbon tax that you know, that was revenue neutral to the state, and then this one which was basic grab bag Bill. If you look at the way, this was written. There was a lower carbon fee, so instead of twenty five bucks, it was fifteen bucks. But all the money went to progressive like exp- spending priorities, and I, you know, in a state like Washington state that doesn't have a state income tax. This really blatantly looked like getting more money out of the citizens of Washington state to accomplish progressive, you know, spending goals, and I so I just think it was done so poorly. And because everyone was so. Just offended by the process two years ago. A lot of the proponents of initiative seven thirty two didn't back this initiative. So you ended up having sort of a loose coalition that wasn't strong enough to base to get broader support in Washington state. I do think though that the way they structured it as a fee rather than a tax could be a model in the future. I think you're right. There was a little PTSD. And maybe that factored into it. Certainly the rural in suburban voters went against it. Although it did it did get four more points than the previous initiative had, but structuring it is a fee rather than tax allows you to put the purpose of it before you do in in the way that it's written its purpose built. So it's investing in clean air, clean energy, clean water, healthy for us healthy communities, and you can say by you know, we'll, however you're funding that as opposed to attacks which goes into the general fund and. A tax. You have to say who your taxing? I so I feel like the structure of a fee, and creating that narrative could be a good model in the future. I just I think that it was stacked against them this time, and I'd be interested to hear kind of how it all went down the oil industry, put BP and coke, but thirty one and a half million dollars into it. So money coming from outside the state to try to bring it down was flooding into that state. So I'm sure that created a lot of confusion to getting people to tax themselves for carbon is not necessarily an easy climate about initiative. This is why you have state legislators who get lobbied and have conversations and look at the nuance and actually craft railroad legislation is the right process. I think to go through for a carbon tax I just think getting this stuff done in about initiative is very very difficult and you see this with Justin Trudeau and Canada. Right. I mean, they did this through the the standard sort of legislative process, and then you know, sort of the federal process not through a popular vote. I just think it's very difficult to give people to tax themselves. Yeah. But in Portland, Oregon, they have a one percent tax on large retailer receipts. So I think it has to be if you are having attacks her fee, it has to be really specific and people were fine with that as going into a clean energy. But that's I don't think you can. I don't think you can ever like us Portland as an example. Let's you mentioned Portland area. Well, that's probably true. But I think we can learn something from all of these initiatives. Yeah. But the coke brothers aren't going to go into the city of Portland and spend a bunch of money like they're going to go to the state level. So cities are probably less vulnerable to this kind of pressure and therefore like more more susceptible to change. So let's just recap. I mean, what is the most influential piece of this? Is it the money that was spent is that the way that these ballot initiatives were written is it just the the drawbacks of relying on ballot initiatives to make this kind of sweeping change it again, it's a combination of all those things. But I'm curious if you think it's one thing over another that influenced this poor night for ballot initiatives, I think in general the clean energy industry has not yet decided that the bowed initiative approach is the right approach. And so you have these things pushed by Tom Steiner or other folks. But I think when you look. At where we've really been successful as Catherine suggested, it's really been a grassroots effort like in Missouri where PJ Wilson past the RPM standard back in two thousand eight election cycle. Right. And so I think that the top down approaches that have been taken to these boundaries shows are probably not the right approach. And I think we learned something from all of these. I love that they're out there, and they're getting voted on and find if the oil and gas guys waste their money or spend their money, and what they think are the most important ways. But some of the most significant outcomes in the elections were in states like Nevada, Colorado and New Mexico were you have new governors that are going to be really pushing on renewable portfolio standards and clean energy public policy. Coming up rearranging deck chairs in the capitol building. I a quick word from our sponsor G E GE's new lithium ion energy storage system, reservoir can cut construction time by fifty percent. It's modular flexible and come shipped with the battery already inside. The reservoir system. Brings decades of field experience in tech innovation into this simplified yet, customizable, battery solution you compare it with solar and wind use it for micro grids complement, your thermal power plant, virtually anything, you can imagine with up to fifteen percent extended battery life GE's battery storage system saves energy for when it's needed most. Whether it's raining, hailing sleeting or snowing GE's reservoir keeps the lights on learn more at G E dot com slash energy storage. We March on into Washington now alongside the freshman class of lawmakers who will be there in the coming months. Democrats will have control of the house starting next year. There will be some real changes. We're actually going to have the chair of the house science committee believe in global warming. That's a big one. But does is really change anything in terms of legislation? So Katherine you believe it will let's start with leadership. I who's in who's out, and why does it matter? Yes. So they are reorganizing in the house. They have a lot more reorganizing to do although Senate because of some of the shifts in those races and the outcomes is also going to have some change in leadership. So that's an interesting how chamber to look at as well, but certainly in the house some of the most important leadership positions for our issues are energy and commerce, which is going to be Frank Pallone. From New Jersey is going to assume the chairmanship with Walden as. As the ranking member and that's important for purpose for the federal power act. And I it's important for innovation and grid technologies on at the same time that committee, the leadership has been pretty bipartisan. I've had lots of companies be able to testify, you know, as Republicans have invited us to do. So so their staff has been very open generally, the committee members are open innovation. So I think energy and commerce committee is going to be a good place to get things done that makes sense. And and where it isn't super partisan on natural resources with Greenhow hall coming up from Arizona as the chair he may be able to curb some of what department of interior is doing and secretary Zinke. And there's the jury is still out as to how long he's going to last in his position, but natural resources also really important. They have been very involved in Puerto Rico, and they're restructuring there, and I've worked a lot with chairman who is now chairman Bishop on those issues, but I think that. This will do is on lands issues. This will be important science committee. Like, you said it's going to be Eddie, Bernice Johnson from Texas. She is going to turn it back to science that committee has been marginalized a little bit. It used to not be I testified in about two thousand and one for the Republicans. I was I was brought in to testify on behalf of renewables because there were members of the Republican party on that committee who were like PHD physicists, and they were very big believers in science, and that is really gone backwards and become very regressive in that committee. But with Johnson leading that committee has jurisdiction over research and development labs NASA. And I think that's going to be really important. You have people new members recently voted in an Connor lamb was in a special election. He won his reelection. And a new district. He's on that committee. So I think that committee is going to have a lot of conversations about climate change about science that I think will be. Really important. All right. So there are clear consequences to leadership changes in the house. What about over in the Senate, which is even more Republican controlled now? Yes, the one I'm watching most closely on the democratic side is energy and natural resources where Senator Cantwell from Washington has been ranking member and may move over to commerce, which is more of her sweet spot. So I'm watching to see who comes up. It could be Senator Manchin from West Virginia, it could even be Heinrich from New Mexico who is really smart on energy issues. But is there a cinema Murkowski from Alaska is pretty good on all of our issues. I've really liked working with her and her staff, and I think they're going to move forward on energy policy legislation regardless it just may be a new ranking member. So there are few pads to action one is increased authority when it comes to advocating for certain agencies and the budgeting process the other is. Creating legislation, and I doubt that that will have any real impact, but you can create messaging bills that do push the conversation about energy and climate forward and the other is investigation. So the the Democrats now have investigative power in the house, and they can start to slow or question, the deregulation agenda at the Trump administration, which of those areas will have the most impact. Yes. So I actually am much more hopeful than you. I try not to focus on any of the investigation stuff and instead focus on what can we get done? And so the farm Bill has to be done next year, and the farm Bill has all kinds of opportunities for renewable energy and clean energy technologies. So I looked to the farm Bill that that is going to have to work for in a bipartisan way, and I think we can get a lot done in that the other pieces infrastructure, and I realized we've talked about that forever. But that is definitely something by partisan and allows members of congress to take something home to their constituents an infrastructure, certainly include. As the grid and clean energy technologies and also resilience so you could bundle that together, you could do something. Like like what we did in the stimulus Bill with a sixteen o three which was grants in lieu of the IT for installing solar. So I'm thinking for for resilience technologies we could use that. So you could get to good climate outcomes. Without even having to talk about climate change, just by putting the right policies into infrastructure resilience and the farm Bill. I totally agree. I mean, the the big thing I'm looking for here is just that. I think we'll have folks who will be able to insert the right ten words into some of these bills to really allow for a broadening of who can get access to some of the Logan teas and who can get access to some of the. You know, sort of other pots of money that are available in all these agencies. And then what about the investigative powers? The Democrats will start asking a lot of questions about cabinet members in about the deregulatory agenda. How much can they do without pissing voters off? You know, there's a really fine line that they have to walk where they can start to ask real questions both of the president for the Russia conduct. And you know, the way the aid agencies are being run. So how much can they do without completely alienating a large swath of the voter base? Part of this for me, though is to differentiate between the impeachment, you know, Russia. Trump personal finances stuff, which is really an investigation and just the general oversight function, which this congress has not done for two years. Right. I mean when secretary of energy or EPA or interior does something. In a congress person is interested in why they did it. They have every right to bring them in front of a committee and ask them to explain themselves. Right. I mean, and that is something that they've done for, you know, decades for, you know, for years, and so I just think going back to actually just having basic oversight functions would be useful. Yeah. Totally agree. And I also think there are a couple of other places where they can have impact in both chambers. One is on trade issues because of all this tariffs. And I think that really does impact districts in not just one you're not from one political party. But anybody is district could be impacted by trade and also regulation so -regulation that impacts people's air and water can really have serious local implications. And I think that's where you can have a winning winning narrative and winning Vic. Sorry, I think that's where you can really see some good narrative that gets. Two local issues and also provide some checks and balances, well, let's wrap up with a look at some of the local races. Normally we end the show with the free electron, but we're doing it a bit differently. This week. We are going to take a look at specific consequential races. We were following so Catherine who caught your eye this time around. Yeah. I think I've mentioned her before cherise David's from Kansas third district. She was a White House fellow and a fan of the pod when she reached out to me and said, you know, I'm just filling finishing up my fellowship and trying to figure out what to do. I didn't know much about her at all except that. She was super smart, she'd gone to Cornell smile mater, she went to the law school there. She's a serial entrepreneur. And so we had a great conversation. I said, well, you know, keep me posted on what you're doing next thing. I know she wins the primary in Kansas third. And now, she's one of the first two native American women who is going to head into congress January, and I was just stunned. She's a mixed martial arts professional light, which I did not. Know when I met with her she's part of the LGBTQ community. She's just amazing and she's going to join another native American woman from New Mexico to the first Muslim women in congress. The youngest woman in congress who's twenty nine Alexandria, Cossio Cortez and a whole host of other women more women than ever have been represented in congress, and I'm super excited about that over a hundred. Yes, over one hundred and women not get into Syria types, but women do govern differently. And you know, I was talking with a friend about this about how girls play in much more kind of a flat hierarchy and in very cooperative ways. Whereas boys are usually a little more competitive in the way, they play. And this may be, you know, going by stereotype, but women work really well in a flat hierarchy, and congress is that it is very flat. Your boss is your. Constituent base you have leadership. Just so that structurally things will work, but they're not your bosses, your boss is who elected you. And and studies show that women bring back nine percent more federal spending to their constituents that they sponsored more bills than men that they're much more likely to work across the aisle. So I think this will just infuse really much more bipartisanship and more productivity in congress and cherise David's she routed her Republican opponent. She is a practitioner of mixed martial arts. And I believe a double digit win would be considered a clean knockout in her world. She and she went person to person she had a very grassroots campaign. She talked about kitchen table issues. She talked about education climate, try healthcare healthcare was a huge issue. And I think that's the way a lot of these women are winning racists by really going at a grasp very grassroots level. And speaking of one of the many women who are heading to Capitol Hill a Presley here in Massachusetts in my home state is the first black congresswoman from Massachusetts. So that is another historic win for for women in this election jigger you were tracking a bunch of climate hawks. What does your list look like who is up who is down? I'd like to know the tally. So yeah, I'm on the board of climate hawks. And we really endorsed fourteen candidate candidates a cycle, mostly in the primary because that's where you really have a bigger impact is making sure that climate leaders get out of the scrum during the the democratic or Republican primary, and, you know, seven of the fourteen folks that we endorsed in the primary actually made it all the way through including, you know, my good friend, Sean Casten, and then Deb Hart Holland in New Mexico, which is one of the first native American women going into the lead. Slater. We had a tough loss with just king in Pennsylvania. But it looks like Mike Levin is gonna pull out California forty nine Elaine Loria was really in a tough race in the second district of Virginia. And pulled that one out. We'll see what happened to Dan mccready. But looks like this nut job is potentially going to, you know, take his place in the in the house. But, but we'll have to see, you know, it's I think what's critical is when we talked about the legislative agenda. You know, having people were climate is their number one issue. The the one issue that they actually talk about the most Sean Casten ran ads on climate change. Right. He actually talked about it at every stump? And so I think he believes in his heart of hearts that looking at legislation through the lens of unlocking economic opportunity in the climate's fear is something that is actually really worth as attention. That is something I think climate hawks is trying to do it. I think that's what we're going to get in. This legislative session is you know, just people whose number one issue is climate I chuckled at the response on Twitter of Sean Casson's win. Sean is definitely an OG in the energy Twitter world, and I've been following him for a long time since he was a businessman, and he's been an active an active participant energy Twitter and a bunch of people ask well, his Sean Casten now defacto president of energy Twitter. Many people sent their congratulations and humorous responses. So there's a lot of support for Sean in the energy community, and it was very inspiring for a lot of folks in the both the scientific and energy business community who see someone like Sean running and winning on this issue specifically as an indication that maybe they should get in the race as well. The one other area that we didn't talk about that. I think is critical here is the democratic governors. We had just so many governors democrat and Republican frankly that. That on their agenda was to pass fifty percent or one hundred percent clean, energy standards. And I think that's just going to be really critical. I think there was an analysis done that showed that the emissions that those governors represent actually gets us all the way to our Paris coal. And so I I just think it's really critical that we made some big progress there. So what are these results? Tell us is the thesis borne out that if you talk about energy and climate change, it's a winning issue. So you have I think seven wins on the climate hawks list and eight losses a a basic split. And then you have energy and climate even if it is front and center, wrapped up and all these other issues like health care the president's performance. The economic issues. So does it tell us anything about the effectiveness of that messaging? Well, the member the goal of climate hawks, and frankly of the clean energy industry. At large is not to, you know, be come the number one issue for the country. Like, I'm not trying to say that when people get surveyed, what do you care the most about that the answer should be climate change? What I'm saying is that as you know, someone who loosely represents a million plus people across the country working in wind and solar and batteries, navy's etc. We need legislation to support our industries. Right. That is how the infrastructure industry works. It's a regulated industry and making sure that we have people it elected officials who are actually looking out for our best interests in making sure that the Bill or other things actually have the provisions that we care about in them. And when they're doing the horse trade at the eleventh hour, making sure that our stuff gets in the. Bill and some somebody else's stuff. Stays out of the Bill is what's critical, right. And that doesn't mean that all, you know, two hundred and thirty Democrats in the house, or or whatever have to be that person that can really only be two people, but it has to be something greater than zero. Yeah. And I would just go back to when you look at the polls of what Democrats and Republicans and independence care about you. Give them eight topics in the top ones. For democrats. Our economy health seniors energy comes in at number eight below other Republicans at security economies senior's health and energy. Again, comes below other independence energy comes one above other. But certainly not in the top three. But if you look at the top issues, the the economy, health and security, those are all very tied to energy. And I think that's where we need to focus is don't make this about energy about clean energy or climate specifically, but bring forward solutions that get to those things that people really care about. And certainly as jigger is well aware, economic development is huge in clean, energy and health is key in climate as as security. So I think that's what we need to to take from this. Now what happens if there are few moderate Republicans on Capitol Hill, they're receptive to that message. And that is why I was following one specific race in Florida Carlos Kerr bellows tight race. He's a young guy who represents a district at the tip of Florida. They twenty six district, and he was just unseated by democrat Curbello is the kind of moderate Republican who you don't want to get out of the house in theory. He's been publicly critical of the president. He's actually introduced a carbon tax he founded the climate solutions caucus and with nearly half of Republican climate caucus members voted out of office this election cycle, the future of that organization is definitely in question. It will probably survive, but like. We don't know who's going to fill those positions of those Republicans who were voted out. So this race caught a lot of attention because it created a conflict within the environmental movement leading progressive Enviro groups supported Kerr bellows challenger. And in fact, they supported many of the other candidates who unseated Republicans who are willing to at least partially engage on climate. So brings up this thorny question as we go further to the extreme edges of the political spectrum. Is there a place for moderate Republicans like Curbello if he doesn't get rewarded for sticking his neck out? Is anyone will anyone actually want to take his place? What do you guys think? Yes. So I actually don't think he stuck his neck out that far the climate solutions caucus does nothing people just sign up to it thinking that it's a good thing. If they've had a natural disaster like rob Peter Roskam who lost his Sean Casson is in the climate solutions. Scoggins he has done zero to help on climate or clean energy zero. So. So I think these guys it's greenwashing that you know, if you show leadership you can show leadership in a lot of different ways. And I actually do think it's really important to have people on both sides of the aisle engaged in all of this. But you know, I really downplay, you know, getting yourself or starting a, you know, a club of people who want to try to paint themselves as really being for solutions when they don't do anything if David Roberts, FOX listening to this. I'm sure he's clapping right now. Yeah. Well, look, I think the Carlos Cabela's a great example, you know, he voted multiple times to get rid of the, you know, the Americans the ACA the Obama article Care Act, right? And so like, you know, like to suggest that that, you know, the voters in his district are going to like roared him for doing that. When this entire election was on healthcare. Think about it. There are millions of additional people because of the way the governor's races were decided as day legislature races that are going to have healthcare and Medicaid now because the expansions will be allowed to move forward. Right. Like, I don't fault people for that being there number one voting issue in not climate change. But I'm not necessarily even talking about voters rewarding him I'm talking about the big money. Environmental progressive groups that are coming in and spending money on his challenger. So I'm just wondering if like other moderate Republicans. Are going to say, well, it doesn't matter. What I do. I'm not going to get the support of the groups that are actually putting money into this space of why should I even talk about the issue? Yeah. I look I think that that that is a really interesting position to to have an I do think that our issues should be nonpartisan. I, you know, I think people generally should be pro economic development. But I think when you think about what EDF has done to raise money for Lindsey Graham and all sorts of other Republicans and what they got for it. Basically what they got for. They believe is, you know, a change in McCain's vote to protect the methane regulations right after Trump got into office, and maybe one of the thing, which is okay. But like in general when you think about the size of our industry, and how big we are. I think that I think that people should be more enthusiastic supportive what we're doing. And it's not too much to ask for them to show that enthusiasm before I cut. A check to that person. Which is why I cut a lot more checks to Republicans in state races and state governorships, and you know, in other places where there have been more vocal in their support of our industry. Okay. So any issues that I didn't cover that you feel like are important coming out of this election while the other races that I were watching where there were two Georgia public service commission races that it looks like the Republican incumbents are going to end up winning one is going into a run runoff because the the Republican Commissioner, I think only got forty nine point eight percent of the vote, but the, but it was a lot tighter than it needed to be in. That's because of the, you know, cost overruns Votto. And so in some cases, you know, our esoteric issues are pricking through and Georgia voters were looking at trying to hold some of these public service commissioners accountable for their votes to you know. Basically, you know, keep this boondoggle alive in Georgia. Yeah. I think as we continue to get extreme weather events. And I don't see those stopping anytime soon. I think people are going to be come much more engaged in resilience. And in how their members of congress and senators respond to those and will become more aware of issues. Well with Catherine Hamilton jigger Shah, I'm Stephen Lacey. We are the energy gang. Thanks for being with us. Hit us up on Twitter. If you want to flag any races that we didn't discuss and just share your opinion on some of our analysis here. Give us a rating on review on apple podcasts or anywhere else. You get this show. And we'll catch you next week.

Arizona Nevada Washington Catherine Washington congress Twitter Catherine Hamilton jigger Shah president GE Portland New Mexico Stephen Lacey
08-05-20 Is that true?

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 4 months ago

08-05-20 Is that true?

"Welcome to America calling from Studio for nine Albuquerque Monica Brain. Do you think there's a cure for the coronavirus. Do you believe grand jury in New York he's empanel to investigate the trump campaign's collusion with Russia if so you are ignoring all credible evidence to the contrary and you're not alone social media is proving to be a fast delivery service for false and wildly exaggerated information even elected leaders on the highest level of pushing stories that are easily proven to be fake. We'll give you the ammunition to fight facts right after national native news. This? Is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez voters in. Tuesday's Kansas primary elected a Navajo woman for the Democratic nomination for the Kansas State House of Representatives district ten Rondo of Aldo has more Christina has would twenty six years old is set to become the third native American and youngest member in the Kansas legislature as the race will be uncontested in the general election three other. Native women and Kansas all won their primaries. Tuesday has what graduated from both Haskell Indian nations university and the University of Kansas and felt her presence was needed to represent everyone in Douglas County which includes Lawrence Kansas a lot of these issues that happen at our level. The people don't really experience this particularly like me I've grown up in not the best neighborhoods I've grown up on like wick in section eight housing reduced lunch programs, even tribal clothing from nation living here, and I don't really hear that much stories of like like that this wasn't like fifty years ago. This is pretty recent And just seeing that type. I WANNA see that type of representation statehouse and And I I believe I'm qualified to do this. Believe our voices I'm voice that you know a lot of us feel like that wasn't her being heard of and I hope I can bring that to the State House. has would one unofficially with two thousand, two, hundred, thirty, nine votes compared to Brandon Holland five, hundred, five votes and AJ Stevens. Four hundred fifty, five votes. This is Rhonda Nevada for National Native News. Native American US congresswoman cherise. David's was unopposed for the Democratic nomination for the Kansas Third District seat. She'll face Amanda Adkins November who in the Republican race Tuesday. The American Indian Graduate Center has received a twenty million dollar donation from writer Mackenzie Scott ex wife of Amazon's at CEO Christine Trudeau reports the American Indian Graduate Center or AIG see received an unprecedented twenty million dollar individual donation of unrestricted funds from Mackenzie Scott. Scott. said in a recent announcement tweet that the contributions following up on a commitment she made last year to give away a majority of her wealth in her lifetime she continued in opposed to be a medium that of the nonprofits elected that quote every one of them is telling complex challenges that will require sustained effort over many years while simultaneously addressing consequences of the Covid nineteen pandemic AFDC Executive Director Angelique Albert we are just a mess like. To be a recipient of this incredible generosity really honored that she's just trusting us to do the work that promotes equity and justice in our in our society. At the time she says, students were hit hard last spring enough for the organization to create a designated Student Emergency Fund that started in. March. So far the additional fund has distributed over two hundred thousand dollars to Aggie students emergency needs because of the pandemic. Cova fill impacting our communities and our students have a hard time. They still are having a hard time. So going back to school has created additional challenges because some universities are doing remote but some are not heading into the fall semester. Albert says funds will address student needs covering housing utility bill, and household item costs along with technology access. Scott's donation is the largest individual donor gift in unrestricted funds over Aig sees fifty year history the solutions journalism network who funds this reporting was also included in Scott's nonprofit donations. I'm Christine Trudeau and demand Honiara Gonzales. National Native News is produced by Kohana Broadcast Corporation, the funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. Support by the American Indian, higher. Education consortium working to ensure tribal colleges and universities are included in our higher education system. Info. On distance learning at a I H E C Dot Org. Support by Indian country counts reminding you that you can be a as hero when you fill out your census form today at my twenty twenty census dot Gov or by calling eight, four, four, three, three, zero, twenty, twenty. Native Voice One, the native American Radio Network. This is native America Calling Monica Brain. There's a conspiracy theories circulating that powerful people like Bill Gates started the corona virus as a way to inject people with tracking chips tied to five G. Cell Phone. Networks. Any evidence to support that is sketchy at best but a Pew Research Center. Study found that a quarter of Americans think it's probably true. Every day especially on social media, we are bomb bartered with stories, memes and musings that spread information that just isn't true or is greatly exaggerated. A good portion of Americans are not equipped to determine the veracity of what they're seeing twitter and facebook say that they're cracking down on false information. They've even labeled a tweet about voter fraud from president trump as false. So how often do you pass on information without checking the facts? How do you determine whether something comes from a trusted source? That's our conversation. Today you are invited to weigh in give us a call right now the number is one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight. That's also one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, native. On the line, we have Dr Moosa through our Tae. She's an assistant professor of justice and Socio Technical Change in the School of social transformation at State University and MADRASA is possibly Yawkey. Welcome back to native America calling. Thanks for having me. Also, on the line, we have Pamela Pereira. She's the director and founder of Media Savvy, citizens and chair of the New Mexico Media Literacy now welcome to native America calling for Maala. Hi thank you for having us. and to round out our conversation, we have Howard Schneider. He's the executive director of the Center for news literacy and a founding Dean for the School of Journalism at Stony. Brook. University. Welcome to native America Calling Howard. Thank you glad to be here. Murray's let's start with you. Where do you get information? You Trust what is your some of your trusted sources? Vs It depends on the topic at hand because as you know in Indian, country a lot of our. News doesn't. It isn't appearing in the mainstream sources, but usually I like to watch PBS news. Kind of go through. You know the headlines, Aljazeera NPR and CNN, and admittedly the things that catch my interest or usually what pops up on my social media timelines is what my my friends and colleagues are posting about. So you know and then and then I have a fair I I feel like I have a fair dose of just people who talk you know friends who say, Oh, my goodness have you heard this? What do you think and so? Yeah. So it's a little. It's a little bit of hearsay and a little bit of relying on the news sometimes for me. It'll. It'll be like a joke click somebody will make some sort of joke or like there was something going around about. Demons recently and I didn't know what it was related to, and then I go back to a trusted news source and find out in no it has something to do with one of president trump's tweets I think that's really interesting and It makes me feel a little bit better very said that you admit that Sometimes you get information just from you know folks what folks are sharing with you or something you see on your social media feed like that's okay right? It's it happened mean it's only human. What about you? Mila. Well I would say that I with me, I follow specific journalists on twitter. So I have very specific people that are follow or I will check the New York Times. So the post or depends sometimes I might just get my information from facebook but then I you know from like you said like from me or from. Certain kinds of something that somebody shared just to gauge what's happening or where people are at. Sometimes if I've lost track is I don't always stay up to date and. I don't check the news every day it's not I figured like if it's really important, I will find out about it. information travels very quickly. And then I go back and then I research they information so very much like you were saying or Maria was saying. Depending on the information. So it's science something to deal with, and then you know I I will go to my scientific sources, right and I mean I have to acknowledge that not everybody has time for for checking and double checking, and that's how we find ourselves in this circumstance where things that are just absolutely false continue to circulate and continue to. Have live in in our ethos of. Misinformation. Howard. What about you? You're the director of the Center for News Literacy, you must consume quite a bit every day. I'm Kinda News Junkie as you would imagine a former journalist and so I start my day every day with the Washington Post at York Times. I will you read carefully my local newspaper, which is very important. with to Newsday and I would urge everybody to get up on their local news. there was an interesting survey just released yesterday that said that people who regularly follow local news or eighty one percent. Or? Hold on hold on Second Howard, we've got a problem with your phone We're going to check with you and see if we can maybe like reconnecting get it a little bit better but you know what this is you bring up a really good point about local news and Marissa. Do you do you consider local news and important critical part of this? Media Diet that that we need to consume. Yes and I think it's particularly challenging for native people you know in here in the Phoenix area in Arizona, our local news is a little bit child. It's hard for us to actually find local news. It's a problem in the area in terms of that, our local news has really been been a number of I don't know how to put it but like you know mater major media mergers and so forth that have made it very difficult for local investigative reporters to get the stories that they work on pushed out and so a lot of times we actually don't really know about crime in our own communities we don't know about How local legislations are going things like that, we have to actually go and either speak to experts or go to community panels to find out that kind of information and an addition being a native person I mean for me when local news is also about I, rely on my tribal council for updates and taking a look at what India country you know has to say you know either through Indian country today or Indians Dot com about you know, how's it going in particular region? So. It's very challenging and that's a tough one. Particularly when it comes to if your tribe at you know doesn't have its own independent media or the media itself is run by the tribe and then you're you're left wondering like, okay. Is this information that I'm getting from this? And you know how does this? Go with what my cousins are telling me. They heard happened at the meeting and things like that. I Will Murray say we'll give a shout out though to their Zona Republic which actually has to native reporters. There right now and it seems through an an effort to have more diverse voices and things like that. You mercy you say that we need to have three good habits for getting good information. Tell us about these. you know this is based on the work of sanity united Spanish philosopher but he'd written about how people who are who endure systemic oppression sort of the three habits they need to have to be able to see through the distorted reality of oppressive governmental regimes right. So those three habits are humility. Basically a willingness to admit when you're wrong and at a willingness to admit the limitations of one zero knowledge and that you know partnered with curiosity also a kind. Of An internal drive and desire to find out about facts and follow up on stories and you know try to understand how something relates to one's own life and and then again the will the diligence right like the willingness to do that the habit the disciplines and the skill sets to follow up on facts claims of others and to expand your factual knowledge and you know I really appreciate that you have Pamela up at eight on because that you know the the Skills to follow up on what you find in the news is that's a that's a skill set. You know that requires nowadays like technical savvy as well and So those three habits combined, but I would I would add a fourth which is that you have to be willing to kind of go against the grain sometimes it's like it's very common for an individual maybe to be in a family or community where they're sort of the only I don't know how to put it but maybe sci-fi type. Person, knew the truth and maybe their family their community says, why are you spending so much time looking this up and you know or or doing that work and a person has to sort be willing to go against the grain and not kind of just agree to the body of knowledge that their community is is proposing if they think that it is fundamentally laced with false information. And that one's particularly important an tough right now when we think about cove nineteen and the the variety of information that's going around about you know this pandemic don't you think? Yeah it's really hard it's It's such. An unknown part of the reason is that it's such an unknown even for scientists that Deniau divisions and so forth people who are expert that it sort of just because something when we say something is unknown in science, it doesn't mean that we're completely ignorant. About. You know the features of the virus and so forth. But that that can be perceived by people who are maybe on trained in that scientific terminology as you know, it's it's made up. Unknown Exist or it's you know so that that is very confusing. It's very difficult for people to look into the literature I mean you know we even know highly trained physicians who are you know having to find the time to actually catch up on scientific literature is not it's really not an easy thing to do, and there's different studies that are coming out all the time. Some of these are in different languages in different countries. How do you? Get access for an ordinary person. You know who you know maybe they have access to the Internet. Maybe they don't. You know like, how are they going to be able to really follow up and find out what is accurate and factional about covid nineteen and Melissa I want to keep on this thread but we're GonNa go to a short break. If you want to get in on this conversation, one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, four, eight. Santa Fe Indian market. One of the largest media events in the world is moving online this year because of the Cobra nineteen pandemic, we'll take some getting used to both for the artists and for those who enjoy mingling with hundreds of artists in person we'll check in on Indian market on the next native. America. Calling. Support by the Colorado Plateau Foundation, a native led philanthropic institution supporting native led organization's protecting water sacred places and endangered landscapes, preserving native languages and uplifting sustainable community based agriculture. The Colorado Plateau Foundation approaches grant making as an active participant helping build networks community and organizational capacity proposals for grants that support the communities and cultures of the plateau are due September third at Colorado, Plateau Foundation Dot Org. You're listening to native America Calling Monica. Brain, sitting in frontier game. Would we are talking about information and misinformation today? Have you ever shared an article that later you found out wasn't true or maybe one of your family members shared something and you thought that can't be right. Did you look it up? Where do you get your reliable information? WHAT SOURCES DO? You Trust want to hear from you. You are invited to our conversation today. Give us a call at one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight. Murray said Duarte is with us. She's assistant professor of justice and Socio Technical Change at the School of social transformation at a State University and Merdeka before the break you were talking about Good. Habits for getting. Good Information and You know these these covid nineteen conspiracy theories that are circulating anything else you want to weigh in on with that. Yeah you know one of the things that's really challenging about the covid nineteen conspiracy theories are you know I? It really breaks my heart. You know watching how these take shape in Indian country and Latino communities, and African. American communities is really hard because these communities that are already you know you know suffering from the structural inequities of of health health infrastructure in this country and public health infrastructure, and so it's just it's particularly challenging and one of the you know It's sort of like you have a conspiracy theory linked onto existing lack of knowledge or understanding about how virus works you know and how public health works and it's just It's very challenging. I. You know one of the stories that I have heard in the last few months from a colleague of mine expressed frustration with sort of ceremonial group that she belongs to who have a great deal of faith and strengthen their their tribal traditions. But who were sort of believing that Sort of a fatalistic view that creator would provide for them or you know that as native, they were strong inherently strong, physically strong that they probably wouldn't be affected as much and that is a type of misinformation and I it. It's not necessarily disinformation that it wasn't the attempt of leadership of the group necessarily to you know cause people to become ill or anything like that. It was just sort of a combination of You know faith hope and also a great deal of ignorance and that is it's really sad. It's really really sad because this is not a common cold. You know it isn't even the flu it's much worse. Yeah Yeah. That's true. Let's take some calls. We've got Joe in Taus tuned in on K. U. N. M.. What do you wanNA share halo there. Thank you for taking my call. Yeah. Because sometimes we listen to different programs, different stations and want to say one thing and another let's say another. But the way it is it's a real virus. And deadly. So the way I see it, we can be part of the problem or part of the solution. So if we take care of ourselves and take care of our in our families by using the measures, then we can avoid it. So it's all up to us. We can be part of the problem or part of the solution because if You listen to the news late for example, I listen to CNN and then I listened to Fox and one I'll say one thing and the other one another but we got you see we've got gotta use Common Sense Common Sense. Yeah. All right. Joe Thank you. Let's let's go to Jerry she's near Oklahoma City tuned in on key C. N. P. Jerry I know doing good good. What do you thinking about? I'm disappointed in What The lady I didn't catch. Your name was saying and really disheartened number one I'm a Christian number two I'm a thinker number three. I'm not a follower and number four I research nonstop day in and day out. I listened her kind of put Poo Poo people's ideas of positive thinking praying to Lord. for help, we also have an innate immune system I've listened to thousands of doctors Klein. I turned my TV off months ago I usually get online to listen to them repeat the same rhetoric and it really doesn't matter which channel you turn to they. All are saying the same, but you immediately turn that off and you get online and you find people all across the United States all across the world. Saying, totally different things I've got five thousand on my personal page and almost ten thousand in my own group. And all of us spend thousands of hours. You know collectively researching day in and day out. Plenty of doctors are touting Hydra. A chloroquine as a wonderful drug six, five years Approved drug all the sudden. Pharmacists across the nation and doctors across the nation are no longer being allowed to prescribe it. Pharmacists are being told to not fill the prescription when it is saving lives, doctors, online, or telling thousands or hundreds of thousands at least have died that didn't need to because they were put on event. When they found real quick Vince weren't the answer. So Jerry, it sounds to me like you. Are doing what we're talking about here, which is researching information in your finding that what the mainstream is telling. You was not you do not believe it and I want to give Murray and opportunity to respond particularly you know when when it comes to matters of faith that is something that is deeply personal and deeply important to many of us many of our listeners and so Marissa. What are your? What is your response? Oh you know. I think you're really I. think that is right that that face is extremely important to the healing process and many physicians. Really you know recommend that their patients who are ill and their families take a matter of faith that is that they practice prayer and that they rely on prayer groups and especially for those who suffered long term debilitating illnesses because you know quite frankly when a person is in that much pain and their suffering, it's like you really need to. Believe, you know I mean, sometimes that's what Kinda gets you from one day to the next. So I, you know I. Don't mean to suggest that you know that we need to leave religion or spirituality or faith out of the picture I. Think those are really important on the path to healing and in Indian country really you know that has our faith in our ceremonial practices are belief systems have really helped us make it through some very challenging hardships you know in our families in our communities. Yeah. So yes, I. Yes I. You know I didn't mean to suggest otherwise and thank you appreciate the motorist and Jerry I just want to point out that from the Federal Drug Administration FDA cautions against the use of hide your chloroquine or chloroquine for Covid nineteen outside of a hospital setting or clinical trial the risk of heart rhythm problems and so I wanna I, WanNa throw that back I want to throw that to Howard because based on what Jerry shared with us it sounds to me like. You do your research and you hear sources like the FDA which cautioned against it. Then you hear sources that other sources that say, no, we're using it. It's happening It works really well and. How do you know which one to believe Howard? Well I. Think the first thing you do is slow down You know we are all now condition to make judgments very quickly on the Internet the blessing and curses. You can find opinions that will reinforce anything that you believe. So. The first question is to ask who is giving me this information or they authoritative Have they done studies second what's the evidence they present? What's the evidence? Not How do they feel or believe what they think but what evidence do they provide for me to make a decision and then third question very important is what other people say we've got a few doctors saying this what do other doctors say and what evidence did they provide to me? That would challenge those assumptions and the forcing, and this is hard for all of us is to question ourselves. Are we open our? We really appreciate. To inflammation that challenges our assumptions. We all wanted desperately believe especially now that they're on medications. That will help that there are tours that will help and that's good. But are we letting that blind us to what really is happening? So what's the evidence? So I would suggest that those are tough questions we all have to ask ourselves. and. The other thing I would say in general is that. Journalistic truth is provisional. Changes over time. And it means that you've gotta follow the news and you have to make judgments based on the latest available information. So if it drug is cited early in the process as being potentially helpful, but then two weeks later, there are a series of tests and those tests raise serious questions. You've got to be ready to adjust look what we've been told about masks wearing masks was not crucial. Now wearing a mask is crucial, it's not that that original information with necessarily misleading. It was that circumstances changes as as we get new facts. It's one reason we have to follow the news on a regular basis and not get turned off or get cynical and say I'm not GonNa follow the news all the same we're gonNA. Make poor decisions if we don't act on the latest available information. What is the line between healthy amount of distrust of? Let's say the government and analysis of information you're consuming, and then just straight down a rabbit hole of conspiracy theories Howard. I think there's a difference between being skeptical and cynical. So you know we're teaching those literacy tests, thousands of students. On on Long Island in New York City as early as fifth and sixth grade, and we want them to be skeptical we want to teach them how to interrogate and not consume. But we don't want them to be cynical. So they're cynical. They don't believe anything. They're distrustful of anything that's not what we want. So being skeptical means the coming and interrogator rather than a consumer and means basically interrogating information. WHO's giving it to me? What's the evidence? What do other people say and before I act on this information? Including before I. Share it. I WANNA be pretty confident. That the information is reliable. This is not easy. This is tough for everybody about sixty percent of Americans now believe it's harder than ever to separate misleading information from reliable information in part because there is some very reliable information and news and it's being delivered in this stu this stu of misinformation disinformation, social media, infotainment viral videos. Opinions. Opinions masquerading as fact based information. Self expression masquerading as journalism, and so you know. This is a big job for all of us. We're we're not born with this. We're not equipped to handle this, which is why I'm such a passionate believer that we've got to start teaching to every one of our kids starting at ten and eleven, and that's what has to happen I. Think if this is GonNa Change long term I agree Howard I want to throw this out there to our listeners are you skeptical or cynical or maybe a little both and where do you get your information? How do you know that you can trust it? Have you ever shared something that you realize later that was completely not true. It's fine. fess up give us a call. The number is one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight. That's also one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, native. Morita is one of the things that. You talk about as well as mistakes of scope and scale, and I WANNA talk a little bit more about that because. For example, the example that I have in my mind this mistakes of scope and scale is I see a video of a raccoon and a dog and their best friends and they you know and they're hanging out and sleeping together in the same head and all of these things, and so then I am automatically think like I could get a pet raccoon and it would be best friends with my dog. Because I saw a video of it. Talked more about that. Right. Yeah. Exactly. Not I mean I think lots of us. Have Known of Plenty of raccoons and dogs that are not. You know and yeah, it's it's so but right. So we see this especially on social media you know or or it's Howard mention infotainment, right? So we see. We have one observation. And, we want to base our whole understanding of reality based on that one out survey, Shen. But you know in science this comes from the scientific method. You know we have to have many observations to get a clearer picture of reality you know, and so that is what we call a matter of scope right? So you know if you really wanted to know, gee, you know I have this really cute dog and I just think raccoons of the super. cutest. Is the how likely is it that they would be great. You know companions you would probably want to you know talk with different people ask you know veterinarians Who specialize in you know taming wild animals, domesticating wild animals and bringing them into the home. You know what is the likelihood based on their observation their experience because they've probably seen a lot more cases of interactions between dogs and raccoons right so that will broaden your scope of you know the sort of the view you're the number of observations and. Then, scale has to do with questions of circumstantial evidence overtime. You know. So let's say at you you know Dazs and raccoons, maybe the age at different paces and they mature at different rates and maybe there's a time when they're super cuddly and cute together not that dangerous with each other and then there's maybe when they get older a little bit grouchy. Very territorial we don't know these things right though sale is about also has to do with the time series that what you're looking at these observations you know and also other kinds of Evidence right that relate to longitude. So it's it's It's it's not. So that's the problem. Right when we get these like one snapshot thing, you know kind of pieces of information. BITs. we're not getting an accurate sense of scope and scale. So with Kobe nineteen stuff, it's like you know we see these studies that indicate you know in this country at this time covid effective this population of school children or something like that right. But a scientists would look at that and say, Oh, well, this study only measures three hundred kids you know and here we. Are Looking at public schools in the US, and we're talking about five thousand kids, two thousand kids, larger numbers of kids. So this is again scope and scale by. So those are those are some of the considerations we need to think of when we consume these, you know very attractive bites of information through social media or something like that. You know what is the context of their existence? Yeah and then. What, how do you go about like for example, just reading the study. So you look at the study you're like Oh. This only has ten people in it or something like that But then also you know you might need to go and check other information check other sources see if. One of the things I'll do with the study is I'll look and see if there's been any reporting on it, and if there hasn't been than that kind of flies, a little warning flag for me like Oh, this is so new that. You know we need some reporters to check into this and to see what the information is behind it. That's our conversation today. We would love to have you join us and give us a call and tell us you know what how do you get your information? How do you know what you're getting is true and what do you think about all these cove nineteen conspiracy theories when eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight Support by Amarin Indian countries. One hundred percent tribally owned insurance partner Amarante works with tribal governments and their business enterprises to provide effective commercial insurance coverage strengthen native American communities, protect tribal sovereignty, and help keep dollars in. Indian country more information on property liability. Compensation and commercial auto solutions at Amazon. Dot. com that's A. M. E. R. I. N. D.. Dot Com. You're listening to native America Calling Monica Brain sitting in Fort? Hare. gatewood twitter is fact checking president trump's tweets and putting warning labels on things that aren't true. Where do you get your information that you trust? Give us call there's still time to join the conversation. The number is one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight, a PA- Maala Pereira is with us she's the director and founder of media savvy. And PA- meal I want to give you a moment to talk about you know what Howard emphasized about teaching young people this about. Getting to the the kids when they're ten and eleven, you have kids. What are you talk to your kids about about you know like checking their information and making sure that what they are consuming is true. Yeah I mean really in the end, our students are getting access to devices and information. From even before the fifth grade, but I think the average age of like a kid it used to be and I don't have a check that the latest state of it is about like a fifth grader, right so that's what gets a phone and so if they're accessing information than they need to know how to properly conduct research, how to know what's true not true were living in a different time in society where it's changing very fast and there's a lot of information and so it's hard to like get your. Bearings and it's not just our job as parents, but it's also educators need to become media and media-literate. You know and news literate and to be able to understand how to quickly function in this society with with the amount of information that we're having sift through to figure out what what's a fact and what's an opinion at the most basic level right you start figuring out what's true and what's not true and so with my kids and I have a child going into sixth grade in the child entering. High. School. And so we. Were very media-literate. Here are discussions around the table are of media literacy discussion how how does that take form? So for instance, this morning my daughter had done this book and it was a bunch of map. And it was maps around the world of stereotypes and maps about like aliens in like did all this different stuff? And so we were looking at the maps and we're looking at one specific map and we realized like because our bias like I'm from South America I'm from Bolivia, and so we wanted to believe that what they were saying about my country by route we're was actually true and so it was like Oh. Yeah. That's totally true. Right and so we have this discussion and then eventually back up and say, well, actually I wonder where they how they form this map and where they got the information from and like you know like what how it was it was somewhat scientifically based, and so it needed to have come from some. Some some kind of source or a series of sources that needed to verify the science behind the map. They were like it was just a book of math and so it was hard to figure it out. We went to Wikipedia, and then we try to figure out like is this true or not true what kind of you know what what they did and didn't do to get to you know to to to figure out whether this specific matter was true or not true, and so it is. Time consuming and it's a process, but it's a process that not only is a life skill, but it's a it's like a survival skill, a necessary skill to live and to function in this world we're no longer living in the seventies. We're no longer in the fifties like we're in twenty twenty. This is the world in which we live at is filled with our opinions and information and social media. You know my daughter has a phone and she has in her news feed. She gets like Apple News or what you know. So it's her phone and she gets all this news and she's spewing off all kinds of news and so we do that like wait a minute wait a minute. Let's slow down. Let's figure out like you know what what of this is actually true. So we always go the source and you know I think what's interesting is that What's the doctor that said it? Right, it just because of doctor said something if we're talking about something scientific like the corona virus. Are. The doctor of philosophy they have a doctorate in like you know what I mean like, right? What kind of doctor is this like? Is this a like a general md they like? Are they a doctor? What are their car proctor? Right, and then they're. Narrow saying doctor so and so said this well, you we you know we have to really in the end. It's sat part of light, bring it up altogether where it's like, what's the evidence? What others say right and? The idea of skepticism which is really an interrogation which is really just asking questions and asking the right question right like like a question like if If. This doctor you know like an actual medical doctor saying they have a cure for covid nineteen. Why aren't other medical doctors saying that as well why isn't the CDC saying why isn't the Food and Drug Administration saying it and those are the kinds of like interrogating questions that I think can be so important particularly when you're talking with young people but also Kind of you know, take away the fun of things as well. if you're always asking those questions you. Can't I just enjoy video do is it really necessary that I have to question everything? Do your kids ever familiar? Do they ever get I don't know like media fatigue. Media literacy fatigue. Well maybe. So you know at our in our home because I'm always we're constantly deconstructing so they'll be like, no, not now not now. In Georgia but. You know I can't let it go. You know there are certain things that like. Like, did that bother you you know or how does that make you feel or you know like we? We do that sometimes I mean, it depends it depends on what is happening right? It depends on what were interacting with and what type of information if we're discussing the corona virus or something as complex as that is very complex like we we need a lot of minds to have conversations. You know to figure out what's actually true. Where did you know where did your friend share that being about that thing and then let's figure out you know. So there's a time and place I get that like if they're watching a movie you have to suspend. Like. And what's happening in a movie? We're not gonNA like fully. There and my kids are pretty skeptical but like it's it's a learned skill you know and it's and that's and it takes practice and we have to constantly do it, and in the end, it's our responsibility to live a citizens you know in this digital world which affects our non digital world. So and I think that's part of it because everybody's spewing different facts and different information and what it comes down to is really. Again, going back to that slowing down but also what is our responsibility and really this should be not just part of. I should be instilled into every every classroom even before I would say, even if you're not talking about news like say fifth grade but you know, I know my my one of my kids was in third grade, it had to do a research project. You have to if you're going to research about flowers used in the medical like blend July is what my son was researching for third grade. He was assigned that flower to research, but it was all these like health properties. Colangelo. So now we're talking about like who says that the property like you know like yeah, I mean it's all about critical thinking skills and whether or not we are sharpening the critical thinking skills building on them with teaching our kids I, WanNa, squeeze in a call we've got. In, Cheyenne River on the shine river reservation in south. Dakota tuned in on Kfi Pi. Hey, the rea-. Thanks for holding. What do you want to share about this? Can you hear me? Yeah. Go ahead. Okay. So what I was thinking is that when we have car. facebook and social media is a lot of times when I get something that's Florida's through the Messenger part of facebook. It seems like those things don't seem to be true they're they're usually later I find out that I shared something that wasn't true. So you know I kind of feel stupid for for having shared it. So then I stopped doing that And then one of the things. That I did find in on facebook is that many times some of my friends who have a doctorate or master's or should know better They usually will share something that is not. that is that is true. So I kind of rely heavily on that as well as my own critical thinking skills as well as this true I didn't even see this on the news and is this something brand new and look at the new stores and listened to see his something that is like seeing that or or if. Somebody's actual opinion so. I mean that that plays into lot of what I share and reshare. I try to share good information because there's some people who follow me on facebook friends who, who will be share what I share and but but I think that it all comes down to. Really actually thinking about it and knowing what you're reading and if if you're actually paying attention to current events. I think that Some of the kids nowadays, they'll reassure things because they their friends do and many times. They are not true and and I hate to say that. But you know we end up doing that just because. In facebook or even twitter or any of those social media sites, many times those. Site when people should the social media so You know it's their friends sharing things returing and It might be the mind thought or people getting caught up and things or you know old this must be true. Because don't shit. I shared right I wanNA take that is such a good point. I WanNa talk about that because if you look at like owes so many people shared this so it must be true the that has to do with Algorithms and Maurice I know this is something that you look into and so would you wanNA share about that about the you know the just because so many people shared it maybe it has validity. Yes. Thank you for bringing that up. It also speaks to a concept that you know. That Howard brought up earlier, which has to do with the concept of the viral video. You know. So you know facebook and all of the social media platforms away they gained revenue it's through the circulation of content and and how that allows them to. You know if you like something or if you hearts something whatever you're you're you're you're you're platform allows you to do. It says something about your preferences and the social media companies they, collect your preferences and put them into these sort of profiles, these personas that allow them to then. I- Dems to and sadly, in the two thousand, sixteen election, it wasn't just you know products that they were marketing. It was also ad campaigns. You know how you were more or less likely to vote you know and you know, and so anyways, those the way that they do that the way that they sort of compile these personalized customizable profiles for marketers is through the use of Algorithms, and so they essentially have algorithms that categorize that speak to. You know the kind of sub communities that we are part of through our social media platforms So what that means is that certain types of content are more likely to circulate amongst you and your friends if you all, you know your. Friends I mean your social media followers and the people who follow if you all tend to share a similar. Sort of political persuasion consumer lifestyle you know maybe you're in a similar demographic age range or or race gender group for something like that region geographic region also influences that. So what that means is that some of the Content that we might be seeing through our social media profiles. It really is Kinda like were in an echo chamber where seeing content that is. Legible to us you know and if anybody has you know If you've had the experience of suddenly plugging into a group of friends or networks that are maybe in another country who speak a different language or something like that you may experience you know suddenly that there's a different type of content flowing into your space if you're in begun begin to be plugged into that different, very different cultural group. So, yeah. So and you and you would recommend that right like like spread it out, follow some different things because that. Will make variety in what you're seeing your feet right. and. So theoretically that works. We, actually don't know you know. So I just want to you know put a plug for the work of Ramazani Boston he's a researcher at UCLA talks about information bubbles and that. In this new sort of digital era of democracy that we really need to pop out of our information bubbles and you know try to. Forge networks with groups you know our cultural areas or you know news sources are very different from the ones that we normally are accustomed to. But yes but you know. So that might be best in theory than in practice because we actually don't know how these algorithms function you know and so that's part of the concerns with the power that the social media giant's the tech giant's have is that they do not reveal the secret sauce. create you know and push content to different sets of users. has it bridges on privacy concerns you know it has to do with issues of free expression in democracy, and it has to do with the social media giant's how they position themselves. Are they really in the media sharing industry? How much are they involved in journalism and how much are they just selling our data profiles to generate ad revenue? So so those are those are definitely Issues we need to sort of I i. I think that we need to really sort of take up through legislation but. That's just an extraordinarily hard thing to do in this particular climate where. Having. It just feels like we're awash in this information and disinformation. Well. Unfortunately, we're at the end of the hour. I could talk about this for days four days the. Thank you so much so much to our guest today Dr Murray said Duarte Pamela Pereira and Howard Schneider. We've got links to all of them on our website native America calling dot com. We're back tomorrow with a conversation about the giant event that is Santa Fe Indian market, which is going entirely online this year we'll see you tomorrow. Smoking gave me COPD which makes it harder and harder for me to. Have a tip for you. If your doctor gives you five years to live, spend it talking with your grandchildren explained to them. Now you're. Not, GONNA be around anymore to share his wisdom and his mouth. I haven't figured out how to do that yet. I'm running out of time. COPD makes it harder and harder to breathe and can cause death. You can quit for free help call one, eight, hundred quit now a message from the Centers for Disease Control, and Prevention. How talk you picky. Where a mask save alive, contact your local linen healthcare provider for more information visit healthcare, Dot Gov, or call one, eight, hundred, three, one, eight, two, five, nine, six, a message from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Ho. Native America. Calling is produced in the. National Native Voice Studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Kwon Broadcast Corporation and native nonprofit? Media? Organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite. Service Music is by Brent Michael Davids native one. Native American Radio Network.

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Kavanaugh Accusers Are Growing In Numbers

The Young Turks

1:03:29 hr | 2 years ago

Kavanaugh Accusers Are Growing In Numbers

"While the church Janke Granik hispan- with you guys on a day of unbelievable allegations. So unfortunately. We do believe them. So. And, but but look, let's have a conversation about all of them. So obviously the cabin, all one or in this case to is the most relevant and important, and we'll discuss that in a minute, and it is. It's absolutely enormous in terms of the ramifications, but later on more allegations against Moore, political figures. I don't know if I believe them all their amazing unbelievable scandalous allegations, and. And they're devastated and family members turning on one another in a couple of there's a lot of that on the show today. I mean, so. Red weddings abound. Did a YouTube live over the weekend on the poll numbers for the Republicans. Oh, wow, that is devastating and partly release. The first story that we're going to do and the list goes on. So a helluva show today, guys. Thank you for tuning in obviously, if you miss any part of it for any reason, if you become a member, you can get it. Anytime you want TY t. dot com slash join, aren't Anna. Let's do it. Over the weekend, the New Yorker with reporting from Ronan Farrow broke his story indicating that second woman has come forward with allegations against supreme court nominee, Brad Kavanagh. So these allegations are by a woman named Deborah Ramirez, and she went to Yale with Brett Cavanaugh, and she admits that the alleged assault took place along time ago. And so there are parts that she doesn't clearly remember. However, what she did relate to the reporters in this case, she says, she does remember and we'll see if these claims get investigated, but let me give you the details. So Deborah Ramirez remembers that Cavanaugh had exposed himself at a drunken dormitory party thrust. His penis in her face and caused her to touch it without her consent. As she pushed him away, she was quoted in the story is saying, I wasn't going. Touch a penis until I was married. I was embarrassed and ashamed and humiliated. Brett was laughing. I can still see his face and his lips coming forward or his hips. I apologize and his hips coming forward. Like when you pull up your pants. And so she says that she never came forward or told anyone about this because she was embarrassed. She was also drinking. So she was concerned that people would go after her rather than look into these allegations. And it seems as though those who support cavenaugh today are using that against her and we'll get to the reactions later, the claim dates to the nineteen Eighty-three nineteen Eighty-four academic school year when Cavanaugh was a freshman at Yale University, the offices of at least four democratic senators have received information about the allegation and at least to have begun investigating it. So the New Yorker notes that the Senate had known about this. At least the judiciary committee had known about this last week, and the reaction from Republicans was to rush the confirmation. And that explains why all of a sudden there was this Alta Maitum indicating that there was a very strict deadline for Dr Blasi to agree to testify. They later changed that ultimate and now it's being reported that Dr Blasi is likely to testify on Thursday of this week. However, with these new allegations, Senator Dianne Feinstein is calling for a postponement for that that hearing in order to do further investigation, and they're also calling for the FBI to get involved. So if the hearing you have it on Thursday, we will cover it live and commentary on the spot as we're showing two guys on t. y. t. dot com. Slash live and analysis at the heart of the Ramirez allegations here. If true and can be shown well enough for people to understand that it is true obviously would be the end of cabinet. And now there are some progressive groups that are actually calling for him to be impeached from his current position in on the federal bench. Now, she clearly says that she had trouble recollecting some of this and this. She was very intoxicated that night, so that to me cuss in two different directions. One is that well, okay. Then you have to be a little wary about what she's saying because she's not entirely positive. On the other hand, which person who's looking to set them up politically would admit that if you were trying to do a hatchet job, you would never say that you would say, I'm positive and come forward yourself, etcetera. So now the second part of the question of whether you believe or not. And look. These are the things that we all look to as we read these stories. And you know, for example, look, even before we get to that, let me just say if the story isn't true that and cavenaugh got blocked on that basis. That would be really, really troubling. It would be devastating, and it would be devastating because it was an injustice done to one person. It also be devastating to the cause of protecting women because then it would give people carte blanche to say, all we knew all of it wasn't true, it cetera. So that's why it's really important for us to the best of our abilities to discern is it true? Is at not true? Is it relevant cetera? Right. So then that gets to the witnesses. So Ronan Farrow Jane Mayer broke the story there in immaculately careful it with these stories. That doesn't mean they get everyone right? So, but they did take a lot of care and have defended themselves about this particular story to try to reach out to all the diff. Witnesses. Now, again, this is what the f. b. I should be doing. So we all have a better sense of it, whether he did do it or didn't do it. So we can make clear decisions. But now reporters are chasing it down New York Times in all of a sudden the Trump administration's best friend. And I don't say that derisively towards the New York Times, I say towards the Trump administration because the New York Times, it's just simply trying to report out a story say that they talked about a dozen people who did not wreck like this at all. And so now the Trump administration doesn't think they're the failing New York Times. They think that they're the brilliant New York Times and are spreading that to everyone who will consider it Farrell and mayor the New Yorker said, yes, we also talked to dozens of witnesses, and a lot of them did not remember this story including a really good friend of Deborah Ramirez. On the other hand, several people did remember this story, right? And by the way, there was one individual quoted in the New Yorker, someone who identified as a close friend, former close friend of Ramirez and said. We were calls for ten years and she never brought this up. I let me just be clear about something just because someone didn't bring up a sexual assault. Doesn't mean it didn't happen. It could be something that this individual was very embarrassed about just in feel comfortable opening up about. So let's just take that into consideration. But another thing to take into consideration is that that friend who was close with her for ten years is now married to a man who was allegedly present when this alleged sexual assault took place. So there's a possibility that that person wants to protect her husband. Again, this is all analysis that's being done by the by me by other people in the media. And the fact of the matter is it's all irrelevant. What matters is having a non-partisan FBI investigation into this to get to the heart of the truth, but that is something that Republicans do not wanna do. In fact, when they heard these allegations, they wanted to rush the confirmation of Cavanaugh. And they do not want the FBI investigation. I'm inclined to believe the accusations, right? And I'm starting to think that Republicans in the Senate are inclined to believe the accusations because they refuse any investigation into these. These allegations on this ellegation to me, there are couple of things that go in different directions and so everybody gets make up their own mind. And obviously a lot of people come into it with their own biases. And I hope that some don't, and I hope that I'm one of the people who don't come at it with a bias because I always think what if it was a democrat or a liberal appointee in and this was happening. Okay. So that leads me to one person who does remember this incident. It is an unnamed person but mayor and and the Trump propaganda on the fake news media's ridiculous mayor and feral aren't going to make up someone and call them in anonymous source. The reason Trump believes that that can happen is because he used to do it. He would pretend to be someone else. John Miller, John barren and being. An anonymous source for people. So he thinks why everybody's probably a serial pathological liar like myself. So my juries in on Trump, that's not the issue here. So on this. A classmate actually did talk to mayor and Farrell, and this is what he had to say. Here's the New Yorker, quote, a classmate of Ramirez said that another student told him about the incident either on the night of the party or in the next day or two classmates said that he is quote, one hundred percent sure that he was told at the time they Cavanaugh was a student who exposed himself to Ramirez well, mad number one, pretty clear. Again, it's just one witness, but Farrell and mayor say that he independently recalled many of the same details offered by Ramirez. They did not coordinate. So these reporters are great reporters, they said, okay, what? What do you remember being the details? And that person had the same details that Ramirez had in her story and an that person apparently added quote, I've known this all along. It's been on my mind all these years when his name came up, it was a big. Deal. So. The only thing that where I go on the other hand is that she says she had trouble remembering. That's tough. That's a tough thing to say, hey, is super series accusation against someone at a pivotal time, and you're telling me you had to take six days to remember it. Exactly, right. I get where a lot of people go. No, I'm out. That's not good enough, right. But it is independently confirmed by this other person and she's and she is apparently a reputation for by even the people who say, I don't remember that story say, oh no, Debra bureaus super honest like like known for being over the top on us, and that's and she shows it by saying, I was drunk and I had trouble remembering. No political hack would ever say that if their job was to go get cavenaugh. So she's not a political hack that I'm certain of in that sense, she might be a democrat, but this is not a hatchet job that she invented itchy remembering. Right. I think that's a legitimate question. And then you have this evidence to help you make up your mind on that for me what also has to be. Telling is her willingness to come forward with these allegations in a pretty honest way, meaning that she's admitting to things that maybe she doesn't remember admitting to the fact that she was drunk at the time. But more importantly, the fact that she was willing to come forward knowing the way that Dr Blasi has been treated the fact that she's had to move out of her home. She's had to relocate her family and she's has to hire private security because the threats against have been terrifying. And she's also seeing the way that Dr Blasi has been dragged through the mud by Republicans and the fact that she's willing to put herself out there with these allegations it. It doesn't necessarily prove anything, but it's something to consider. And again, the most important thing to do is to conduct an investigation and that again is something that Republicans do not wanna do and understand the politics of this too, which is that? Yes, Republicans don't wanna do the investigations. They're afraid he's going to get past the. Midterm elections, they might lose the Senate and then it might not get cavenaugh confirm. The Democrats for the same reason do want the investigation partly to find out the truth, but partly to delay the proceedings that is a real political concern of the democrat saw take that into account as well for for me, I think, man, if it isn't true and you buried this guy and you didn't do an FBI investigation or you put him on the court and it wasn't true and we never find out that's still is terrible for him because forever a huge percentages country is gonna that he did it. And if it isn't true, I would want if it was me, I'd like by God get in there, talked to, here's my witness, one witness to look and nobody's regulation is perfect from thirty six years ago at cetera. But I gotta get this off my name right. Absolutely. I know that if I were dealing with false accusations, I would one hundred percent want someone to investigate it to ensure that my name gets cleared and it's just strange that he doesn't want that cavenaugh for his part has responded by saying, I won't be intimidated. I won't withdraw as a nominee for the supreme court. And so he continues to deny the allegations. He wants to keep moving forward with the hearings and get confirmed. But let's say best case scenario for him, he does get confirmed without any investigation is he comfortable knowing that there's a huge portion of the country that either doesn't know what the truth is. They're kind of on the fence or are convinced that he is someone who's committed sexual assault. This is a serious thing by the way, attempted rape is a serious crime, and we're not calling for a criminal investigation, but I don't think that anyone who has committed anytime. Of serious crime should ever make it into our Justice system. But more importantly in the highest court in the country. And one more. Some degree of strike against them. You wait again at whatever using is appropriate. He said that these charges by Ramirez were quote smears pure and simple. So he's now super fighting back now if you thought they were smears, I would fight back super aggressively and you probably would too. But as I read Ramirez story, I thought, no, this definitely happened to her. I'm not a hundred percent sure that it was rent Cavanaugh, but she didn't make up the whole story and she's not doing it for political reasons. Otherwise, she wouldn't do all the things that I described here and she wouldn't be hesitant and, and by the way, another thing you should know in this cuts into directions as well. The Democrats apparently went fishing here trying to find someone because they had heard of a story at Yale where cavenaugh done this number one that apparently exists enough people have heard about it that the Democrats found out about it. Number two, they then went and tried to find who would happen to and through that process Ramirez gets revealed. So that is a strike. That is a thing in her favor because she didn't come out here and go. It was me. It was me. I'm doing that Kevin. I don't want him on the court. She's not doing any of that. She got dragged into you. Wanna counted as a strike against the Democratic Party for going fishing and finding this person. Okay, fine. And that seems like that's what happened. But the question is true. If I if I'm Kevin on, I read this story. Of course you're going to get mad if it wasn't you, you're going to be superman right? But at the same time I read it and go, she definitely thinks it happened to her. Okay. So then the question is, who was it? Because I didn't do it and I wouldn't. I'm not sure I'd go out there and say this spear through through and said, look, man, we, that's a terrible thing for that to happen to her. And maybe we should look into figuring out who did it because he definitely wasn't me. Yeah, unless he just thinks she's just a super, super clever liar. And this was a political trick all along. But this fact pattern doesn't seem to match that right again, there should be the FBI involved in this. They should look into it and trying to figure out whether or not there's any corroborating evidence whether or not any of these allegations are true. It's ridiculous that it's now up to people in the media to do the investigation and figure out what the truth is by the way. One other thing I wanted to bring up last week, we played a video featuring Senator maisy Hirono and she had asked Brad Kavanagh. Have you ever been. Accused of, I don't remember the exact wording, but she asked if he ever. Was accused of sexual assault as an adult, and I thought that was weird wording, right? And now I'm realizing, oh, it probably had to do with these allegations because remember these allegations are from when he was a freshman at Yale when he was an adult, the allegations that Dr Blasi brought forward happened when they were in high school when he was seventeen. And so who knows? You know, like what's happening behind the scenes. You're right. It does seem like Democrats are on a fishing expedition trying to find more accusers, but nonetheless I don't want to. I don't want this to be a guessing game. I want this to be something that's looked into by nonpartisan professionals. Exact question was, have you committed any verbal or physical harassment or assault of a sexual nature? And that was in context of what he was an adult. And so the yield incident, he would have been an adult and. And his certainly would've qualified as that. And he said, no, I, that he had not. So one super last thing on this is that. Look Kavanagh's now been caught saying several things didn't prove to be true. So it's that context is also relevant. And so now in the context of a guy who's swearing up and down the certain things or the case, and it turns out they're not the case. Now you have this situation. Well, it makes him less credible. And obviously every new accuser makes them even less credible and both sides know that. And hence why the Democrats want to see if there are more accusers and now Michael Ani's talking about he has another one or and, and I'm sorry, ended Republicans think we gotta get this thing right now so that there are no more accusers and he's on the court. I don't care if he did it or didn't do it which ways e-voting voting with corporations. He's voting against over weight. He's in, he's in, go, go, go. And that appears to be the case, except for one caveat, unless they think it's going to cost them the election because the most, the thing that the any. Titian cares most about is their own seat. And so that's the calculations being played out this week and actually one super-duper last thing is that in the post game today, I wanna talk about the context of Georgetown prep where cavenaugh Cam from and how they would apparently target one woman at a time and try to get them intoxicated. And you know they called there in the thing that they can cocktail was jungled USA cetera. When I wanna talk about that even separate from this story, obviously it's related to this story, but that concept of guys trying to do that. It's just merits further discussion. Let's do it in the post game. You get that by being a member of TY t. dot com slash join. Okay. So let's take a quick break. When we come back, we will discuss reaction to the story by both Trump officials Trump himself included and also Trump's base Emma Viglen was at a Trump rally in Springfield. Missouri at Lincoln is the only Abba takes thousands of best-selling nonfiction books, and there's still some down to their most impactful elements. So you could read or listen to them in under fifteen minutes. All on your phone with Blake is you'll expand your knowledge, learn more and just fifteen minutes than you can in almost any other way. Plus you can listen anywhere. My was gonna new book is called the subtle art of not giving f. It's by Mark Mason. She talks to me about it all the time. So, hey, why not us blankets to absorb all information in half an hour so I can go back and go, yeah, who's not giving now five million people are using blankets, expand their minds, fifteen minutes at a time. Get started today right now. For a limited time blankets as a special offer. Just for our audience, go to blankets dot com. Slash t, y t to start your free. Seven-day trial. That's blink is spelled b. l. i. n. k. I s. t. Lincoln's dot com slash t y t to start your free seven-day trial. They had some fascinating things to say about Dr Blasios allegations. I'm back in the young Turks member comments. I, Paul says there's a big difference between investigations done by reporters, the Senate Judiciary committee and the f. b. i. background check FBI is best option to get to the truth. If you believe they are nonpartisan is we do right now in this point in history, then you should want the FBI. Now of course Trump hates FBI. So that's another factor because they're Invesco truth. Yeah, four Costa Rica rights, and it's simple. If you're innocent you on the investigation, if guilty you make excuses not to smooth, writes in leave it the Trump to pick a judge who can't get confirmed in what would have usually been an easy vote in the Senate. Now this makes me wonder the atmosphere, Justice, Kennedy, fostered. That's an interesting comment too. And he clerked for Justice, Anthony Kennedy, who insisted that Cavanagh be picked apparently Gordon some allegations. Okay. And then I'm going to go to Twitter for two more Gabby Morita writes in there or the new allegations, really that unbelievable. At this point, they seem very much par for the course Gabby. I hear you on that. I was actually referring to later stories on other allegations, and we'll get to those in a little bit. And Joel forty. Four says thing about the party that would March through hell the rapist on the Scotus because he'd make it so that rape victims would have to have the rapist baby. Now, look, I think it's too over the top Tacoma rapes because that has not been proven. Alleged so far. Yeah. Alleged attempted rape is the heaviest of the charges, but the second half of your tweet is unfortunately very, very good point. I mean here we have a guy who is apparently against Roe versus Wade. So if you're raped, sorry, you're going to have to have the rapist's baby. So I mean, that is so deeply disconcerting to begin with. But the Republicans view that as yeah, that's no problem. I don't see why that's an issue, right? So the fact that we have to start the conversation here is so terrible. When you add in the alleged attempted rape, it does make it even more problematic. Okay, I do. We are doing the membership drive. I wanted to check in on that and then give you guys an exciting story about that in this. Excellent. Just a look at our thermometer. We started at twenty seven thousand six hundred and sixty one after Labor Day. Let's see where we are today. Thirty one thousand nine hundred five. Now that would be great. The thirty two thousand. By then to today, that would be wonderful dot com. Slash join the support, progressive media, your home, a progressives here on the Turks, speaking of which aggressive progressive. One of our shows has a very important exclusive tomorrow. So make sure that you are checking that out. It is at live three PM eastern at TY t. dot com. Slash members live because you have to be a member to get aggressive, progressive live. But if you are in some of the members already know who it's referring to because they get notices a head of time and they're super excited about it. But for everybody sign up now don't miss that exclusive interview with someone. I think you guys are all fans with an important announcement. So TY t. dot com. Joined to become a member and then watch aggressive, progressive tomorrow, live at three pm eastern for that exclusive or Anna, what's thanks. There are now two women who have accused Brett cavenaugh of sexual misconduct and Michael avenue. ATI, the attorney for stormy Daniels has come forward alleging that there is a third woman who has credible claims against Brett Cavanaugh as well. So we don't know what those accusations are avenue hasn't released any details about those accusations yet, but it appears that he will be representing this woman. And again, he says that the allegations are credible. Now, with that said, I think an interesting conversation would be the political calculation slash miscalculations by Republicans in regard to the story. There has been some polling recently indicating that Republicans are losing support among female voters. And so Trump Trump weird slip. Jank has more details on that. I don't know where that came from strong details. I have the best details. Do defense. Okay. So before the political calculations here which are affected by if there is a third woman? Albany on Twitter has been talking about this since Sunday night. We're doing the show live here of course, Monday night, hey, he says his client is no longer government employees, but this she still holds a security clearance. So that is relevant. It makes you wonder if she worked with cabinet some point in the Bush administration or when he was a judge and she, he says, she's had multiple security clearances. Now there's no way of judging whether that person exists and and how credible they are one any of the details validations are because they're not public yet. Now, ATI as a person cuts in two different directions. Clearly he's against Trump so you can take what he says with some grain of salt. On the other hand when he has promised big scoops in the. Past he has always delivered. There is not been like, hey, I'm gonna do this, just kidding. I was just trying to get media attention that has not happened yet. So if he says there's something coming out, it doesn't mean it's going to be credible, but there probably is going to be something so that would be a third person. So now as a Republicans look at that here is the calculation they're making okay. If we think we're going to lose the majority in the Senate, then we have the cavenaugh through right now. Otherwise, we're not going to be able to get them through the Democrats control the Senate after the elections. On the other hand, if we can hold a majority, who cares about cabinet, let's get rid of them. Let's give someone else that is not going to inflict political damage on us right before the election, especially with female voters. So that is what they're weighing right now and how much damage is it going to do the Republicans if they keep this national conversation going where they're constantly attacking women who are making serious allegations and saying on, they're lying. There smears they're this. They're that. So now factor in the pulled it animation. They came out over the weekend and I was so blown away by the numbers that I did a YouTube live on it. And so the generic congressional elections Democrats versus Republicans, who do you want to control congress? Was that already an incredibly high eight point advantage for the Democrats until this poll this poll now has it at a twelve point advantage. And there's only six weeks left, so tick, tick, tick, tick, tick. Now, the only demographic that the Republicans are still holding is men over the age of forty five. They have lost every other demographic and now because they're lead among men over the age of forty, five is strong enough. They're still holding men overall, but now that lead among men is just down to three points, which is really bad news for Republicans. They have to hold men at much higher numbers in order to win these elections. Now, how about women? They always had a disadvantage when he came to women. And to me when the Democrats MSNBC always touted, oh, they lost women. I was like, yeah, but they have men do just telling half the story that doesn't make any sense. So well, now in this case, I just told you the other half their question man when it comes to women, they're the lead. The Democrats have now is no longer big or significant. It is now gigantic. The Democrats now hold a twenty five point advantage among women. Now it doesn't take a rocket scientist to do that. Math. Only three point lead with men and a twenty five point deficit among women and women have been showing up in record numbers in the primaries and that's just within the party. Okay. Wait till get a little of the general election. Now the last stat that has got to get Mitch McConnell and his colleagues super nervous, which whether it's the right thing or not, the right thing is probably going to cavenaugh Speight more than anything else is even in Republican districts, their lead among compared to the Democrats on average for the whole country is down to one point. Now understand that a lot of those Republican districts are super safe. They have twenty point leads. Thirty point leads in some of those districts. So if you take all the Republican held districts on an average down to a one. Point lead against the Democrats. That's not a wave. That's a soon NAMI. Republican pollster said, I have never seen numbers this week. So as they as they get together and caucus this week, which is exactly what they're doing. I need you to understand that they're gonna keep it real that McConnell's gonna talk to those guys. How many of you do think are gonna lose Ted? Do you think you're gonna lose in Texas? Okay. And how many, hey, are you going to lose in in Missouri when get mccaskill back into the Senate? Right. So what do we need to do? I mean, I are, we gonna go from twenty five point deficit with women down to thirty points, then we're all toast. We might all lose, right? So that's what's happening right now. I have so many things to say, okay, so first off when it comes to Republicans, losing support, I do think that the cavenaugh hearings have a lot to do with it. But also I think Republicans have really underestimated how disastrous Trump's administration has been for their pulled numbers because they've continued. Asli supported him and it appeared, especially when it came to the election with Mark Sanford. Remember Mark Sanford was one of the lawmakers who decided to criticize Trump and he lost the election as a result of that. And I think that there was too much emphasis in too much attention paid to that where Republicans thought we'd better fall in line, we'd better support Trump because if we do, we're going to pay the price. But I do think that there were a lot of moderate Republican voters who ended up reluctantly voting for Trump, but then later saw how disastrous policies weren't like the tax policy. It had very low approval ratings from the get go right before it even got past and Republicans passed it anyway and they didn't care. They didn't think they would. They would have to suffer the consequences for that. And I do think that they will. And I think that this Cavanaugh thing this Cavanaugh story is just another example or maybe the straw that breaks the camel's back. We'll see. But going back to Ted Cruz. Yeah, Ted Cruz is in trouble. And I think that Senate Republicans see that there's a really good chance that cruise could lose to better Rourke and what makes that abundantly clear to me is the way that cruise tries to attack Beto. He can't attack based on policies because Beddoes policies are popular. So instead he attacks Beddoe for having nice hair and good teeth. You tax. The weakest attack. I've ever seen in politics an attack though. I mean like, hey, you know what? You're too good looking. I thanked me like that all day long. But I guess if you're Ted Cruz, you can't help, but think that anyway. So now my my final on this is look do I think taking into account Kavanagh's potential vote on Roe versus Wade, and then that impact on the elections in your electoral, chances Senator is a legitimate way to think about whether you should vote for cavenaugh. Yes, I do think that do I think that t- your electoral chances into is a legitimate way of deciding Cavanaugh at this point, is the right way to go? No, I do not think that I think that you should. They should make that decision at this point based on whether they think he did or did not do those incredibly serious allegations. So I don't think politics should play into that because those allegations are either. Obviously disqualifying if he did do it or you should go to bad form and defend him to the hilt if he knew think for sure that he didn't do it because that's an unbelievable smear job if you'd think he didn't do it and you say, I don't care that he got smeared lose my political career over defending a person that is what was being smeared, but but these are politicians. They're not like you and I right. The only thing they care about is their own seat. So when as they, as they look at these events that are on folding. Man, they, they all have to be super, super nervous about it because my God, when you have women's showing up the primaries that the record rate that they are, you got to twenty five point deficit with women. Now, imagine that you rush this confirmation through and they're an avocado as right, and there's a third person and they're credible. Now you got women wondering my God, what the hell is cavenaugh been doing all his life, then you got the store. We didn't even do because we thought it was. Not to the level of these other stories about how he needed a certain kind of a certain look for women who were implying, etc. I don't wanna get into too much of those details, but when you put all of that into consideration and then you go, yeah, all these horrible, horrible charges. We don't care women. The only thing we care about is that he's going to vote against Roe versus Wade. I mean, you might have a wake in a woken a giant that you're not going to know what to do with. And so if you wanted record turn out like we've never seen for women voters that is the exact recipe for that. So if they're not caucusing right now to being credibly careful about their political chances, they ought to be 'cause they might be walking into something that they literally have never seen before in their political lives. Well, let's talk a little bit about the reaction to the latest allegations against bright cabin because I think those reactions give you a sense of some of these lawmakers priorities. So let's get to that. Following allegations from a second woman indicating that Brett Cavanaugh may have sexually assaulted Yale student by the name of Deborah Ramirez, a number of people who are allied with Trump and Trump himself have come forward, denying the accusations saying that they still support cavenaugh and that this is nothing more than a smear campaign. So before we get to the Conway's Lindsey grams of the world, let's go to Donald Trump. He wanted to address these allegations made by Deborah Ramirez, and here's what he had to say. About these. The. Statements people represented by. Ears should look into the players representations. I think it could be chance. This could be one of the single most unfair unjust things to happen to a candidate for anything. People come out of the woodwork from thirty six years ago. Thirty years ago never mentioned. It happens in my opinion, is. A good way to figure out whether this is a smear campaign and whether this is purely political, and whether this is unfair and unjust is to call for the FBI to do an independent investigation. This would be a background check a more thorough background check to see if any of these allegations might be true, but Donald Trump and Senate Republicans do not want that investigation to take place. So. The bar for Trump is so low. Now that whenever I watch Trump clip and he doesn't say that water is tremendously wet, I feel like, oh, hey, got through it answer without totally humiliating himself. Now, in this case, he's now actively decided that he's going to attack the people who might be victims of cavenaugh and he's going to, he's decided, no, I'm all in. I'm gonna call it all political that they're made up, but they're totally made up. And the Democrats work with the lawyers for these women to make them up. I don't think that's a fruitful strategy, but that's super obvious. When was the last time Donald Trump had a productive strategy, if right, exactly. So Kellyanne Conway was on CBS this morning and she also addressed the latest accusation. Here's what she had to say. Why does it not matter to anyone that judge cavenaugh has said unequivocally and categorically these allegations are false. He thinks the latest one show a pattern of. Smear campaign against him. And he has said from the beginning that he wasn't at the party in question thirty six years ago in in Maryland, all that has to matter. But this president, this president wants them both to testify in the Senate Judiciary committee is set up a process where they both can. I just don't think one man shoulder should bear decades of the two. What does that even mean? That one man shoulder should bear decades of the metoo movement? No, like he's being accused by to specific people at the moment. There could be a third based on what my glove naughty says, and by the way, let me just correct myself. She was addressing Dr Blasi allegations in that clip. And so. So her argument is well. He says, he wasn't at the party. So that means something. But it's, he said, she said like, that's why you need to have enough investigation. And that's exactly what Republicans want. Lindsey, Graham, you know, talked about the hearing with Dr Blasi which is at the moment scheduled for Thursday, and he was asked if they're going to be any other people involved or they're going to be any witnesses. Anyone else speaking other than Brett Cavanaugh and Dr Blasi. And he said, no, that all you need to do is hear from those two. But then if you do that again, it's a, he said, she said situation. They don't want any corroborating evidence. It's crazy. So general principle she lays out are perfectly fine. But when you in this context, it makes no sense. So what do I mean by that? So if you said Charlie rose, shouldn't have to bear the whole metoo movement on his shoulders. He's not. He's just being judged based on what he did. Nobody's judging Charlie rose on what Harvey Weinstein did or what Roger Ailes or Bill O'Reilly did. They're just saying Charlie, what you did was bad enough that you gotta go right now if you said, hey, these, sorry, should not be judged for the actions of everyone else. You should just judge them based on what he did. Well, we would agree to that too, and and different people come out differently on that issue. But that's more of an open question and one that is can be and has been debated right then us right to say, well, you can't put Weinstein on Z's hundred percent, right? But nobody's putting Weinstein on Charlie rose or Brad Kavanagh. They're all judged on the merits of their particular situation. If you said to me, cavenaugh didn't do these things, but y Cedeno Riley, did I'd be like, and why would I care what? Why say no Riley did. In this context, told me the guy didn't do it. So of course, he doesn't bear the burden of what other people did. So it's a straw man argument or k. and then when she says, well, you know, his point of view should also be taken into account. I don't know. I'm sure that there are people who don't take his point of view into account, but we do, that's. That's why it's not like we came out where we're positive. Okay. It's over Ramirez is definitely Ryan Dr. Blasi Ford is credible, but not just credible. She's one hundred percent, right, right. I don't care what he says. Nobody's, I don't think anybody reasonable is saying that we're saying, yeah, that's why it's hard to figure out. He says it didn't happen. They have a credible case that it did happen. That's why we'd like to to find out more. Well, there is one specific person a Senator who does not care doctor. Z. has to say, and this is the point that I was trying to make win. The whole debate happened regarding whether or not Dr. Blasi should testify. If the Republicans refused the FBI investigation, I argued that these senators, Republican senators have already made up their mind. They don't care what she has to say while she testifies and guess who proved that point for me Senator Lindsey, Graham. So I'm going to skip ahead to video four here is Lindsey Graham arguing that. Doesn't matter what she has to say. I've made up my mind our to listen to, but I'm being honest with you and everybody else. What do you expect me to do? You can't bring it in criminal court. You would never sue civilly. You couldn't even get a warrant. What am I supposed to do? Go ahead and ruin this guy's life based on an accusation. I don't know when it happened. I don't know where it happened and everybody named in regard to being there said it didn't happen. I'm just being honest, unless there's something more. No, I'm not going to ruin a judge cabinets life over this. So he also said that based on, you know, what's been agreed to on Thursday for the Thursday hearing it will just be Brett Cavanaugh testifying and Dr. Blasi testifying things could change things or constantly changing their new allegations by another woman. And so Democrats are saying, we need to postpone this and have an FBI investigation, but just to quickly answer Lindsey Graham's question, what do you want me to do? Here's what I want you to do. Here's what a lot of people want you to have the FBI investigate this a thorough background check. You know he bring brought up, oh, you know, the statute of limitations is over. You can't have a criminal investigation. No one's asking for a criminal investigation. He even brought up a civil lawsuit. No one's asking for a civil lawsuit. We're asking for the FBI to get involved so we can have an independent organization. Try to determine who's telling the truth here, even barring the, the least you could do is to listen to the hearings with an. Mind. He's not interested in that again. If it was a democratic appointment or Republican appointment, and I was a Senator on that committee, I would definitely want to hear both sides of the story because if it leads me to believe that he didn't do it, I'd be doubly pissed if it leads me to believe that he did do it then what I change my mind. Yes, of course. I changed my mind, but here here's a sitting. United States Senator. I don't care. There's what is nothing she can say that makes you believe that there's nothing. He say he doesn't want to ruin Kavanagh's life by listening to that testimony. And actually, you know, being unbiased in this case, if you thought after listening to it, you know, these allegations are not credible and I don't wanna ruin the guy's life. Okay. But before listening to it saying, I've already made up my mind. Well, first of all, it's not the right thing to do. Also another very savvy thing to say, you know, if you were a little bit smarter, you would play politics better than this and you. Oh yeah, I got a total open mind my God, my voters. You should understand what kind of an open mind I have then listened to it and then go, oh, well, golly, gee, man, she turns out he's right and she was wrong. But now there's so brazen. They don't even care to lie anymore. They're like, no, no, I'm biased. I don't give a damn what anybody thinks, hey, my Republican base, remember how biased I am in favor of the man and never the woman. Okay. Just so you know, and the conservative and never the progressive and never anything else. It doesn't matter. I'm always going to be biased in favor of mine team. Well, he probably thinks politically, maybe that does help him because you're voters, don't care anymore that they do want you to be biased and they don't care about the facts. Actually. Now that I put like that there is an argument to be made that among voters, don't care about facts anymore. So this might appeal to them? Well, we actually have some evidence of that and when. We come back from our break. We are going to hear from the actual voters. These are Trump voters who attended a Trump rally in Springfield, Missouri. So come right back. We'll show you those clips in more enjoying this free clip from the young Turks. If you wanna get the whole show and more SUV content while supporting independent media become a member t. dot com slash joined today. In the meantime, enjoy this. Back on the young Turks. Let's check that thermometer real quick. TRT dot com. Slash join and become a member, sport home, progressives get all were programming, including griss progressive or we're gonna break some news tomorrow old school by the way Tereza going to join us on old school right before politic on. So can I see this thermometer real quick? Yes, thirty one nine twenty three. All right. Going up nicely. Let's see. We have thirty two thousand by then today. Let me read some member comments for you guys. Alex writes in, and I'm not sure that he was saying this are cast or not, but he says it's weird that they push a bad person for such a high office instead of doing the right thing and getting cleaned, pick there. Are you familiar with the Republican party push a bad person for such a high office? I think you're being sarcastic because pretty sure that they already did that for the presidency Democrats. If someone came forward with allegations that. Democratic supreme court pick littered one year, like gun guy. Conversation. It's over that person's gone. I mean, they are you that, hey, these women are Democrats, and so they're not to be trusted. The first person that came out with allegations against Al Franken, worked at a conservative talk show. Again, it's always projection right anyway. WVU Libby seventy-one rights and in the member station. I'm so sick of hearing seventy two year old man say unfair over and over again like a five year old here here totally with you on that. Libby math mass seventy. One says when did not being on the supreme court means someone's life was ruined. Okay. Fair point. And then Tisch. ACP writes in is that twelve point advantage for progressive women too, because we've got several strong ones running in November. No, the twelve point advantage is generic democrat versus generic Republican, who do you want to control congress? So it it is not based on particular congressional seats nor the ass based on males or females, or it's just generic democrat Republican, but does that translate over to women? I who are candidates in my experience in the primaries more so yes. So for example, as I sell those numbers, Kevin Yoder in the Kansas third district running in St. David's. China gone gone. So those female candidates are getting even more female voters to turn out. So let's see what happens. This Forty-five, our little less than forty five days left, but I think they're in a world trouble. All right, and it was all right. How do Trump voters feel about the allegations against supreme court? Nominee, Brad Kavanagh? Well, Emma Viglen. One of our reporters went to a Trump rally in Springfield, Missouri to speak to the voters, and we're going to hear from them in just a minute, but before we do so the conservative media has gone out of its way to smear the accusers, and there are two as of now we have Dr Christine Blasi Ford who initially had the allegations against Brett Cavanaugh groping her without her consent and allegedly attempting to rape her when they were both in high school. And then later a Yale student who was a freshman at the time, accuses breath Cavanaugh of pulling his pants down and thrusting his penis toward her face. Now, Steve, Crowder is. A gross Verson. I mean, that's my bias against him, but you don't need to believe me. You can see for yourselves. Here's the way he covered the bread Cavanaugh allegations and how he referred to Dr Blasi Ford still talking about the alleged attempted rape accusation, Dr Christine, by the way, no longer going to be calling. Dr. Christine, Christine. Christie, Christie food you. Christie, let me just say this. Of course it's possible, but the accusations here could be accurate. Right? And we're not saying that all accusations of attempted rape or false. You have to balance the scales of Justice between as an attempted rape, some thirty, something years ago that someone doesn't know when that happened. While you stopped mid rape, possibly drunk and passed out. We're going to present the evidence to you and you decide, yes. By the way. I know you're saying just me no one else in the I labeled her lying hor without proof granted sheet at the same. But with attempted rape. Pissed. Okay. So we called her allying hor and he also accused her of calling someone rapist with no evidence. She did not call anyone a rapist. She accused attempted rape, those were allegations. But more importantly, there was evidence. There were notes where she had spoken to her therapist on two different occasions in two thousand twelve regarding these allegations. And so there's that there's also the fact that she took a lie detector test that is considered evidence, but nonetheless, Steven, Crowder. I mean, this is what you can expect from trash like him. So I hear a high pitch voices are really funny. So congrats on that. So I'm not calling Docker anymore. I, what does that even mean? No, you, it's a signal to his misogynistic viewers. Never respect a woman. She's fifty one years old. She's a professor. She's earned that respect. And she earned that degree. But we're taking that away from her because come on, she accused a man of doing something wrong. And we of course know that that's unacceptable. So she's no longer doctor. Okay. Now she's Christie always, you know, find a way to put women down one way or another. Then she says he is in he merciful, he says, not all attempted rape. Allegations are false. Why? While thank you for Cassini that I really appreciate that. Now, of course, you know, the overwhelming statistics on this is that most allegations in that field are overwhelmingly true meaning that the great majority of the allegations when you go to court who've to be true. So if there are there are stats on it and and so the the, the cases that are true greatly outweigh the ones that are fall. So if you're gonna say anything at all, you would say, hey, you know what? It doesn't mean that every accusation is true because some or not, but the overwhelming majority are right that would be factual, but instead he turns it around, I'm not saying everyone who says rape falls, but come on. Right? And so by the way, so this signal. To any woman who comes forward with or has been victimized by any type of sexual assault or rape this signals to them, hey, don't come forward because if you do, you're going to be labeled as a lying whore, right? He has no evidence that she's lying. He has no reason to think that she's lying. And by the way, why is she a whore? How is she a whore, even if you don't believe the allegations, what makes her a whore because we are going to denigrate and try to humiliate every woman, and my audience is going to get off on that is what he thinks. And so this will be so much fun. They'll get takeout of it. So look whether you think there's any evidence tobacco cavenaugh or Dr Blasi. Does. She is certainly not a question that I think is a hundred percent settled either way, and that's why we wanted to be. I investigation to find out more. That's why we want the hearings cetera. But to conclude beyond a shadow of a doubt that she is not telling the truth and there's nothing to back her up is a weird conclusion because she certainly genuinely believes it. Maybe they think, no, no. So everything's politics. Everything's conspiracy everything. The fact that she's a fifty one year old professor greatly respected in those circles. It's all conspiracy. It's all conspiracy, right? But look, you've got your audience who doesn't believe in fact. So probably willing to believe anything you say. But to say that there is no evidence on either side. Like for example, on Cavanaugh side, there's the fact that it was thirty five thirty six years ago. There's the Mike judge who's in the room saying it didn't happen. So he has some facts on his side. She has a lot of facts on her side including. Therapist's notes and we've done, you know, a lot of stories about all different evidence on her side and the and how credible she is and how she told her husband. She told the therapist. And it goes on and on. So if you were to say, hey, I weighed all those, but I believe cabin on. And so if I think that she might be making it up and I find that deeply disturbing. Okay. I wouldn't agree with your conclusion, but. Okay, that's that's your opinion dick about it, right? Like being a re, I don't know about reasonable, but at least you know, you're coming at it from, this is what I'm inclined to believe. But I would like an FBI investigation or I don't want one because you want him in the core by Hooker by crook, whether he did it or he didn't do it. Okay. But when you say, okay, now based on of us at all, I'm going to then turn around and call her allying horror. The point of that appears to be that, hey, we, we will try to destroy her and and so and as long as I put that propaganda out there right or wrong, reasonable or unreasonable and matter. At least I did some damage to her and then he will turn around and go. I don't know why nobody calls me misogynistic God. These liberals, they're so touchy. Just call someone a lying whore and all of a sudden they get all emotional, getting emotional Stephen, and, and by the way, when we do these videos than they need their safe-space and and. On and no one cries more than a conservative. So you just call them a bitch, right? He's a fucking bitch. Sorry. Okay. Sorry about that. I can't. I can't help it. All he ever does is whine and cry about everything. Oh my God, people don't like me. Oh, people are complaining about me. And then he goes off and he calls people lying hor right calls. People who are cues, ING, someone of sexually assaulting them lying wars, right? And we're not supposed to ever respond to that and I know and if you do than they need their safe-space and they say, oh my God, I'm melting special snowflake. I can't believe Antica sparing was me to me to be mean to me. They've been mean to me my whole life. Go ahead and cry. Stephen cry all day long, and we know exactly what you're about and at least thank you for giving us clarity on how you feel about her and women in general. Exactly. All right. So let's move onto the Trump rally in Missouri. Reporter Emma Vig Lind was in Springfield, Missouri for a Trump rally. And during that rally, she specifically spoke to Trump supporters about the sexual assault allegations against Brad Kavanagh. Here is what one of those supporters had to say as woman. I think it's horrible that she would bring this up thirty five thirty six years later. If she was really assaulted, she should have reported at the time by waiting this link of time. She makes all women look bad. What do you think about the statistics that say only twenty three percents of twenty three percent of sexual assaults are reported at the time? Like, why do you think that is? I've seen enough episodes of law and order SVU that that's probably correct. Okay. So she just contradicted herself. But while citing a television show for like a place to get information, but okay, that's fine. Fictional drama, so, but. All the people I interviewed. That doesn't mean every single person who was at the rally, and it doesn't mean it's every single Republican voter, but she does pretty good job of trying to find a collection of people to give you a range of opinion. So for example, in other rallies, she's found a lot of folks who have an open mind about the mother investigation. So great as interesting, but on this issue, no warrant a lotta open minds didn't hear. You should watch the full video on rebel headquarters. That's the YouTube channel will you'll find the full video in full context. But if you watch the full thing, you won't see a single Trump supporter that she's spoken to who believes the accusations or cares even if they are true, right. Yeah, it was divided into two camps. One is of course it's not true. Republican says, it's not true. We're done with it, right. And the second can't was. Yeah, maybe it's true, but who cares? I mean, he was a, you know, seventeen when he was trying to rape women. So it's not that big a deal cheese. So, but yeah, we'll have the link down below if you're washing later on YouTube or Facebook, but you should check out YouTube dot com. Slash rebbe chew or Facebook dot com slash revelation because they've got a lot of those interviews and they cover these Trump rallies all the time. So let's hear from another show supporter. It's just his word against hers. I'm sure she's making it up. I hate to say that, but I think she is most men. Most men are very compassionate towards women on something like that, and women aren't. What? Okay that that didn't seem awfully compassionate. So most men are compassionate about attempted rape. Women are not. I just sometimes I trouble keeping up with them. I don't know. I literally don't know what he meant other than guys, right in women are wrong. All right. One more clip. So you think that they're making it up or she's making it up those battery if she hasn't, such limitations was over years ago, but yeah, so it doesn't matter that her therapist's notes corroborate kind of Herat stations from twenty twelve. It's just the highest court in America, the supreme court, but who cares if you did it. Look, he if you're going to say that point of view, one way to handle it would be my God. I'm really concerned about those allegations idea of a guy holding a woman down closing mouth and trying to rip or close off while other guys turning up to volume. So no one can hear screams is deeply problematic. But I think that you fifty three year old man can't be judged for the actions of of when he was seventeen drunk. I don't agree with that sentence, but that's a way of phrasing it without seeming like who cares trying to rape her. What's the difference like you feel like the rest of that I sent this is who hasn't done that before. And in fact, that has been quotes. I've seen from other conservatives about this like which young there was a panel on cable news Trump supporters. And one of them said, which young men hasn't tried to do something like that. A lot. I hope a lot. The great overwhelming majority, right? I just if you are a woman who identifies as a Republican in this era in the Trump era you deserve better. You deserve better than being in the same group of people that includes men that think of you this way that think sexual assault doesn't really matter that if a man has been accused of sexual assault in his life and the woman accusing him about sexual assault, telling the truth, it doesn't matter. They should still be supreme court Justice with the ability to make decisions that impact your life everyday. You deserve better. Okay. All right. We're gonna take a break. When we come back. There is a Minnesota lawmaker who has abandoned his campaign because his daughter is alleged sexual sexual assault against him.

Democrats breath Cavanaugh FBI Senate Donald Trump Deborah Ramirez Brad Kavanagh rape Trump Brett cavenaugh assault Dr. Blasi Missouri Senator Springfield YouTube Trump Trump Ted Cruz New York Times
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Hysteria listeners can get twenty five percent off a calm premium subscription at com dot com. Slash hysteria it includes unlimited access to all of calms amazing content get started today at Combe dot com. Slash hysteria that's c. a. l. m. dot COM slash. Welcome Steria. I'm Aaron Ryan with you this week in deal high and grace. Kara. On this very special episode, Hawaii Senator maisy Hirono joins me to talk Cavanaugh Senate Republicans and other bullshit her words not mine most about grace part and Karen deal in studio to highlights and female candidates were excited about in later actor and writer, Jen. Reggie stopped by talk about down feminism. And of course we wouldn't leave without telling you what heels will die on this week. I'm so excited. Couple housekeeping things. We have Hawaii Senator maisy Hirono this week for uterus, weekly, very special edition. She's great. We got her to say bullshit twice, and we also have Jen Richards actor writer. She's wonderful. We have her on for the second half of the show housekeeping stuff. So we've been getting a daily of emails from listeners in response to stuff. We've covered a lot of stuff in response to Grace's. Birth control story were still getting emails about that. We really, I, I thank you guys for all the feedback on that. It's been. It's been, yeah, it's been wonderful. Turns out getting a birth, getting birth controls a pain in the. Everywhere. Yup. We've also gotten a lot of stuff about Cavanaugh sexual assault and other issues like voting registering. Women who are running for office are all things that are important to us than that we like to read about and that we promise that we're taking a look at, but that we run out of time to respond to and we promise we'll have a reader mailbags episode soon. If you want to get in touch with us, the Email address is hysteria at crooked dot com. That's Steria a crooked dot com. Another housekeeping thing you should listen to pod. Save America, Tuesday's episode of pods, if America's really good on Friday to women, follow Jeff flake into an elevator. Two hours later, the vote to confirm Brett Cavanaugh onto the supreme court was delayed by one week, and that was partially thanks to one of the women interviewed on this Tuesday's pod, save America, Ana, Maria, Archie LA. She's great. The interview is really, really a good. Listen. If you want to feel uplifted, she's got a lot of tenacity. She's got a lot of grit. She's really, really cool person. So listen to Tuesday's pots of America. I mean, always listen to positive America. Doc, Tuesday is particularly so like being uplifted is is worth its weight and gold right now because there's a lot to try to drag us down these days. Yeah, yeah. But I think that there are a lot of people who are equally determined to bring it back up. Yes, I agree. I agree, unlike view the long game, so we're going to go to the news real quick. A lot's happened last week in the cavenaugh stuff on Wednesday, September twenty six cavenaugh released his nineteen eighty two summer calendars to dispute Christine. Blasi Ford's allegations the same day. We learned that there was a third woman who is accusing him of of sexual misconduct. In addition to Dr Ford and Deborah Ramirez, people listed on the day of the calendar that he provided match that easy that people that Dr Ford said, we're PJ que- yeah, squeeze my favorite squeak can scream and yeah, I mean, that's that's me all day to squeeze in our line. It's also interesting to me and I and I kind of I, I made the joke, I believe on. On Twitter who keeps you know if you kept calendars like that involved in the eighties like you're either in your your nerd. Right? Blake. How was brought Kavanagh this late hard, partying, jock guy, but also kept calendars. The only guy who kept calendars and was a hard partying. Jock in the eighties was like Patrick Bateman. He was also, but you have to remember that Kavanagh's very rich. Oh yeah. Like he's Hella rich. She got into Yale with no connection. That's his grandfather, but there was a like, John Oliver show was like there's a golf course at his high school, like George pup? Yeah. Yeah. Georgetown prep is probably one of the most prestigious. This is one thing that hasn't been discussed. A ton in the news is it's one of the most prestigious prep schools in the nation. One of the wealthiest demographics in in the country. So academics are going to be highly valued at that school. And also all job is, I think the, I think, I think both of those things could exist at the same time button, but the the excessive amount of privilege of that particular schooling environment. Is. Oh yeah, presi it's intense. Okay. So now we're moving onto Thursday, ten years after last Wednesday, Thursday to twenty seven. There was a really long hearing that a lot of people watched. I think it was. I read something like one in five Americans watched it or something like that. There was also a real time hysteria text chain. We're making gayley was drinking mimosas. Yes, to invite us over to her house at seven. In the morning. Yeah. She invited us the day before to come over at seven and drink mimosas. We'll be Moses was a big hard sell, and then there was a real time account all of that's just like, can you believe this? How're you doing emotionally? How are you feeling right now? Yup. I like the we checked in with each other. We did check it with each other Eliza Mestre Monica, and I were texting back and forth all day. It was. Yeah, it was a rough day for a lot of women. I think it was a rough day for a lot of survivors, men and women and a great day for bars though. Well, it wasn't a good day for beer that's for sure. Beer beer stock just drop. Yeah. Yeah, that's true. Makes people at drunken creep, like Ambien made Rosanna racist. Yeah, it's the beers fall. Yeah, plenty of people are capable of drinking beer with out acting like a day. Was beers recession. Yeah, it was not great on Friday, September twenty eighth, the judiciary committee voted to send Kavanagh's confirmation to the Senate floor, but thanks to selfless bad ass women. We mentioned earlier in the show that's Maria Gallagher and Ana, Maria Archie let Senator flake called for an FBI investigation to last no more than one week to explore the allegations against Cavanaugh. And as of this recording, the FBI investigation is currently underway and it's supposed to conclude momentarily. Apparently they've done all the investigating that they need to do. Just a note that Senator flake is not a hero. I mean, he might have had a of he might have actually had some moral compass bestowed upon him as gift from these fantastic women that we mentioned. But this is, you know he the fact that it took the intervention of Marie Gallagher and Ana, Maria Chea is very upsetting weeks of behind the scenes meeting. Yeah. And like, that's another thing I, I'm, I'm not going to bestow the title of hero. On a person who is displaying basic levels of human decency. Yep, it up and it. So often that we're expected to do that, Joe, Joe, Scarborough tweeted about how like one man can. It's like Joe, honestly, fuck off agree Dopp the reason that things are so bad is because we're so willing to like, like, you know, get on our knees and worshiped people who act in a minor decent way. And that's just it does why everything's so broken, I think, or I think it might have to do with the fact that it's was the reason that there was such a felt like there was such a huge discrepancy between those eleven white male senators and the populists or what women are feeling is because there's no women which brings us to the midterms and and an opportunity to vote, which is placed to really galvanize who gets to sit in that hearing who gets to be the person asking the questions, whose whose voice represents you specifically and the import. Of that? Well, I can't say this current Republican party ever breaking stride with tradition, history and appointing a single woman to the judiciary. Even if like women are running, there's never been a a female Republican on the judiciary committee committee in the Senate ever. So I can't see them breaking tradition, but we're going to highlight some women on in a little bit who are running for office who on the democratic side can add that energy and maybe look make it look even more cartoonish than it did last week when it was just eleven white guys in the Democrats. So and the prosecutor and the process, right. Oh, that's right. There aunt Lydia. Oh my God. I haven't heard that while. Yeah. Well, it's I've said it multiple times. She's, it was awful, and then they just sort of, here's the thing, then they just sort of dismissed her rudely when they were done using her as a mouthpiece to talk to a woman. And it's just like, yeah, that's what happens. You align yourself with those guys. They're going to use you for their purposes and then continue to disrespect yet or you're, you're never going to be one of them? Yeah, I liked the hurt the s. and l. take on it when it was eighty Bryant. Yeah, then she was just like, oh, okay. I'm already regretting this. So great. Yeah, she was great. I want to talk about one more thing last night. President Trump had a rally in Mississippi. Did you did you? Yeah. You Texas about? I tell you said, yeah, this Texan that goes on behind the scenes clearly. Yeah, I texted the second that I saw Trump mocking the female reporter. I think it was actually two female reporters, an NBC news and then one from MSNBC. Yeah, he had a big mocking couple days. It was a female reporter, but I was talking about the rally in Mississippi when he was mocking doctor. Four. That's right. Yeah, that's that was, oh my God. There's so much mocking that goes on. I, I'm forgetting like, I don't know. I don't know. I don't know. Yeah. Yeah, here's the thing. I think that I think that people who love President Trump enough to attend a rally for him are the sort of people that like to imagine people like us getting angry at things like that. And so I am trying to keep my rage in check because he's performing, you know, he's, he's a bad. He's a bad stand up comic who's who. Who's driving the world into our off a cliff. And I just, I don't know. I think it's, it's obviously disgusting. But I, if somebody told me that he I did not need to see the clip before I was like, oh, yeah, that sounds totally, right. Yeah, totally deduct, shout out, checks out on brand. He also expressed concern for men this past week. I don't know if you guys read to him or hurt him, say that it's a very scary time for young men in America, but that that also struck me as a real crown jewel of this past week. Yeah, it's crazy to me that they can conceive of things happening to men as though those men more people, but not happening to women. Like it's as though they believe us to be two separate species one with a higher purpose and higher capacity for emotional feelings and and leadership and value. And then the other part being this kind of unnecessary annoying sex puppet class, which is I think it is. It is a whole thing. I mean, what's frustrating about about that comment to me is that. By saying that that is a scary time for young men. First of all, let's be real. He saying it's a scary time for young white men in America because it's been a scary time for young. What the fuck in central park five Backley exact calling for them to be executed when they were not guilty. Exactly. But the second thing is that he is having into something that I think is actually valid, which is the fact that masculinity is evolving. It is changing right now. So young men, I don't think should be afraid of that when he frame it is something that men should be afraid of the, yeah, they're gonna feel fearful, but I I, it's that when by nature of this feminist movement by nature of the metoo movement win are gaining power. You know, the flip side of that is that masculinity is being called into question a little bit, but I don't think that's necessarily bad. I only think it's being brought up in such a way by Trump by his cohorts that it's it's a scary thing for men, but it shouldn't be viewed as a scary thing for manage. It's be seen as an evolution. I think that he is saying it's scary time for men because he's afraid that women just go around willy nilly. Using men of rape exactly, which is the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard. Did you guys talk to your families about this about the hearing and definitely, yeah, definitely. Yeah. I talked to my parents about it. They were. They were very invested in watching it. I know I just I after I did, I was on pods if America last Thursday. And after I did that up a soda, I just wanted to crawl into a hole. I could not think about it anymore, but I did. I did talk to a family about it. It just wasn't my fam- I. Did you talk to yours here? Yeah, I did my so my dad was very like, 'cause he's in England right now. I asked if you watch the hearings and he was like, he was like, yeah, he's bet guys going to a really rough time. And I was really like, and I was really like, want will. Why do you think they will? He was so upset and I was like, yeah, yeah, but, but how about and I like, you know, kinda like when in not I didn't go in on him, but it was really interesting to hear how much I was surprised, honestly, like how his kind of empathy, like just just like kind of default went to Cavanaugh. They do. You know what I mean? Because he's like, oh, people get accused in America of stuff all the time. It happens constantly. And then I had to kind of be like, and this sucks that I had to qualify. But I was like, but she's a professor. She's very wealthy. She's a PHD. I mean, this is a per, you know, this isn't, you know, not that it should even matter if somebody is a stripper or what they do, but I was. This is somebody who's lived a private life. And then when like I associated with education and like all of that stuff that started to kind of, you know, he was like, yeah, I get that, but it is is really, I made me wonder, you know, I think that there's a kind of public and private opinion that people hold dude. I mean, and I, you know, it's my dad's so, but I thought that that was really, I was surprised by that and it made me curious, do you know what I mean? Like what people's? Yes, there's the stuff that people say on Twitter and whatever, but like, what do you say when you're in your group of friends? Yeah, I mean, I think that's that's kind of important question like Donald Trump does the, he says, the thing that people use to feel like they were only comfortable saying around other scared spiteful people. Right? Who blame everything wrong with the world on the fact that women are gaining power, that the idea of genders changing that it's no longer. Okay. To hold down a girl at a party and try to Raipur even if she's. Been drinking too. I think that there are people who were talking about those things in private, and now Donald Trump is kind of start saying the quiet part loud currently. This week in a special edition of uterus, weekly. I'm delighted to welcome Hawaii Senator maisy Hirono born in Fukushima. Japan. Harouna was nearly eight years old when her mother brought her and her siblings to Hawaii to escape an abusive husband and seek a better life Haruna served in the Hawaii house of representatives from nineteen eighty one to nineteen Ninety-four. She was elected Hawaii's Lieutenant governor in nineteen Ninety-four voters in Hawaii. Second congressional district elected Harouna to serve in the US house of representatives in two thousand six Senator Harouna was elected to the Senate in two thousand twelve and sworn in as a wise first female Senator and the country's first Asian American woman Senator. She serves on several committees in the Senate including armed services and the committee on energy and natural resources. But she's been most visible recently as a member of the committee on the judiciary. So Senator Horon oh, what's the congressional cafeteria? Like right now, I imagine kinda tense with congressional cafeteria. Like where do you eat when you eat lunch? Is everything very tree sitting at my desk. Who goes out? No, I just sit at my desk visa paper, you know, that sort of thing. And and I tell you it would be nice if I had at least I don't know twenty minutes to eat, but often that doesn't happen. I'm not complaining, you know it is what it is. So I, I'm actually really glad to be here at this time of great non normalcy. Yeah, yeah. Well, what you're doing is really important this week is really important. McConnell announced that there will be a vote this week on confirmation. What's your strategy leading up to the final vote? We've been talking about how this is not normal times. That's what I've been saying because so certainly it's not normal to rush this person through in in this way. It's not normal not to have all of the documents that we should have access to normal and not to have a FBI investigation for new information that came forward and it's not normal for appropriate witnesses to not come before the committee. So these are not normal times and what I would characterize us all fired, rush by the Republicans to get this person on the supreme court. They did want to do it before the Tober term stored, and they're trying to get as close to that as possible because he is going to be they reliable fistful on a lot of issues that will impact all of our lives for decades. So last night on the on that note last night at a at a rally in Mississippi President Trump openly mocked, an imitated doctor for its testimony. How do you respond to this as a woman and how to Republicans justify this behavior. How the Republicans justify this behavior. I think that the Republicans in my view have lost their souls, and I was very, very disheartened to say the least, but not surprise for President Trump to go down to the lowest common denominator, which for him is always attacking people making fun of people. All of that the it's really sad for the sad tragic that we've come to the point where this kind of behavior is deemed normal from a president of the United States. So we can't get used to this kind of bullshit. So I was very disheartened. And one thing he said is e mocked her the fact that she couldn't remember some peripheral things about the attack. And when I was able to I was on Anderson Cooper last night, and I said, the thing that she was one hundred percent sure of is brick cavenaugh attacked her. But you know what was disheartening was really to to listen to all the cheers. So he knows how to play. His base, you know, so how to roll up his base. And what I am doing is to to listen to all these thousands and thousands of women who have come forward and I want them to retain their anger, but to be very determined because we can't just be angry. We have to be determined to do something about it. And I just heard from one of my colleagues that we're all getting phone calls and we're being all kinds of communications from women particularly who have experienced these kinds of assaults and kept to themselves. But he told me that he talked to two women who had contacted him. One was eighty years old and this happened to her when she was much much much younger. So this is what's going on. So moment for our country. We obviously in the Senate, have not triggered out how we should deal with or or address the issue of sexual assault in our country and what to do. So you know, the rest of the country is paying attention much of the rest of the country. That gives me hope. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, that is definitely something that we see over here to. But on the other hand, you know, on one hand, we have people that care very deeply about this and that are feeling empowered to speak up that like the eighty year old woman who called your colleague and your colleague who who moved enough about it to to tell you. But at the same time, there's a huge swath of the population that just doesn't care that easily just dismiss his allegations of sexual assault, assault and harassment. Do think that this is politically motivated, you think men who brush off allegations or justified by calling locker room talk or boys will be. Boys are inadvertently tattling on their tangible pass behavior by being dismissive, about sexual assault, and I wanted to know what your thoughts were about that. I think it comes from a fear the as exemplified by what Tim, both Trump and his son said that the men and boys in our country should be very, very afraid, really afraid of what that women are going to falsely accuse them, the vest, their attitude. This is why the p. People have experienced these kinds of terrible assaults. Mainly women do not come forward, but I hope that this is a moment where we're just going to stop this kind of thinking and do our best. You know, I just feel as though all the women who are coming forward, some of them ever having talked about assaults going back decades that they're going to remember how it felt then and how it feels now to be marginalized to be to be shunted aside to be told, basically, we really don't want to hear from you. And even if you come forward, we don't believe you. I hope they'd be taking that anger, but it has to be channel in determined and I tell you the women are really making are going to make a difference in my view in twenty eight team. That is my hope. Yeah, keep me going. Yeah, same on this side. One thing that I was thinking about yesterday as I was walking around listening to old maisy Hirono interviews on my headphones was that you've done a lot of work on military sexual assault, and one of this. One of the things that you emphasize in a Bill that you sponsored? I believe last November, which feels like a million years ago, to be honest. But last November was the practice of retaliation against survivors who come forward and report. I was. I was thinking yesterday as I listened to you talk about that how it feels. Now as though the Senate is practicing a form of kind of sick retaliation on American women who report like Dr Ford came forward and the retaliation seems to be doubling down on Cavanaugh is, does it feel like that from inside the chambers. What if feels like is the Republicans not being able to face the report to be able to deal with it. They're just hiding behind whatever it is you know, the these, these, the kind of thinking that led to the scourge of sexual assault in the military when there were supposed to be zero tolerance in the military for sexual assault and harassment, and went on for decades and decades. And I believe that not, I believe, I know that it was the women sitting on that Armed Services Committee. Finally, seven of us in a very macho committee Kirsten gillibrand and the rest of us are very much focused on. We're not going to just sweep this aside. And this is why there is a change when women are sitting at the decision making table. We folk we can focus on those kinds of issues that do not give the kind of attention that they deserve. So in that context, we know that there's retaliation that's still going on in the military. We know that the culture has to change, and that doesn't happen overnight. And obviously in our country, we do not have the kind of cultural shift that says, this has this kind of harassment that's going to sexual conduct and attacks have to stop. But it doesn't happen overnight. We have to teach our girls and boys how to treat each other like human beings. But obviously, you know, from the admitted predator and chief practically half the country is getting a whole different kind of message. Yeah. And that's another thing I wanted to talk to you about October is domestic violence awareness month and you and your mother fled Japan. You're fleeing an abusive father. How does your experience your personal experience with abuse inform the way that you approach issues of abuse in your professional life? I know that if my mother had been married to a normal person who a person in that. Culture supposed to take care of the family and all that none of which my father did because he was a of alcoholic, as well as a compulsive gambler. So he had to illnesses. We're no for my mother facing up to it because I know that people who are in abusive relationships very, very difficult to get out of those relationships because usually they come and say, they're sorry, blah, blah, blah. I'm so grateful that my mother recognized what she needed to do to save herself and her children. So she changed my life. Now, what is that? I, I wouldn't say that it was so much that it was more the fact that my mother took control of what was going on in her life that that's what informs a lot of what I do. And of course, being an immigrant, not speaking the language being poor, I really speak for people who do not have much of a voice and and really I don't. I, I would not be doing this if not, for that kind of a background of being an immigrant being very much outsider, having a very strong. The mother who did something very amazing for that time. And it's not as though she sat me down and said, oh my daughter, here's life lesson for you. I just watched her being very determined to support our family. How does it make you feel to know that young women are watching you as somebody who they're looking up to in the same way? It's not anything that I ever thought about for myself because most of the time I worked very quietly, but in a very effective way to to move legislation. That's really the the, the approach that I've taken by the times call for a lot of us to be much more vocal. And I've always been a fighter, and I just been very quiet about it. I'm good at what I do. I'm an advocate. This is why being in congress, as when I served for fourteen years in the state legislature is so much, you know, it's kinda my Cup of tea, but at the same time, yes, this whole. Kind of role. I suppose that I did not seek, but I do realize that if my speaking out is encouragement for others to speak off standard ground, I'm I'm glad for it. Going back to what you were talking about you, you kind of brush up against us. When you're talking about the Armed Services Committee. You mentioned a couple of weeks ago that that mentioned just shut up and step up, which is, you know, everyone knew it was in the context of of the four women who sit on the judiciary committee. I think the question was something like, well, do the four of you basically do we have a special responsibility to deal with this issue? And I said, it's not just us, it's the men is all of us. In fact, some men were basically perpetuating this kind of behavior, and that's when I said, all you men out there just shut up and step up and do the right thing. So that is being hurled back at me and all different contexts, including, I have to say, Lindsey, Graham was on what George, Stephanie. Just before I was on and he said, maybe you're on told me to shut up, but I'm not shutting up. Well, ho- brave. What a brave, brave man that Lindsey, Graham who's a massive plan. Now I'm rises a man hater. Oh, please. You know. So what would happen if in your in your vision, what would happen if more men would take a step back and listen to women an in context from the Senate, all the way down to women who work in industries like the service industry? Well, I can tell you the world would be a much better place, much better place that's being just a, you know, sort of. I'm not being facetious by saying that, but women have had to put up with this kind of bullshit for two for way way too long. And I'm hoping that this is a time for some kind of a cultural shift in a and tipping point of for for women in this country, and we don't have to be loud and obnoxious about it, but we need to be very determined and we need to stay the course because these cultural changes are do not do not happen on this. We are persistent and especially one like this, we over their fault, lies in our country. We obviously haven't dealt very well with Ray. In our country. We obviously haven't dealt very well with gender equality issues in our country. So you know, I really glad that we now have we support a same sex marriage. That was amazing. I didn't think that would happen in my lifetime, but we need to stay the course in terms of the kind of change we want and how women are treated in this country senators since you're the only immigrant in the Senate, and therefore the only one who cannot not run for president in a sea of people who might be trying to think about running for president. Does that leave you free too. And I'm and I'm using the phrasing of one of my colleagues is that leave, you free to let your freak flag fly. Well, there are a lot of people who don't know that I can't run for president, but, well, you know, there are a lot of things that caused me to speak up much more and it's because I am on a daily basis outraged by was this administration is doing to children of the border would to the DACA people that we haven't even dealt with eight hundred thousand of them. And so my head explodes on a regular basis. And so I'm very motivated to to speak up. And I think the feedback I get from people who appreciate the fact that I am speaking and I speak very plainly by the way, sometimes not even complete sentences. I think it reaches people in a way that that they can tell that I'm not programmed to do this. I, I really come from a standpoint of knowing what if you'd like to be marginalized to be part of the me too, because I've certainly had people, you know, men do unwanted kind of things that that we've had to that I've had to put up with and I know most women have had to. And so I I have life experiences that have brought me to this point and I'm glad that I'm able to speak up because it makes a difference to a lot of people, but I always tell everyone the each one of us has a responsibility now because these are not normal times. Maybe normal times you call up your Senator, you call up your presentative and you think your job is done. These are not normal times. We have to all be organized. We have to. Reach out to advocacy groups that we may not have worked with. I say, to all the people who come to see me, we please get out of your advocacy silos because we are all getting screwed. I've been saying this long before I started to be so vocal that people are in our country are getting screwed every second minute of an hour of the day. And if by our efforts in my office, we can decrease that number will be making a difference. We will be doing our jobs and it's something that I've said for years now in terms of what we're here to do. Well, one more thing. You mentioned your head exploding a lot, which is unfortunate. On a regular basis, regular basis, these Senator with the exploding head mazy. How do you put your head back together after it explodes like, how? How do you? How do you regroup? How do you calm yourself down and apart from just caring deeply about the issue? How do you distress? Oh, you should have at least one Trump. Let's stay a week. Oh, really templates usually Sundays and do other things. I don't turn on the news and I do other things that mainly more creative things I do pottery which I don't do here. So I I of found another outlet which is I make my own paper and I make cars and do those things. I'm, I'm very, I would say that my outlet is to to do art. That's so good. So I used to go to the museums a lot, but I say to everybody, we all need a break and I, we all should take a Trump. Let's stay at least one day every week. Sometimes I have to take an entire Trump this weekend. Keep my soul together. That sounds so luxuriance. I'm going to try that. One of these should be helpful. Well, Senator Geraldo I know you have a lot of important work to do maybe the most important. Thank you so much for speaking with me and have a great to by law. And we're back with some female candidates were excited about. We are taking some time on hysteria between now and the election to spotlight women candidates that were really excited about an also tell you all to visit crooked media's vote, save America which has recently launched. If you go to vote, save America dot com. You can register to vote. You can view competitive races and you'll be able to see sample ballots pretty soon. There's a lot of stuff there. So please, if you haven't visited yet do so. So this week we have three candidates were going to showcase and Kieran. Why don't we start with yours? Her name is Carolyn long. She is the democratic challenger. In Washington's third district, the website is elect long dot com. WWW dot elect long dot com. Kinda love that name guys. I kinda love to elect long. That's pretty memorable. Caroline long is a first time candidate, and she's challenging another woman Republican incumbent. Jaime Herrera Butler while the. Race leads Republican in the open primary more Democrats voted than Republicans, which makes this race much more competitive than was originally believed. And Caroline is a fighter who works for working families and group in a rural coastal community where her mother worked as a waitress and her father worked odd jobs and started a small produce business. And she started working at the store when she was twelve years old to help her family make ends meet. So she worked her way through college with a union job. Go unions, go you out to unions good union union at a grocery store, and then she went on to earn her PHD in political science. She's an accomplished professor who has written two books on constitutional law has worked at Washington state university Vancouver for more than two decades as a tenured professor and in administrative leadership positions and kind of felt the call to public duty and the civic duty. And she's running for office for the first time to stand up for Washington state, working families and to defend American values. As they come under attack. Like never before. She's great. She's also Jaime Herrera, Butler used to work, I believe, for another congresswoman from Washington state and hurt her opponent long's opponent, and she's a kind of an enemy of of choice as most Republicans are. Now, they're very few pro-choice Republicans, but Caroline long is is a democratic challenger to somebody who is very openly anti-choice. So she somebody that definitely deserves their support grace. Let's talk about your candidate. Well, let's talk about another first time Canada over here. First time candidate. Cherise, David's who is the democratic shallan would democratic challenger in Kansas third district, and you can find out more about her at cherise for congress dot com. So she is challenging Republican, Kevin Yoder, and if she is elected, she is a triple threat here if elected, she's going to be the first native American woman in congress, the first openly gay person from Kansas congressional delegation and the first woman to represent her district that show she wins. She just gonna like run around the district in circles. Just being like, oh, I'm in. I'm throwing her parade comes Queen of the district. She the district. So the race right now is a tossup. It's leaning slightly in favor of her opponent. However, Yoder is the most vulnerable house encumbent in Kansas, Kansas women, Amman Kansas. So cherise was raised by a single mother who is also US army veteran in Leavenworth and as a member of the ho-chunk nation. Cherise could make history again as the first thing that American woman elected in congress. So a little bit about her background. She graduated from law school and then worked for law firm in Kansas City specifically on issues, including economic development for native American tribes. She then went on to live and work on the pine ridge Indian reservation and she served as a White House fellow during the final year of the Obama administration. This is one of my favorite things about her. Most recently, she hosted a podcast that she called starting pants. Oh, I love that. It's so much and it's called starting pants because she interviewed entrepreneur. And investors. Also guys, this woman just keeps getting cooler. She's also competed in MMA tournaments. Yeah, mixed martial arts tournaments fighting both professionally and as an amateur both categories. Oh my God. It's awesome. She's cool. Also, I one quick note the pine ridge Indian reservation in South Dakota is one of the most economically depressed places in the country, and it's really, really something that needs smart people like her working on helping advance. So it's really cool that she did that also like she's an MA fighter. So she could literally kick off are totally literally and figuratively. I mean, she's go groceries. My candidate is Angie Craig. She is the democratic challenger in Minnesota's. Second district, Minnesota, Minnesota, Minnesota. That's the near my home stomping grounds. I'm from the minutes kansin region, right between Minnesota Wisconsin. Angie's website is Angie Craig dot com. In two thousand sixteen Angie round against the current Republican. Jason Lewis, but lost by just two points less than ten thousand votes God. Everybody needs to vote. Please go vote. If elected, Angie would become Minnesota's. First LGBTQ congress member, the race is rated as a toss up, but projections show her as likely winner her opponent. Jason Lewis is terrible. He used to be allowed mouth talk radio host, and my dad used to listen to him to get himself angry because so wrong and bad. He sucks. I like your dad. That's cool. Dad, my dad Lawson's do Angie. Craig is awesome integrators ready for congress because the opportunities she was lucky enough to have or disappearing for too many working families. She grew up in a mobile home park when of three kids raised by a single mom who worked with going to school to earn her college degree, Angie work two jobs to keep up with the cost of her education graduated from a state college. She began her career as a newspaper reporter and then worked away up in business over fifteen years to eventually lead a workforce of sixteen thousand employees for a major Minnesota manufacturer as a former fortune five hundred company. Executive, and she's helped create jobs, empowered women and veterans to advance their careers in created workplace policies to promote diversity and inclusion. And she's also been a powerful advocate for marriage equality in the state. She and her wife or proud to have raised their four sons in Minnesota and embrace the state's values of family community and carrying each other. That's great. Minnesota's great. Go Angie, Craig beat Jason Lewis and voters in Minnesota in Kansas. And in Washington, please pay attention to these great candidates. They've all three been endorsed by our pal and yours former President Barack Obama love that. That's exciting. Yeah, that's huge. So we have to take a break. And when we come back, we'll have our guest, John Richards and personal. Hysteria is brought to you by post mates host. May those maze. Here's the win, like three creepy witches. I almost worshipped today that said resting bitch face on. 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Slash hysteria that's two words join Honey dot com. Slash hysteria Honey. The easiest way to save money will shopping online. The. And we're back. Hysteria is delighted to welcome this week, Jen Richards, a writer and actress general join HBO's new comedy MRs Fletcher as a series regular Margot, a transgender woman who teaches a creative writing course that Catherine Hans character enrolls in gen welcome. Thank you so much for coming. Thanks for having me. So I wanted to kind of segue quickly into segment. We call personal political, personal political is you know, kind of how news stories affect our lives and a story that kind of struck me this week was a California now has a law on the books that will require corporations to have women on their boards if they have a presence in the state. One thing that that kind of reminded me of is how. Feminism is sort of in some ways, seems a little trickle down to me like women at the top are given a ton of energy and a ton of resources in tone of coverage. But how does that affect women who are more marginalized and John? I wonder what you think about that. Think like everything it's complicated. I actually do think that's a great law. I think it's a good start. There's a lot of evidence that I wouldn't necessarily call it trickled down, but there is evidence that it's harder for marginalized people, lower organization to succeed. If there aren't people like them at the top of the organization, there's good evidence about that. I used to work a nonprofit management for years and did a lot of consulting there. And one of the issues with diversity is that people would often try to put like a single person like we'll have one buck person on the border, one black person on staff, and what they found is that in order for any particular marginalize identity to feel comfortable and confident they need to have at least two other people that same identity within the organization. And ideally at different level. Vols. There's just two people. We're dynamics happen. If you're alone, you people tend to check out the, there's a kind of critical mass that reaches. And ideally you really do have to have it at all at all levels from the board down to entry level. So I think it's it's a kind of like necessary, but not sufficient. He's a logical phrase, but I, I think it's actually really helpful to to mandate that. You'll probably get cases of tokens ation, but I took is all the time. And as long as I'm getting paid and I get responsible, I'm okay with that. I like the way you use the term critical mass. You need like at least three. I was like, oh, that's like when me and my cousins walk down the street in Boston and people get frightened. Critical mass. There's three of us. Oh, no, they're taking over. What are you and your cousins look like frightening, scary, scary with our face. Thank you. Oh, this is a, this is an audio medium. So people can't see this at home, but Jen is drinking out of a Cup. It looks like it's made of skeleton skeleton standing on skulls and skeletons weren't enough, and we're talking like twelve, I think around the mug, those skeletons are comfortable like, regardless because there's twelve of them. So none of the skeletons of scale. For sure, John, I wanted to talk to you a little bit about your work as a visible, trans actress. You're the first ever openly trans character on a CMT show, which is kind of incredible. Did that. Did that strike you when you're on Nashville? We did. You realize that you were breaking ground that you were doing something that nobody done before. There's this bad habit of trans people to always say. They're the first to do something. I'm the first person opened Dr Pepper in room, three ten today. Everyone wants to claim the first. I think it is significant to have and openly trans performer on country music, television, just because of shows like Nashville's reach an areas that might not otherwise could expose to these issues. I'm from the south, like my family's in North Carolina and Mississippi. So I was going home to North Carolina, right during the height of HP to which said, like, I'm supposed to use the men's room and it shows like Nashville that got to people who could be kind of their their fears could be exploited because of ignorance because they had this. Blind spot, you know, kind of right wing conservatives who were trying to stoke an issue that didn't exist, could raise the specter of, you know, a burly man who throws on a dress sneaks into the women's room, and it's legally protected. And when people in those areas didn't know any transpeople at all in real life. It's kind of easy to to buy into that just because of, you know, desire to protect your children, but then they see someone like my character on Nashville, and I don't think they even mentioned that the characters trance to like the second or third, I think the third appearance, so there's a chance for the audience just to see them as a character who's helping the lead of the show recover from an accent, and you get to know the personal little bit and then it comes out and then it's not so scary. It's like, oh, it's just a person. It's just a person like what was the big deal. Right? And I guess that kind of to me feels like it has parallels in when we're people are looking for a blank person to work in any position like a female CEO or a a black member of the board. It's sort of, like I mean, on one hand, I. I worry that like pushing one person to the top and then being like, okay, we did it. We're done. We have one, we're good. I worried that that's not, you know, that's not sufficient. But on the other hand, you know, having one person can be kind of the beginning of may be normalizing. What that looks like feels like if the person is good, I mean that that's an a whole issue to. That's the problem with tokenism mission is that if someone throws someone in just because their identity and not because of the qualities, they actually bring to whatever they're there for. Then you get this kind of self offending prophecy of like, well, we didn't think this kind of person was good enough, and then we threw him in there and look, they weren't good enough. So that cycle continues. So you really do have to look for the best people. But I think there's a kind of consciousness raising that comes when you decide to like we're going to put more women and then look for really good women who will help our company. And the other thing is it seems like it's you need opportunity to get good. Is any other thing. It's not just like the, it's not just carthorse, it's horse cartons. So that's where we were talking about it. That you in resolution thirteen, twenty five. It was like in conflict resolution. They found that like the UN started saying, okay, if you get four people in a in a situation to resolve a conflict, you get one more person if you add a woman, so you can have four people or you can have five people and make sure that one of them is a woman because in a lot of areas like no women were ever included and by getting a chance to be a part of that process of being just getting involved, getting a seat at the table getting to be a part of the conversation that then gave some agency to people when they come back to run for leadership roles to gain confidence to gain experience to know what it's like, because certain things you can't get good until you've had the experience to do those things. You get a chance to fail like that's something that men that's a. That's a big privilege that Manhattan that has denied most other identities is is the chance to fail. I see it in Hollywood all the time, like some young old. You know, young white director, we'll get a chance to do a big feature film, and then it'll completely fail in like, oh, he took. Big risks. He swing for the fences. Let's give them another shot and then somebody and get a franchise. Yeah, exactly. And then a woman does. It's like, oh, see, women can't women can't do comedy, right, or whatever, whatever the case, yeah. Yeah, right. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, that's a really interesting point. It feels like it feels like sometimes, yeah, men do have a chance to fail and men. I was thinking about this last week not to bring everything back to cavenaugh, but it's sort of hard. So in the air right now, I was thinking about the hearing last weekend Dr. Ford was so composed and for the most issues, obviously scared, but she was very polite and you know, deferential to the people asking the question. She was in their workspace and she was, and then you know, Brett cavenaugh comes up there like a big whiny fucking baby. And I just like was thinking afterwards pundits were treating it as though they were in any way comparable performance right like and it reminded me of the debates last fall between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump where he would just kind of March around the stage looming and saying nonsense. And then afterwards, people like, well, I don't know. It's a toss up like it's it was so frustrating. Did you watch the the cavenaugh hearings and have a reaction? I tried not to, but it couldn't help it. It was just everywhere. I was actually breaking piloted NBC and we kept taking breaks to go watch more of it. God, it's like the world's grimaced soccer game. Like old was gathering around to be like, oh. It's it's horrifying. Like I can't believe. I mean, just on the face of it. Like if you just for a moment compartmentalize whether or not the allegations are true or whether they're even relevant if you just put all that aside for second, just the way he composed himself during that hearing is astonishing that he would even be considered for a position that is supposed to be defined in large part by a com. Even-handed on decorum civility. Yeah. Yeah, self restraint. Yeah, you know, being bipartisan neutral, like I think about Hillary with with the Benghazi hearings to and thinking about how composed and coochie was for for like how many hours? Ten, our our, our straight. Yes, she did no yelling, no, no. And I mean, I, yeah, the the lack of decorum was was striking to me the fact that that there's a comparison between those two. It's been really frustrating. I think emotionally and I sort of toggle between feeling frustrated that we're all focused on it and also. To some extent feeling excited that we are also invested in something in in kind of civic engagement, but God, I wish it wasn't under these circumstances. I was thinking a lot during also during the cavenaugh thing because I watched the entire fucking thing through masochist. Yeah. Well, I, I had to do it for work. I did it for my job which is masochism. I was thinking about how win Sonia Sotomayor was being considered for the supreme court. How people were like latching onto her being calling yourself a wise Latina and kind of penalizing her in the press or being in in some way, not even close to as emotional as Cavanaugh. I was wondering, grace. If you had thoughts on this on her saying, she's a wise Latina on on on like the the, the, the chasm between the way that Brad Kavanagh was treated in the way that any woman of color street it in this context a well. I mean, I think it goes back to the idea of tokenism that we've kind of talked about as well. So when you sorta my or could she just didn't have an option to fail, she just didn't have an option, but to be the best possible version of herself and the best possible version of any Latina that could exist breath Kavanagh just has to be good for himself. He just has to make himself look somewhat passable. Is there double standard? Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I just I also think that, like I know there've been a number of. Nations about this. But the whole hearing itself was was convoluted in weird because it wasn't a trial and it wasn't exactly it wasn't his hearing to become supreme court Justice. It lived in this strange world that I think was super unsatisfying because when we walked away from it, I don't think we learned much more wind learn much about what happened between. We learned that he is a dick exactly. I four the hearing. I was like, wow, you know, I don't know very much about this guy except I find his judicial record appalling. But then after the the the hearing, I remember thinking this is a man who behaves in a way that men think that they're entitled to behave to women or marginalized groups all the time, and they get away with it because they've always wait a minute tequila who. So to me, it's it's not politics. It's theater at that point, everyone is performing for the audience and then we have to ask, who is the audience? And I think for for Lindsey, Graham, I think for Brett common all it was an audience of one like they were performing for Trump gonna, say Satan. Senator Trump and Republicans because I've heard a lot of thoughts that it's about mobilizing the base like the think it's a particular base. It's the base that Trump and particular mobilized, which I wouldn't actually call like having grown up around Republican. I see no similarity between what's happening now and and traditional Republican Zoirsho. It's they've utterly betrayed any value that they ever late any claim to, and it really has just become, you know, there is this awful joke on SNL last year where something about the fifty two genders that Facebook and that was the reason that Trump got elected, and there was this kind of blowback against it and and identity politics and all that. But I've been thinking about that ever since and I think there's some truth in it. Actually, I feel partially responsible. You did it. I did hear me. I'll make this really brief, but basically, I mean, gender is such a huge part of the way that we move through the world the way that we relate to each other, that we construct everything that we see in wanna do and transpeople kind of dismay. Erupted, a very safe and secure binary that has defined people's roles in society for a really long time. And in that disruption, we've gotten a blow back to the most like kind of like basic redefined forms of the gender binary. And I think that's what we're seeing with with Trump. You know, we're, we're getting, you know, from from Obama who's a very kind of like a feet kind of cold, you know, intellectual to someone who is pure bombast, who can kind of brag about assaulting woman because there's a sense of like, oh, that's how men are. That's what men do. And I got the sense that very much that Brad Kavanagh. That's what he was doing. He was kinda like doing what he thought Trump would want, and people who like Trump would want, which is being a man like, yeah, I did this. I drink beer and like I hit on women because that's what men do, and that's their correct rule. So you're saying that that's not necessarily even reflective of of his authentic self by can't. I can't possibly claim to know that. No, that that in that moment, that is the performance he reverted to and that there's I'm sure that there's a reason for that. I think that's dead on because that's actually something that that I noticed too. It did feel like theater, but it also felt like a fabrication of this, this man's identity in the way that he viewed himself. I don't know that he necessarily sees himself as this like, you know, bloated, frat dude. I think he probably has holes himself in higher esteem, but I do feel like there's a pressure to put himself in some particular box, and I think that's the one that he went with, and that's probably the one that he was guided to go into. And as you mentioned, it's four purpose, it's because there's an audience that he's trying to appeal to. We've seen again and again, Trump critiquing his own team when they don't stand up strong enough, he hit a about Sean Spicer. You know, he hated the the impersonations on SNL because they made someone look weak. Yeah, that's this whole thing that was actually less turned that that that will not concern. I might my impression was that Trump was going to hate the Cavanaugh performance because he cried because there were moments of emotion. I thought that was going to make him look weak in. In effect, you know, it was kind of the opposite because I think he showed a range of of bravado that that'll to Trump really liked, but I just referring to this theater is is dead on, and that was something he's like, I think the Trump campaign specifically asked for that from Cavanaugh you know, from the jump like it's before the hearing, it was kind of like, oh, like there was internal rumblings that, oh, we don't like the performance. He's too boring. He's to metered, you know, he needs to kind of like step up to the plate. So this this to me felt a little bit like watching somebody who is kind of boring, like trying to muster up emotion. Yeah, you know, like and, and and the bombast you know, I wish politics reporting stakes. Crabbe statecraft should be a craft could be like an it should be like engineering. We should be hiring people who are trained in it who take a very kind of like mechanical approach to this whole kind of cult of charisma that we have around politics is just so incredibly dangerous. Yes. I think we might be moving. Place now where you can't succeed as a politician unless you have that quality and that that then takes there. There's one positive to which I think that we are moving in a direction where career politicians, no longer exists. The idea of somebody who just sort of works exclusively in that world and that you come from from a different background, I think, is kind of necessary, but that different background is reality. Television background is acting that different background is something that is by nature performance and not by nature intended to to pursue a civic duty and able. But eventually you become the performance. Like if you're a person who is open, I'm not like that. You know, I, I just play a an asshole on TV. I just play an asshole in congress. I'm not an asshole in with my family or with my daughters and it's like, yeah, well, you know if your job is to be that asshole, eventually that's who you are. It takes over the person, the goodness of you and it, and it and its carcinogenic, and it's not something that people can escape. I think a lot of people like to entertain the the, the idea that they can somehow. I'll be thorough, Lindsey, Graham style tantrum, and then also be a good guy that everyone everybody wants to hang out with. And eventually that comes to a head and that's impossible. So by the way, that's the double standard that that brought Cavanaugh I think was purporting between his himself as an alcoholic and himself as a soap person to there's this standard that like you can be a good guy, but you can also be a bad drunk, and I don't think that's the case at all. I don't think that's the case at all. I think if you're if you're bad guy when you're drunk, then that's who you are all so too. Yeah, I can. We can say this that if brought Kavanagh's confirmed, he will be groundbreaking supreme court drunk, the Guam. Sure. There've been a lot. Data for so many. There's so much room in those flat flax in the robes. That's what I mean. You can just put, you know, keep a whole six pack all the beer, what's happening under the bench in the in the robe, it's like, you're just have different pockets sewn. Yeah, exactly. Cousy he likes beer. I'm convinced that basically what the only way that I can make sense of what's happening in Washington right now is that straight white men in power have seen the writing on the wall that they know their time is up like there's no way around it demographically were shifting in such a way that they cannot retain power. It's impossible. There's no other option. And so they're kind of it's like a cash grab like, fuck it. You know, this thing is ending. Let's steal and take whatever we can to benefit ourselves. And the one thing that they can do long term is stack the supreme court. And I just think it's all about that. It's all about saving unborn babies and stopping the gays and stopping the women, and they can do that best buy stacking the court and everything else is just up for grabs on. It's the sort of the spirit of make America. Great again, which is like the reaching back to a time when everybody who's angry, but how things are now was more comfortable? Yeah, not not when not when women were more comfortable or people who were. GB q.. We're more comfortable reaching back to a time when people who are like you were saying Jen are made uncomfortable by the challenging of existing paradigms. They want to go back to that, and they don't really care who they hurt or what they take away from people on the process. And I guess maybe we need more female CEOs and female senators. Combat that, Aaron, I just wanted to say like, and just to your point about it is your identity like what you like cavenaugh had a choice. He still had a choice in how he wanted to like the Trump camp might have wanted him to perform a certain way. But at the end of the day, if you're supposed to be an independent thinker, if you're supposed to be a person who can withstand the pressure of whatever politics are and be like nonpartisan than it's like that, it's like the responsibility is still on him for for the words. He chose juice, say out of his own face been as calm and collected as as as Dr Ford, it would have come down to a. He said, she said, which which is awful in there. People who would have picked aside no matter what, but the few crucial swing people like flake and Murkowski and it cetera who might have been on the fence. I think he pushed on the wrong direction. I hope so. I really hope so. Well, we found out very soon. Yeah, terrify. I'm just so anxious. I know. I know. I know we have to break, unfortunately. But when we come back, we'll have the hills die on this. This up Assode of hysteria is brought to you by casper sleep friend that makes expertly designed products to help you get your best rest one night at a time you original casper mattress combined the multiple supportive memory foams quality sleep service with the right amounts of both sink and bounce gotta love a singing amounts sinking. Bounces very intense, sinking bounce is a rap. Song waiting happens inconvenience. Thinking about the dance dance sounds, I have a casper mattress and the cool thing about it. I think mattresses are a little bit like tennis shoes or like running shoes in that if you don't notice them at all, that's the best like I don't even. It's it's so nice. I've had it since I moved out here. So a couple while like month now, since I got my apartment and it like I just don't even notice my mattress. It's so comfortable. There's no unevenness in it. It's just it's nice. 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Well, to prove this point, here's some things we do all the time that are way more complicated than getting started investing. I let's hear making French press coffee. I always leave it in for too long. And then I have like grinds tar tar. I'm very good at making French press coffee. Well, then you'd be greeted investing cool. Keeping with the flurry of political news. That's complicated. Okay. Yes, it is complicated. I feel like I'm in a college class that I hate with a professor. That sucks, but investing is not complicated actually. It can be pretty easy when someone else does the hard work for you. Swell evaluates thousands of companies and builds diversified solution, focused portfolios. Every company selected works to solve today's biggest global challenges think clean water, renewable energy, and disease radicalization, and the best part you won't sacrifice returns. We'll make an impact stocks of companies with high environmental and social impact of actually beaten the s. and p. for twenty five years. So yeah, why not invest make an impact and secure financial future? It's like guilt, free capitalism. And it's easy to get started with swell. Actually, socially responsible investing is like a huge thing. When I was at when I was working in finance, it was like, people were like, I don't know, can we help the world and not blow it up and make money? But apparently now you can. It's well was well, you can. You can't right now hysteria listeners get a fifty dollar bonus when they sign up at swell investing dot com. Slash hysteria that is swell investing dot com slash hysteria. And we're back with the hills will die on this week, Jen since you're the guests and we'll let you go first, what's a hill? You're gonna die on and it's not an important it has to be unimportant. Okay. Well, this one's very important to me. I have a thing about thirty laughing, coffee cups versus teacups. Okay, go on one something as a teacup. It can only ever be a teacup for life and want something is a coffee Cup. It can only ever be a coffee Cup for life. And if I see someone put coffee in a teacup or tea and coffee Cup, I get incredibly anxious. So the shape of the Cup or mug does not matter. Well. So if I'm going to choose the first time a liquid goes into a coup-, there will be considerations, but ultimately it's about whatever was served that first time in the Cup. So like for instance, you have a purple Cup right now that has teabag. Yes, so I'm fine with that. It's the first time I've ever seen that Cup. It has thi in it. If I were to see someone else drink coffee out of that Cup, I would be like Klein, I see how. Bad hated if I went to go put coffee in this after the tea without he puts coffee. You're just being mean no, bullying the no bullying is number rule. Number one, his crawling. I had a question about because you don't have like the like a tea Cup can be, you know, like a proper like with t.f had like, so now, what about if that Cup originally gets coffee? Put in that. It's a teacup. Well, if that original, no. Okay. If that originally gets because like my mom has cups that I would consider to be classic plastic cups, but she doesn't drink tea. She drinks coffee. So McKay with that. Okay. Because in her house, those are coffee Cup. What about other fluids? What if I put Coca Cola in this Cup? Why would you do that? I don't know if that doesn't make sense. Sometimes if you know haven't, one of a much is and yeah, race I feel cozy by her own code. I know this is a weird fanatical little thing in my head, but I do think there's something to the shape of a Cup, how wide it is the thickness of the lip and the material that absolutely do determine how you take the liquid wine aficionados. That's that's similar. Like when you have specific, that's a real thing when I used to work in restaurants, they actually do have. There's a particular kind of glass for every varietal of wine. Right. Oh, my gosh. Lutely. I don't know if at time for any of that. I forever changed the way I'm gonna look at coffee and tea cups. Thanks a lot general passing on your body, Karen. What's your hill this week? Some minds petty, but you know, sometimes they'll go on yelp to find a restaurant and it says it's open, but then you go to the restaurant on it's closed. Oh boy. And. I feel like kill yourself if that restaurant. No fault is that that was at the restaurants fault for misreporting. Their hours is a yelps fault for not getting a right is it isn't. It isn't yell crowd source in some ways. So maybe we are at fault for not getting the took the hours as an official thing that yelp worked out with the restaurant or that the restaurant has a right to put in I, I was in Brooklyn the other day. Thank you for making that question much less existential. No, because I went to a restaurant and I chose it based on yelp is an Indian restaurant, and the only one in that neighborhood and I went and it was three o'clock and it said it was open all day and it was closed and they were, and I sat there given the like death by from like it's says, you're open ignored me. It was extremely rude. Okay. Here's the hill. I'm gonna die on this week. Oregano is fucking trash. Oregano is a try. No, it grace come on stand for that. I wanna hear all the spices here. First of all could media. First of all, it's an herb and it is the trash herb. It tastes. It tastes like soap. It's always overused in foods. It detracts from the overall tasted like a talion food. I can't think of a food that last night I made a soup and called for oregano and I was like up on not owning in a regular on, you know, oregano and I didn't use it with. I didn't use oregano in. It was the best version of it. Oh, I've ever made it was great. What about if you would about if it's fresh oregano? Fuck what? What about in in vinaigrette fresh vinaigrette of some kind for salad. I guess if I can't taste the oregano. Fine. You know how people have like I, I have the gene that makes launch tastes like, so maybe you have a rare gene that makes oregano? No, I think I'm correct in the world is wrong. Anyone else think oregano is trash? No, I love. I love it. Love it. I considered a spice. I consider them all spices. They're all spices. Kinds of spices used to flavour food can be considered a spice. I will never sunk goal oregano. I'll never sprinkle oregano straight on something. I'll give you that, but I use it in things all the time, sea bass oregano. We'll see. This is why we need more women leaders because this is compromise that you're seeing right now. Yes, grace. What's your hill this week? Okay. My hill this week is this drinking is hard. It's hard. It's gotten harder if difficult for me, I drink and then it's fun. And then the next day I feel like Kaka and I don't like it and it's difficult. It's called aging. I know. Oh, Greece into drinking knows so. No, I committed. Are you to this though? I'm to drink to, oh, well, I'll probably citing the difficulty. That's the thing is that is she's she, she's a trooper. I am a trooper so I shall I the good fight. I will not give up, but it is difficult. And I just want everyone to know that that it is. It is. It is struggle. I'm petite woman and I like to pretend or I forget that in the moment. And then I drink lots of sake. Let's say which happened two nights ago. And then all of yesterday I was squiggly. Little line. Do you know the animated show, Doug and all the characters are just kind of like slightly moving. That's me. That was me for a whole day after I had like six little teeny thimble fools of sake. I think that's called being wavy. And I think usually the kids use it when in reference to drugs. Oh yes. My drug is is restaurants sake. And drinking his heart. Oh gosh. Well, those are all as stupid of hill to die on any week. Plan if this Jane and that's all the time we have for hysteria this week. He Mayhew so much to Senator maisy Geraldo of the Wii. Thanks to John Richards. Thanks as always decrease our player and deal, and it's wanna get in touch with us. Please Email us hysteria crooked dot com with like what you heard lease rate us an itunes and tell your friends. We'll be back next week. Nadi me toddy sorry, cry. To step with the base. From this mama get me. So.

America Senate President Trump Brett Cavanaugh president assault Minnesota Angie Craig Senator maisy Hirono Mississippi United States Senator flake FBI Combe dot com Jen Richards Twitter supreme court Senator Blasi Ford judiciary committee
THE STRENGTH OF INDIGENOUS WOMEN

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

2:59:22 hr | 1 year ago

THE STRENGTH OF INDIGENOUS WOMEN

"We wish to extend our deepest and most sincere condolences to those who were killed in the to Christ Church Muslim mosque in New Zealand. The shooter a white male proclaiming to be an Australian national targeted Muslims who were in prayer. He killed forty nine people and injured dozens more. This was a senseless killing driven by an individual who has reportedly stated in a manifesto that he believes there is quote, white genocide and quote happening against what he calls, quote, his people and quote all around the world. For most of us who recognize racism for what it is. We identified this at a sick and inexcusable justification for taking human lives. We also recognize a deeply sad attempt to demonstrate reverse racism, which we know and recognize does not exist. People of color on this planet did not invent racism. Please. Join us for a moment of silence before we start our show as we acknowledge this incredibly senseless loss of life. Thank you. Zoos? You've reached native opinion. We earn indigenous information and education radio show in podcast every week. We talk about current affairs related to and from our own native American perspectives. My name is Michael kicking bear that guy over there. He is David Gray. All good morning. Good morning. Good morning, brother. How are you? I'm well. Thank you. Welcome back. Thank you very much. I kind of forgot about. Forgot about the it's all good in. I know you did a fantabulous yob. It's always more fun. When we both do the show doubt. I find the exact same thing. I mean, I'm I am lost. Even when the you know, obviously as everybody probably knows we we have a run down. Just keeps us organized keeps us straight. And even with that. It's like, what do you think? Oh, yeah. You're not there. So yeah, it gets kind of kind of kind of hard. So. Yeah. Thank you for keeping a straight and keeping us going there brother for shade. All you're welcome. You've done as much. So you know, it's a team effort. Yes. It definitely is that we do. Appreciate it improved our audience. Yeah. I had a. We. It was kinda hard. Community member out of the for for our church church congregational money back up and try to explain a little bit. So my uncle. Ran a spiritual center here on our reservation for many many years, of course, is set in the past passed away in twenty sixteen and the church was then taken over sounds like over that that probably wasn't the right way to put it. But we have we had another pastor come in who had been doing plenty of co pastoring. Alongside with my uncle might my uncle's health was deteriorating. And and so it was it was a natural fit to have him. You know, take the reins. He passed away. Probably almost a year ago at this point. And so obviously that was that was tough. And we have another pastor who is who is a you know stepped in. He is from Haiti really cool guys base been with congregation for many many years while the pastor that passed away had his oldest daughter Kia and she passed away basically six months after her dad died. So, you know, it's it's been kind of one thing after another. And so you know, I wanted to pay respect to the family. You know, they're her mom was, you know, obviously, very very hard on her for obvious reasons. And so we're trying to. Trying to be is supportive as we possibly can. So and just to give you an idea this family lives in. Well, David understand somebody. I'll be right back from and I'll just kill Mike for second. The family drives to our church every morning every Sunday morning, and it's about would say an hour and a half drive one way. So that's how far the pastor would drive and his daughter live lived closer to our spiritual center. So they're they're very dedicated to you know, to to the spiritual center in our congregation and. You know in our community, of course. So in our thoughts and prayers as we as we say on. Our with the rest of the family. So so that's where it was that. It's a it's why I had to kind of suddenly not beer in the so I appreciate, you know, the the thoughts and everything and this import you guys gave today tremendous last week. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. You're welcome. Tape with the big set. It's like one of those lovely lovely things. So anyway, let me let me move us forward here a little bit. So if you kind of new to the show a beginning of every episode, we just like to give your contact information. The different ways that you can reach us here. So Email is always good you can emails hosts that's whether NASA at the end hosts at native, opinion dot com. Twitter, of course, are to social media accounts that we are Twitter and Facebook, so Twitter where at native opinion. There are Facebook page. It's Facebook dot com forward slash native opinion, podcast, our website, of course, native opinion dot com. All of our episodes publish out there to YouTube land. So if you're purveyor of YouTube, you can find us all of our audio episodes, there might sound kind of strange, but a lot of people actually think about music, lots of people listen to I I like to say, listen to music videos, that makes probably knows even less sense. But we're we're kind of surprised a lot of people do listen via YouTube. So so they episodes are there. If you love podcast like me, which is primarily what this platform is is we're also a podcast. So which means our episodes publish twenty four to forty eight hours after this broadcast, which is every Saturday morning at nine AM eastern now Saturday mornings nine AM. And so if you go to any of the podcast director, you can find us there so apple up. Wow. Can't talk today, apple podcast, Google, podcast radio Republik, Stitcher. Iheartradio Spotify again, wherever you get your favorite podcast from you should find there and last, but not least you can also leave us a voicemail. It's eight six zero eight hundred five nine five that's number there. Eight six zero eight hundred five five nine five, and we actually did have people call in over the last week and a half, brother. So I figure I go ahead and roll one of those right now. Absolutely. That'd be great. We heard again from badger so happy to hear them. Low my brothers. Hey, thank you brother grail for foot, a great show and on your own over your both back and that it again the next week. And I'm so glad to be back in contact with you. Thank you for your kind words on Twitter. And yes, everything is great. I needed a break from social media, and and apple to lose my cell phone, so not a temporary phone and didn't have any podcast or any social media, delete. And actually really good for me. I am glad to get back and catching up on the old shows. And and while this last one out was top, them wise. Thank you for that, Tim. Why segment that I really, you know, I think that is our open. Well, I guess there were open very far and. Just like we have an IRA tation. And you try to drops in you have to kind of push your eyelids away to get the drops in. That's what has like, you know, I think comfortable talking about the founding fathers and about ways things are going. Now, even is. Yeah, I need to get my eyes opened a little more and and an ongoing thing so deep it up using love. I just thank you for what you do. And and keep doing it. It would be badger without this signature ending. Now. That's. Your horn. Thank you. Good to hear from you, buddy. Yeah. Definitely. Yeah. He had posted on Twitter that in of got concerned because. It was kind of like taking a break by. Okay. Not maybe not quite severe. But I mean, I didn't know it was because he'd lost his phone and stuff like that. So and again for new listeners badgers truck drivers over the road truck driver. So he's all over the country. And you know, I gave up on radio pretty much even satellite radio years ago. I just love podcasts. And so if I drive anywhere specially long distance, you know, I'm usually got something going in. For me, not to have that. Now, I think I would be I don't even think I'd wanna drive. This some serious university by myself, you know. I know, but it's like radio socks emphasize saw. So, you know. Yeah, I'd much rather fill my brain either with knowledge, or at least something that's truly entertaining. That maybe people wanna listen to. But that is not commercial radio in my opinion. Yeah. The again, thank you about your appreciate that wanna say hi to cliff in shot could see with. Thank you think did get your Email cliff. Thank you. Try to pop that in here in a moment, brother. It's not in the rundown. We also heard what see from Lee. So here's what we had to say. Typing furiously. Good morning. Good evening, Michael and David are happy vaca-. And I finally, hey, take if taken my dad for breakfast show, which I. Massively got wrong in my Las voicemail, which is quite funny to have my clip come in as you say good morning, everyone say good morning, and so nice to to. Hey, you Brian Ellie? Now rather than me waking up and visit in the Oval Office may be catching you. Free clock in the morning. Noise. Hey. Cows have been catching up and up in very busy. And I'm sorry that you've received this voicemail. So les? It's night. Freud I write off seven in Norwich and very wet. But I just wanted to say everybody of enjoyed that come to it's been very busy may so of meaning to send you something semis. Across from news articles, offend interesting. But just to pick up a couple of points you made from your law show. You mentioned about history and abai schoolteaching history. And with ancestors, come from an you get that you get love history, but the trouble wave history England guys back phases of years and. Same many different parts of Britain. I've been taken a anyone to stand that volley came a very and most of your was Celtic, and then Brehm came a and where where am I actually situated? Now, there's a Raymond town about five miles away. There's a no Medea causal in Orage. The suffice India's old cathedral this about five years old. So we have very much. You know, a lot of history that gets tool dovey is very important to teach way you come from, you know, as your country said there's a lot of people who. Geico. The Koi patriotic of the country in Britain. Oh, I've say myself is. Pesident of the world. I don't I don't, you know, claim to be proud of one nation, but as many people that. Fail. The only tree branch Shamma true. Englishmen unite red blooded Englishman, and they have a day test and the same people that like, oh, we don't want any immigrants coming over debris and stayed on jobs, and they have DNA tests, and they find that Danish Jim in, and they just don't know what to say is quite funny, actually and people. I think that there appear for thera braid is a quite funny. But I'm just touch on that also hedgerow pas today by the the sadly, the native people go missing and unreported and people doing enough about over only touch the tip of the always bag as an expert on the subject, but. It's sad because we had a football two missing from fronts in moving to cod. If you've probably had cooled silently crashed on flight between a fronts in Britain. And he's only on little toy Tony commercial plane, but the coverage was absent unbelievable. The official people can offer it's become go right there than study the people put money forward of a football is. And I find him, and I'm dislike well aside, the compensate the case, not many people have got rich million football of buddies that can pay a plane to go and look again, all Bassole things. I, you know, so of unequal sometimes, but I'm. Yes. I that's all I have for tonight might be a good breakfast show hype. Michael you doing well on the the doll you keep mentioning likewise may of Ana a calorie controlled up, and it's not very nice, but I do have annoys coffee and Donut if your breakfast show also ahead Dave's beam Smith to Davis being Smith took into his SME radio voice has so. Oh, yeah. Thank you again bay fan to think to listen is up this fate in the listener feedback and visual affair well. And good evening. Morning. Thank you. It's always good to hear for storm warning at the end. We appreciate that. Yes. Yes. Yes. If Dave has kind of radio voice said a natural radio voice that people would kill for guys. Degree. All I hate my voice on the radio. That is a very common reaction though for them. Couple quick points on what what Lee said to specifically about when we're talking about missing murdered indigenous women at the go from laughing into something extraordinarily serious, but we're going to have a segment on that later in this episode on missing murder digits women, but the, but what I wanted to comment on real quick was his statements about the the inequities around coverage, particularly by by the news media. We we have that same problem here. If if a girl is white or a boy is white and they go missing it's call out the army. To find them. But if it's a person of color in more, specifically an indigenous person, they can't be bothered, and if that's hard for people to hear I just have to, you know, watch mainstream news. Yeah. The truth will bear it self out. It's it's obvious. Now, the one the one. Thing. I do want to give kudos to is one particular program, which is live PD, which is on the network because they do regular, oh, let me let me back up life. PD covers you know, officers their daily lives on while they're at work within initially. I was very concerned about this. You know, showing what they do how the interact with the public and things like that. But that's not really what I wanna come into what I wanna comment on his do a missing children's segment every single episode and nine out of ten times. It's a person of color, and I think that has a lot to do with a gentleman named Tom Morris? Who's one of the co hosts on that on that particular show? So I wanna give them kudos because at least there's something on on mainstream television. That is putting I would say much more equal emphasis because they also they also focus on, you know. Non people color as well. But it's balanced in. That's what I appreciate. So. Sure. Sure. So it can be done. I guess is my alternate point. Why they don't I don't know. Good morning to lower and chat. Welcome. Yes. Welcome. Let's see. We also heard from Christopher when it gets this up here as well, brother. So here's you had to say. Whole rockin. Christopher moose going cremation or curly. Live in Sacramento are huge fan of your podcast is thank you so much the work that you do for a community. Very this is my first time listening to the live episode. I didn't really chat rooms at I would like to make a comment on determine racist. And what it pertains to me being a native American and also after near could walk into worlds at the same time. Doesn't matter. If I got my forty acres, and a mule doesn't matter if I got a mansion and Kim million dollars if every person in the country got a mansion in ten million dollars and forty acres and immu we still be looked at as second class citizens is ingrained in the society to prejudge based upon race. It's not something that we do consciously. It's something that is ingrained. It's it's that feeling when you see somebody from your own culture that speaks your language and nobody else and that person is going to help you out to get ahead of everybody else that same feeling. Yeah. It's ingrained hobos have day. Thank you. Appreciate that. Thank you. Christopher in your absolutely, correct. It doesn't really matter. How much substance a person of color has? They're still looked down upon as the other. Sadly. And you know, as I've been known to say racism in this this country is you know, is as natural as saying good morning. That's that's how ingrained to us Christoper's word. How ingrained it is into their psyche. They're their upbringing their total way of life. And that's what it is. It's a it's a way of life. Again, very recent example, look to New Zealand. Okay. So I mean, you know. I'm going to touch on that a little bit later. But it's there it is. I mean, you know, I I don't know how much plainer it can be. I really don't. Got to change will. I was thinking about something this morning, and I had read a couple of statements from people on social media. Mistake. And one person stated what we've got a boat them out. And we've got a we've got something that's got to change. And you know, it goes on and on and on. I thought about you know, the thread and. You know, the old adage always holds true if you want something done, right? You've got to do it yourself. And there's a bunch of folks that need to adopt that ideology and stop waiting for somebody else to do something. Somebody else devote them out. We just had a midterm election and. Nobody got booted out that should have gone yet. So you know, we have to stop relying on our the wrong people got voted out. We have to stop relying on. The other person let somebody else do it or somebody else will do it. No. We need to do it. We need to stand up. Go to Washington and say, hey, this is what it's going to be not what you want it to be. We are not represented. We keep putting people in office that will represent the very folks that are are destined to make our lives difficult, and I say destined that that's that's not really correct word. But they choose to make our lives difficult. At every way possible and those people at corporations. Their their main concern as their bottom line. It's not us. The only reason they're concerned with us because we help them reach their bottom line. And how do they do that is it's through manipulation? Through the media through everything they can possibly think up to nip Yele there's to buy their products to increase their bottom line. So you see? That's one way. We we can make a difference. We have to stand up and do something. Completely agree. I mean, if you knew of something like that this isn't aimed necessarily at the corporations, but look at all the people that just got arrested for manipulating schools school school, admissions rather. Yep. Absolutely. Largely white very well to do people that are like on. Oh, my child is going here. Basically, that's their attitude. I make more money than you. I support your school. Therefore, I get the dictate the rules and that and that's very pervasive all throughout the United States. Not just an education system, but Davis mentioned corporations, right? The getting back to your point on the education system nippy Yele relation. That's been going off a decade. It's not it's not a new phenomena. Some people may say. When did this start? It's been going on for decades. Yep. Examples of you support the fool in the White House out there that might be listening. Or listening to the podcast. That's how the fool in the White House got into the schools. He got into it's it's it's been proven, absolutely. So. That manipulation will continue as long as we allow it to. But moving on. Yeah. When one last quick point from Christopher it doesn't have to do with racism, but he had made mentioned, and this is something I've taken note of I need to to somehow make it better. We have a few people in chat dome that have sort of good out. I get into chat. But as Christopher said, it's kind of it's not very obvious. Always on like like, we what we say. Is there is a player on our website is when where I think most people connect through there's little chat bubble there. But it and it kinda jiggles. Unusually is anybody that's left. A message has sort of a little yellow dot next to it. If you click on that, it should bring you into the chat rooms allow you to you know, comment, but it's not very obvious. And I've I've sent numerous letters emails to screen our broadcast provider, and they just don't have an another way of implementing shat, which is something that. Really would like to correct. So that that's how that's how you can do it there. The other way of courses are spreaker also publishes their own app for all of the shows that are represented on on their network. So you can use their app favorite dish show. And then click on the chat bubble the same way on the on the mobile app and talk to us that way. Unfortunately, we don't have a another way today. David I have debated back and forth about in doing a live. Call in show, that's problematic in a few ways. Technically on my end. So we're still looking at a few options. But right now text chat is the only the only thing we have. So I just wanted to point that out and try to explain that. And I'll try to illustrate that maybe on the home page of our website a little bit better. So people going there conc- what I'm talking about. So so thank you. Thank you think of all right. I'm done, David. Okay. We're ready to jump into a native new segment. We are. I article this morning is fighting the colonizer and soft. Traditional kinship blood quantum and this enrollment from the Omaha tribe. This was brought to us by Marissa may Kanda Cummings. I hope pronounce that. Correct Moraga from Omaha magazine dot com. She goes on to say mine anguish name is Marissa Cummings. I am buffalo tail clan of the sky people. I am a- haw. I am. The eldest granddaughter of the eldest buffalo tail clan woman. Eunice Walker Mon. My great grandfather Charles Amos Walker was the first. Chairman of the Omaha tribe and served on tribal council for over twenty five years. He wasn't honorable honorable man. Excuse me and received seven dollars a week for serving on the council for his people. This is my heritage a homo hall. A homo is the way indigenous people call themselves, Omaha people call themselves, excuse me, and my Omaha. It identity is inseparable from my family history. I have been enrolled in the hype meet the official criteria for enrollment and possess. The official government documents to prove it, even so the Mahad tribe of Nebraska, tribal council and enrollment officer have stated that I had been removed as a tribal member though, I have yet to receive official documentation for my expulsion, a removal known as in quote disembowelment. They claim that the basis for my dissonant is due to blood quantum a measure of tribal affiliation based on ancestral bloodlines. Blood quantum wasn't idea introduced to North America by Europeans and many many excuse me. Federally recognized tribes today, you some sort. Use some combination excuse me of lent, descent and blood quantum to determine membership. My great grandfather Charles Walker what certified certified full blooded Omaha according to the bureau bending affairs in nineteen sixty one. At some point in time. According to the tribes bookkeeping. Wow. Someone changed his blood quantum to thirty one thirty seconds his siblings. Have the same mother and father yet they have. Full blood quantum. What's the difference? I suspect that the Mahal try but use a blood quantum as a weapon of retaliation. And exclusion against those who fight political injustice and advocate for physical fiscal excuse me responsibility within the tribe. It is retribution against me. The date March seven twenty eighteen was a pivotal moment. Four by tribal status and identity. That's when I request today certificate degree of Indian blood CD IB for my children. Although my children are not enrolled what still qualify for a CD IB. That's when I learned from Laura MacAulay. The tribes enrollment officer that she was doing an audit on my family in a few of the families. She also informed me that my great grandfather. Charles Walker was missing the bureau of Indian fares documentation from sixty one the showed is blood quantum to be four fourth. So full blood Omaha. She had him listed as thirty one. Thirty seconds, Omaha blood. I am formed her that I have a copy of the archival document. And then I then emailed to her could Sern I then drove from Sioux City to the enrollment office in Macy Nebraska to meet with her provide a physical copy of the missing documentation. I was told that a CD IB and unroll where the same thing, which is not true. No, it's not. And she could not provide me with a see the IB for my children. She instead wrote me a letter. Showing their one eighth blood quantum CBI. However is a completely separate document. From tribal enrollment on September fourteenth twenty eighteen I wasn't formed by tribal employee's that the tribal council was meeting to disannul my family. Since the enrollment arbiter had previously mentioned reviewing my family. I took it seriously. My sister, Andrea Cummings traveled to the enrollment office and requested more information. She was provided with a copy of the tribal council resolution number eighteen dash nine one which declared the sending of resolution number fifteen. Dash one nine nine. We were not provided that they the resolution that was rescinded in the tribal minutes are not public the document that we received made no mention of any individual disembowelment. In fact, no names were named in the document. Then the. Been the enrollment officer told my sister we were distant rolled. But she refused to provide any letter documentation of disembowelment feeling desperate. I posted on Facebook about the vague resolution number eighteen dach- nine one and my unexpected disembowelment. I received enough pouring support from Omaha people on lock I received countless messages and emails from others telling their own stories of incorrect. Blood quantum it feels fears of retaliation. On September twenty first twenty eighteen the tribal council issued a statement that they had discarded the nineteen eighty-five supplemental base role and are only considering the nineteen sixty four base role listing I listing of tribal members characterized to be true and accurate. By resolution number eighteen dash nine one. While the base role reference by the constitution of Omaha tribe. As of August. Twenty fifteen is the nineteen ninety sixty one membership roll the emission of the nineteen eighty five supplement supplemental role was our has excuse me serious implications for hundreds of enrolled members it is mass des- disembowelment without notification. On December four twenty eighteen. My sister, again visited the enrollment office who I told us we disin- rolled. On this occasion. She said we were not disrepair old because the tribes constitution has no disembowelment policy. We were instead declined membership. Yeah. Schematics? It remains unclear how one can be declined membership after being enrolled with a tribal dentition number. But that is my current status. I believe that my rejection from the tribe is retaliation for my working with the FBI when I served as chief tribal officer for of the I'm the Omaha excuse me tribe. I held the position from March twenty fifteen timber twenty sixteen believe the current council members are angry and retaliating for their family members, pleading guilty to embezzlement of contracts port cost fund from IHS did health service. They division of the federal department of health and human services, responsible for medical and health services to members of federally recognized native American tribes and Alaska native people. So let me let me be clear because this this come up before with with with other try. Early sack is Asian and embezzlement where ferring to taking federal funds federal dollars in the form of grants in many cases and pocketing it as opposed to give a planet to the people as it supposed to be intended to. So right. I did present financial documents to the F B I after I received a subpoena. I complied with the federal legal process on September twenty second twenty sixteen. The US attorney general's office announced that a federal grand jury had indicted, former on Omaha tribal council chairman almond Sheridan formal council. Members force Aldrich Tilly Aldridge. Jeff Miller Dorin Morris junior. Rodney Moore's in the list of names goes on along with former on hot, tribe, employees. Just awebber in Barbara Freeman the indictment alleged that the defendants coveted converted excuse me and misapplied three hundred eighty eight thousand. Some dollars by causing the issuance of law bonuses or incentives to themselves several several of the tribal employee's on account of the file claiming cz. Claims filings excuse me over the course of September October twenty eighteen there were all found guilty. The crimes do not reflect. How valley's likewise my experience being disciplined rolled or declined. Membership exhibits a twisted value system that is not the traditional way of people. Tell you. The article goes on to tell about their bylaws of their constitution and so forth. The rest of be on the show notes. It it's worth a good read. 'cause she she has a a valid complaint. And it is a problem that's pervasive throughout the country. It's not just limited to one or two tribes. It's pervasive. And it needs to stop. These are the tools. I I don't know how many people out what mentioned may saying impasse step associates that since the federal government could legally. Remove us from the face of the earth. They gave us the tools to do the job for them. And they blood quantum is one of those tools. They gave us to help radical ourselves from the face of the earth. Yeah. Anything you wanna add? Probably just to build on again, indictments and things of that nature. So because I think it confuses people sometimes so. See how I can frame this properly. The federal government has responsibilities to federally recognized drives. Okay. Unfortunately, it's the way it's been defined. You know today to I wanna say five hundred seventy three tribes of federal tribes. That are federally recognized in the United States today. I believe that number's correct? Not I can be corrected. Not a problem. And. I'm not trying to ignore all the other tribes that are out there. Okay. Of which there are many. But focusing on the federally recognized tribe through moment. Those tribes alone have to fight for federal dollars. Wrap location. Just a number of different crazy crazy channels to get things like money that are ultimately a responsibility of the federal government. Through treaties, a number of different things. Okay. So that's one problem. The other problem is this situation in many others, many other disembowelment cases, so we've we've presented examples where the motivation for reducing tribal rolls is inevitably. Buried ingred and a lot of times. We'll see tribal casinos connected to that. Unfortunately. Okay. This is an example, where perhaps it's not being motivated by gaming motivated by greed, as a, you know, by embezzling funds that the government said okay here. Give it to your people for healthcare. Thanks. We do some internal wranglings or whatever in put the money in their pockets as well as their non-tribal, ally employees. To do what? By loyalty. And the understanding that when that gets out, and it will because evidently, it almost always does becomes public. You make it that much harder for tribes that are legit have legitimate claims over and over again, fighting the federal government for things that the government should be providing anyway, and you're giving them your arming the government with justifications to go. Well, we'll look over here that tribe pant manage itself, and they'll put a blanket across the entire tribe as if they're all criminals, which that's not true. Either Yamaha tribe is not a bunch of criminals, but because of a few people they get blanketed that way and other tribes. Because of their behavior of those individuals. Because of greed. Gotta stop. Yeah. It does. Because Dave said you're giving them tools that they give you initial tools that they know that this kind of stuff is going to happen. And you're not seeing that. Through your behavior for those that are doing that. No, they're not and it hurts the tribal body at large. So. I'm okay. Move on here. All right. Gotta love Deb. Helen. Really do since she's been in office just one introducing one. Resolution after another. Commonsense legislation. Here's another one. Holland and also, I don't want to ignore cherise David's introduce historic resolution, recognizing native American women for women's history month. Arkell goes on. Here says I'm sorry off through native news online published this and article here goes on to say today congresswomen Deb Halland New Mexico for district entry Davis of Kansas third district introduced a historic resolution recognizing native American women for women's history month along nineteen original cosponsors, including native American caucus co chair Representative Tom Cole. Thank you. Tom. From Oklahoma fourth district. I say, thank you. Because prior to cherise in Endo, Deb hauling the being voted in Tom and our good, buddy. Mark Wayne Molin two Republican in the only two native Americans in congress at the time. So Tom Cole joined SRI, son. Deb Hoan on this. That's good. Goes on here to say it is the first time resolution, recognizing native American women has been introduced in the United in US house. The resolution honors the heritage culture in contributions of American Indian Alaskan native and native Hawaiian women in the United States. It also calls attention to the challenges that disproportionately affect women in native communities, including the wage gap disparity and domestic violence that contribute to the academic of missing murdered indigenous women. Quote, women's history month is all about recognizing the contributions women have made to this country while recommitting ourselves to fight for equality. My resolution honors the stories in contributions of native American women, which are often left out of the conversation by giving voice to a whole group of women who have never had a voice in congress were also drawing attention to the struggles and challenges our community still faces end quote said Representative debt Howland coach share of the native American caucus and one of the first native American women serving in congress. Quitting again. Every March we come together to celebrate women who have shaped our nation's history and those who continue to pave the way for future generations native American women are not always thought of in that celebration. So I'm proud to partner with Representative Holland to make sure we remember remember all that native American women have contributed to our society to advocate for native women and to work on the issues impacting our communities unquote that was from cherise, David. Quoting again. For more than three decades. The month of March has been dedicated to shining light on numerous and lasting contributions of American women throughout our nation's history. Each year, I think of the women in my own family and the legacies. They left behind in particular. I remember my great aunt the Fisher, a gifted native American storyteller who made an extraordinary impact on the arts throughout our lifetime. Now, always think of I always think of and treasure the examples of my mother Ellen Cole who was the first native American woman elected to the Oklahoma state Senate, and whose influence guided my own path into politics this year, we observe women's history month. I am proud of the tremendous history. Recently added by congresswoman, Deb, Holland and Therese Davis. The first native American women ever elected to congress end quote, said Representative Tom Cole coach. Chair of the native American caucus. There's some additional links to the resolution internet's giving one link in to the resolution self if you guys would like to read it and. I think it would be good. Dab also made history. Once again by being the first and only native American woman to set in the chairman seat. Yes. Yes. I saw that photo. Awesome. The gavel. Yes. Instead of it being Nancy Pelosi. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. We need more. I was glad to see that. I was too good. Good good. Good times. Good times. You know, I'm glad that we. Included this this next segment. I'm glad you came up. What what the suggestion to do? So. Okay. Well, I think it's I think it's important. Because you can't solve a problem. If people stay quiet about it. And even though it may, you know, some people at some point have said things like this have become squeaky wheels will pay the squeaky wheel gets the grease. So I think that this. This segment should remain for the time being and and if people have comments or a Piff unease like brother badgered did. And his statement and its mail, please share it with us. Absolutely. Yeah. We will definitely put on what are we talking about? We're talking about. Racism in America. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. So thank you. Thank you for that. Brother. Appreciate that. In all contributions. Are welcome. All contributions are welcome in. And 'cause we'll we'll plug him right in right here. So in this segment of racism in America. We're going to focus a bit on cable news media personalities. All right. Our first example that we get to pick on. Is that of Fox News is own Tucker Carlson. Tucker currently holds the current number one talk show on that sad. Sad. News network. And he's been under fire for some racist. Comments says of late comments that are extremely demeaning towards women and these occurred between the years of two thousand and six in two thousand eight spoken on past appearances on a show, and I'm not even making this up. If it's called Bubba. The love sponge. And Dave, Dave. You should be familiar because it comes out of your state, Florida. I'm not surprised. Comes out of. The host of that show. His real name is Bubba Clem. And. Got nothing. Much much of these clips apparently were uncovered by the organization called media matters. And I'll quote from their site a web based not for profit five a one c three progressive. Search and information center dedicated to comprehensively monitoring analyzing and correcting conservative misinformation in the United States media. So in his first example, we pulled some statements primarily that Carlson made about women. Lovely stuff. Hold onto your butts in my brief experience. You don't get swimming going is arguing with them. Really? Yeah. On brand never use true. You debate politics with the woman and just go full blown out there, especially feminism, if you're talking to a feminist, and she's giving you a well, you know, men really need to be more sensitive, and this actually meant donating more sensitive to be quiet and kind of do what you're told. I love women, but they're extremely primitive. Their basics are not that hard to understand Paris and Britney in a commercial the Bama is classic old school miscegenation old south on. It's young white girls are going to be. That he's coming for your pristine. In America, you want to Sarah Palin you there. I'll agree with that. I feel sorry for attractive women. I mean, did you know? You know, when she's laying her head and your bed at night. You know, who the hell's inter Petromin what they're doing? Nobody just her well when she's an dormitory type setting and these little girls start experiment around next thing. You know, you know, you gotta lesbian on your hands. I don't think I don't think bio-. Fido, fixing onto the Komori nothing. I don't got a PS two playing going on my mom and dad here. Tell me that they love me and took me in bed. So here's Trixie. She wants to explore my body a little bit. So, hey, let's go crazy. Wow. Well, I can't think that's pretty unlikely is outlandish is that is how old is your daughter. Working. Really? Really talk her. Really? Here stuff like that. And you go how can this guy actually even been married? Let alone how child let alone have a daughter. So I don't know any comments brother will. I'm not surprised that. Mentality that comes out of the FOX network. Get. Too bad that that's his opinion of women. Yeah. Well, you know, he, obviously he's he's aware that that these clips were remade public. We say, and he has already made the statement that he intends to not apologize for any of them. Here's another one just in case that wasn't bad enough rock a crappy place filled with a bunch of you know, literate monkey big. I have zero sympathy for them or their culture, a culture where people just don't use toilet paper, folks. Women. I agree with you there. Their culture is your in their homeland, and you're over there as an American who they hate and they want nothing more than the Americans off their soil. So they're not gonna play. Shut up and obey is my view. How did you salvage Iraq? At this point. I don't you know, it's beyond our control. I mean, if somehow the Iraqis decided to behave like human beings or something he need to say, look, I'm a bigot. Okay. I'm a big I don't like Islamic extremists. Like if you are really heavily into Islam. I really I I'm sorry. I just don't mind up here for you that much, and I don't care what that sounds like you can call me, a racist motive p one and this juncture, you could say that and not catch a lotta certainly could vote for you said that. White man, you know, contributed some I would say like creating civilization the stuff. I think they've done a pretty I don't know what to her would kick your ass playing basketball. Yeah. Of course, you would. Getting fall on. He's black saying, he's a real brother. Hey. Blackie is he black for one thing? One white parent one black. So that makes him white. There's some really good. I mean immigrants. I just think it's, you know, people come to this country would have something to offer the hot be really smart. You know what I mean? All right. So do what would he define me as Dave? I'm I'm African American. I'm native American. I'm Dutch Irish I'm also Portuguese. I didn't even I wouldn't even ask the food on thought the the color of the sky was I know, I know, but I'm just saying in. I mean talk I don't need you to define who I or anybody else's. And you notice his comment was is he's got a white parent in a black parent. Why isn't he white? That's you know, that goes back to Christopher's point. From voicemail. The automatic assumption is. White first everything else second by some people in this country. True. So. When when we get to the end of this this segment, I have an article that I want to to read before we go onto the main content. Absolutely. Absolutely. So now, I wanna turn you guys. Attention a little bit two other news media personalities on these are folks that you know, we generally don't think of as racists in in what I'm about to demonstrate isn't so much about racism. It's about responsibility. But around the theme of racism. So what responsibility should news network have. To prevent for example. Spreading hate or enabling racists. And the term that they love to use his radicalize others. You hear that term all the time in news media, go further, you're gonna say something. Yeah. I was just gonna say they have a responsibility to. Do do. What's right? That's what have responsibility for. They should be held responsible. If they contribute to to use their term if they contribute to radicalizing individuals by spreading. The same type of crap that help radicalize those people to start with if you know that the article or the segment that you're about to do or the clip that you're about to to play on national TV is going to contribute to some some nut job in you know, they're out there the tribute to that nut jobs radicalization than you should have the foresight to not play it. It's not rocket signs. Thank it's. Yeah. It's not hard to look at that. And say, we're not gonna do this. Thank you. That's exactly the point. Here we go. Let's use a very recent example, the Maas shootings in New Zealand as an example. All right here are three CBS in quotes n so CBS N is the digital network. Arm of CBS news Ciba's an anchor correspondents talking about what can be found in the New Zealand shooters manifesto. All right. So here we go. This is media fascination. One key petits is here with more on the manifesto civic. You've been going through it what what stood out to you? Well, if you wanna point out, this is the entire manifesto the great replacement. The second page is actually a wheel mentions anti imperialism picture of George Washington. Ethnic autonomy, responsible markets. We March EV forever four it says it starts talking about birth rates. He says birthrates birthrates birth rates. They must change it goes into this diatribe really about fertility level saying there's not a single western country. Not a single white nation that reaches these levels. Not America, not Europe, not Australia. New Zealand white people failing to reproduce feeling decreased families failing to have children, which is extremely interesting. He also goes through a lot about point in that manifesto where he says that it's in direct relation to something. That congressman Steve king has said and I'm quoting here. He says we can't restore civilization with somebody else's babies. Now, you're an elected member of congress. And now you find something that you said. To the press finding its way into a manifesto like this where he got that. It will. Exactly, right interesting. This struck me too. He sorry. Didn't hear you brother. Now having heard what she just said what he just said. Remember me saying it's all about the numbers. Yes. How many times have you heard me say that? Dozens I posted that on social media dozens of times, and this is the first time that somebody is actually come out and really said that it's about the numbers. Now, the imprisonment the murder the disappearance of people of color, especially in young, boys. It's all about the numbers. It's about reducing the numbers of Brown. People. To stem, the flow of increasing numbers of people of color. It's all about the numbers. And there you go. He said there. I wanna I wanna make note that next Nikki, Batista, the two other co anchors are people color, you know, but their job is to deliver what they're told. Right. Right. So so this is exactly. What's going on here? So let me continue good about three more minutes on this club. The asks himself all of these questions, and the answer is why did you target these people they were visible large group of invaders culture with high fertility rates, but later he says, he's traveled all over the world. He's been treated kindly by all ethnic cities. He wishes them the best is worn thin compassion, but those same people seek to come to my peoples lands replaced. My people make war upon my people. I'm forced to fight them. Which is interesting. So he's saying he doesn't hate them. He just wants them gone from his if he's actually turns out he was born in in Australia. He's invader to that as a European right real. And he's he goes into a little bit more about himself. Always twenty-eight. He's that he had a regular childhood without any great issues. He had little interest in education didn't attend university workforce short time invested and bit connect use that money to travel, which he references is that I'm just a regular white man from a regular family who decided to take a stand. Turn. Sure. A future for my people. It's incredible stuff. I know that the question is is who is this guy. He gives us a sort of brief bio, and then the question after that is why why why why would you do this any kind of kind of lays out a wide ranging list of reasons, including bringing up the US a lot. I was responding that. I mean, why he did it? I don't think we'll ever really know the depths of his mind is it's impossible to understand yell. So did point out. I think a lot of people wonder. Forties of said that that doesn't appear to be the case. He says he's not a direct member of any organization and that he made this decision himself. So what he's hoping for? I don't think anybody's Nikki, thank you so much for your reporting, and I actually want to let our viewers know that later in the next couple of hours, we'll have a former deputy national security adviser. French housing will be here to talk to us about this one of the things we're intrigued by is within this manifesto. They're starting to be a there's a discussion happening online about whether or not some of the things that appear in that are in essence a trap in a way that get journalists and other people talking about these things and actually have no connection to what this alleged individual this individual alleged to have done because he doesn't really believe any of this stuff. He just wanted to go the way he described himself. I thought. Oh, geez. It sounds a lot like what it's very stereotypical the sort of person that you would expect right? Did you say we that that we've had conversations about people who may? Maybe our the working class and they're getting rod deal, and and he sort of driving himself as that kind of person. But then you point out at other times, you know, sounds like life has been actually great good for him getting around you travel. Then on race cover when he's Australia's make sense, you reference President Trump reference these things the second amendment that have nothing and no connection to your don't say that. So we'll dig a little deeper right up. There was only fifteen seconds. Go ahead rather. I don't I don't I didn't say Jesus because they find it. Unbelievable. What this guy did? I find unbelievable that they were told in the guys manifesto. Why he did what he did. And they're still trying to deny why he did it and trying to find reasons other than why he did it. And now. Sorry. I'm sorry. Couldn't be anymore blatant as to why he did it. So another point to that. Which was absolutely valid. But I'm going back to responsibility. Okay. You kept hearing Nikki not saying it's interesting or it's fascinating. Why? She finds a book of racist philosophy enthralling, really. She's part of the problem. That exactly. And then she like many in the media is an enabler. Also, right at the end, you heard valve Ladimir Duthie, the the male voice. Mention quote, maybe it's a trap for journalists to talk about the racist manifesto end, quote, you'd think. Don't maybe CBS should have taken some responsibility in air on the side of caution. But no, no, no, no, no. This is this is today's mainstream news media. They doubled down by bringing Franzen who previously served as deputy assistant to the to President George W Bush, and who is deputy national security advisor for combating terrorism to talk about what how racist communicate dangerous ideals. Here we go, but he suspect in the attack on to New Zealand mosques has been identified twenty eight year old. Australian Brenton Tarrant is charged with murder forty nine people were shot dead. And dozens more were injured page manifesto was posted online by someone claiming responsibility for the shootings CBS news cannot confirm its authenticity. But the writer called for violence against immigrants calling remained faith. We can't we can't. We can't verify the authentic city, but we're going to tell you anyway eaters so for more on this. Now, we are joined by FRANZ. She's a CBS news senior national security analysts in a former homeland security adviser. So first off I just want to sort of get your gut reaction you hear about what's going on. You've seen some stuff in the news. This manifesto the live streaming. What would you should I assess, you know, look, the first thing I thought of this rise in antisemitism. Right. We've we had the tragedy at the Pittsburgh mosque. We ought to recognize that this sort of sentiment is on the rise around the world we've seen countries like France, reacting to the immigration of Muslims. Would semitism. Come from. Yeah. It's from around the world refugees. It we've seen it in Germany. There's just this rise, which is why in this country. The department of homeland security is doing more and more active shooter drills at places of worship. So the people know how to react in this. I mean, it's sad. Right. It's a sad comment. That's what they really make sense via. We're talking to a reporter in New Zealand, and she said it took twenty minutes or so for law enforcement to get there. And part of the reason she said is because they're used to this. That's right. The last mass shooting Australia's t ninety paled in comparison to the magnitude of this right from you make good point about what happened in Pittsburgh on October twenty seventh at the tree of life synagogue, a man who walked in there and slaughtered those eleven worshippers had said in a social media posting that I can't sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. That's a quote, you see some of that echoed in this manifesto. You see some of that echoed frankly, by political leaders where they say. Where they talk about. You know, things you know, that with regards to babies not being white rice, Steve king famously had actually just to make sure that I get right? You know, Steve king congressman Steve king said that the wanna give him the quote here right now, he said, white nationalist, white supremacy. White supremacists western civilization. How did that language become offensive? He went on to say, we can't restore our civilization with somebody else's babies when those sentiments are echoed in their repeated, and they're not just repeated deepen the internet repeated on a national stage by people who are elected officials. What does that do to people who might have thought this is just me? I just think this. But now people that are in the line might think this to we just saw in this particular case, a member of the New Zealand parliament issued a statement very similar sort of talking about an invasion of immigrants. It was condemned by the sitting government, but what it does is it sort of legitimizes this ugly. Disgusting semi antisemitic sort of language, right? If mainstreams, and that's what's particularly dangerous. Right. Because it suggests that there among political leaders some level of tolerance for this. If not encouragement, and I think that that again that encourages the sort of this is a mainstream idea, this is a legitimate political philosophy one. It's not. There wasn't a few minutes more. But you guys definitely get the point. So we're talking enabling. Yeah. I I agree with the thousand percent. What's worse is she she? And the those news people are furthering the anti-semitism argument which had nothing to do with what happened in that church. Those churches. Had absolutely nothing to do with what happened in those churches. Why do they even bring up the anti-semitism argument, it is irrelevant to what happened in those churches? They didn't bother to bring up the nine church church parishoners who were murdered by the white nationalist kid in the south did mention didn't mention them once, but they made sure they mentioned the eleven. People murdered and and the the synagogue. Who who would you wish and they kept furthering this anti-semitism argument? It had nothing to do with what happened in that church, those churches, and for them to do that that was shirking their responsibility. Which is what we're talking about here, and they contributed to. More mass shootings. They're coming. They're coming full person with have to be a fool to believe that they're gonna stop. They're not gonna stop. You're going to have more nut jobs out there continuing this type of behavior because in part of the cramp that we just heard exactly. U N actually also Tim in chat kind of stole part of my punchline, which is fine. Not a problem at all. But but you're you're you're absolutely right. Tim wrote in chat, tell me that doesn't sound like the expired Cheeto in the White House, and that that was part of going to be part of my broader point. These folks are able which means they are responsible for the reaction in in some cases, whether they want to admit it or not whether or not they wanna take the responsibility or not they are. And you know, I'll also even say ourselves in that matter, but you know, we have I guess you could say a specific agenda here, and particularly this segment is to point out with very specific examples of racism or the enablement of racism in my argument. And which is also I'd leave what Dave just said is these folks are helping not helping these racists continue that behavior. Oh. Oh, I got intention. Got attention. They read part of my manifesto. Good job CBS stupid. Absolutely. Lure made a comment that I think is important. She she stated, and I quote this making me physically ill in told Laura I'm sorry. It is. And I am not making that statement to patronize. I'm glad that it's making you physically ill because that tells me, and my gut that you were not one of these people that harbor these types of thoughts exactly now should everybody be physically ill. Absolutely because when people become disquieted within their physical being it makes them do one of two things. It makes them take action to correct it. Or it makes them hide within themselves to avoid. Being exposed to what made them physically ill. And I don't think you're the latter. I don't think you're one of those people that's going to hide to avoid being physically ill. I think. The previous. I think you are fighter in you'll stand up against things like this. And I'm hoping that all of our audiences that way, exactly and this. But these are the things that exist in this world, and they exist in this country more so than people are aware of I have something I wanna share when we finish this segment. Yep. I mean wrap up and just my final point on on the news media's back, basically may be maybe the news meet in the news media, all the news networks, shall we say shouldn't be Ebeling racists by talking so much about it. Absolutely. Well, that's partially. Why this is happening? Maybe just once they should stop competing over who gets the story. I will report. With more detail than the other networks over there. Maybe our congress should do their jobs for once and direct the Federal Communications Commission to institute, equal propaganda limitation standards for broadcasters. That scares the shit out of them. That in my mind is not limiting free speech. It's forcing areas of responsibility into mainstream news media to areas where the level of detail of situations that report on may enable promote or to use their words, quote, radicalize individuals or groups who intend to cause mass casualty I don't I don't find anything wrong with that. I think that to me makes sense legislatively. I mean, if we could co if we could trust Horford mainstream to quote, do the right thing. And police themselves legislation like that would not be necessary. However, maybe we're getting to a point that perhaps we actually need it. So thank you guys for listening to me on that. Okay. Brother. You are up. In my research. I came across an article that struck me somewhat profound and not so much because of the content although that was a contributing factor. But because of the person who wrote the article. And this article article comes by way of the guide in excuse me. One second. Needed to wet. My whistle. A moment. New problem. And the title of this article is white people assume niceness is the answer to racial equality inequality. Excuse me, it's not and this comes to from an author by the name of Robin de ngelo. And the byline is while most of see ourselves as non-racist. We continue to reproduce races outcomes and live segregated lives. There's make sure this is in the show notes this it's a fascinating article. And there's a caption to a piece of art that was. Generated with the article, and it goes onto say suggesting that whiteness has no meaning creates at alienating even hostile climate for people color working and living in predominantly quite environments and the stray shin is by Mick, young Lee. And miss de ngelo goes on to write. I am white as an academic consultant and writer on white racial identity and race relations. I speak daily with other white people about the meaning of race in our lives. These conversations are critical because by virtually every measure, racial, inequality, persist and institutions continue to be overwhelmingly controlled by white people. Now, I am by no means anti white. I I'm just not anybody. That knows me will tell you that. And I'm not going to give you the the old cliche examples. I've just going to say that anybody that knows me will tell you that. No, I'm not anti white, nor am I. While most of the ourselves as not racist. We continue to reproduce racist outcomes and lip segregated lives in the racial equity workshops that I lead for American companies. I get participants one minute uninterrupted to answer the question. And I quote, how has your life been shaped by your race in quote? This is rarely a difficult question for people of color, but most white participants are unable to answer. I watch as they flail some giving up altogether and waiting out the time unable to sustain sixty seconds of this kind of reflection. This inability is not benign, and it certainly is not innocent suggesting that whiteness has. No, meaning correct. I'm sorry. Creates alienating even hostile climate for people of color working in living in predominantly white environments, and it does so in several ways. If I cannot tell you what it means to be white. I cannot understand when it means not to be white. I will be unable to bear witness to much less affirm alienating. Excuse went on alternate racial experience. I will lack the critical thinking skills to navigate racial tensions in constructive ways. This creates a culture in which white people assume that niceness is the answer to racial inequality and people of color are required to maintain white comfort in order to survive. An inability to grapple with racial dynamics with any nuance of or complexity is. You big you ass- in younger white people who have been raised according to an ideology of color blindness. I've been working with the large with large tech companies whose average employee are under thirty years old. Why didn't -ployees are typically dumbfounded when their colleagues of color testify powerfully in these sessions to they daily slight in indignities, they endure and the isolation they feel in overwhelmingly white workplaces. This pain is especially acute for African Americans who tend to be at least the the least represented. I wish that term African Americans would disappear because Brown Brown and black people from this country not from Africa there from America. While. But again, it's a media label at the other day, you know, that when we say native American when we say again, that's I prefer the term indigenous in but for me, but that's that's a label. I've chosen to use not news media. Well, but then veneer of post racial society that essentially doing the Obama years has been ripped away by our current political reality most white people continue to conceptualize racism as isolated and individual acts of intentional meanness. This definition is convenient and comforting in that it exempts so many white people from the system point supremacy. We live in and are shaped by now again, this is coming from a lady that is white. This is a person of color writing this. This is a white person writing this. It is at the root of the most common kind of white defensiveness. If racist are intentionally at openly mean, then if our lows that night's people cannot be racist. How often will white person? Used of racism gather as evidence to the contrary friends and colleagues to testify to their whiteness. They charge cannot be true. They frame cannot be racist. Because and quote, and I quote, he's really nice guy in quote more to quote, again, she Bolland tears on the board of a nonprofit serving under privileged unquote to just going to insert row. Fouth that that's one of the arguments. I make about liberals right politically speaking that you know, that oh they're not racist in. Well, you know. Has just not true. Okay. We grace eve many many many examples for that still occurs. We insure we we often pick on Republicans here on this show. But the thing about it is is going on in the democratic side as well. So, you know, let's just not was not ignore that. So anyway, go ahead. I'm sorry. No problem. Not meeting to be racist. Also follows I'm toy also allows for absolution if they didn't mean it it cannot should not count. Thus. It becomes essential for white people to quickly eagerly. Telegraph their nights in his to people of color niceness, and these instances is conveyed through the tone of voice, light tone of voice, I contact accompanied by smiling and conjuring of affinities like shared enjoyment of music, John ra-, compliments on hairstyle statements about having travelled to the country of the other is perceived to have come from our knowledge. Excuse me to knowing people from the others community. Kindness is compassionate at off implicates. Actions to support or intervene, for example. I'm having car trouble. And you stop and see if you can help I appear upset after work meeting, and you chicken and listen with intent of supporting me niceness by contrast is fleeting hollow and performance. In addition to niceness proximity is seen as evidence of a lack of racism consider the claims, many white people give to establish that they are not racist. And I quote, I work in a diverse environment in quote. Quote, coating again, I know and or love people colour continuing the court now where do we heard that before very recently? Continuing the quotes. I was in the peace corps, or I live in a large urban city in quote, these are significant because they reveal what we think it means to be racist. If I could tolerate and especially if I enjoy in value proximity claims approximity maintain I must not be a racist. A real racist. Cannot stand to be near people of color. Let alone smile or otherwise conveyed friendliness. In a nineteen sixty nine hundred eighty six excuse me article about black students in school success. Cigna Cigna thea for Fordham, and John Abu describe a fictive kinship between African Americans a kinship that it's not. By blood or constant Geel or offense offense. But derived from the assumption of shared experience, the kinship the I'm sorry, the racial kinship white people attempt to draw from niceness might be seen as a false fabricated. Affinity. Most white people may lip segregated lives. And in fact, have no lasting cross racial relationships. We are in the position to choose. Segregation off the do can I can I have one one thing. Sure. Little native perspective so to speak. We didn't invent for example, borders, and I'm not saying that in the sense of the country's borders, but think of property borders. They're winning. We didn't carve up landscapes and say that little section is yours that over there is yours. So so this is inherent again back to Christopher's point. It's inherent. You know, this country grew up that way. It's like stay over there. We're over here because this white picket fence defines as such hit him saying. So yeah, the claim was young. I'm doing okay. Oh, the claims of non racism that we make are are there for based on the most superficial a shared experience passing people of color on the street of large cities and going to church on occasion with a co-worker. Have a story share? I was at lows yesterday. And then I'll go on with this article brand drop. Sorry, brand drop. Take into that there. I was in this. Let's see store that sells homegoods. No, he goes. I was in knows. Dirt's no going here. In their lawn and garden section and. My spouse, and I were in shopping for plants, and we were in this one section of lawn and garden, and I don't know why. But I just happened to look to my right down the aisle a little bit was another couple. A white couple. And you know, my I just you know, immediately like to see what other people by. So my eye mmediately went to the shopping cart. You stocker? Davis a lawn Stocker. There you go. Go to hold sorry. Bad word. Gotta Rick rake rate. What did you buy? And you know. I see lady staring at me. Now. I notice her purse is in the cart. Oh god. I see this lady staring at me. And then she picks up a process. Shoves it under her arm. Wow. Okay. And his. So you still are. Leans over whispers to her husband. And I didn't think that was happenstance. It's just not happenstance. You know, she was find wandering through the store with their person the car until she looks over and sees me. And then she grabs it and stuffs that under armpit. And that's the kind of crap that I go through almost weekly here. It doesn't matter where I am. I can be in the they the deep north. As a friend of mine often calls, it's the they're parody on the phrase, the deep south call it the deep north. And I go through similar experiences. I'll walk between, you know, two cars on the way into a store and are all here. Click. And I'll look over and there's some person sitting in the car that's just locked their doors as they see me coming. You know, that that example, you just gave it in the store reminds me of a routine that Louie Anderson. Used to do when he was doing standup, you know, Louis alive, but you know, he's in poor health. But he talked about how racist is own. Parents were never forget this retainer. I'll try to convey the same way. He goes, my father in particular is like really really rudimentary racist. And he goes, you know, my my father was basically kind of like this. And he goes it goes. You that to towards personal meaning don't guides. Don't look at them. Look at them. I remember this. It's not true though. Right. So this one time this this lady did this middle-age, the white lady, and I stopped and I knocked on the window. And I said I have three of these at home. I don't need anymore. Perfect. Perfect. There was there was another instance in another home goods store not still late now. The name the brand now. Not gonna do it. Another home goods store, and I was pushing one of these flatbed cards might be mile business. And this lady just says. Lookout, you might get run over. I said, you're safe. I haven't run over anybody in the last couple of weeks. So whenever I get a chance to to to tweak somebody I'm gonna because of stupidity like that. But it happens to me at least once once a week if not once every other week that sort of covert racism. Yep. Yep. Yep. So I'll get back to the story of the the article rather note that are cursory friendliness does not come without strings. Consider the case of a white California woman who call the police that's past may when a group of black Airbnb guest did not return her smile. Dick speaks the expect tation is that the nod of approval, the white smile will be sip Rocatica. This woman like all the other white people who have called the police on people of color for non-existent offenses bicker sleeve denied she was racist. After all she did smile in way before reporting them. I have heard many black Americans talk about the awkwardness of white people over smiling. It's true. The act is meant to convey acceptance and approval while maintaining moral integrity, but actually conveys white Rachel anxiety over smiling allows us to mask the anti blackness. That is the that is foundational to I very existence white, a fleeting benevolence, of course, has no relation to how black people are actually. Undermine in white spaces. Black friends have often told me that they prefer open hostility denies Mus. They understand the open hostility and can protect themselves as needed, but the deception of mice ads confusing layer that makes it difficult for people of color to cyber untrustworthy ally. Ship from dangerous, white liberalism gas lighting ensues. They defaulted. The current system is the reproduction of racial inequality. To continue reproducing, racial inequality. The system only needs for white people to be really nice and carry on to smile at people color to go to lunch with them on occasion to be clear being nice is generally a better policy than being mean. But niceness does not bring racism to the table and will not keep it on the table. When so many of us who are quite wanted off. Niceness does not break with white saw the and white silence. In fact, naming racism is often seen as not nice triggering white fragility. We can began by knowledge. Ing ourselves as racial beings with particular and limited perspective on race. We can attend to understand the racial realities of people color through offenses interaction rather than through the media. There's that word again or through unequal relationships. We can sit insist that racism be discussed I work places and a professed commitment to racial equality beat demonstrated by actual outcomes, we can get involved in organizations working for racial Justice, where these efforts required that we continually challenge our own socialization in investments in racism and put what we profess to value into actual practice of our lives. This takes courage and niceness without stategic. End intentional anti-racist action is not. -rageous? And again, that's article will be on the show notes if anyone chooses to read it than save it. I did send it to you. I think probably s. Yes. You did in Facebook grab it added to it. So thank you. You woke that the Barilla's really good article in the. People can use that to guide their own. Their own approach. Absolutely. I think I think that'd be good thing. You know? I would always thinking for whatever reason, you know. Key to mention them the media, we don't we'd just kinda did a whole thing on on that. But I got thinking about small businesses and communities in how much they're suffering. They talk often about one of WalMart opens up a Home Depot or Lowe's, or whatever, you know, how things have a ripple effect. If you really want to take power away from news networks is you gotta hit them in the wallet and less and less. People are going to the advertisers that frequent those networks often of which happened to be pharmaceuticals. You would enough since you know, if they started pulling their audience, which you know, you never raise your hand if you've ever received a poll from CBS news. Not me. Yeah. So so, you know, for them to claim they know what their audience wants is is ludicrous. And so, you know, it would I would love to see a cultural change in that sense. That all of a sudden they're going to pull people in ask him, actually, what you want is to cover what's important to you. You know that kind of thing I think the responses would surprise them. I mean, if they did it, honestly. And and and the one way you get their attention as you take their money away. You know in in that writing going shopping in your local garden stores opposed to Home Depot, or whatever. Or whoever you target the change. You know, you know, the X advertiser is is on the air all the time on CBS. And you know, I'm just not going to buy from them anymore, or if enough people did that of like, what would where's our money going? Why are they renewing? We'll see that's what I meant. I'm sorry going met him done. But you guys get the point that it does work. It's true. So it does and that that just hits to my point that I mentioned couple of weeks ago about we have the power to control. Corporations. We we actually do in. You. You hit the nail squarely on the head. Again, we have the power the dollar. And that no matter and the thing about what people don't realize it doesn't matter what your individual income levels are no you still have to buy stuff out there, folks. So it's like, you know, I if you're if you're only making ten thousand dollars a year, there's a lot of women inning country. There are a lot less than that, even but we all still have shop somewhere. And it's like, oh, you know, people don't make that connection. Always. No, they don't. But you, you know, the power of the dollar is is more. Where am I looking for? It's more of a motivator than than you believe you just believe led to believe and convinced that you don't have any power, but you do. Very true. Think Tim left Donut Donut agai, Tim. See you next time. But yeah that that article. Hopefully, we'll be a wakeup call for a lot of people because the lady hit the nail squarely on the head because that is what exists. That is exactly what exist in good. We do have allies in ending country. That are woke that understand that understand this. I remember I was listening to a podcast started up recently by. Oh my goodness. I just just vegetal names. It's called all my relations actually sent them out a tweet a few days ago. It's a Adrian keen is one of the co host Matija. I can't remember her. Last name is the second coast, and they had on Kim tall. Bear recently. Talking about native American DNA. And she herself Kim Tom bear was talking about, you know. Got on the subject slightly about you know, lack of leadership from indigenous people in academia in certain aspects. But she did about, you know, those that those non native people that learned from native people is better than and we've talked we've said that this on her own show. You know is better than you know. What ninety percent of what what is going on in Kadamy out there. So so these allies are needed, you know. Providing, you know, the hearts appear in their learning from from indigenous people, so I guess that was my point. But yeah, so it's it's you know, it's important important important. Yes, it is. This is what sixty five and. If it's not apparent to most by now, we've been talking a lot about. Women. This show we have and the title of this episode is the strength of women has been hidden for too long. Says so we will keep uplifting. Women. We will keep supporting women. And we hope that our listeners will do the same exactly. And you are up with the the next article. I most certainly am step away from the mic for the proximity to three minutes by right back. Alrighty. Thank you, sir. This next article reads, cannabis first female founded indigenous airline, launches on additional international excuse me, Women's Day. Iska wheel air hope I pronounce that name right will offer small charter flights to remote communities in. This comes to us from the CBC news. Mickey cowan. Canada's first airline. To be started by indigenous woman launched in Vancouver on Friday, which was last Friday or International Women's Day. And I quote, it's time said Teresa. Yes. That is a different spelling tear Frazier CEO of its will air. Which means woman in Cree. Frazier who has me Edis said she chose the name deliberately in celebration of women and matriarchal leadership. The airline will fly charter services in its single piper. Navajos plane in aims to expand on into a multiplayer operation in the next few years. All I hope they do. I wish them much success. The airlines for its partnership is with Homa home Oko wildlife and cultural tours based in camp. Bill river where it will help provide remote nature tours. Along with the launch the airline also announced it is partnering with an organization excuse me. Call give them wings an initiative designed to inspire indigenous youth of all genders until careers aviation. And I quote, we're facing a looming human resource shortage in the Asian industry, and quote Frazier said coating again, there is potential for this shortage to have significant impacts on indigenous communities and should commercial providers. Find themselves on able to service remote in northern routes. It's a great opportunity to address that. Frazier hopes that as a female pilot herself she can help encourage young women to enter the nation in the street in Canada fewer than six percent pilots are women according to the British Columbia aviation council. And I quote, we have made great strides in advancing gender equality in aviation unquote said chair Heather Bill, it's a long day. I'm sorry. And I quote, again, I long for the day when we don't feel the need to celebrate this gender difference in quote, she said, that's a great point too. I mean, you know, we're. Doing that division thing like male versus Email black versus white and. It's that's just so true. I remember we ran we ran a story about her probably better than a year ago when he was considering doing this. I'm trying to remember the context, but I'm very very happy to see that it got launched. Also, tremendous. And I wish I wish the airline lots of luck. I hope they expand in ways that they never dreamed possible. Absolutely. And as they hope I hope it encourages a lot of native youth to explore professions in ABA Shen. Absolutely. There's just so many areas that are people need need to get into not be afraid to get into geoscience is another one. Oh my goodness. I could talk for another hour on that. Why? It's so important just. Yeah. Don't try to get them back in my mind and make put a segment together on. But. Yeah, yeah. It's just all the, you know, anything in stem is so important yet for kids for sure. Alright let's see we've got about seventy minutes left in the broadcast to fill here. So on read this next article. And then I want to also do a segment on missing murder digits women right afternoon. So putting them together. Here made a good deal of sense. I think so the title of snicks article reads congress begins debating violence against women's act again. This is through Indian country today, presented by Jordan Bennett began. Jordan writes. Congress held a hearing Thursday to introduce a new version of the violence against women's act. Now the question is what will it take for that measure to become law again? One witness said Republicans, quote seem fixated and quote on gender identity will there that there's that again gender identity making it that much more difficult and quote hard to tell in quote, if they support the new proposal quoting again today, they seem fixated on tacking trans women that seemed to be the primary purpose today in quote said hearing witness, Sarah, dear Muskogee creek nation. Quote, I expect to get more pointing poignant questions today about tribal jurisdiction from Republicans. But I didn't get any. So I saw it seems like there was some sort of distraction going in said, and depending on mount of time I'll play a clip from from from Sarah. I believe I have a clip from her. Going on here. The subcommittee on crime terrorism and homeland security held a hearing today to discuss the reauthorization of the act going into its sixth year since it expired on February fifteenth quote, unfortunately, not only did vowel expire without being reauthorized. But because of the foolish government shutdown Lieven had a lapse in appropriations for Vala earlier this year, which jeopardised funding for domestic violence shelters end, quote, said chairman Gerard, Naylor, democrat of New York. Quoting again because of its importance in success via was reauthorized on a bipartisan basis in two thousand in two thousand and five and again in twenty thirteen and quote. However, the twenty thirteen reauthorization of our was opposed was supported by Democrats only this time around Republican said the issue is quote, two important, and quote, and it should be bipartisan issue, really. Well, here's the thing. They don't want to provide the funding and make it a permanent law because it's basic tenant is to protect women of color. You know by. The examples of mentality that I've seen from many white men. They don't believe white women need that protection is long as they just do what they're told and keep their mouth shut. That's the pervasive mentality for many white men that I've heard them say you heard it today clip from Turco Carlson. Yep. Exactly. And so we can we can say the these folks behavior and their positions change and Gotti audio. Okay. Yes. But the thing about it is I can't believe Tucker Carlson who paid millions of dollars for his quote opinions. On a network that has purported that type of racist behavior. Right. So you have to put everything in context if you're going to make a decision whether or not somebody has quote changed in the fact that he won't apologize for past comments says a lot too. So I won't be later. Belabor the point. But there you go. Why hope he's ready to retire because he's about to? Or going on here with the article Representative John Radcliffe, Republican of Texas blame the Democrats because they refuse to include a simple extension of the end of the fiscal year. Instead, he said they are using the law as a quote bargaining chip and quote for other issues, quote for all the women that I see is is this him. I 'cause I wanna. Yes. Okay. So that would sound a little something like this for all the women. I know install Vishwa has helped as prosecutor I can't help. But think about and remember all the women who were so fortunate women whose husbands or boyfriends put them in cemeteries because those husbands or boyfriends drank too much or became jealous too much or because they they like to hit women too much and quote Radcliffe said. In a voice learner that. Quitting him again. And because that I know what's at stake. If we don't reauthorize baba in quote, he says. So he uses supporting at least he's one of them that supports. Yes. Exactly the night. Probably shouldn't have used the voice because I only voice when I'm being sarcastic. And and I didn't mean to be really so much there. All right, but moving on here says it was in that time that he said he never asked victims their family members or other stakeholders if they were Republican or democrat quoting him again, I never asked because some things are more important than politics, and quote Radcliffe said quoting again violence is one of those things and quote. Our Representative Debbie Lesko Republican of air Zona who is also a domestic violence survivor addressed how controversial this Bill was in twenty thirteen and now. She blamed Democrats for not wanting to negotiate on the Bill. She wants a party affiliation to be put aside. You can't put party affiliation aside. If you keep pointing fingers at the Democrats, the Democrats pointing fingers at the Republicans on an issue like this the thing that I heard of that. I'm so tired of hearing the positioning. He's he was I'm sorry. Here's the most important thing. It shouldn't be negotiated on make frigging permanent law. Exactly. The only thing that they need to even discuss is how much money they're going to put into the Bill for the next year. Not whether or not it should become law again. Right. Make it a permanent law. We're going to we're going to authorize fifty million dollars for by this year. And then make it an incremental amount of increases for the next ten years. Don't keep reauthorizing the Bill. That's Bs exactly. So in fact, I'm so pissed off right now that the rest of this will be in the show because I want to get to my clip. Because the deal specifically with a component of this, which is missing a murder digits women because presumably this is where some of the funding towards that would come from. And so the subcommittee of indigenous peoples of the United States held a hearing on missing murdered indigenous women about three or four days ago. Me. Yeah. Now, what is the subcommittee of indigenous peoples of the United States as the lone subcommittee with exclusive jurisdiction over Indian insular and Alaska native issues in the house of representatives, the subcommittee on Indian insular and Alaskan native affairs, oversees matters ranging from national natural resources and land management ownership and leasing to Indian health care tribal. Criminal Justice department of reservation economies enhancement of social welfare and improvement of energy efficiency and renewable energy development initiatives on tribal lands and matters relating to the offshore territories and freely associated states of the United States. Okay. So I'm going to pick this apart a little bit. And show you why our government is so confusing. When we're talking about what this subcommittee has oversight of says here. Improvement of energy efficiency and renewable energy development initiatives on tribal lands. Matters relating to offshore. Territories. So matters relating to offshore. Territories. There's another agency called Bom. Bureau of ocean energy management. Who has oversight of what? Because when tribal nation is interacting on offshore affairs. We're going through Bom we're not going through the subcommittee. Because Bom is the federal lead agency. So that's confusing, especially if you're a tribe who am I talking to your a subcommittee, which means you're meeting on these issues presumably on a regular basis? And to have so many different types of things that you're overseeing is also. Potentially a problem. Neither something falls through the cracks right, but needless to say, this is the committee that was tasked to hear indigenous women of me missing murder indigenous women issues, so I started to at some of the hearing because it was it was available online, and I'll make sure there's a link to the full hearing seat you can hear it. So this is nearly seven minutes. And then I'm probably going to go back. I have to actually go into the editing software in over my other clip store. And impossibly play a couple of things, but it's important. And also before I go there. I want to one second. Are you guys? The chair of this committee is now because he was named chair this past January Ruben guy Galago he's the chair of this committee that were referring to and the subcommittee itself. I don't think I have that opening more, dammit, I was going to tell it is, of course, made up of Republicans and Democrats. But obviously would the Democrats in charge of the house at the moment. Mr. Gallego is a democrat. He's chairing this committee. I guess I'll leave it at that. All right. So. Here's here's a portion of that hearing. And then I'm gonna play probably another clip here. We go. The subcommittee for indigenous peoples in United States went outcome to order now. I will introduce our expert witnesses for today. Our first witness is a Syria. Choose a citizen of the Muskogee creek nation lawyer and professor of women gender sexual six valley state university of Phoenix. And also she has just recently been inducted into national women's hall of fame. Congratulations. And thank you for being here. Next is going to be the honorable Ruth buffalo citizen of the policies of the Mendon hit sat and Addicott nation and member of the North Dakota state house representatives. You're welcome honor. I apologize. If I've messed up any of those names and titles are next witness is Mary Kevin Nagle member of the Cherokee nation of Oklahoma illegal counsel to the national indigenous women's resource center and filing our last witness is Tamika room and Athabasca mother of four and executive director of the last native women's resource center. Thank you all for being here. Next. We'd like to introduce miss Mary, Catherine Nagel, she's legal counsel national indigenous women's resource center. In the morning, chairman Guayaquil German Bhave ranking member Paul Cook. And all the members of the committee. Thank you so much for inviting me here today, and for your time and consideration of this very important issue. I'm honored to represent as legal counsel to the national indigenous women's resource center, a national nonprofit dedicated to the restoration of tribal sovereignty jurisdiction to protect and save the lives of native women and children. The ended up your c has played a critical role in raising issues raising awareness around the missing and murdered indigenous women crisis here in the United States today. The United has hosted numerous educational trainings briefings on the hill, they've hosted screenings of educational films held candlelight vigils and collaborated with local grassroots organizations to generate support for a national day of awareness for missing and murdered native women and Carl's our main office is in lame deer Montana. And so. Our staff directly experienced the losses of both any Scott in Hannah Harris, this is a crisis that strikes at home and it strikes deep in September of twenty eighteen in WC hosted a candlelight vigil at the Smithsonian museum of the American Indian. We were honored that congresswoman win more came and spoke about the importance of the restoration of tribal jurisdiction, it supplementing with tribal resources to tribal law enforcement and compelling the federal government to take this issue, seriously and investigate and prosecute cases of murder missing indigenous women, but probably the most impactful moment of that candlelight visuals when Florence chillier spoke and shared the story of her daughter Monica who was murdered during a domestic violence action in the kimes canyon on the Hopi reservation. As to myself. I am a citizen of the Cherokee nation. I am an attorney, and I'm a direct descendent of tribal leader. My great great great grandfather who in the eighteen twenties as speaker of our tribal council worked to create an established Cherokee nation surpreme court and pass a law that criminalized the rape of any woman on Cherokee lands, regardless of the identity or race citizenship of the perpetrator. I'm a direct descendent of tribal leader who understood the connection between tribal sovereignty and safety for native women, and that understanding informs and commands the work that I undertake today, I think all of our in testimony the testimony of my colleagues today underscores the the depth of this crisis. The fact that are women are murdered ten times the national rate on reservations in addition to that incredibly high rate of violence. We also know that the majority of this from a statistic from the DOJ National Institute of Justice, the majority of violent crimes committed against native women are committed by non-indians. So even though are members of our own nations and our community. Are committing these crimes. We have a huge crisis of non-indian perpetrate violence against native women, and because of nineteen seventy eight the supreme court eliminated tribal jurisdiction. This is only exacerbated the crisis that as professor dear mentioned has been accumulating over hundreds of years since fourteen ninety two however when we look at the missing and murdered indigenous women crisis jurisdictional, loophole is a major source of the high rates of violence against women and the lack of response because of the supreme court decision in nineteen seventy eight and the currently will framework for tribal nation to undertake in arrest and prosecute a perpetrator who was murdered or kidnapped native woman. The tribal government must for jurisdictional purposes determined that the identity of the perpetrator is a citizen at a recognized tribe and Indian and if they cannot determine that that paralyzes tribal law enforcement and tribal government from working to protect their own citizens. This is the case so often that was the case with Livia bone bear. When she went missing in October of twenty seventeen her tribal nation could not determine whether or not. It had jurisdiction simply because they could not identify the identity of the perpetrator. And although her brother, Matthew loan bear repeatedly demanded that all state tribal and federal officials act immediately to locate her and to search for her it wasn't until ten months later. He'd been asking for ten months for the federal authorities to search all bodies of water on the reservation that they found her deceased in her truck at the bottom of lake sequoia so often when one of our women are girls goes missing. It is our family members our friends who undertake the search to rescue her not law enforcement that has to change here. You've heard of bring this up on on our show numerous times about the fact that there's no intervention from law enforcement, the families are left as she said looking for their lost. And you couple that with what we talked about earlier in this episode about the amount of energy that anew. Network will give to veggie on a name. But you know, the recent girl who was found he actually escaped her captor ran to a local house in the police call, but the news media was covering that situation for more than two weeks. White girl. But you hear reels in this coming straight out of the community now. Whether or not getting any help. And so two Lee's point is that fair and equitable. No not equitable wrong word, but is it fair? Absolutely. Not. Here's the rest of the clip. So it's not only jurisdictional issue. It's the lack of response from the federal authorities who oftentimes under the current legal framework do have jurisdiction and yet do nothing. Another major issue that I've written much about in my written testimony. And what the in WC recommends is more access to the national criminal information system in CIC currently today, only four seven tribal nations have access to this database is a critic forty seven out of five hundred seventy three federally recognized drives. Another statistic for you guys tool anytime, a native woman goes missing or murdered for Justice. And right now, the lack of access that tribes with only forty seven of the five hundred seventy three federal recognize tribes have access a huge impediment finally lack of resources, so many of our tribal nations. Do not have adequate funding for their own law enforcement as well as victim services as the Diversey has stated publicly for many years advocated. We are we are working so hard for it to fund victim services because we have to fund we have to deal with the crisis of domestic violence and sexual assault oftentimes those crimes escalate to murder and homicide. So we need funding for our victim services and tribal on force -ment. Thank you so much for the opportunity to speak today. So needs to be noted. On course, these these these ladies opening statements, which they are curtailed to five minutes, which is standard hat for for subcommittees on. My also wanna go back and read something Beth wrote and chat regarding when I was commenting on. You know, my frustration with, you know, finding the, you know, the proper authorities for tribes to interact with in brought up specifically offshore territories or they call federal waters, and that are tribes are told to interact with Bom and Beth wrote supposedly the subcommittee would provide oversight to Bom, meaning this particular subcommittee, so committees usually only do oversight. They aren't the direct hands on actors. He said would. And that's true. My only argument went to rodent chat as well. But we. But we as tribes need more access to the actual proper lawmakers. Those influencers those people that are shaping the very laws that affect our communities to go back to we've also the show we've reached out actually mad a chance to mention that. Dave, I the few weeks ago, I had actually reached out to the woman who was just speaking her organization because they arrested a series of billboards. In some cities on this which they said come on the show, but they were I think they were actually prepping for this herring. So we'll we'll get that. We'll get that to happen shortly. Because it's it's important that you know, that we help in any way that we can you know, to to get the word out and things of that nature. So. Any comments those five brother? No, they're just needs to be. Yeah. A lot more done than than there is being done. And the fact that there's nothing being done. It's not accidental. You know, the fact that they they keep throwing all of these reasons out. There's no funding. There's no this that can do that. That is. Direct admission. That they don't consider it a problem or important enough or important. You throw out all the excuses s don't why something can't be done or why something can happen. That is a directed mission to a lack of care concern or that even acknowledges, you know, the the party's bringing forth the complaint or they need it shows a lack of concern for what they have to say. Exactly. And. As long as we continue to sit in wait for someone else to acknowledge something that's been a decades-old problem. We're just gonna continue to do that. We're just gonna continue to sit in weight. If you want something done, right. Do it yourself. Yeah. In the the the challenge, of course, without though is is resources are are needed. You know, that could be something as simple brother is boots on the ground. Right. Looking exactly look looking for help out. Yes. We can we can certainly rally our communities to search for someone. But obviously, it's so much so much broader than that what I what I appreciated in her words was once again point out. You know, the lack of thority that are tribes should have on our, you know, on reservations with regard to prosecute to Ori powers in and something we've been chasing for ever, basically. Since since the the change was made. I forgot the date off the top of my head right now. I want to play the statements made by Ruth buffalo from this committee. But we do that we received an Email from one of Wizner z-. Probably a couple of weeks ago. Okay. And I wanted to wait for an opportune moment to to mention that E mail. And. They Email comes from Brian. I think you'll know who I'm talking about. Yes. Yes. I do. And it had to do exactly with the missing in murdered indigenous women problem. Not an issue notes. Not an issue. And I sent Brian a link to one of our previous guests, Jennifer too. She started a company that. Addresses pilot of the missing in the digits missing motored indigenous women problem. And I'll post the the house, and you that link again, and we can put it in. You know, put it in the show notes listed as one of our resources on at least tell tell audience what what it is. I can't pronounce the name out Kinna basket. That's what that's what it's called and the name. Means not one more. That's the whole premise of of her program. Not not one more missing in digits woman. Not one more and can biscuit is the stance for warrior women. And her her her program is self defense for women indigenous women to help keep themselves from becoming a statistic. That's correct. Yep. And Brian's Email that prompted me to send him that link was to. Create organizations with the ending country like search and rescue native FEMA, you know, even ham radio clubs to, you know, be able to pass information along at a faster rate emergency medical services, where people can respond when these instances come up, and you know, on the ground if you'd be amazed at how much can be thwarted or or founder discovered just by having that type of resource if we've had people right into asking, you know, if there there's a way to get like an app developed for for this for this problem as well. And what I explained was you know, sure, but it it. It's what's more important is the the information gathering aspect to that, you know, the databases, you know. Things that are our nation should have always had access to such as NCIS or see or excuse me. And and you know, I know I know my own tribe has just recently gained access to that. You know? So it's it's not crew tailed to only tribes that or you know, seemingly economically independent, these have been straight up blocks and resource problems of meaning access not necessarily, you know, you're not paying me enough money to access it. No, it's not that. It's, you know, a host of of other problems. I don't have it with me today. But but I have information on some other programs as well. But but apps or are, you know, certainly a tool that can be used on. But they have to tie this something in that was my ultimate point. They have to tied up. You know, the best information available right as. As you know, in in the best areas that that information's going to come from our communities, you know, so. Exactly. So being able to give people a way even if it's a website where they can entering formation. You know, by might, you know, my family members missing this is, you know, in any amount of information that they that could be entered into particular database, but even is something as important as this subject. There's still people that are very nervous about entering information into a website. You know what I'm saying? So, you know, it's the there's there's a lot of things that you know, we need to overcome in order to make progress. Even if we do it ourselves, which we really should totally agree with your brother, you know. But we need identify where those challenges are in an address them in comedy concerns too that people might have so ho-. Absolutely. And I think I think that's an excellent way to do it. Because. As as been evidenced by the clip, forty seven forty seven tribes have access to a national database when when every here's here's something. That's that's profound in it's the truth. When every police department in the country has accessed that database. Every frigging police department. So basically let let's let's let's play that out a little bit. So. I belong to a tribe, and I'm not specifically talking about my own being more hypothetical theoretical. I'm a tribe. I don't have access to that database. I want access to that database. I have to leave my res- and find the closest either local authority or most cases state authority. And then even then they might not give me access or they'll say, we'll handle it for you. We know what happens when the when they say, we'll handle it for you. It gets thrown into a queue with a thousand of the things and not deal Delta's priority. Exactly nothing happens. Excuse me. So that's why I think it's it's really important to establish a nap a national native database. Exactly. Going back to your point about responsibility. I think it's the responsibility of tribes to do. So. I just I just do because it's it's a problem that happens to all of us know tribe is immune. No tribe is immune. And each tribe has a responsibility to its tribal members to do so. That's just my opinion. They have an opinion to protect their tribal members. Indeed without question. I mean without question. So here's here's another example from another person who presented again, this is Ruth buffalo spoke at this subcommittee hearing. Here's what she had to say, hopefully, this place. Okay. For my. Machine here. And of course, it's going to fail me. Hang on. Why are you feeling me? This is why prep ahead of time. Oh, that's why you see why England. Honorable Ruth ipod jets. Ruth buffalo. Sabres North Dakota house rooms twenty seventh district. Monta goods good AGA tasted good morning Lido shot Z nakba, go meta. She Mia a dish heads. My name is Ruth buffalo woman. Appears thank you. It's an honor to be here in front of you to to share about this important topic. I am a member a citizen of the mandolin hit odds on recruit nation and descendant of the Coa Apache currently. I am representing district twenty seven in south Fargo. I am a newly elected member to the house of representatives in North Dakota. The sixty six just lead of simply I want to share a little bit further about my tribal heritage in our communities in the hit odds, specifically, a matriarchal society. And so the women carry pass on the clans. So I'm a member of the dripping earth clan. So as you can tell when we lose our women, it's a huge hit on tire community. We. Still hang onto some of these matriarchial traditions such as our women sitting during prayer while our men's downed because the men have such great respect for women. I have introduced four legislative bills which will dress the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous people in human trafficking, and I also want to acknowledge the good work that has been done by former Senator Heidi Heitkamp with regards to missing and murdered and also human trafficking. In addition. I have brought forward a study resolution to further examine the issue of missing and murdered indigenous people in human trafficking and a resolution urging congress to pass Savannah's act. This legislation has passed through the North Dakota house and now awaits action in the North Dakota Senate, it's important to note that the legislation introduced in North Dakota is non gender specific as we wanted to include all genders in using the language missing and murdered indigenous people. House Bill thirteen eleven seeks law enforcement training, and others and house Bill thirteen thirteen as amended would create a state repository on missing people, including the indigenous population house Bill fifteen seven fifteen forty one will provide human trafficking prevention and awareness training to hotels establishments in schools. House Bill thirteen eleven would provide training for states attorneys law enforcement officers in fficials regarding missing murder. Indigenous people the training would be provided by the North Dakota human trafficking commission, which is comprised of key stakeholders from tribal state in federal agencies in organizations in government house. Bill thirteen thirteen would create a state repository for missing persons including indigenous populations. This Bill comes with a fiscal note of seventy five thousand to update the software of this criminal Justice information system within the attorney general's office. In addition this Bill would address the need for accuracy in data collection of missing and murdered. Indigenous people. I wish I had more data to share with you. But the fact that I don't is part of the reason why I'm here as a resident of Fargo North Dakota. I found myself on the frontlines of the search for savannah in August of twenty seventeen elder women from the turtle mountain bound of Chippewa asked me to lead the search the following day in our culture when someone asks you to do something you don't say, no, especially if a female elder makes the request. We began the search on August twenty seventh my birthday later that day kayakers phone the body of the deceased savannah gray wind in the Red River from that day forward. Our eyes were open to the very real threat before us, and we formed a local task force in the Fargo Moorhead area dedicated to preventing such tragedies from ever happening again. And we thought if and when this should ever happen again, we didn't want to waste time and having to convince LAN for. Isn't that we that? We are human beings in that we deserve Justice. There cannot be there. There must not be any more stolen sisters. We simply cannot tolerate losing anymore. Sisters in this way. From my experience of being volunteer searcher. It has led me to find solutions. I thought of how savannah was an enrolled member of federally recognized tribe, but grew up in Fargo off of the reservation from the start of the search. I wanted federal agencies to become involved after all she was a member of the federally Rick of federally recognized tribe the realities of the situation dictated that we must work with local authorities when instances occur outside of the reservation. One thing that full forever ring, in my mind is attending the trial in hearing one of the murderers. Hear what he said that day to the police he told the police she always goes missing or she's always taking off. She her parents were just here last week looking for her when we knew the statement was faults, but it raises many questions did this comment sway law enforcement or not into taking swift action. That is why we continue working for Justice and for healing our communities. Some of the recommendations that would like to quickly mention is a national inquiry with hearings held throughout the United States in rural and urban areas to go to the very communities that suffered the last of their loved ones to include language of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls and people into the scope of work within the office of violence against women in the office of victims for crime as a public health, professional researcher. I know data tells a story without data. There's no clear evidence that a problem exists hundreds of communities hold stories of truth from generation to generation our communities. No, which relatives heavy to return to their families. We must help tell them. We must help have those stories told by giving them, tools and resources to do. So and eventually bringing the last ones home might get ups. And thank you for a long meted testify before you. So. Some more information for you guys back the accused would say something like that. Is. Against addictive. It is it is indicative shameful. She also made a point right at the end there something another point that we've made on the show not necessarily about the subject of missing murder indigenous women, but of I don't believe you until you provide me evidence. Right. And in this particular context, what she's talking about is if we don't have data they're not gonna give us money for resources like putting together database. Absolutely shameful. Because what she's basically saying is if indigenous people go into local law enforcement say, hey, my my child is missing or my sister's missing or something to that effect. Your like prove it. Because that's an essence what you're saying. I don't believe you prove it when you prove it, then I'll think about helping you. Maybe I'm being a little harsh. I don't know. But, but that's I'll say this much. That's the perception that can be communicated. Yeah. That's pretty close to being true. You know? I was toying with the idea that there there is a thirty minutes of broadcast time we could consume if we choose to brother, I was even going to try to play some of the exchanges, the tween the committee, and the ladies I haven't honestly through that half of of the clip. But it's I don't know. Do you think that would be valuable? The exchanges. You're not all that. Obviously. Like an hour long. It was like over an hour long hearing. So. I going. I'm sorry. Go ahead. I'm sorry. I think it would be valuable what the respect that. It would it would show. The resistance. That's that's put up against something. That's so sorely needed to to be a permanent law. I don't know, you know, how much resistance there is the back and forth. I haven't listened to the whole exchange. I haven't either. So I don't know. So we can experience it together. Salute me, again, I have to do this from within the video editor us. And so I kind of have to queue us to that point. Let's see. Then I have to step away from the mic. One more time. Let me see let me take this off. And let's see we're at about here is it unique opportunity to recognize schism. Sort will ever name in front of me, miss some Jerrell? I know she's from one the Alaskan native communities as she wraps up her testimony issues in make corrections to the laws to support the nation's first people's, Dan. Thank you so much for to all of our witnesses. Did the clip die? It sounds like it may have. Well, until we get the clip back again. Sorry. I just want to say Mr. Gallego who is chairman. He's democrat. He's going to speak. I this much. I do know here we go. Again, I want to expert witnesses for their powerful testimony reminding members that committee ruled three D imposes a five five minute limit on questions. The term will not recognize members for any questions. They may wish to ask of the witnesses. I will start by recognizing myself. The first five minutes. We'll try to our ranking member go on from there. Thank you again. From is. This has been I think very difficult for many of us to to listen, but very much necessary professor deer in your testimony. You mentioned the sovereign bodies institute, a nonprofit native owned and operated organization, what is the importance of having relations such as SP work on data gathering projects related to 'em. I w and to how acceptable is this information to federal agencies. Thank you for that question. I believe that it's critical that native people are at the forefront of this effort, even if we were to receive federal funding, it still should be that tribal members, and families and survivors should drive the data collection and one of the reasons for cultural reasons, if someone is going to add a name of a missing loved one to a data set is sometimes need for ceremony feasts that are associated with that. So it's the federal government collecting the data. They're not necessarily in the position of providing that. And so we do need. Well, federal data would be helpful. I really believe that the forefront should be led by indigenous women survivors in their families. I think that nonprofits hand partner with federal agencies, but it needs to be on the terms of the indigenous people at the forefront and that will help our families. Feel comfortable in coming forward and sharing their story. And sometimes it's been decades, and they don't believe anyone cares anymore. So we need to do that outreach. That requires grassroots efforts said the professor Representative of with buffo you spoke about the progress of your bills on the issue in north the North Dakota legislature in my home state of Zona a Bill to improve data missing in murder digits women just United passed the house this week and headed to the state Senate. Can you can you speak to why it's important to address this crisis at a federal level as well. As the local like you are trying right now. Mr Chairman and members of the committee. It's very important that all levels of government pay attention to this issue because we have a larger population that also lives off of the reservation or off of the exterior outside of the exterior boundaries of an Indian reservation. I'm so that is why we are focusing on a state level to make sure that we implement mechanisms that will tell a story will show that evidence that there is an issue here in that we need to pay special attention to this epidemic. Thank you. Thank you Representative. Mr. ru of how does M I w differ for last contries versus tribes in the lower forty-eight, n how do these differences impact your attempts to address the issue from Alaska, there's many jurisdictional differences in Alaska compared to the lower forty-eight tribal communities and those jurisdictional issues have impact in a couple of different ways. A lot of our tribes are very isolated. We have two hundred and twenty nine tribes only one is federally recognized as a reservation in that's Medlicott, LA. And because of that the two hundred and other twenty tribes are under the jurisdiction repeal to eighty with concurrent jurisdiction with the state of Alaska to there's half for their law enforcement, jurisdictional and Justice systems through the state of Alaska at this point because of the isolation of the tribes in the differences in terms of distances the cost of those distances, it has created a mess in terms of the fact that there's very difficult times. I know that Joel Jackson who you referred to from the native of cake often tells the story that they'll get faster response for killing of most out of season than they will of a native woman. And unfortunately, that's not just a story. And the problem is that law enforcement, the lack of law enforcement and Justice systems in our communities really does create a crisis in terms of living in our is slated communities. So so I mean think about that. Now that we shouldn't care about wildlife. Obviously, we should okay. But to put the priority reverse. I know is insane. He'll unfortunately, we also have a large number of native people that live in the city of Anchorage and Fairbanks Juneau and other what they call hub communities and the response there tends to be I I don't want to oftentimes. Native women if they have other issues are often not taken seriously, especially if there's been some kind of crime against them and there's oftentimes mini crimes against them. I think they're very we have very vulnerable population in the cities, and unfortunately, then law enforcement's response also laps any real care. Oftentimes. Thank you, Mr.. And now like to recognize my record member of Mr. Cooke for his first question Republican. Thank you very much. Once again, I wanna thank witnesses. I noticed a see. Wilson pipes done in the audience number of years ago. Went down Cherokee North Carolina where there was. Play native American play. I think he was the star of maybe it was I don't know. But it was a great great play to emphasize vowel violence against women, and some of these things to outsiders that they don't see, you know, I think some of the things that you under underscored were all concerned about in the back of my P brain. I'm trying to figure out why this is horrible terrible. Now, how we going to correct this. So that we do this. And we talked about the differences in people are concerned about confidentiality in everything else. I I think identifying the problem getting law enforcement all those things a database. There was a woman. I can't remember name. I think relies time was MAC marriage. She was not a police officer. But she wrote a book about what she did in these killings in California. All over the place, and this one person when you look at this just what she passed away, unfortunately, and then book became a bestseller, or at least it was. And I'm trying to think an almost what I want from you, I understand anecdotes name ocean and everything else one. I'm hoping is that the the collectible wisdom here that you give us a battle plan a battle plan where we can kind of turn it into action. Terms of construction constructive laws and policies that unite everybody. Okay. Let me pause right there. What the hell is he talking about? My presentative buffalo, and that's how address her because she is an elected congresswoman for her stay in in North Dakota. Read off bills. House bills believe from North Dakota offering them up as. Things that they can use the language. They can adapt. Adopt. Whether or not they're they're law in North Dakota. I don't know because I had I didn't research the bills close enough. But there was at least six or eight bills that she read off and he's talking about a roadmap. See this. What we're talking about losing. What we do the work for them. And they don't they don't take it. Well. Just another way to deflect and Ebeid. That's all that is flecked away from the conversation innovate responsibility. Hers. Let me see let's which people liking scroll head here. Do this. You guys don't hear the noise. All right. So. Yeah. Beth just rodent chat. He's putting the responsibility for action back on native people, his it's his frigging responsibility. Well, yeah. Guiding Gallego kind of looks. I don't know he must've cracked joke or something. I don't know. Okay. We bring the audio pack up. So let's see what's going on next by tempt to help you from embarrassing. This is certainly not going to be the last time we address this because this is a serious serious problem. And when thousands of our US citizens are sisters, go missing, it is responsible for us to not do something with that like to move on to next Ron of or down dice here in to represent Cartwright for his questions. Not sure what I miss. Usually, folks, go back and forth by party affiliations. So I'm gonna resume. He's a damn. I wanna take moment. Thank chairman guy. Yeah. Go for calling this important hearing and also to my new colleague congresswoman Holland of who who raised this issue in her campaign. In fact, she called 'em. I w an epidemic in her campaign. And and I think she's right. So thank you chairman for for calling this hearing. My understanding. I if I'm mistaken, please correct me my understanding is that victims of violence and tribal communities are often reluctant to report and share information about crimes, and that the part of this is tied to the historical relationship between settlers and indigenous communities, and that this is a particularly strong barrier in rural communities and professor, and I wanna say chief Justice, dear can you give us some temples of what these that's right to I'm Hala. She she she is or or also was a chief Justice at one point for her nation concerns are how plays out in present times. And I'm particularly interested in the difference between rural and urban communities. Thank you. Thank you for the questions. I think that historical mistrust that many native people have in law enforcement is well-founded. I think that the history of law enforcement in Indian country has not been one of necessarily protection, but one of persecution. And when you are a native woman and your sisters and your aunts in your mother, and your grandmother, and your great grandmother have all been victims of violence and nobody's done anything. Why would you come forward? And I think that trust has to be built, and it's not going to happen in one Bill, and it's not going to happen in one year that trust is going to take years and years and years to rebuild. I think the challenge in the urban environment. Is that native women, particularly if you know, she is not the perfect victim. Like, Elizabeth smart drew shoting that good on CNN primetime. If she's had an addiction problem or she's been homeless or maybe her children have been taken from her and you go to urban or offers Vatian police departments oftentimes families, tell us. There's just a shrug in a will what did you expect? And at that point. Then the family is left feeling as though nobody cares. And so both on reservation offers relation we need to develop in, cultivate, a culture of compassion and a culture of understanding, and that's not something you can easily do through legislation, but I believe with the leadership of congress. We will begin to see a sea change in that that problem. Thank you and Representative buffalo use use spoke about a couple of issues that I'm interested in data and training. Data. We're interested in ways that. These concerns can be overcome. What you said in your testimony wrote it down without data. There is no clear evidence that a problem exists. So what can we do to improve our data collection systems? For example. You suggestion your testimony that the language of 'em? I w included in the scope of work for the office on violence against women and the office for victims of crime when I'm after here is can you give specific examples of language that you think should be used before she answers. Dave, you know, I don't know if we disagreed on this point or not. But I understand why they why they do this as a matter of fish Ince's, but I had raised the point in the past. That what happens a lot in legislation is they take a series of bills the group together, and they put them all under a larger Bill, and then the money is distributed in let's say it's approved and there's a lump sum of money approved that supposed to address all of those things, and then people end up fighting over which one is a higher party other. And I mentioned that in the context of missing marine digits women and had one I had preferred at the time, I guess to see that is being funded independent of autism degree because that's what I was afraid. What's gonna happen is if I wa did ever get reauthorized where was the priority in dollars ago? So what's the part that you think we might have not agreed on? I don't know. I maybe I'm wrong. But I you know, I just had sought maybe having it independent of our in. Maybe we'd industry. I don't know. Sure. In my opinion, Vaa, which should not be a writer Bill. So it has to compete with funding for apparent Bill. Got you. Yeah. It should be a separate Bill. Is that what it is doing no bottle? I think it's a rider Bill. Okay. I don't I don't think it's apparent Bill unto itself, and it should be. Okay. Let's let's let's hear what our responses here. Thank you, Mr. Cartwright in members of the committee. It's unfortunate that we. Have to. Have the ask to include the language of missing and murdered indigenous women girls and people so it's I I will say that. I. Inform almost but also, you know, our efforts at the on the ground level at the grassroots level. Our our grassroots and four prevention how can we prevent these tragedies from further occurring? But we do have to address the existing structures in what systems are currently in place. So we we do need to include. We believe this language of missing and murdered indigenous people at the state level what we found in digging deeper into the data collection. Statewide is that North Dakota does not currently collect any data on missing people. So that was we'll talk further about okay? Thank you for the suggestions. I also understand you propose legislation to condruct conduct training for law enforcement and your legislature. What are some of the topics that you think this training should focus on so mister car, right? And members of the committee at the state level with the training where we are tapping into existing structures such as the North Dakota human trafficking commission. So that commission is comprised of different experts in the field. So this legislation is giving that ATI the. The the the freedom to. To provide that training to law enforcement within that commission, the human trafficking commission. There's members of the first nations women's alliance who have established in built relationships throughout North Dakota in the region. So some of this training would look at perhaps, cultural competency training understanding the differences within tribes. Some that are matriarchial just understanding also trying to find ways to build trust until work towards healing Justice in our communities that your show much he'll back. Okay. I'm gonna have to stop there because we're up against the clock. Kind of again the link to the entire hearing will be in the show notes YouTube video, and you guys can certainly. Grow through that. We encourage that for sure. So there you go. Newest thoughts on that brother. There are some nations that are stepping up to ensure that things are are happening. Those back to me saying. Want something right? You got to you have to do it yourself, and some nations are stepping up to do that very thing because they know as the chief Justice said. The the mistrust is justified. It is it's justified. So it's not you know, that has specked of of you know, cooperation as going to happen overnight. It's it's something that's gonna take time. But. If tribes wait until that trust is reestablished. Many more murdered in missing women are there in girls and men and boys are going to be exactly. But that's that's all I have on that particular clip. No, I agree. I really don't have any more this time. Like, I said I'm gonna do my follow up in with. The other organization, and and see if we can get to get some folks on on the show, we can talk about it more because I'd like to I would like to. Actually pose those questions when it comes to things like, okay, we know roadblocks have always been, you know, or not roadblocks excuse me, when I meant to say was excuses that come out of government be at state or federal is budget. And and and from the same point of view that you've already communicated about doing it ourselves have we broken down a little more Grindley to figure out in. What is going to take to create, you know, a nationwide indigenous database that? Because that's in my opinion that that's where some of the starting point is. In data that we control and that we can build off of. So, you know, apps or whatever, you know, local tribal law enforcement can access, you know, stuff like that. Right. And it, and you know, the information should be accessible by a number of means, not all tribes are going to have an infrastructure that will will accommodate internet. Yes. That's right. So so how immortal where they don't rely on that. Yeah. Right. Make it assessable via phone or by whatever means. So you know, it that it has to be, you know, viable resource for for everybody. So. But I think it's worthwhile to try to kick start something like that. It is a matter of fact, in my opinion. It's it's it's necessary to kick start something like that. Because as we've seen by wa is up for debate. Yeah. Yet again. So, you know, while they're doing that native country Indian country should be career ending their own version of Bauer where it's not up for negotiation. And we develop resources, so you know, instead of waiting ten months like that that poor family did to find only to find a family member of the bottom of a lake in her vehicle xactly. Xactly? Have resources available to put in motion right away. Give you for instance. You'll see why say this every time there's a a major earthquake or you know, disasters where people a buried alive. Almost immediately. There are organizations that have search dogs. That are put into place and that are flown there. Immediately almost overnight. To help assist and those types of disaster. That's that's that's a great point only, two minutes left. But I'm gonna I'm just going to throw this in the real quick. Just just to see examples of exactly what you're talking about watch television programs reality TV because this actually rally TV does make sense watch something like north woods law. Because you because they they do cover missing person cases, many times Tigers get lost in the woods. And they roll out the army to find folks. With all those available resources. And that's not the, you know, but, but if if it framed that this is an indigenous persons that's going missing the whole approach changes for whatever reason, sure. To to an example of, you know, complete complacency. It makes zero sense because we're still American citizens at the end of the day. So excuse me. So so what the tribes have to fund the programs themselves. So what? If that's what's necessary. That's what has to happen. And it shouldn't matter whether it try has little resources or tribe has a lot of resources. Somebody's got to pick up the slack somewhere to make to make sure that it works. So. All right. Well, again, you guys we appreciate you taking the time to listen to us hair. Absolutely. Do we know it was going to be a full show this week? And we thank you very very much for listening. Again, if you need to reach us spur easy. You can Email us hosts with an S hosts that native opinion dot com. Are you can find us through Twitter, at native opinion there or our Facebook page, which is Facebook dot com slash native opinion podcast. Can also leave us voice militate six zero eight hundred five five nine five. We would love to hear from you. If you have stories that you would like to submit please Email them to us. We do look at those. Appreciate it very much. If you have stories in the areas of racism that you'd like to share we are interested in hearing about that as well. We're also looking for music submissions. If you're an indigenous artists in particular you'd like to get some airtime, please let us know through Email again hosts with an that native opinion dot com. My name is Michael kicking bear from the Mashantucket peak watt tribal nation. He is David grill from the Cherokee tribe. Ella? Bama Dono that goalie. Thank you guys very much. Thank you all that have been in chat and listening to us live. We'll get next week Saturday nine AM take care. Bye. Bye.

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