17 Burst results for "Kandel"

"kandel" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Experience

09:09 min | 10 months ago

"kandel" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

"You can't save a bitch that was saw can't save a bit. Do you remember when these songs and then they would have answer songs and the like. There's been a bunch of those right where they would. Someone would have a song and then someone like some would have a response. Song to that comes. Scrubs scrubs was then they had another one it was. I can't remember. But i know. Just listen. i saw you standing in the rain. Wasn't there one of those orange juice jones so when they're an answer any orange juice jones if i know any as today just immediately told how to know or did you jones how cool he was orange. She's shown the shed. That song was the best at a time that was original kind of song did nevertheless on the told the whole story of getting done wrong like that especially didn't tell it in the rain right like everybody knows that story but you follow this couple in the rain and then at the end when the chunk. Yeah that's a gal. Bits cannot here and credit cards and everything. Yeah that was made people. I came over here. I'm not selling ship joe. Got more stuff. You've never heard this right member. My black ash right. Yes thank you we We kept the other one in california because we weren't sure if we're going to be going back and forth. Yeah you got that. We'll look at this one right here. There's some holes in his house candidates for holiday toes not like h o e. There's some hose in this house candle. That's a look at this window. Joe because i fell in love with yellow spring. That's one of my top sellers yellow spring candle from the streets. To the creeks from the who into the woods from horse to ores from adidas. I got a whole store book and this was the white chicks out there. 'cause i got a lot of white bitches updated okay. Karen kandel name was karen refined for like thirty years. There's more deaths a. He'll turn into the home shopping network. That's what i wanted to voice over the same time at the same time. I opened up a online store. And doing well okay. You have a website that we could just put up screens to deliver these objects out one after another. Joe you know listen a little thing you scam with the phone. You call them. I don't call it objects products. Give me my candle back. But is it not a product. If you don't want them joke do you gonna use them. I'll definitely use them. I like candles. Those are good to soy to their soy. Yeah their hand point in the. Us them back. And i don't do anything with soy is a candle man. Don't disrespect that people what get mad at. Soy soy is like a political fruit or vegetables it. Yeah yeah yeah people call your soy. If you're a republican people call week men soy boys. That's a it's an insult. I never knew that. Soy is one of the rare foods. It's actually attached to being a bitch. That's a pussy food. Yeah like if you're if you're a guy was really in the soy and this is not my perspective this is just i just think it's a fucking it's plant doesn't matter to me isn't that mommy isn't that soy like when you have a at a japanese restaurant isn't it sort. Yes yeah isn't that isn't the case jimmy. The first time. I ever tried a mommy. I was so ghetto. The whole thing and i was i was like mud throw was killing me. So partisan outside. I didn't know about salt and everything in the al jesse. Saw some seats of just a mommy. It takes away from it. You wouldn't even want it. It's the whole process. The whole process of rippin asleep. Eta means our whole immature soybean sometimes referred to as vegetable vegetable type soybeans their green and different color regular soybeans which are typically light brown tan or asia. So it's the soy. I like it a moment. I don't mind soy but a lot of people think of soy as being a bitch food. I'd never knew that that it was a healthy. I mean i knew that is not the most masculine food it was like you. Step your game up. Were you into the eta. Mommy lane it's like. Oh shit motherfucker. Eat at a mommy now. There's a reason. I think soy lowers your testosterone all. Yeah yeah we can produce. Estrogen like activity in the body mimicking the effects of natural estrogen. Yeah but i think you titties office. Oy not quite but in my family is you might femininos you. Fuck slants affect your your hormone production. Do you know. They actually develop testosterone like synthetic testosterone for wild yams like plants from wild. Yeah that's how they that's how they develop some artificial testosterone or executive tests. That will be part of the whole silence on blue pill era. That's a different thing though. That's just blood flow. that's nitrous oxide. So why nobody promoting while oxide nitrous What does it what does it nitric nitric oxide. That's like a. No explode all those pump things you do when you wanna get jacked weights. Lot of those those supplements they mimic the same sort of effect just not the same degree as like finance right like at like viagra and silas and shit like that. But they don't they don't make you have more testosterone. What these like soybeans. And i think really for affect your hormones. I think it's just like it can. It's a it's a possibility like chemically but in order to actually do it. I think you'd have to eat some fucking preposterous number of soybeans. I don't think it's like no. I don't think it's really has to worry about. But i think it's just a stereotype. I didn't even know that the thing for me. I didn't even notice stereotype. The car toys. I didn't know that. I thought it was like a like you. You're evolving a foodie. Like the first time. I i was like oh shit. Y'all don't know about the the mommies. Because i was introduced somebody else too but i didn't know that it symbolized been a pussy. It doesn't it's silly people silly to taste good. They do it right. Put a little chili powder and salt on the outside. I like to see so. I like tesol to. I'm working at a stadium. Joe are you really doing rfk stadium. Where's that in washington. Dc when doing that. thanksgiving weekend. Oh shit it's not the state of his departure lot outdoor show. I'm doing outdoor show. Just like the ones that birt's been doing not at that level. I talked to bert about that. The per shallow to the catbird is the guy who started off. People aren't giving him enough credit. He's the these. og of drive shows. Yes but if it right into his whole shit he never stopped. Torn burke toward through the entire pandemic doing drive throughs and i was sending. My drive is dislike throwback thursday whatever he was like this and then the name of what would this summer. What was the name of the two of the hot summer tour. I'm like this motherfucker. But he created the bubble. He fucking did. It created a bubble stay drunk entire summer and enjoyed it. Good time i don. Rfk stadium original stadium for the for the washington redskins. The washington redskins to beautiful. But for nine years. That was my a traditional show at dc. Improv i will do thanksgiving weekend and it was a good time for me because i got to see my family. I got to work. That's a great club too so great to seek that one of the ten greatest clubs in the country and it's been probably the most consistent for twenty five years so good it's just the perfect size perfect everything about it's perfect and i get every year saw it is. I don't even know the comic can do bad in terms of ticket sales there. Everybody seems to do well. At least the law neighbor they have they book good line-ups like when it clubs got that much prestige. They've been around that. There's certain clubs like comedy works where people just trust them. You know there's a bunch of helium in philly. Just trust them. There's going to be a good show. They're not going to scrubs. And that's that's how the dc improv felt like that. They've developed community a real for for nine years. I saw my son from administration. Took them up. It was just him in my arms and then the next time he was kind of like crawling next time he was walking then he walked his head like four years of pitches of his growth there and then because of the pandemic put the weekend was like damn dead blows a tradition. Now and then pip. They made a pivot from the dc improv. To partnering up with tc pull up. Whatever it is and it dawned fucking outside. She s beautiful. I like the people are adapting this one of the things that you're saying like you start. This business and bert started doing things. Outside and thompson girls doing like these pay per view shows thompson. Gura and bert kreischer doing these. And and sometimes christina. They switch back.

testosterone Joe rfk stadium bert kreischer Dc washington redskins Karen kandel nitrous oxide thompson california washington jimmy christina viagra executive burke Gura philly
"kandel" Discussed on In The Limelight

In The Limelight

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on In The Limelight

"I'm here with really Miller. Vanity fair's. House of culture, entertainment and celebrity passed from the crashes to Kate Middleton and everything in between on this week's episode. Another flurry of reports about Megan and Harry potentially coming to blows with William in the Middleton's. Also, the return of Thomas, Mark, all we knew it was coming that anticipated sequel. Also, Megan Harry are saying goodbye to yet another staffer who has an incredible nickname. We also have some amazing conspiracy theories from listeners about the whole Megan indicate if at all that Josh, and I hadn't even really considered on previous episodes. So I'm excited to get into all of that. But I thank you to everyone who reached out to us about musty Churchgate. Like who knew this would be such a source of like fervored conversation. Right. Josh I love it feels somehow it feels just like appropriate and on brand that this was something. Like is become a gate. The air fresheners and the church scenario. Right. And as reported we spoke last week about the report that Megan thoughts Saint George's chapel. Windsor was too smelly. So she wanted some hand atomised to fresh in it up. We had a few listeners including Karen who'd reached out via Instagram message. Pointing to a report that the fragrance brand dip TC is claiming they actually scented Megan and Harry's Royal wedding, and they claim that Meghan Harry, personally, chose a selection of fresh and floral fragrances that was perf that we're perfect for spring. Mysteriously though, not doesn't specify which of the sense, they used isn't that weird? I guess I don't know. I don't know. Maybe they signed some sort of NDA or will it feels weird because if they're like coming out with this like, quote unquote press release, you would think they would just go out the way with it. Why not give it the hyperlink to you know, like, the the Meghan Harry Kandel package like I would I would go for it. And I have never bought a candle in my life. Right. So I guess we'll just have to leave that up to our own imagination. I also love that. There's actually a two thousand six interview Meghan gave where she says, quote, unquote, fragrance is my favorite thing so much. So that if I leave the house don't put any on I'll turn around and go back home. Same me too. I love every Meghan quote that our old begging quote at this point that gets turned up. I feel like becomes my new favorite. And this. This is like this is rose the ranks immediately fragrances my favorite thing. What if I what if you went on a date, and you just said to that to someone like fragrances, my favorite thing. I don't know. How one would react. I wouldn't know how to get out of there fast enough. But amazing I love that. We got so much. You guys are the best. Like we ask a question. We immediately get so many responses directing us, exactly what we needed to know. All right. Let's talk about this explosive report. And before we even do this. You might want to clear out your schedule for the next ninety minutes because there's so much to it. I was going through this report. I read it on my phone. I think in bed like Saturday morning like vaguely hung over could barely take it in and had to put my phone down. Then I rent back to it later Saturday and pick through the quotes. That's when I sent you Giulio my God the quotes of this because they hadn't even read them yet, Jillian texting about this. And then today, I got visited a third time. And boy, let me tell you. There's a lot in this report. So it is from Emily Andrews, we should give her credit from the sun who is a very reliable Royal reporter what I liked about. This report in particular was that it didn't feel waited in one direction. It didn't feel like it was very Kate supportive. It didn't feel like it was very Meghan supportive of in Philly goes, very, William Harry. It just felt like it was giving sort of the lay the land everyone's coming off a little bit. But different motives, you're all about that. Journalistic neutrality also touting its do Oscar winning movie or something anyway. So it's called bad blood brothers. So basically, the kind of headline Prince Harry went mental accusing William of trying to wreck early the relationship with Meghan Markle. And I don't know about you. But I was in from that headline..

Megan Harry Meghan Meghan Harry Kandel Kate Middleton Meghan Harry Meghan Markle William Harry Prince Harry Harry Josh Miller Thomas William Philly Oscar TC Windsor Karen Emily Andrews
"kandel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Now, you hear that I'm emphasizing response to a patent of activity, the standard model of learning and memory is one where that isn't the issue. What is the issue is that it's the long term stable strands and on your other podcasts from Eric Kandel in others. They will tell you quite a lot about the studies that have looked at long term stable strengthen his role in learning and memory. But what we're saying? Here is something quite different which is that when a patent of activity comes in it might have necessarily a simple patent like a five hundred train synapse number one might respond very effectively to that. But synapse. The ten might not. But then you have a different frequency like a two hurts train. Well, it might be that other synapses in respond preferentially to those. So if I now have lots of synapses in the brain, I can modify different ones. So that when patterns of activity come in you can recall information that's being stored in this map of the brain. So it's an entirely different way of thinking about memory. It is a different way of thinking about memory. And I think it it has certain similarities with the standard model and some major differences. I just want to emphasize the similarity is that in the sort of standard ball, wear long-term strength is a key thing. And I'm not aware these patterns of activity of the key thing. Both of them dependent on the molecular composition of synapses. That's the first thing. So there's a common out there. But what we're saying is that this issue of recall, see, that's a really an interesting problem in learning and memory, researching must be will study how information is stored. But frankly, I think it's quite mysterious. How information is actually recall? I mean, how how does it pop out when you buy something or not pop out yet or not popout? Well, L studies indicate that is when a patent of activity goes into this field of synapse diversity. I emphasize the diversity of synapses essential now model that when you have diverse in obsesses, you can instantly recall information out of that. And we show now paper in a sense how when an animal was doing different behaviors you get these sort of different responses of the snap Thome map. And we have an is video in our papers. Well, which sort of illustrates that rather rather nicely. So how would you go about testing this hypothesis? I mean to like say someone's going to figure out which which model is closer to. Reality. What would be the next step? Yeah. This is a fun question to some extent, we've been going down that track because we have used genetics, and we have some work, which we hope to publish in the near future, which basically asked the following type of question if we make gene mutations. Can we see any evidence that the term stable strength is the key thing or this patent detection is the key thing. And there's a general strategy used by geneticists sanity avocados of scientists which is called genetic association or genetic dissection and pulled us the full ahead of the Royal Society gave a nice description of it once on television when he tried to explain to people that if you want to look at a person who has lung cancer, you might notice that they have yellow fingers that car nights with a lung cancer. But it doesn't mean that it caused that lung cancer, you know, the yellow fingers didn't cause cancer. Obviously we. We know that Kansas caused by gene mutations in cells in the lung, but people can often be fooled by carnations, and what you're looking for is dissociation of coronation, so in effect in the case lung cancer, you might like to show his a person who doesn't have yellow fingers, but they still have lung cancer. And that would innocence prove that those things can be dissociated. So we did this big genetic study where we made lots of gene mutations in lots of mice..

lung cancer Eric Kandel Kansas Thome Royal Society
"kandel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Work of Dr modern others has focused on the the firing patterns of nerve cells their lexical activity and one of the aspects of our current study that we performed was to ask how do these different synapses which have different Maneka compositions respond to different patterns of activity, and we used computational approach done by professor Eric Franson from dot com. And he demonstrated that these different synapses can respond give a different output when you present them with the patent. Of activity. So this simple concept sort of big concept that comes from that is that you have many different types of synapses synapse diversity and that produces different responses to patents of activity, and this is a beautiful thing. Really? Because even though it sounds sort of simple. And maybe so rather trivial it leads into a new model. The how memories can be stored and recalled right because it would be recorded differently. According to which synapses it hits. Well, yes, let me put it like this. If the molecular composition of synapses controls, how it responds to patents activity than if I change the molecular composition of a synapse Enel change. How response to a patent of activity? Now, you that I'm emphasizing response to a patent of activity, the standard model of learning and memory is one where that isn't the issue. What is the issue is that it's the law? Long-term stable strands and on your other podcasts from Eric Kandel and others. They will tell you quite a lot about the studies that have looked at long term stable strengthen his role in learning and memory. But what we're saying here is something quite different, which is that when a pattern of activity comes in it might have necessarily a simple patent. Mike five hurts train synapse number one might respond very effectively to that. But synapse number ten might not. But then you have a different frequency like a two hurts train. Well, it might pay that other synapses in respond preferentially to those. So if I now have lots of synapses in the brain, I can modify different ones. So that when ends of activity come in. You can recall information that's been stored in this map of the brain. So it's an entirely different way of thinking about memory. It is a different way of thinking about memory. And I think it has similarities with the standard model and and major differences. I just wanna emphasize similarity is that in the sort of standard wear long-term strength is a key thing and Amazon where these patterns of activity of the key thing. Both of them are dependent on the molecular composition of synapses as the first thing. So there's a common out there. But what we're saying is that this issue of recall, see, that's a really interesting problem in learning and memory research. Must people study how information is stored. But frankly, I think it's quite mysterious. How information is actually recall? I mean, how how does it pop out when you get something or not pop out? Yeah. Or not popout. Well, I'll studies indicate that is when a pattern of activity goes into this field of synapse diversity. I emphasize the diversity of synapses essentially now model that when you have diverse in obsesses, you can instantly recall information out of that. And we show now paper in a sense how when an animal is doing different behaviors, you get these sort of different responses of the snap Thome map. And we have an is video in our papers. Well, short of illustrates that rather rather nicely. So how would you go about testing this hypothesis? I mean to like say someone's going to figure out which which model is closer to. Reality. What would be the next step? Yeah. This is a fun question to some extent we've been going down that track because we have used genetics, and we have some work, which we hope to publish in the near future, which basically asked the following question. If we make gene mutations. Can we see any evidence that the long term stable strength is the key thing or this patent detection is the key thing. And there's a general strategy used by geneticists sanity other kinds of scientists which is called genetic dissociation or genetic dissection and pull nece the former head of the.

Eric Kandel Eric Franson Maneka professor Amazon Thome Mike
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Your work, but not just your work everything you've lived through in eighty almost eighty nine years. I'd like your advice, I wanna perform better at everything I do as a human being which includes, you know, relationships living being happy career all the stuff three most important pieces of wisdom or advice that you would offer to someone say who has twenty or twenty five what would you offer just three a good marriage is a marvelous marvelous bedrock and which deliverance life. You have not only a lover. But a best friend whom you can really rely on all circumstances attend. You S bullshit in. This is not. And that's so helpful to have. She no access to grind. Not infrequently. When we go out in the evening. I tried to say, right, Bob, blah, blah, blah, blah. You know, it's wonderful that were person who's concerned about you from a different point of view. The new concern about yourself as an objective perspective and a good marriage is just a wonderful thing. That's one. So definitely have a good marriage. He had two more career is not a bad idea. Okay. To really really enjoy. And knock yourself out to do something original limit and to stay physically active, physically active, beautiful pieces of advice. And thank you so much. It's been a great honor to be able to interview you in to learn from your life's wisdom. In addition to old, the amazing neuroscience. They've done your career. Thank you again for being a prof- radio. Dr kindle, I really enjoyed discussing things with you. We we got the show would you would you normally recommend to people at the end of the show that they read something or look at something from the guests to learn more, you have done so many great things that I'm not sure where I should send people shouldn't ask them to read your most recent book, would that be helpful? So I I've written full books for the general public. I think the one that is probably the most interesting. For the general public is called in. Search your memory. The emergence of new signs of mind. The New York Times book review said is scrupulously decay, que get magnificent panoramic autobiography, I didn't write that. Goes on arresting in indeed, unforgettable an enchanted. Nice thing to set about his been a road three of the books. I think that's the best book. That's the best book RS general introduction to my work. And the first of the full the next book ever over is called the age of insights, the question to stand beyond conscious in awed minden brain competed, nineteen hundred to the present. And that takes my interesting Kokoschka Sheila Viennese artists come from. And brings my interest in autumn. Today's Aren a third book wrote is I'm interested in pointing out how the autism scientists and not to worlds of fought. But Welford artists used the same kind of strategies that scientists use in order to solve that problem. He was reduction strategies. So they may paint in very simple ways. Take a Rothko. Like, this example, what can be more reductionist lightness, right? Or does you know bands of Colorado's? If you sit in front of one of these paintings in second religious experience because each one of those bands of color is in fact, several years top of each other. You can see the deeply is coming through. And surely a almost religious experience. It's wonderful. I love that you wrote a book on art and brain science, it seems like sometimes in the quest for reductionism and western science the role of art gets lost and hearing so mob. Listen, it's so such if you go to my house, he would have such a good time. Even my office. I have ought hanging on the wall hip. Denise, and I just love to be surrounded by on weekends, usually at least one museum or something. Like that. That is so beautiful. If you've liked today's show, I highly encourage you to read some of Dr candles books, and any of these books will be illuminating in. It's rare to be able to get inside the mind of one of the great leaders of science and see how he thinks how we've all been even how he thinks the brain in art interact. So if you like reading or we like listening, I highly recommend Dr Kent books..

Dr kindle Dr Kent Sheila Viennese minden Bob Denise Rothko Colorado The New York Times eighty nine years
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"A big difference for me what difference? Did it make? Well, it's such a fantastic story of seeing this whole animal life revolve. It really provided by Allah and fiction. The same context got it. It's it's always interesting to hear what someone who creates work goes to for inspiration. And what would offend tastic? Would offend has take just perspective on it. I love the fusing biology in fiction. When when you do sit down to write your next book on paper. Do you form the outline in Philippine or do you just let it flow from your brain? In didn't redrafted. I usually have an outline of something. In chapter couple of chapters. And I sit down, and I just scribble it out. I just read, you know, I don't pay much attention to the detail of form min across things out can correct them. But I consider the first draft just really beginning. Get me going, and then my secretary types it up for me, and I play with it and amend whatever an expand your your process. Definitely seems to be working because you are you're prolific as a writer in addition as a scientist, and that's something that I know I can learn from. So I'm thank you for sharing your secrets and you'll rage. A very very good point one of the things that I find to my surprise that distinguishes me from my colleagues every bit as good as I am in science is that. A communicate better with the public in part because our rights, but also I was on the Charlie rose program have been a number of television programs that is not designed to allow scientists to speak in straightforward language to the general public, and I've always enjoyed doing that do you think that's because of the time you spend studying psychiatry in spending time on a couch with or this with the patient on a couch. No, I think is due to the fact that. In my early years. In addition to being a competent scientists are results recognized recognizes very good teacher. So I was recruited to NYU to develop the neuroscience program there and then Colombia's stole from NYU to develop the neuroscience program there, and I worked terribly hard to develop those programs. I would. In medical school in neuro. Science course are making up the number. Let's say forty lectures, no, pressing gifts for lectures. So what? Might give AIG lectures, ten lectures. And then you have a number of people, you're five lectures, some people own give to lectures, and but I would do is. I would not only respond that choose. I would wear the whole course. Said then listen to other people such as they saw that. I did this. And did they started to do this for themselves? And I always my early years if I was going to Chicago to give electrode rehearse it. I never encouraged my colleagues in the same thing. So that really got me help me and understanding when am I getting across when am I confusing people in us, very helpful? I'll see you practice being teacher in becoming an excellent teacher in the new took that into your writing very well said that those beautiful and inspiring for me. Thank you. Dr candle. I have one more question for you on our interview. If someone came to you tomorrow into based on your life experience, including.

NYU scientist Dr candle AIG secretary Chicago writer Colombia
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Look at how the world's changed over the last almost nine decades of your life. Do you have any thoughts about how the world's going to change over the next nine decades? You have the benefit of having seen way more history than I've seen you have wisdom that I may have when I'm ninety. How do you put on your futures hat and say how here's where I think things are going to do you spend time on that deal? Do you have theories about it once that aren't proven yet? I have a difficult time living in the present at much about what's coming into the future. I clearly see that for example in medicine. There are many problems that will beginning to understand. And that we're. Beginning to treat, and they look at better and better, for example, coronary artery disease, we know that diet is very important for that. No, hypertension has to be controlled in order to minimize cardiac damage has separates after. So we've learned a lot of hygienic rules that improve the physical quality of our lights, and they're very important. And they're not that difficult to follow. The trouble is that people become addicted to separate patterns, they come addicted to smoking. They come up addicted addicted not to warn to glass of wine in evening, but to several glass of wine followed by several glass of scotch, whatever beginning with Scott tonight, dogs, whatever the sequences. So I think what has to be reasonable about. But when takes in. I think died is very very important. So so far someone who starts now in their twenty. If they take advantage of what we know about walking in food. They they have a much better chance when they're ninety of having a a highly functioning, brain, absolutely absolutely, also, watch your weight obesity. It terribly is true mental I weighed three hundred pounds when I was about twenty three. Wow. And I'm nine point six percent body fat right now. And it took me years to figure out all the stuff that was going on. But I think you're terrific. Now. I I would have to just double down in what you said they're being obese. It's really not good for you, including for your brain absurd. It up it is there a field of medicine knowing what you know now that that if you were to start over that you would go into if. You were just entering medical school. Now, what would you pay the most attention to? I don't know. I still like sokaiya tree. Which is what I restrained in. It was a primitive discipline when I entered it. It's a primitive discipline now. But it's making progress we're beginning to understand the brain better. And better I'm beginning to relate different mental illnesses to different parts of the brain. And although we have not made tremendous therapeutic progress in the last twenty years if you look a period of forty years, we have made significant progress, I think that will continue to come. It's an Arab here in which much growth is likely to occur. So even if you were starting your career again today, you would still go into country. Yes. Also, like one aspect important part of psychiatry psychotherapy, if you will being comfortable with patients there, you know, good behave in their bad behavior. They're painful being if you..

Scott nine decades three hundred pounds twenty years forty years six percent
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

05:18 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Schizophrenia and Parkinson's an addiction endure clear meadow, conjure links to those things in the neurons have more metal contra, and I've spent a lot of time on my last book looking at how to might O'Connor behave that affects how neurons behave, and and it seems like if there's not enough electricity being made by medal Qendra you. Couldn't get enough synoptic firing in that that may be an important an important part at least in some conditions. Knowing that you're not a might have contra expert does that that theory, hold water, given that you know way more about the brain than I probably ever will is that an area worthy of exploration a mobile congre than you have will after read up on that at the moment. I'm not convinced. Okay. But at least worthy of asking. Okay. That's good deal. I import all the roles that have learning memory a we absolutely don't affect. I think we don't know. We don't know very much about them at all right now. I want to go back to short term memories. What's the difference between that example of remembering a phone number? What happens in your synapses, some of that, you know, you're only going to need for a little while versus something that gets embedded in your brain. I know we're talking about repetition, but what's happening at synoptic level. When you just wanna remember it for a little while this short term change in snapped extremes. When you learn something for short term memory memory that persistent minutes, the synapse changes, but is a functional change in it only lasts for minutes. But if you learn something through repetition, we'll because it's very proud for for you. You actually see an anatomical change occurred. The synapse the senators becomes anatomic more powerful Ness reflected in its physiology. Also, the presynaptic terminal is larger the posting up the contact point is law. So the synapse is much more effective because it's an atomic getting more effective the mental differences between short term memory. Term rate short memory involves a functional change to simmers. Long term memory involves than Tomiko change much over that. Tom changes produced by alterations in gene expression, says signal gets sent from the synapse to the nucleus. New. Gene products are produced transported out to the center apps, and that allows the growth of nursing app to connections. Is there something we can do to increase meaning consciously to make it easier to remember those short-term things in make them longer term repetition? My boy. I'm feeling good. That you've told me that five times. So by repeating it for me than albeit will remember it up here. For the third session. Let's talk about exercise. Excellent. We know that exercise is good for the brain at this point. And when the New York Times interviewing you I think last year, you said you've exercised your whole life. Now, there weren't a lot of people who practiced exercise in the fifties and sixties, but you did what made you decide to do that. I'm embarrassed. Terry this festival I was in Vienna. Nineteen thirty eight when Hitler much thin. And one sport the Jewish boys in Vienna. Learned after Hitler marched in to runaway. I was surprising eating fast when I came to the United States. I tried out a my high school track team at a respiratory high school, and I was co captain of my track team in my senior year. In fact, it was the coach of the track team who asked me Eric way applying to college. And I said I'm applying to Brooklyn college, my brother's going to good school. And he said have you ever thought a Harvard? I said, no, he said, Ryan, Trump horrible. I applied the hovered and I got in. That was due to might track. Coach pushing me not that. I was great track start over that was not obvious that good enough to really compete strongly at that level. But I was quite good in highschool placed in the city championship and Iran on a realty three other people. So we let him his four people, and we wanted all sorts of major events the Penn relays the sequel relation cetera. So you you learned in high school that it felt good and you just kept doing it ever since. Right. But I became very athletic a day in high school. I was almost crazy in the amount of time has been practicing for owning a I heading. had a co captain team. With me was a guy called Ronald Berman who also is my roommate in Harvard. We went to hover together he was better than I was together..

Hitler Harvard Vienna Schizophrenia New York Times Brooklyn college Parkinson O'Connor Ronald Berman Ness United States Tom Terry Eric Iran Ryan Trump
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Learning is learning the grammar, repeating things practicing speaking it. Etcetera etcetera etcetera. Practice makes perfect is one component of learning. I have found that for me to really learn something at the deepest level. I either have to teach it, and I was a teacher at the university of California for for about five years or I have to write a book about it. What is it about teaching or the act of synthesizing to right that makes things stay in your brain? While you described it perfectly. If you really take it apart. So you understand the component parts at how they fit together. So that you can explain it to your grandchild's. It's gonna stick in your head as well. As making it easy for the grandchild to understand it. So taking a complex piece of information and simplifying it thinking it through is very very good way of learning you hold onto it for a long time. Is there a better way to do that? While repetition is very good. So see the road or if you don't understand it. It's very hot. Remember got us, those either repetition or disassembly. Reassemble in new way are the two big techniques related kiss in your newest book. You talk about some that you could call a unified theory of the mind. How would you explain the one theory of the mind around how our sense of self emerges from physical matter? Well, people used to think that brain in mind, a separate the brain mediates walk in a running motor activity. He's but mind, you know. Understanding something communicating something else is not mediated by the brain. Now, we know that every mental process is about logical process that comes from the brain. Simple complex, trivial sublime. They're all brain prophecies, every mental processes, a brain process has been a major Vance of alleged fifty years have you dug in on the role of micro Qendra in the mind or in the brain amid I've obviously know that the congress source of energy in cells are important to dictate it sent absence, but I've worked at Monaco Henry in any particular way. Okay. You haven't worked in particular way. Because I know that in your book on disorder things, you talk about autism in.

Vance Monaco Henry university of California congress fifty years five years
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

05:33 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"All right. Get me out of these clothes into a dry MARTINI as the officers to say. All right. Let's talk about memory. Your memory is exceptionally sharp. You're going to be celebrating your eighty ninth birthday about when the podcast hits the air. My birthdays a few days after your so a happy birthday in advance. What have you done to keep your memory both short-term in long-term working as well? As does. I don't do anything specific about it. But you know, I read I write at talk to people. I don't go home and memorize poetry. But I stayed till actually involve many people my age have retired a longer involved. I'm talking to you from my lab. This is my office. The search is going on just any of the side of the wall here and I'm involved in. I don't work every day our Newark about five and a half days a week. But but I'm here I'm intellectually involved in what goes on in science, and it stimulates the brain. Also. I mean, when I'm out of the lab also stimulate the brain Igor to the opera, man. I do think almost everything you are not doing the closer the day involves intellectual activity if uncountable mobile so continuing to exercise your brain by using it keeps it younger running. Can you talk about self perpetuating memories? And what you've discovered about those by self-perpetuating human what a self perpetuating protein at the synapse in that. If memories are sustained for a long period of time. What changes versus things you remember as a phone number? You dial it and you forget it. They're all mechanisms at the synapse in once you produce a change in synoptic strength producing alterations in the local machinery for protein, synthesis. It keeps the process going. So this alteration in gene expression that gets transported down to the Senate tax and that allows the synapse to produce more protein, so more. Substances that unnecessary to strength med synapse. What happens if you're remembering something traumatic versus pleasurable. Well, they both produce alterations in synoptic strength. They produce it in different systems that some systems immediate pleasure. Some systems that mediate pain to croup different Atta Tomiko pants ways to mediate one versus the other. Do you support the concept of PTSD post traumatic stress disorder? Absolutely. I was hoping you would say that certainly something that that. I I've I've experienced I able and scare you I can tap likely. The next time and we'll start. So there's no question is true followers. We have different thresholds. Some people are much more sensitive to it also want to really frightens much more susceptible to list redneck stimuli. Do you think that's something that we can change? No. Mean I think. I think that's built into us. And it's probably beneficial. You wanna be able to start until we wanna be able to move away from stimuli that a dangerous, but we should be able to get. Progressively, better ways of helping people overcome excessive fee that they show on a variety of circumstances. So for example, if somebody is at the a war front and sees a bomb exploded nearby and his terrible noise is associated with. They may be frightened every time they here even a slight noise that set of post traumatic stress disorder one should be able to get them over it. If only by bitch waiting to. You know, play the sound in a way, it is clearly knock you ass- and convince the person's nervous system that no damage is gonna Kerr. Is there a way to look at the way we lay down pleasurable memories and use that kind of that that system in order to get an active when people are re-experience seeing. Those sounds in others is their way to to turn the brain onto pleasure mode versus fear mode, not too easily. Why do we remember things from childhood like a song that sticks in your head from childhood and other things like high school algebra, just go away? What's going on with the way, we store in sort information like that? Well, I mean, something's in what satisfying will meaningful twist than others and probably something's your mother's love or the first girl that you met in really likes. This more important here than high school algebra is a measure of importance. And satisfaction on his faction. Do we have any other control over our memories are stored? Yes, repetition repetition. Okay. If you wanna learn French, you can't have one conversation in French in expected to master the language, you have to go and learn it and one way you're.

us PTSD Newark Senate croup Igor Atta Tomiko Kerr
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"But the first thing is very carefully read the literature. Let's see whether you're take population of people, let's say a hundred people thousand people. And you expose you confide them into two groups it control group and experimental group. Give a control group. Seltzer. Give the other group, whatever the experimental drug news. And you see what is the difference between the two groups? And then you can statistic eight inside whether or not. The drugs that you're testing is bred official and how it what it does. That is beneficial for you, it may also be detrimental, but may be beneficial. But it may carry some downsides it it's very important to understand how a drug works in all of its ramifacations before, you You know. know, wanna prove it? That's why the FDA is there to evaluate the safety of these drugs. It works really well for populations to do that. And when you have an individual looking at a drug same daffodil, which has a well known cognitive enhancer in some people. It doesn't do anything in other people. It turns the lights on in a new way in changes their ability to think even their typing speed, and I'm looking down the road and saying if we know that there's this statistical curve of how it works across a population. Do you think we're getting close to being able to tell a genetically or environmentally or via some other mechanism whether a drug is going to work for one individual versus abroad population. Or do you think that's still far out in in on the drug in certain you'd see that genetic predispositions? Allow the drug to work or prevent the Drexel marking. So there are some situations in which a biological formation that we already have that person or can easily obtain on that person. Well, tell us whether this drug will be affected for ineffective in that particular individual. I'm hopeful that companies like twenty three and me in ancestry dot com. That are now getting genetic information on hundreds of millions of people in Sunday people to to do kind of the broadest epidemiological stuff possible to see not only does this drug work. If you share that information with him, but it only works for people who have this whole genetic profile. And and I've started to see some new information coming out of that. Do you think that that that approach is going to be adequate to peel back the onion on on many drugs, or is it gonna take more than that? I think you really hit the nail right on the head people differ from. One another biologically that is you know to reach a Netflix. And if you look at any single drug in population, that'd be very -bility in how effective the drug is and knowing the genetic makeup of a person, and if you've tested that drug in a variety of different people different genetic makeup you can predict but this is a good candidate for the drug or this person's bad candidate. And that's important to know because of a person has an illness. It can be helped by the drug. He may be one of a number of people that illness that would be helped. But there were other people who have other biological predispositions may not be up to the more. We know about the biological underpinnings of a person the more likely we ought to make intelligent decisions. But which kind of drugs won't be held several which kind of disorders. I'm exceptionally hopeful that this new data said is. Is going to change our understanding of individual biological variance. So that those unusual brains an unusual neurological structures in unusual genetic structures it can be teased out. And we'll be able to go into a doctor and say, oh, why don't you try this set of compounds? Instead of this set this happening. We are beginning to get it just early stage but stations can tell from your biological history. By the one kind of anti hypertensive medication is more elected to be better for your another..

Seltzer Netflix FDA official
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"The neuro circuit you'll find at the connections between sensory nerves in the motor Nour's getting progressively weaker. So that was the first demonstration the learning affects the strength of the connections. If you scare the hell out of that sit the startup that same stimulus to produce a very weakly reflects for producer much larger reflects, my strong reflects has called sensitization. We look at what happens at the neural circuit is seated connection that Reseda begin within at a certain strength that we can with the nation moved in the opposite direction sensitization became much stronger. So that was the first demonstration learning involves the change in synoptic strength are neurons communicate with each other that is turned out to be a general principle. How could we take that new understanding of the brain and apply it to the things that we do as human beings who played tennis? I play ping pong. It's pretty close. Okay. You when you practice ping pong? Do. You think you're doing pretty much changed synoptic strength. It's continue to hits you're getting real, you know, reflects gets more and more effective officiant. A number of things go on your attentional system. Also proves to strengthen connections in order to do that. Recently, the military's been using trans cranial electrical stimulation to increase learning speed. In fact, I run intellectual current over my brain when I played ping pong sometimes using a device called the halo before that. I used them electrophoresis machine to do it. And it in studies in the military. It seems to let people learn specialized skills about twice as fast to think that's a dangerous thing. Or maybe a good thing. I think you'd have to not just stimulate the Brennan, a very general you'd have to stimulate specific areas. Yeah. I think you know, as long as the Senate a control fashioned limited to gre-. It's an experiment. It is much Sanchez. It works in. What circumstances doesn't were what if the age range of people who benefit from this? So it's you know, it's a new finding it needs now to explore the terms of safety and significance at this point. It definitely passed the FDA and it's just running on the motor cortex regions. So for for physical skills, and I'm I think I see differences, but it's hard to also blind myself because you can feel it in. It's also hard to know. Maybe I would have learned that fast anyway, without the electrical current, but this is also liked it to be most effective in people who have damaged the motor cortex for one reason or another to allow the recoup their regional function bringing other areas that compensate for the fact that the primary areas that. Weakened by this these. I'm also very interested in your work on nicotine. I interviewed a professor from Vanderbilt University who wrote the first paper in nineteen eighty eight on using oral nicotine, not smoking for treating Alzheimer's disease and has been studying it for a long time. But I also know that you've looked at memory disorders, mental illness in nicotine addiction along with your wife. Denise what's your take on nicotine after this research? Well, nicotine access the brain at enhances the actions of certain drugs that you take after nicotine. So it has a powerful effect the brain whether it's all beneficial is not at all clear. I don't think smoking is a particularly good idea. But smoking more than a Cotin. Yeah. Also ailing all the stuff that comes with the cigarette. I would unequivocably say having newer near your level of scientific credibility, but ridden some science books in looked at deep smoking's just bad from an aging perspective smoking is more than not much more. Dow ailing all the stuff that comes with lit cigarettes. Yes. And for nicotine itself, it it seems like for some brains d'oeuvres, very strong benefits, but for other brains just doesn't work much like a lot of things. Yes. How would someone listening to the show? Go about knowing whether coffee nicotine a joke sort your any other compound fish oil in anything that may affect their brain. How they go about knowing whether it works or not given there's so much individual variability..

nicotine motor cortex sensory nerves FDA Reseda tennis producer Senate Dow Sanchez Cotin Vanderbilt University Denise Alzheimer's disease professor
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"To be valuable for helping adults. Learn better, or do you think those factors are that? That's not enough. I think it's unlikely that those factors will help without sodas certainly possible that we'll get some compounds hormone substance fish, it will enhance cognitive capabilities the substances that you mentioned those that normally present in brain. And the particularly helpful if some part of the brain has lesion that produces that. So by giving it exhaustively you can compensate for the Natura production of that by the bright. Okay. That makes a lot of sense. I want to go back to two years before I was born back to nineteen seventy when you looked at how chemical signals change the structure of the connections between synapses. How did you arrive at the breakthrough to understand that what what was the the learning process that led up to the moment for you? We're talking about the plight. A pleasure between a nineteen fifty seven nine hundred sixty. I worked at the National Institute of health and a head earlier in medical school at a six months elective period in which I could do whatever I wanted to. And I wanted to be a psychoanalyst. And I thought that even a cyclist should have something about the brain. On the brain. And I just loved it on based upon that one experience. I was nominated for the National Institute of health why nominated, but I graduated from medical school physicians who being drafted into the surface for two years stint. But those that were eligible, but selected for research program at the NIH, and I were selected for research program at the NIH, and I enjoyed it so much at stayed not two years, but three years and had a wonderful experience there. And but I did there was to record from. Single cells Nipah campus the area, the brand numbers don't be very importantly involved in memory storage. And I found how he sells worked, but it didn't learn that much about memory storage. I realized this study memory dictate the beginning you needed to look at behavior and see how.

National Institute of health NIH two years three years six months
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"He's been described by colleague as one of the truly great intellects one of the greatest scientists and greatest neuroscientists of the last hundred years and something I would agree with Dr Kent dealt. My wife said he'd at Caroline's institute where you gave an acceptance speech, and she was actually in the audience when you accepted it, and she asked me to tell you at the beginning of the interview that your medical textbook was her favorite book in all of medical school. And so she was really excited when when she found out that we were going to get a chance to speak lives of truly an. Honor to have you on the show. But I'm delighted to be here. You recently wrote a book called the disordered mind what unusual brains? Tell us about ourselves. After decades and decades of research and looking at the mind, what do unusual brains? What did they tell us about ourselves? What what what can we all learn from this? I've never had a chance to talk to someone who has this much knowledge in one brain and ask that one. What did we learn the one point? Well, we see what different regions of the brain. Do but their function is because we see that if some particular behavioral function is at one Bill we can trace it down to particular brain architecture, and that allows us to relate structure to function. There are a number of ways of doing it. But there's a very powerful way of doing that. What did the different grade region separations mediate in terms of behavioral function does this mean that if someone has a structural problem in their brain that they're that? They're stuck got hit head when you were a child that party brain doesn't do what it was supposed to do. Is there hope if it's a child? Yes, example, you have damage to your left hemisphere, which is involved in speech. Instead of Chris used in adult. You have something which is very unlikely to return to his normal level of function. If this happened to you on your list, let's say twelve years old. There's a very good change that the right hemisphere will take over and compensate for it. So this plasticity in the young rate that is lacking in your brain in mind. Do you believe that will ever be able to turn on childlike neuro plasticity adults? Probably not from not. Okay. What what drives that that sentiment? Well, they're at a topical changes that occurred the brain as you mature that almost impossible to reverse. So it's hard to consider that perhaps one can have a brain x plan that is take some immature brains. Have some somebody else and implanted in your brain? And that might get incorporated. Function as a immature brand, you skull underneath fiscal it's unlikely, but that's an outside possibility when we talk about unusual brains, it brings to mind a couple stories I interviewed a woman who has a phenomenal brain for research and her why can you do what you do? And she said when I was twenty one I had a virus in part of my brain. And it created a lesion that grew another part of my brain inside of it. And she says ever since that happened. She could look a stack of research papers, and synthesize. Anyway, she never could before. So I always like you look at these outliers or my wife, she hit her head when she was eight before that twelve year old thing took out the language processing center of her brain. She fell off of a two story building and was unconscious for three days. She can do simultaneous translation as big five languages and run an emergency room. But they now hypothesize having looked at the structures in her brain that it's because the right hemisphere took over, but she was a child example, the other one was in adult example, if you put on your fifty year in the future hat. Do you see any any hope for people being able to programmatic -ly make this country changes to our brains, or do you think that's just too messy in its unlikely? We'll ever be able to do it. It's hard to predict what's gonna happen. Fifty years from now, it's hard enough to predict what's going to happen. Ten years. I'll think it shuttle likely K also to explantion to take a piece of brain from one person and put it into another person's head is not an easy game. No..

Caroline Dr Kent Chris hundred years twelve years Fifty years twelve year fifty year three days Ten years
"kandel" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"We'll job wagon aiding refer back to the Atari. So the describe that same phenomenology through that model, the lens of that model? Yeah, right. So the your, your microprocessors made up of transistors has it has roughly the Atari must the chip inside have roughly thirty five hundred kinds of searchers, sort of off on digital electronic magnetically it's just a single visual switch, right? So all ready transistor is a million. Simpler than any selling your brain. Isn't that? Isn't that right there? Your problem? I to me because I'm so glad you said that because to me, that's the problem. I spent a lot of time studying neurons when I was growing up as a undergraduate and they're, they're almost infinitely complex. And then Eric Kandel added in all what's going on in the periphery in terms of our a modulation of the of the physiology in the periphery the neuron, it becomes almost infinitely complex look at a single neurons. Right. Exactly. And so that right. And I think you're, I think we're in real kind of via mid agreement here even tiny unit, right? Like the smallest kind of individual unit that we can manage studying with these tools in a brain is already wildly complicated. Right? And why do we think that kind of just by watching more of them, we're going to somehow magically figure it out. Well, tell you where where would I stand back and try to simplify the code so to speak? Isn't there something. To be said for firing rates of cells, couldn't you say something meaningful if you looked at individual cell firing rates and maybe they're down stream affects those firing rates or something in that zone, which because that feels transistor. Like in terms it's not go ahead. So people do right? Yes. So so in fact, we know that lots of of of neurons, especially in kind of, you know, early sensory systems like dishes and vision, right. Used these kind of rate codes, right? The faster the cell fires like the bigger the number. It's trying to communicate. Right, and we're something whereas I think that's already. Yeah, you're getting a. Yeah, I have my apologies. No. The hope is that there's some information communicated and hiring. That that a lot more information as being communicated, kind of by the relative timing between different selves try so the fagging hold on to time timing between was that mean. Right. So imagine you have kind of three neurons, right? ABMC. Yeah, right. What matters is not necessarily how fast a. or b. or c. or firing individually, but what really matters is did a fire before be if I'm just gonna look at a tiny little temporal window here, just kind of, oh, did a fire I or to be fire I or did see fire. I. Yep. Or was there some kind of joint pattern across all of those rights which is probably the more common thing, right. Some sort of feedback and presynaptic in addition modulation and all that stuff goes on draft resume, all this. Yeah, right. Exactly. So there's all this complicated the all Aji. So instead of looking kind of like a trumpet where you. We're, you know, it's just one loud thing playing at some particular at some particular rate. It's really much more like a piano where the in this case, the piano player has you know eight hands or something. There's this kind of all these chords. They're having to pedal healthy and the pedal. It's it's really beautiful, Oregon. Have you modeled anything after the piano mathematically? Well, so in fact, a lot of the techniques. So if we turn to kind of techniques, people are plying today where the research actually lives some of the same techniques people use for mathematical techniques. People use for music transcription, right? So you hear some song, you know, and you'd like to have the computer figure out kind of what was what were the notes that were being played at a given time, right? Also applied or apply to these sorts of neural systems, right? Where they're really trying to figure out. You can imagine the trae they're kind of decode the sheet music of some part of the. Brain. Right, right. That makes sense to me. But it is all very hard..

Atari Eric Kandel Oregon eight hands
"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Was offering the chance to do a health. Trait with snoop in Colorado. This is before some of the California laws passed. So we like to have fun with these things, and he was a great partner and doing it for a worthy cause. So you've now raised one hundred million dollars for charity, which is something very few people can say that they've done you being amazed. The nonprofit issue in a mad and team there. And what I wanna know though is in order to get to the level where you can pull off something like this because this is something a lot of people might have said, oh, I could have this idea, but they would probably not have done all of the things right in the right order or at least right enough in order to get there. I know that some of your experience came from those discussions you had with all these Nobel prize winners and all that. And I want to dig into some of the biggest lessons you learned from talking with this amazing group. Sure for that. Yeah, yeah, I'm totally getting this. Is. Is your podcast, Dave. I'm just I'm just a passenger. All right, good deal here that you talked to Dr Eric Kandel on designing memories, and that helped you think about what you're doing it amaz-. What did you get when you interviewed the Nobel prize went? Oh, man, yes, Dr candles one of the most remarkable people I've ever had the pleasure meet in my life. So his story, I think I'll I'll share it very briefly, but it it outlines so much of how our brains create memories. So he was seven years old when living in Vienna, Austria when the Nazis invaded and over the next two years, his family lost everything. And he found himself on a freighter coming across the command, cross the ocean over to New York over to Brooklyn with his brother, not even with his parents. So there, you know, eleven twelve on this freighter making their way by themselves because of that experience, his memory of that experience. He wanted to understand the roots of brutality and that led him. To study the it in the superego and Freud. And then someone when he was at Harvard said, look, if you really wanna understand the brain and how our brains work than you gotta study at one cell at a time, forget about all the cycle analysis and really dig into the medicine. And so he went to med school, started studying the brain once all the time, and basically over the course of his work, realize that we is human beings have two different types of experiences on the one end of the spectrum are bitchy aided experiences, which means you know as you and I are sitting talking in a restaurant, there may be phones going off. People chattering in the background and that has neither rewarding effects nor punitive effect. So we bitch, wait to it, we ignore it on the other end of the spectrum are sensitized experiences. So if I asked you, you know, where were you the first time you became a man? Or where were you on nine. Eleven? You would remember those events because. Those are highly sensitized events. And the difference.

Nobel prize partner Dr Eric Kandel California Harvard Colorado Vienna Austria Dave Freud New York Brooklyn one hundred million dollars seven years two years
"kandel" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"kandel" Discussed on Science Friday

"So it's usually a complimentary service and you can write a digital obituary can leave grandpa a candle. He can give grandma teddy beer and you can even send virtual flowers online and it's sort of a place that would stay up. I don't remember how long probably a long time. So people could visit it. That's right. So they most funeral homes have kind of digital archive that remains online so you can go back and visit it. I've seen these archives go back as far as ten, twelve years, and then people will leave their remembrances. And so instead of having a f- physical or material guest books you would time the did. Guest guestbook. So have social media like Facebook or places like that played a role here to? Yes. So social media is definitely in a place where I think most people are seeing changing notions of grief online, and I think it's been really interesting to watch the kind of progress because now there's actually ritualized procedures that we see across social media, whether it's in China or Mexico or the United States. You see things like people posting a picture of the deceased writing a message annually on the day of the death, writing a message on the day of the birth, and then just revisiting the social media pages AM Facebook or writing someone on Twitter. Whenever one is reminded the deceased doing there must be apps for that though. So it's just the website there are. So there's some interesting afs like in China, they have a tradition called Qingming where you go back to the tomb and clean the tomb. And honor the deceased annually. And so in China, now they actually the government has sponsored an app so that their purpose is to reduce transportation pollution. And so you can actually instead of going back to Grandpa's grave and cleaning it, you can simply visit him online while you're riding the subway and burn some incense, leave a prayer and send a message virtual incense. Wow, I understand that people have also started tying the physical space of death to the digital space, like with ghost bikes, right? Where people have died on a bicycle and are spaces, they're sort of geo Tae. Yeah. Yeah, so ghost bikes are something that emerged a few years ago and so bikers were being killed in and as a way to remember them, people would buy a second-hand bike at, say, a goodwill or Salvation Army, and then paint it white. So it would look like a ghostly bike in the physical landscape, then they would put a biography and the person that was killed in basically right and narrative of how that person was killed. The idea was to challenge the political space of cars and try to get people to think about the fact that a lot of bikers are killed, and the narratives are usually written like, oh, no biker ran into the door of the car instead of, you know, so. So it kind of puts the fault on the biker. So the ghost bike movement was I started to challenge those narratives to make people more aware of how many people are killed on bikes annually. So they place these ghost bikes in the Fisk. Space where the person was killed, and then there's a virtual map online where you can visit every by in his GPS location, and then actually read the story, the person that was killed there interesting was the science Friday from WNYC studios. Amai replay to- talking about ghost bikes and other online ways to talk about death with a candy can't. She's associate professor at Baylor University and author of virtual after lives. Grieving the dead and the twenty first century of something else that you you. You mention our QR codes were putting cure codes on gravesites. Yes. So is popular in the United States in historical locations where you can put a QR code onto a gravestone..

China Facebook United States associate professor Grandpa geo Tae Salvation Army Twitter Baylor University WNYC studios Amai Fisk Mexico twelve years