16 Burst results for "Kamilah Forbes"

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on Keep It!

"Guest today. A writer critic and host of come through with rebecca carro which then on she's also if producer and curator of the new audio project in love and struggle. Please come through for rebecca carol. Thank you. I'm delighted to be here. Same i'm glad you're here. And the guy some questions about in love and struggle because i constantly feel like love is a struggle but i don't think that my love struggles are what you're talking about in here audio project. I know they really could be. I mean the idea for for the series. It's now this is the second installment of a series that was live last year at the minetta lane theatre and this year. Obviously we couldn't do a love event so it's all audio but the idea for the series came from an inscription by alice walker A million years ago. When i waited in line to have her sign of book a copy of my book and she wrote for rebecca in love and struggle alice walker and i remember thinking that that was everything because especially for black folks. It's like it's always going to be love and it's always going to be a struggle. And so i just sort of used that as a launch point to celebrate the lives and the stories and the experiences of black women through monologues stories and poems and music How long have you held onto this beautiful quote from alice walker. Is it before or was this. Just what she had signed in your book which she signed him in my book. It's also a quote. I mean i think the origin of it is quote by grace. Lee bugs an activist. Who said at one time. And i think it probably had something to do with alice in tribute to her but it was never quite clear at i end when i emailed alice to ask her if i could use it. She was delighted to been reminded. I'm love that okay. I always think about that as a john of writing by the way. What the things that authors right to people in books when they're in line. It's so stressful. Actually right like it because you don't want to like bite other people's stuff but would i. I mean i published my first book. When i was twenty four and i didn't know like what should i write. What should i write. And i'm not gonna lie. There were a couple of times that i wrote in love and struggle shore. And then later when i had the opportunity to meet my north star an absolute idol tony morrison and she signed books that i brought for her like all three or four or of the books that i had. She very patiently gracious. Least i'm the mall but was with pleasure and one was blessings. Um which i thought was really lovely. But but you're right. That is a terrific like genre and there are so many people who have books That probably got like depending on what was going on in the author's day or whatever story you tell them right a tiny little personal note to that like no one else has ever seen right right. Yeah but again. It's very stressful. I feel like i mean luckily or unluckily with this book my recent book surviving the white gays. I did a virtual tour. So i didn't have to like sign. Sign sign with folks standing in line so i missed doing that but i also am to have not had the stress of trying to come up with something really fabulous talked about that too. You know because. I've survived the white gays but different spelling of game but yours. Listen i read true story. True story two three years ago when i came up with the idea for the title of the memoir and i said it out loud in my son who was then. Thirteen was like mom. What do you have against gays story. I think we have brought up white gays or something in film on this podcast over the four years. It's been on an interview with someone and each time. They've stopped and been like what do you mean the case Gays but that book How does it feel like doing this during a pandemic and now we're slowly colleague out of it and you know what. What are your thoughts on. You know having published a book during that period. and also now you know Looking to have a new life post pandemic where people are out. Well i mean. I certainly hope so. I'm really really missed. Bookstores. especially independent book that community which is has always given me so much love. And i just love book people. So i'm anxious to get back out into bookstores. I hope that that happens. You know of course. Paperback will come out in in the new early in the next year. We'll wait and see what happens with that. But and i'm super really missed the opportunity to do trevor. No live like that. It was a thrill to do it anyway. But i would have loved to have done that live so you know i mean it was there. Were you wanna be next to. Trevor noah live. Okay saying who does nine always smells good. I mean listen. I'm i'm trying to get on there i am. I'm also kind of a low maintenance kind of gal so it was nice to do these events and conversations from my home and then close the computer and like wash my face and poor glass of wine nice to not have to to and fro a lot or do a lot of traveling and so now as it was very economic and suited me. But i did miss doing seeing folks Absolutely getting back to in love and struggle. You talk about how like you could see the original show in new york and then What changed when you are like. This is gonna have to be audio. What was the impetus for being like. I do want to get it out this year. And do an audio component so we work with When the first one kamilah forbes from the apollo who is just phenomenal and monica williams who was director and it was a real stage performance. Like it was really. We had a harpist mom but it was a real production like it was a real theatrical production. It was much more of a team effort and folks wrote their own stuff but then we had folks who would help turn it into something that felt like a narrative arc. But i was very much just about. It was my vision in my concept. And then you know the folks who came in to perform and had like these arresting presence like brittany pacman cunningham and anita hell and bossy ap and move fresh and it was just a really bold and beautiful piece of work. The idea of doing it for audio only this year was actually a good bit easier for me. Because i've now done a bunch of audio. I hadn't done so much worked at wnyc. But i mean podcast audio so in the time since that first one i did come through and then i did. Billy was a black woman. And so i had a sense of high wanted it to sound and so for this installment i wrote an intro. I did the interest. Etchells and in the out tro and use that to weave through the voices in this one. I have a question to you know about this project. You know celebrated somebody black women and you know their stories and then you have your book surviving. The white gaze up. How did you find that writing this. That book a memoir helped you Do you feel that you've ultimately survived. Do you think you created a new black gays for yourself to operate with the world definitely but i had it when started writing. Otherwise couldn't have written it. You know the impetus for the memoir. Which i knew i was always going to write but i had to wait until i had the emotional fortitude in the actual agency and foundation of my family and my chosen family But this summer. That mike brown was murdered My son was young and asked if we were going to get shot And it was just this torrent of rage and protectiveness and fear and anger but also like it was a real pivot for me as a mother and a black woman mother of black. And i also just had this wave of remembering how my white family sort of gone through life kind of nonchalantly not thinking about this kind of thing. And that's when. I knew i was going to write the memoir. And that was the black gays right now. Reflecting on my experience growing up in a white family to why town through the black gays and i was pissed and like really met and that it would that my son was in danger and then he felt endanger and i was endanger but that nobody knew that when i was being raised or nobody thought about the danger that i was in so yeah i definitely feel like i operate now through the black gays and but i also feel like black women in when it comes to struggle and i write this in the intro assault by toronto burke where she was talking about..

alice walker rebecca carro rebecca carol minetta lane theatre Lee bugs tony morrison alice Trevor noah rebecca monica williams grace brittany pacman cunningham anita hell Etchells trevor wnyc new york Billy mike brown burke
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"In many ways true success lies not in your own resume but in how you're helping others build their resume what you're doing to bolster and elevate in their lives and in their careers in part two of my conversation with erin cherry. We talk about this fundamental concept of helping others where they are and in reaching the goals that they want to reach. Because it's important that we recognize that our careers can accomplish so much more than just what we do on stage are onscreen. I look at the certain things that come my way and same yes and being open because you can fall into the trap of what do you think your career she looked like with the pass should be and you'll say no and you'll miss out. Welcome to why. I'll never make it or win me for short here. We go learn from fellow. Creatives sharing their own ups and downs and the performing arts. I'm your host patrick. Oliver jones a professional actor and singer for almost thirty years. The website is why. I'll never make it dot com where you can sign up for the win me newsletter. And by doing so you'll get a free copy of my new book. Creative wisdom a collection of quotes and insights from previous podcast guests all that and more at. Wow never make it dot com in part one of my conversation with jerry. We focused on her work onscreen as well as on stage. Particularly her emmy winning performance in amazon prime's ever after and a highlight of her career in sharing the stage with andrea shields but cherry has also found opportunity to produce her own works and this episode will focus on two of those projects. One is a collaboration with nigerian. Artists called now africa and this showcases contemporary african playwrights and builds a home base for artists from the african diaspora. Another is her show called sundays with a cherry on top. Now this showcases black culture in all of its forms ranging from actor jason durden of american soul to apollo theater. Executive director kamilah forbes. Much like this podcast. She uses her show to highlight those making an impact in their community and she explains how the show started and why. It's so important to her. I just realized you know in my community. my tribe. There's so many men and women that. I know that are doing amazing things that no one really knows about and so i was just like oh my gosh. What is what the heck no knows about this right. And so i remember. When i was younger there was a show on on sundays. Call like it is and like. It is used to air locally every sunday here in new york city. It was a to show that the black community go to hear interviews about the latest writer. Poet author actor artists. Whatever project that was happening in the community. And i was like oh really have anything like that anymore right now and i tried to look around for it and so i use. I wanted to feel a need of you know. It would be his name sundays at the cherry on top. Because every sunday you can you can click on an episode in. Hopefully it'll grow. Because i do want to get picked up by local. Tv station which would be great. And you go and you sit you see with. The latest show is on broadway or off broadway. Or what's the latest black on restaurant were. Who's the latest chef chef. That's out there. That i can go to and maybe you know have eat in a restaurant. Because i'm the community does so much and there's not a place to go to find out what where they are and technology is a way to bring that all together and so. I really wanted to start off with my friends. Everybody on interviewing. I know and get new guest like yourself how you like. However burger getting to know each other and deceit on just. I wanted to grow and spread in that way but you know like like my first season. I interviewed camilo forbes. Who is the executive director of the apollo. And the reason why i wanted to interview her is because so many people know about the apollo but they don't know that a woman's running it black woman's running it right so little things like that and you know or the artistic director of the national leader. Who's one of the youngest artistic directors in the country. You know so. I just wanted to bring awareness to the black excellence as happening around us when i say us that everybody because we contribute so much to to the arts and to the world and jeremy we just got kamala harris. Mvp and so the little girl me. I need to see images like that. Because i didn't have that growing up. You know as far as Seeing a woman vice president and as a black woman at that and so it's important for me to have conversations and have joy and laughter and it's been such a difficult time you know with the covid and everything shutting down and i didn't want to stop my show a wanted to continue to have a live interviews and so that's why move the platform to from to doing it on you know a platform where it's safe but i still have conversations that we can still laugh. And just how fun. Because i was like. I don't want these interviews to be serious. I just want people to know what you're doing. I just wanna laugh. I just want to cry. But i just wanted to use it as a way to heal. Because i needed it more myself which. I didn't realize you know. Because when i was like oh i want to continue this when i started doing them and people started seeing. Yes and said yeah we need. This is a healing balm for myself too. Because i feel so good. When i'm having a conversation and laughing in connecting in i just it will be up to wild cherry. You really need this as much as the person as to what have been. Some highlights were surprises. Even as you've been doing sundays the highlight is just the fact that i'm gonna. I'm still sticking to it. Because i don't know if you feel this way but it's the scary thing to have an idea like this and started because one you know you don't know who's going to like it who's not gonna like it in one and then it's like it our haters out there. People like who the hell does she think she is. This is all the acuity is what we're talking about other actors insecurity in their doubts. This is one of those. This is the area where i feel the most insecure with the show and it has my name in. It is like who'd the ambassador to put my name in the title. You just as all the stuff that i have that. I'm big in the other person's thinking about me and so that's been interesting and the the nervousness of doing it in failing meaning that no one likes it. No one watches it. No one cares and that has been an interesting journey to and it's a very scary journey and rumor ability. Feel doing it. I did not see coming right. It's very vulnerable to put something out there. That's not really been done. Was doing it right now to fill a need and see see if it gets accepted. That's.

jason durden Oliver jones erin cherry patrick kamilah forbes amazon andrea shields new york city jerry cherry africa first season kamala harris prime One nigerian one jeremy camilo forbes african
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Back to all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. My guests are Pulitzer prize winning playwright Lynn, Nottage and director and executive producer of the Apollo theater. Kamilah? Forbes linen Camilla recently collaborated on the off Broadway acclaimed production of Lind's play by the way. Meet VERA stark, I spoke to them about working on the show together. And what the early conversations were like as they began to discuss. Vera stark. Camila had seen the initial production. And one of the question, she asked me is what would you like to see that's different or Whitten this production? Do you would love for another production to do? That's right. That's right. Yeah. And because I think, you know, a lot of times I think director either you're working with a writer on a first production or you're just working on yet. Another production of a writer's work, and you may not have the opportunity to have them in the room. So this was really a gift, right? Because we also were able to glean from Lynn, well, you know, what it didn't work. I I've seen that before. And it actually didn't work. And here's another way to think about it. Here's another way to look at it, which I think for for for director it it's like, oh, that's great. So we don't have to spend several previews trying it realizing that it doesn't work and get to the choice that does. And I think that Camille is also really comfortable hearing, my fears that I was re staging a play that I'd done eight years ago that was. Funny and comedy's hard. You don't know whether it's going to land in the same way that it did the first time, and I think a lot of our relationship was her making me feel comfortable and confident that this was going to work and the world was very different eight years different. Yeah. I was in Europe. And I saw they brought out for a group of journalists. As I as an thank you for coming to this thing, we're going to present an American musical, and it was singing in the rain. And there was one section of it. That is so, you know, baby, it's cold outside creepy. You know? There's a section of that. They were singing, and you just felt the whole. Oh, yeah. That that song in.

director Vera stark Lynn VERA stark writer Camille Camila Pulitzer prize Alison Stewart Apollo theater Camilla Nottage Lind Europe Whitten executive producer eight years
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:44 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Talking about theater and Lynn Nottage who was named today as one of times one hundred most influential people of two thousand nineteen there's only been one woman to win the Pulitzer prize for drama twice. That's Lynn nodded. I for the play ruined in two thousand nine and then again for sweat in two thousand seventeen we spoke to Lynn about this brings production of her show, by the way, meet their stark the off Broadway league nominated star for outstanding costume design and outstanding projection design as part of this year's Lucille or tell awards set the depression era. Vera stark is a black made who serves as a confidante to former child star who is trying to hold onto her fame. We learn why later now famous something VERA wants to but how she gets. It leaves a lot to be desired. She becomes a household name playing slave in film, something that follows VERA her entire life, by the way. Meet VERA stark ran through March at the Pershing square, which your center, I spoke to Lynn Nottage, and the show's director Kamilah Forbes earlier this spring, and I. Gan by asking why she chose comedy as Jonah through which to tell this story. Take a listen. I think that leftovers incredibly cathartic, and it's a easy way for us to process trauma, and Lord knows we as African American woman understand trauma. And I think back to some of the comedians who I really love like, Richard Pryor and moms mabley who were able to tell the truth in ways that were very very funny. When you're thinking about directing Camilla's grew ball comedy. It is funny because it's very at times very broad with serious subjects what do you as a director think about and what you tell your actors to do. Sure. Well, you know, we started off with research about the just the style of scruple the period of screwball comedies were. Created and popular just so that we understood the rhythms right of the world. But then I, you know, as we started to get as we started to really dive into the world. It was how do we make sure that we ground ourselves in the truth of seen because I think it's important with the broad of it's easy to stay in that place of broad comedy, satire comedy. But, but we have to also understand that there's a underlined story that we're here to tell you don't want it to be too cartoon. Exactly. Right. Exactly. When you're writing comedy. How do you have word that gives you a good sense of humor you like to laugh, I teach in one of the things I always tell my students is that you must tell the truth. You must lean into the authenticity of the situation. And I think when you do that you avoid a lot of the pitfalls, and so that's what I tried to do, you know, whether I'm writing drama or whether I'm reading a comedy, I use the same tools. So for VERA, what's what's Veras truth? I think there has a very complicated truth, I think that. She's a woman who came to to Hollywood in the early nineteen thirties with this assumption that the big pictures were ready to invite her in and she arrives and discovers that it's quite different. And I think that her truth is that she's a performer, and she's a brilliant performer. And she's this this wit and incredibly intelligent young woman who can't ply her trade. And so I think that her truth is about figuring out. How do I survive and do what I love in a place that continues to marginalize me Camille, there's this interesting relationship between the two lead characters, and I think some people probably women of color pick up right away. What the situation is between the aging starlet. And and VERA as you were directing these actors to have that relationship, which we discovered pre exists this moment, but you don't want to give it away. Can you talk? A little bit about trying to create the in the moment. But also giving us a little bit of foreshadowing of these two ladies, maybe know each other before. I mean, I think for the actors as we had to ground ourselves in the truth of the circumstances of what you've written in the play. And that's what they can play from an and more importantly, as I think about Vera Lynn has set up this world of of women supporting each other a sisterhood a combat ary, and and that exists on many different levels, right? Because it's not only with VERA and Gloria. But also with VERA and Lodhi the other women that we meet that who lives within her roommates would these come who is a community that ultimately built with her halter up. I'm so I think that the sisterhood lives on many different levels, and we had to ground ourselves in the truth of what that sisterhood was with each of the characters that's around your, and if I can I think Camilla did a really wonderful job of nurturing, those friendships in understanding that the core that these are women who are looking for community, and who wanted to have these lovely re relationships in very difficult circumstances. There's an issue about everybody passing for everybody passing black people passing for Latino people in white people. Everybody's passing and pretending to be something. They necessarily are even the rocks the white rockstar who sings the blues in the second half. Right. Everybody's being somebody else. Why was that something you wanted to explore? Then I think firstly I was really interested in the mask that we put on in America in order to survive, and how we have to shed vetch vestiges of ourselves in order to fit into this great melting pot. But also I was interested in so that the performance of aspects of self in how do you perform an extreme version of yourself? How do you put on that mask in order to go to work? And so I think that that's one of the things that I was interested in when we were. Looking at passing and you're right. It's like every single character, including ASTA, who's the director who's pretending to be German, and he's a Russian Jew. And I think that's just the nature of Hollywood at the time that people made these compromise choices in order to survive. And even in the play the second half of the play these three academics are looking back at Veras life, and her choices and trying to say what they think are life choices were and the sort of very pompous ponderous the fella in it is going on with his accent. And then he says he's from Oakland. Yeah. Drop and you're like, oh, I know passing yet again. My guess Kamilah, Forbes and Lynn nodded Lynn wrote the play, by the way, meet VERA stark and Camilla directed it. There's is reminiscent of that of Hattie McDaniel. She was the first African American performer to win an Academy Award and she won playing a mammy character in gone with the wind. I went and I watched a scene from gone with the wind with McDaniel, and I watched her kademi award speech. And when you put them next to each other, you realized what she was living through and dealing with. I thought was it's it's heartbreaking. Actually, it was terribly heartbreaking. What these women had to go through in order to appear on the Silver Spring. If you listen to her in the film. She sounds like this. Come on come on. No. The.

VERA stark Vera Lynn Lynn Nottage Vera stark Camilla director Kamilah Forbes Hattie McDaniel Hollywood Pulitzer prize Richard Pryor Jonah Pershing square Lucille Silver Spring ASTA I. Gan Lord Veras Camille
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Legal state national conversation about pot. We've got questions we'll get semantics shattered from noon to three here on WNYC. Welcome back to all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. My guests are Pulitzer prize winning playwright Lynn, Nottage and director and executive producer of the Apollo theater. Kamilah? Forbes linen Camilla recently collaborated on the off Broadway acclaimed production of winds play by the way. Meet VERA stark, I spoke to them about working on the show together. And what their early conversations were like as they began to discuss. Vera stark. Camila had seen the initial reduction. And one of the question, she asked me is what would you like to see it's different or Whitten this production? Do you would love for another production to do? That's right. That's right. Yeah. And because I think, you know, a lot of times I think a director either you're working with a writer on a first production or you're just working on yet. Another production of a writer's work, and you may not have the opportunity to have them in the room. So this is really a gift, right? Because we also were able to glean from Lynn, well, you know, what it didn't work. I I've seen that before. And it actually didn't work. And here's another way to think about it. Here's another way to look at it, which I think for for directorate. It's like, oh, that's great. So we don't have to spend several previews trying it realizing that it doesn't work and get to the choice that does I think the Camille is also really comfortable hearing, my fears. That was re staging a play that I'd done eight years ago that was. Funny and comedy's hard. You don't know whether it's going to land in the same way that it did the first time, and I think a lot of our relationship was her making me feel comfortable and confident that this was going to work and the world is very different eight years different. Yeah. You know, I was in Europe. And I saw they brought out for a group of journalists as as an to thank you for coming to this thing. We're going to present an American musical, and it was singing in the rain. And there was one section of it is so you know, baby, it's cold outside creepy. You know? There's a section of that. They were singing, and you just felt the whole. Oh, yeah. That that song? The.

Vera stark Lynn director VERA stark Camille Alison Stewart writer Camila Pulitzer prize Apollo theater Camilla Europe Whitten Nottage executive producer eight years
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:26 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to all of this hour. We're talking about theater and Lynn NADA JR. Who was named today as one of times one hundred most influential people of two thousand nineteen there's only been one woman to win the Pulitzer prize for drama twice. That's Lynn nodded. I for the play ruined in two thousand nine and then again for sweat in two thousand seventeen we spoke to Lynn about this brings production of ratio, by the way, meet their stark the off Broadway league nominated VERA star for outstanding costume design and outstanding projection design as part of this year's Lucille or tell awards set the depression era viewer stark is a black made who serves as a confidante to a former child star who is trying to hold onto her fame. We learn why later now-famous something VERA wants to. But how she gets. It leaves a lot to be desired. She becomes a household name playing a slave in a film something that follows VERA her entire life, by the way, meet bureau stark ran through March at the Pershing square signature center. I spoke to Lynn Nottage, and the show's director Kamilah Forbes earlier this spring, and I. Began by asking Lynn, why she chose comedy as John Rao through which to tell this story. Take a listen. Who will I think that leftovers incredibly cathartic, and it's a easy way for us to process trauma, and Lord knows we as African American women understand trauma. And I think back to some of the comedians who I really love like, Richard Pryor and moms mabley who were able to tell the truth in ways that were very very funny. When you're thinking about directing Camilla's grew ball comedy. It is funny because it's very at times very broad with serious subjects what do you as a director think about and what you tell your actors to do. Sure. Well, you know, we started off with research about the just the style of screwball. The period of screwball comedies were. Created and popular just so that we understood the rhythms right of the world. But then I, you know, as we started to get as we started to really dive into the world. It was how do we make sure that we ground ourselves in the truth of the scene because I think it's important with the broad screwball. It's easy to stay in that place of broad comedy, satire comedy. But, but we have to also understand that there's an underlying story that we're here to tell you don't want it to be too cartoony. Exactly. Right. Exactly. When you're writing comedy. How do you have weighed that because you've got a good sense of humor you like to laugh, I teach theater and one of the things I always tell my students is that you must tell the truth. You must lean into the authenticity of the situation. And I think when you do that you avoid a lot of the pitfalls, and so that's what I tried to do, you know, whether I'm writing drama or whether I'm reading the comedy, I use the same tools. So for VERA, what's what's Veress truth? I think vir has a very complicated truth. I think that. She's a woman who came to to Hollywood in the early nineteen thirties with this assumption that the big pictures were ready to invite her in and she arrives and discovers that it's quite different. And I think that her truth is that she's a performer, and she's a brilliant performer. And she's this this wit in an incredibly intelligent young woman who can't ply her trade. And so I think that her truth is about figuring out. How do I survive and do what I love in a place that continues to marginalize me Camille, there's this interesting relationship between the two lead characters, and I think some people probably women of color pick up right away with the situation is between the aging starlet. And and a VERA as you were directing these actors to have that relationship, which we discovered pre exists this moment, but you don't want to give it away. Can you talk? Was a little bit about trying to create the in the moment. But also giving us a little bit of the foreshadowing of these two ladies may be no each other before. Well, I think for the actors as Lynch it we had to ground ourselves in the truth of the circumstances of what you've written in the play. And that's what they can play from an and more importantly, as I think about Vera Lynn is has set up this world of of women supporting each other a sisterhood a combat ary. And and and that exists on many different levels, right? Because it's not only with VERA and Gloria. But also with VERA in Lahti, the the other women that we meet that who've your lives within her roommates. Who are these come who is a community that ultimately built with her and hold her up? I'm so I think that the sisterhood lives on many different levels, and we had to ground ourselves in the truth of what that sisterhood was with each of the characters that surround VERA. And if I can I think that did a really wonderful job of nurturing those friendships in understanding that the core that these are women who are looking for community. And who wanted to have these lovely relationships in the very difficult circumstances? There's an issue about everybody passing for everybody passing you go black people passing for Latino people in white people. Everybody's passing and pretending to be something. They necessarily are even the rocks the white rockstar who sings the blues and the second half. Right. Everybody's being somebody else. Why was that something you wanted to explore? Did I think firstly I was really interested in the mass that we put on in America in order to survive in how we have to shed vetch vestiges of ourselves in order to fit into this great melting pot. But also I was interested in so that the performance of aspects of self in. Oh, how do you perform an extreme version of yourself? How do you put on that mask in order to go to work? And so I think that that's one of the things that I was interested in when we were looking at passing and you're right. It's like every single character, including von ASTA, who's the director. Or who's pretending to be German, and he's a Russian Jew. And I think that's just the nature of Hollywood at the time that people made these compromise choices in order to survive. And even in the play the second half of the play these three academics are looking back at Veras life, and her choices and trying to say what they think are life choices were and the sort of very pompous ponderous the fella in it is is going on with this accent, many says he's from Oakland. Yeah. Greatest drop. And you're like, oh, I know he learned passing get again. My guess Kamilah, Forbes and Lynn nodded Lynn wrote the play, by the way, meet VERA stark and Camilla directed it. Veers situation is reminiscent of that of having McDaniel. She was the first African American performer to win and Academy Award and she won playing a mammy character in gone with the wind. I went and I watched a scene from gone with the wind with headed McDaniel, and then I watched her Academy Award speech. And when you put them next to each other, you realized what she was living through and dealing with thought was in. It's it's it's a little heartbreaking. Actually, it was terribly heartbreaking. What these women had to go through in order to appear on the Silver Spring. If you listen to her in the film. She sounds like this..

Vera Lynn VERA stark director Lynn NADA JR Lynn Nottage Kamilah Forbes Hollywood Pulitzer prize Camilla Academy Award Richard Pryor McDaniel Pershing square Lucille Silver Spring John Rao Lord Lahti Camille
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:02 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A great things to do with kids. Or if you're just not looking to drink for the holiday. All right. So what if I don't want to March? I don't wanna crawl don't really necessarily want to be around my kids. Is there a walking tour? Yes. The Saint Patrick's weekends in Irish New York walking tour is being put on by the big onion. We love. Their walking tours are always really fun. They've been doing this for twenty eight years and this walking tour highlights Irish history throughout New York. You're gonna meet a Saint Paul's chapel. But then you walk around a lot of sites in downtown New York, you go to sites associated with Tammany hall five points. The first Catholic church in the city. It's a great way to learn about IRAs history in the city, and it's a lot of fun to get outside. Sounds like great fun. That sounds really good for history. Nerds two, very educational, very edgy. Can do bring the kids. It's educational. Our number one two four three three WNYC two one two four three three nine six nine to have a Saint Patrick's Day event. You wanna shout out or if you have a question or some sort of spring event happening in New York City that you would like to let us all know about we love to hear from our audience and crowdsource ways to celebrate New York City, the greatest city on the planet, according to the time out index. All right, bingo. Loco Bingol Oko. Yes. Bingo, look, so this is a great option. If you want to have a good time for Saint Patrick's Day, but would prefer to stay in one spot. The stabbing a house of yes. Throughout the day on Sunday. And this is the party imported from Ireland, and it's a hybrid of a bingo night and a rave. Did not see that coming bingo night and a rave rounds or section of a bingo night in a rave a good time throughout the day. As you play bingo to really humorous, fun hosts at you'll get up and dance with DJ. They have fun, contests and competitions confetti dance contest. It's really fun. And they're giving away hilarious prizes trip to Vegas of boats and a lawnmower. Oh, it's every New Yorker, it's well, you know, a lot of people in suburbs. Come in might enjoy that law, nor so the house push the house of. Yes. This is in Bushwick. Okay. Bingo, loco did not see that coming. All right. So the Irish art center, let's say you really do on a celebrate in a more. I don't know sedate way meaningless, less raucous. Let's just say that this is an annual event put on by the Irish arts center, it's a book day, celebrating Irish authors. So people can go in find books of Irish literature to celebration of Irish literature in Irish author so you can go and find books. Purchase books too. Great. It's a great day long festival tomorrow. And wears that that isn't hell's kitchen. Okay. Good. So we've got Bushwick hell's kitchen pub crawl pub, crawls that mostly Manhattan, mostly Manhattan, Murray hill east village now, how do you guys figure out what to put in? When you make all these choices because there's so much going on in the city editor, how do you edit this? So we try to go to as many events as possible and most of the ones that we cover, and when we're putting together a list like, obviously, the most important thing is that we think all the events are going to be fun and a great time. And then the probably the second consideration is a diversity of events. So like we're talking about today. To give people options who want to take full advantage of what the city is offering. So from pub crawls to more cultural events, literary events family, friendly, events nature wanna go out with friends. So try to hit all those points. My guest is well Gleeson. He's deputy features editor at time out New York. We're talking about some of the things you can do the Saint Patrick's Day and also because spring is right around the corner considering the time on indexes said we live in the best city on the planet or number two one two four three three WNYC. If you wanna shout out something to do this weekend for Saint Patrick's Day or some event, you have coming up that proves that New York City is the best city in the world. Okay. It is women's history month, and I know the timeout good on you has figured out a couple of things you can do we can do to celebrate women's history month. What's on the list for people who want to commemorate? Yes. So a great thing happening this weekend been happening this week. And it goes through Sunday is the women in the world festival. This is taking place at the Apollo theater in Harlem, and there's a range of panels concerts. And events highlighting Finola, businesses female musicians and performers a lot to do a Saturday. Susan Suzie Orman is giving a talk on personal finance to can't believe Nicole is performing at the Apollo music cafe Saturday night. And then Sunday, there's a full day of panels. So if you're interested in making a day, I've I would definitely look into that. And you have performances by Cameron, Bruno activist. Angela Davis will be giving a talk that you can go to and there are female leaders some NGOs that will be talking a wide range of things that's all at the Apollo theater all day long. We actually had the director of the Apollo Kamilah Forbes on because she directed Nottage is recent play, and she was just talking about how what she wants to sort of how you take a legacy institution like the Apollo and move it forward. And this seems like something that that really fits that Bill. Yes. Very multifaceted a lot going on. And it looks really fascinating. All right. So have you like comedy? There's something called the all female reboot. What is that? That. So the pit theater is created and directed by a woman named Liz MaGee, and it's basically spoofing this recent that we have of these movies that may have been dominated in the past to being remade as female-dominated pictures. So Ghostbusters oceans eight things like this. So they take very male dominated movies. And do a live performance of them reinterpreted with an off Email company, then does that take place? Again, the pit theatre flat iron that is in flat iron. Okay. And I know on this show we talked about the orca show a little bit. What's the theme of it? This year. Is singapore? So it has these gorgeous vertical structures, which really sets it apart this year, it's gorgeous. And if you're if you're thinking about going this weekend, actually is the first weekend that they have these great cocktail nights. So you can go it's drinks in the garden of music. You can walk through performers the botanical garden at night is beautiful. You can walk to the main conservative great date night. That's pretty neat. Yeah. My guess is we'll Gleason deputy features editor of time out New York's gets the few more minutes. I wanna talk about that the survey that we're the greatest city in the planet. So what was that based on? So we timeout started. It's time in London, basically, nice and sixty and then it's expanded cents an hour and three hundred and fifteen cities all over the world. So we took advantage of that global audience did a massive survey. So we talked to a lot of our audience about how they were feeling about their cities right now. And we all that information crunch the numbers with some data from our editors and. Basically, we found that of all the cities our audience from New York is feeling the best about the city's culture. And it's feeling the best about the city's diversity of other cities that we've covered, and it's it was ninety one percent, which I think is an amazing statistic is feeling great about the culture in New York right now, that's pretty cool. That's a really great thing to think about I love that that big quote pull quote from the article we've got a couple people we can squeeze in the neck last minutes. Joel is calling us from Brooklyn high. Joel. Hi, hi, what do you have to offer on Thursday, March twenty first something I've organized called the alternative guitar summit? Is presenting the music of the Woodstock festival fifty years after with six guitarist and twenty to twenty five other musicians celebrating that he Parco music, and I think it's gonna be a lot of fun. Instead, look PawSox Reuss down on bleaker street in the village. That sounds so great. I'm asking this is the first day of spring perfect perfect showed a lot of Woodstock events coming up this year that we're excited about it. I know this summer I got a house in Woodstock. Recall have a party. Hey, Barbara in Brooklyn. Hi, barbara. You have your own arts installation. This is fabulous. Let's hear I I do I have an art installation up at five miles gallery in crown heights. And this is the last weekend of it..

Manhattan Saint Patrick New York City editor Apollo theater Irish New York New York Irish arts center Ireland Irish art center Loco Bingol Oko Vegas Tammany hall Susan Suzie Orman Brooklyn Barbara Bushwick Woodstock
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:57 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Come on come on. No. Come home from the website. And then it's really interesting when you come back, and you listen to her accepting her Academy Award academy of Motion Picture Arts and science fellow members of the motion picture industry and honored guest. This is one of the happiest moments of my life. And I want to thank each one of you who at apart and selecting me for one of the awards for your kindness. It has made me feel very very humble. And I shall always hold it as a beacon for anything that I may be able to do in the future. I sincerely hope I shall always be accredited raise and to the motion picture industry. My heart is to tell you just high for you. And may I say, thank you. How do you McDonald's? Most famous example of this. But I know in your research, you found other actresses who went through the same thing. I think. Primarily made me think about it is my love hate with switchable comedies and growing up watching all these films on television and black and white at four thirty in the afternoon. And I really love the fact that most of these films have women at the center, they were witty. They were fast and furious. But then they're always came a moment when a black person with bug eyes would shuffle onto the screen and and serve something. And then shuffle-off, and it would disrupt my experience of watching watching the the film, but I think what made me in particular drawn to these women were that there were some people who were able to disrupt these frames in very specific ways. And these were women like Theresa Harris. And Freddie, Washington and Nina McKinney, who were honest news, and who demanded to be seen in very different ways. I think then Hattie McDaniel, and I wanted to tell their stories it was I went and I watch. A scene from gone with the wind with had McDaniel, and then I watched her Academy Award speech. And when you put them next to each other, you realized what she was living through and dealing with the thought was in. It's it's. Heartbreaking, actually because it was terribly heartbreaking. What these women had to go through in order to appear on the silver screen in. The course of the play. We have three different time periods. Camilo right. Right. Can you talk a little bit about creating the mood for each one? The first one is in the thirties. Sure. So the first one is in the thirties, and we are dealing with sort of this this the the rhythm of the writing is in the style of screwball comedy. So it's fast. It's various it moves quickly. There's brought comedy. So there's there's a very sort of specific world in which and then we moved to the nine we moved to actually contemporary day in the nineteen seventies and the nineteen seventies. The set is it's we're gonna talk show and very, Mike. Douglas stick cabs. You know in the seventies is far more relaxed, and we're coming off of the sixties and coming off a free love. So it's it's it's vastly vastly conflicts. I think with the this the pace and the speed of of the nineteen thirties because as far more looser, and then we deal with the contemporary world of academics. Which is somewhat of contemporary time period. But we're in the world of academia, which is about structure would is about putting things in the boxes, which is about checking off boxes, which is about categorizing. So it's interesting. I think in the twos, the looseness of the seventies versus the the structured academic world that we also live in inactive as well. So it's a it's a it's a beautiful. I think tapestry that Lynn has given us to play in with these three different time periods. Is it written that the same actors who are enact one are playing different characters and act intentionally double cast? So the actors that appear in the school bowl comedy, then appear on the talk show, and then appear as talk show hosts, and I was really interested in how these archetypes would evolve over time, you know, who would who was in one thousand nine hundred thirty and who was in one thousand nine hundred seventy the character in the first half. Who is passing. She's light skinned black woman, and she's passing for Latina plays the most radical Angela Davis on steroids. Academic in the second half was that intentional? They absolutely intentional. I think because in the first half anime makes very radical choices in order to survive. And so I think that after fifty years she's gonna make those same radical choices. But in a very different way. How did how did you have? How'd you get and work with the actress to have VERA? In the nineteen seventies we made her, and she's got this big dress on she kind of reminded me, a della Reese. That's who she modeled exactly who she. Good job. But she's it's this fine line between her being a little bit. That almost too hard a word, but you just sense that life is not been kind share her. But she still has some fire. What is your direction to an actress to catch that to to capture that push pull? Well, I think it's it's about you know, we we built a timeline and in that time line we had a lot of conversations of filling in that time line about what her life was like she talks about that. She did fifty pitchers with you know, where characters did not have last names. She sees her peers getting far more acclaim than her. But yet there's always this fire that's burning in her that she's a consummate performer that she was born to do this. So even though we're seeing her fifty years later worn down and the world has given her so much more weight to carry. They're still that fire that yet, I'm still a performer, and I still have that hunger. That just maybe just maybe write that my. Success is right around the corner. And it's interesting when I was writing the character in the second act, I was really thinking of a Queen who has been exiled and who's fighting to get back into her kingdom. My guests are Lynn Nottage. And you're talking for you like that. And I do. Camillo Forbes and Leonardo's we're talking about the play, by the way. Meet VERA stark what as a director as a heart was a hard seen to nail in this performance. A hard seem to nail. I would say you know, what what was really probably the most challenging. And I think it's just because it's all about precision is last seen of act one are lasting of act one. Because it is about comedy comedy is. So it's so mathematical, and if there are certain if a certain beat is off you missed the joke, and if you missed that joke than the second job may not land. So it is all about mathematics and where and so I think that's that's always hard. But when it lands, there's so much joy, you know. And there's so much satisfaction in that. So I would say that. And that's our height of our most I would say of the screwball comedy. Right. Is that a matter of just good old-fashioned repetition? Just make sure people hit their marks that's hitting the Marxist a part of it. But I would also say it's hitting the marks and comedy is also about audience right because in the audience becomes sort of the third. Factor. I'm not just the actors and hitting the marks. And so introducing the audience and making sure that that is also incorporated into your rhythm. It's just as important Lynn have you done rewrites after watching a play. And you realize this joke isn't quite landing or I need to slide it down. Yeah. Absolutely though for for this particular production. I didn't do any rewrites. But when I was first writing, by the way, meet very stark, I was rewriting on a regular basis because the things that I thought were terribly funny and actors would deliver the lines, and it was absolute style and be like, well, it's funny on the page. It was one funny and my head. Why isn't it funny on the stage? And so it was really finding a way to to sort of massage jokes. In front of an audience, which I think is part of what comedy is my guests are Kamilah, Forbes and Lynn Nottage Lynn wrote the play, by the way, meet VERA stark. And Camille is the director we'll have more with Camilla and Lynn after the break. WNYC's supporters include the story prize finalists, Deborah Eisenberg, Lauren Groff and Jamal Brinkley..

Lynn Nottage Lynn VERA stark Hattie McDaniel Lynn Nottage director Camillo Forbes Motion Picture Arts Academy Award Theresa Harris McDonald della Reese Angela Davis Nina McKinney VERA Camilo Freddie Douglas Mike WNYC
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:55 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Currently leeann is a playwright in residence at signature theatre here in New York where her play fabulous the re education of on dean was produced this past fall now playing at the theater until March tenth is her comedy with edges called, by the way, meet VERA stark sat in the depression era. Vera stark is a black made who serves as a confidante to a former child star who is trying to hold onto her fame. We'll learn why later now famous something that VERA wants to. But how she gets. It leaves a lot to be desired. She becomes a household name playing a slave in a film, something that follows VERA her entire life. We're joined today by the show's director, Kamilah, Forbes and Lynn Nottage herself weapon to all of it. Thank you. Thank you. So Lynn this play tackles, ageism, sexism, color, ISM confinement, slavery. But it's also the screwball comedy. Why did you decide it could have been a tragedy? You could have written a very serious drama about that. Why did you choose comedy? I think that leftovers incredibly cathartic, and it's an easy way for us to process trauma, and Lord knows we as African American woman understand trauma. And I think back to some of the comedians who I really love like Richard Pryor and moms mabley who were able to tell the truth in ways that were very very funny when you're thinking about directing communities screwball comedy. It is funny because they've it's very at times, very broad. Yeah. With serious subjects what do you as a director think about and what you tell your actors to do. Sure. Well, you know, we started off with research about the just the style of screwball. The period of when screwball comedies were. Created and popular just so that we understood the rhythms right of the world. But then, you know, as we started to get as we started to really dive into the world. It was how do we make sure that we ground ourselves in the truth of the scene because I think it's important with the of screwball. It's easy to stay in that place of broad comedy, satire comedy. But, but we have to also understand that there's an underlying story that we're here to tell you don't want it to be too cartoony. Exactly. Right. Exactly. When you're writing comedy. How do you have weighed that because you got a good sense of humor you like to laugh? Well, I teach theater and one of the things I always tell my students is that you must tell the truth. You must lean into the authenticity of the situation. And I think when you do that you avoid a lot of the pitfalls, and so that's what I try to do, you know, whether I'm writing drama or whether I'm writing a comedy, I use the same tools. So for VERA, what's what's Veras truth? I think very has a very complicated truth, I think that. She's a woman who came to to Hollywood in the early nineteen thirties with this assumption that the big pictures were ready to invite her in and she arrives and discovers that it's quite different. And I think that her truth is that she's a performer, and she's a brilliant performer. And she's this this wit in. Incredibly intelligent young woman who can't ply her trade. And so I think that her truth is about figuring out. How do I survive and do what I love in a place that continues to marginalize me Camille, there's this interesting relationship between the two lead characters, and I think some people probably women of color pick up right away. What the situation is between the aging starlet. And and VERA. Sure, as you were directing these actors to have that relationship, which we discovered pre exists this moment, but you don't want to give it away. Can you talk a little bit about trying to create the in the moment? But also giving us a little bit of the foreshadowing of these two ladies, maybe know each other before. Well, I mean, I think for the actors as we had to ground ourselves in the truth of of of the circumstances of what you've written in the play. And that's what they can play from an and more importantly, as I think about Vera Lynn is has set up this world of of women supporting each other a sisterhood a comeback. And and and that exists on many different levels, right? Because it's not only with VERA and Gloria. But also with VERA and Lottie the the other women that we meet that who've your lives within her roommates. Who are these come who is the community that ultimately built with her and Holter up? I'm so I think that the sisterhood lives on many different levels, and we had to ground ourselves in the truth of what that sisterhood was with each of the characters that surround VERA. And if I can add I think did really wonderful job of nurturing, those friendships in understanding that the core that these are women who are looking for community, and who wanted to have these lovely re relationships in the very difficult circumstances. There's an issue about everybody passing for everybody is passing you go black people passing for Latino people in white people. Everybody's passing and pretending to be something. They necessarily are even the rocks the white rockstar who sings the blues and the second half. Right. Everybody's being somebody else. Why was that something you wanted to explore? I think firstly I was really interested in the mass that we put on in America in order to survive, and how we have to shed vetch vestiges of ourselves in order to fit into this great melting pot. But also I was interested in so that the performance of aspects of self in. Oh, how do you perform? An extreme version of yourself. How do you put on that mask in order to go to the work? And so I think that that's one of the things that I was interested in when we were looking at passing and you're right. It's like every single character, including von ASTA, who's the director who's pretending to be a German, and he's a Russian Jew. And I think that's just the nature of Hollywood at the time that people made these compromise choices in order to survive. And even in the play the second half of the play these three academics are looking back at Veras life, and her choices and trying to say what they think her life choices were and the sort of very pompous ponderous the fella in it is is going on with this accent. And then he says he's from Oakland. Drop. And you're like, oh, I know he learned passing yet again. My guests are Camilo Forbes and Lynn nodded Lynn wrote the play, by the way, meet VERA stark and Camilla directed it. Veers situation is reminiscent of that of Hattie McDaniel. She was the first African American performer to win an Academy Award and she won playing a mammy character in gone with the wind. If you listen to her in the film. She sounds like this..

VERA stark Vera Lynn director Hollywood Camilo Forbes Lynn Nottage Richard Pryor Hattie McDaniel Veras New York dean Lord Kamilah Oakland Camille America von ASTA Lottie Camilla
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:14 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"East village. The creator stomp join us today and Pulitzer prize winning play, right? Lynn nods is known for her searing and serious dramas. But did you notice you have a knack for screwball comedy for play? By the way. Meet VERA stark is all about a young black man who wants to be an actress and her quest for fame in old Hollywood, it's being staged at the signature theatre Lynn, and the show's director Kamilah Forbes will be our guests. This is all of it. I'm Alison Stewart, and I'm gonna meet you on the other side of the news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Nora raum. President Trump is in Hanoi where he presided over a signing ceremony with his Vietnamese counterpart Vietnamese carriers have agreed to purchase one hundred ten planes from US company. Boeing Mr. Trump raised his host on behalf of the United States. I want to thank you very much for hosting and hopefully great things will happen later on with our meeting, but a lot of good things are happening before, and that's the signing of trade deals with the United States. And we appreciate it very much. Thank you. Mr President, the president is in Hanoi where he'll meet with North Korean leader, Kim Jong UN for the second round of nuclear talks. President Trump's former personal lawyer is to testify in public Wednesday on the president's personal and business dealings. Various media outlets are reporting that Michael Cohen says he'll provide documents that he says prove the president committed illicit acts NPR is not been able to verify. That report Cohen is expected to be asked about payments. He made to women not to talk about alleged affairs with the president has pleaded guilty to lying congress lying to congress in two thousand seventeen and to campaign finance violations. He's served three years in prison. The house voted to terminate President Trump's declaration of a national emergency at the US Mexico border NPR's Kelsey Snell reports two hundred and forty five house members, including thirteen Republicans voted to deny Trump's move to access funds to build a wall without congressional consent. The measure is what's known as a privileged resolution and that comes with special rules, including a requirement that the Senate vote within about three weeks. Unlike most legislation emotion to disapprove of a presidential order needs. Only a simple majority to be approved in the Senate or the outcome remains on clear. The White House is already threatening. The Trump will veto the legislation if it passes and neither chamber is expected to have enough votes to overrule him. Kelsey Snell, NPR news, Washington. Former vice president Joe Biden is dropping his strongest hint yet that he's edging closer to announcing at twenty twenty presidential run Sarah Mueller from Delaware. Public media has more on the story violence conversation with historian John reach him. I'm presidential attributes turned to his twenty twenty plants Biden says he's very close to a decision and his family is supportive. But he says he's uneasy about them enduring what could be brutal campaign, primarily will be very difficult and the general election running against President Trump. I don't think he's likely to stop at anything, and whomever. He runs against Biden also says he wants to be sure of having a reasonable chance of becoming the democratic nominee. He says he doesn't want his campaign to be a fool's errand. For NPR news. I'm Sarah Mueller in Delaware. This is NPR news from Washington. Authorities in Long Island say a commuter train struck a vehicle Tuesday night, all three people in the vehicle were killed. Police say the vehicle was trying to beat the gate and get through an intersection before the train when it was hit. Several people on the train suffered minor injuries. In the rural mountains of Oregon an Amtrak train stranded on snowy tracks with almost two hundred people aboard is once again on the move. Rachel McDonald from member station K L C C caught up with some of the passengers who were stranded for more than thirty six hours. The passengers were not allowed outside the train during their ordeal. But they had food and heat. Diane McMillan-Scott, tack of Newport, Oregon is on her way to Martinez, California. She says the worst part was the lack of cell service for her son of the nice people were nice enough to share their phones. So we can let our family to know that we were we weren't lost somewhere in the wilderness. But my friends have encouraged me to come home. It's not a good omen. I think I'm going to try to get a flight and get to my right destination. Get out of here. The region was hit with a rare heavy snowstorms Sunday night. The train was stopped by snow and down trees for NPR news. I'm Rachel McDonald. In Eugene, Oregon, the United Methodist Church voted Tuesday to strengthen its bans on same sex marriage and the ordination of LGBT clergy delegates defeated a measure, which would have allowed regional and local bodies to decide that issue for themselves. The United Methodist Church is the second largest Protestant denomination in the US, many other mainline Protestant denominations have embraced.

President Trump NPR United States president Joe Biden Lynn Oregon Kelsey Snell Hanoi Mr President Trump Rachel McDonald Sarah Mueller Pulitzer prize Washington vice president Delaware Senate
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:43 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Then it's really interesting when you come back, and you listen to her accepting her Academy Award academy of Motion Picture Arts and science fellow members of the motion picture industry and honored guest. This is one of the happiest moments of my life. And I want to thank each one of you who at apart and selecting me for one of the awards for your kindness. It has made me feel very very humble. And I shall always hold it as a beacon for anything that I may be able to do in the future. I sincerely hope I shall always be a credit to my race and to the motion picture industry. My heart is full. To tell just high for you. And I say, thank you. How do you McDonald's? Most famous example of this. But I know in your research, you found other actresses who went through the same thing. I think. Primarily made me think about it is my love hate with screwball comedies and growing up watching all these films on television and black and white at four thirty in the afternoon. And I really love the fact that most of these films have women at the center, they were witty. They were fast and furious. But then they're always came a moment when a black person with guys would shuffle onto the screen and and serve something. And then shuffle-off, and it would disrupt my experience of watching watching the the film. But I think is what made me in particular drawn to these women were that there were some people who are able to disrupt these frames in very specific ways. And these were women like Theresa Harris. And Freddie, Washington and Nina McKinney, who were honest news, and who demanded to be seen in very different ways. I think then Hattie McDaniel, and I wanted to tell their stories it was I went and I watch. Just a scene from gone with women had McDaniel, and then I watched her Academy Award speech. And when you put them next to each other, you realized what she was living through and dealing with the thought was in. It's it's little heartbreaking. Actually, it was terribly heartbreaking. What these women had to go through in order to appear on the silver screen in. The course of the play. We have three different time periods Camilo. That's right. Can you talk a little bit about creating the mood for each one? The first one is in the thirty s sure. So the first one is in the thirties, and we are dealing with sort of this the rhythm of the writing is in the style of screwball comedy. So it's fast. It's various it moves quickly. There's broad comedy. So there's there's a very sort of specific world in which and then we moved to the ninth. We moved to actually contemporary day in the nineteen seventies and the nineteen seventies. You know, the set is it's we're gonna talk show very, Mike. Douglas, dick cabs. You know in the seventies is far more relaxed and work coming off of the sixties and coming off a free love. So it's it's it's vastly vastly conflicts. I think with the the pace and the speed of of the nineteen thirties because it's far more looser and we deal with the contemporary world of academics. Which is somewhat of contemporary time period. But we're in the world of academia, which is about structure, which is about putting things in the boxes, which is about checking off boxes, which is about categorizing. So it's interesting. I think in the act to sort of the looseness of the seventies versus the the structured academic world that we also live in inactive as well. So it's it's a it's a beautiful. I think tapestry that Lynn has given us to play in with these three different time periods. Is it written that the same actors who were enact one are playing different characters enact intentionally double cast? So the actors that appear in the school board comedy, then appear on the talk show, and then appear as talk show hosts, and I was really interested in how these archetypes would evolve over time know who would who was in one thousand nine thirty and who was in one thousand nine hundred seventy the character in the first half. Well, who is passing? She's light skinned black woman. She's passing for Latina plays the most radical Angela Davis on steroids. Academic in the second half was that intentional absolutely intentional. I think because in the first half anime makes very radical choices in order to survive. And so I think that after fifty years she's gonna make those same radical choices. But in a very different way. How did how did you have? How'd you get and work with the actress to have VERA? In the nineteen seventies we made her, and she's got this big dress on she kind of reminded me, della Reese, a little less interesting. That's who she modeled exactly who she. Good job. But she's it's this fine line between her being a little bit. Thanks almost too hard a word. But you've just sense that life is not been kind to her. Sure. But she still has some fire. Sure, what is your direction to an actress to catch that to to capture that push and pull? Well, I think it's it's about you know, we we built a timeline and in that time line we had a lot of conversations of filling in that time line about what her life was like she talks about that. She did fifty pitchers with you know, where characters did not have last names. She sees her peers getting far more acclaim than her. But yet there's always this fire that's burning in her that she's a consummate performer that she was born to do this. So even though we're seeing her fifty years later worn down and the world has given her so much more weight to carry. They're still that fire that yet, I'm still a performer, and I still have that hunger. That just maybe just maybe write that myself. Is right around the corner. It's interesting when I was writing the character in the second act, I was really thinking of a Queen who has been exiled and who's fighting to get back into her kingdom. My guests are Lynn Nottage and fortress talking for you. Like I do. Camillo Forbes and Lynn Nottage we're talking about the play, by the way. Meet VERA stark what as a director as a heart a hard seen to nail in this performance. Hard seem to nail. I would sit. You know, what what was really probably the most challenging. And I think it's just because it's all about precision is our last scene of act one are lasting of act one. Because it is about comedy comedy is so much it's so mathematical, and if there are certain if a certain beat is off you missed the joke, and if you missed that joke than the second job may not land. So it is all about mathematics and where and so I think that's that's always hard. But when it lands, there's so much joy. You know, and there's so much satisfaction in that. So I would say that. And that's our height of our most. I would say of the screwball comedy. Is that a matter of just good old-fashioned repetition? Just make sure people hit their marks. That's par hitting the Marxist a part of it. But I would also say it's hitting the marks and comedy is also about audience, right? Because in the audience becomes the third factor. Not just the actors and hitting the marks. And so for introducing the audience and making sure that that is also incorporated into your rhythm. It's just as important Lynn have you done rewrites after watching a played in. You realize this joke isn't quite landing or I need to slide down. Yeah. Absolutely. The though for for this particular production. I didn't do any rewrites. But when I was first writing, by the way, meet very stark. I was. Rewriting on a regular basis because the things that I thought were terribly funny and actors would deliver the lines, and it was absolute style. It's it was rickets and be like, oh, it's funny on the page. It was one funny and my head. Why isn't it funny on the stage? And so it was really finding a way to to sort of massage jokes. In front of an audience, which I think is part of what comedy is my guests are Kamilah, Forbes and Lynn Nottage Lynn wrote the play, by the way, meet VERA stark. And Camille is the director we'll have more with Camilla and Lynn after the break. WNYC's supporters include the story prize finalists, Deborah Eisenberg, Lauren Groff and Jamal Brinkley..

Lynn Nottage Lynn Hattie McDaniel Lynn Nottage VERA stark director Camillo Forbes Motion Picture Arts Academy Award Theresa Harris McDonald della Reese Angela Davis Nina McKinney VERA Camilo Freddie Douglas Mike WNYC
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:24 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The two time Pulitzer prize winner is always busy and this year is no exception. Currently Lynn is a playwright in residence at signature theatre here in New York where her play fabulous. The education of on dean was produced this past fall now playing at the theater until March tenth is her comedy with edges called, by the way. Meet VERA stark, saying the depression era, very stark is a black made who serves as a confidante to a former child star who is trying to hold onto her fame. We'll learn why later now famous something that VERA wants to. But how she gets. It leaves a lot to be desired. She becomes a household name playing a slave in a film, something that follows VERA her entire life. We're joined today by the show's director, Kamilah, Forbes, and Lynn Nottage herself. What all of it? Thank you. Thank you. So Lynn this play tackles, ageism, sexism, color, ISM confinement, slavery. But it's also the screwball comedy. Why did you decide it could have been a tragedy? You could written a very serious drama about that. Why did you choose comedy? I think that laughter's incredibly cathartic, and it's an easy way for us to process trauma and Lord knows we as African American women understand trauma. And I think back to some of the comedians who I really love like, Richard Pryor and moms mabley who were able to tell the truth in ways that were very very funny. When you're thinking about directing camellias grew ball comedy. It is funny because it's very at times very broad with serious subjects what do you as a director think about and what you tell your actors to do. Sure. Well, you know, we started off with research about the just the style of screwball. The period of went screwball comedies were. Created and popular just so that we understood stood the rhythms right of the world. But then I, you know, as we started to get as we started to really dive into the world. It was how do we make sure that we ground ourselves in the truth of the scene because I think it's important with the broadening of screwball. It's easy to stay in that place of broad comedy, satire comedy. But, but we have to also understand that there's an underlying story that we're here to tell you don't want it to be too cartoony. Exactly. Right. Exactly. When you're writing comedy. How do you have weighed that because you've got a good sense of humor you like to laugh, I teach theater and one of the things I always tell my students is that you must tell the truth. You must lean into the authenticity of the situation. And I think when you do that you avoid a lot of the pit FOX. And so that's what I tried to do, you know, whether I'm writing drama or whether I'm writing a comedy, I use the same tools. So for VERA, what's what's Veras truth? I think vir has a very complicated truth. I think that. She's a woman who came to Hollywood in the early nineteen thirties with this assumption that the big pictures were ready to invite her in and she arrives and discovers that it's quite different. And I think that her truth is that she's a performer, and she's a brilliant performer. And she's this this in an incredibly intelligent young woman who can't ply her trade. And so I think that her truth is about figuring out. How do I survive and do what I love in a place that continues to marginalize me Camille? Camila? There's this interesting relationship between the two lead characters, and I think some people probably women of color pick up right away. What the situation is between the aging starlet. And and VERA sure as you were directing these actors to have that relationship, which we discovered pre exists this moment, but you don't want to give it away. Can you talk to us a little bit about trying to create the in the moment? But also giving us a little bit of the foreshadowing of these two ladies, maybe know each other before. Well, I mean, I think for the actors as we had to ground ourselves in the truth of the circumstances of what you've written in the play. And that's what they can play from an and more importantly, as I think about Vera Lynn is has set up this world of of women supporting each other a sisterhood a Cumbria. And and and that exists on many different levels, right? Because it's not only with VERA and Gloria. But also with VERA and Lottie the the other women that we meet that who've your lives within her roommates. Who are these camera who is a community that ultimately built with her and halter up? I'm so I think that the sisterhood lives on many different levels, and we had to ground ourselves in the truth of what that sister was with each of the characters that surround era, and if I can add I think that did a really wonderful job of nurturing, those friendships in understanding that the core that these are women who are looking for community, and who wanted to have these lovely relationships in the very difficult circumstances. There's an issue about everybody passing for everybody is passing you go black people passing for Latino people in white people passing. Everybody's passing and pretending to be something. They necessarily are even the rocks. The white rockstar who sings the blues and the second half. Everybody's being somebody else. Why was that something you wanted to explore Orland? I think firstly I was really interested in the mass that we put on in America in order to survive, and how we have to shed vetch vestiges of ourselves in order to fit into this great melting pot. But also, I was interested in sort of the performance of aspects of self in. Oh, how do you perform an extreme version of yourself? How do you put on that mask in order to go to work? And so I think that that's one of the things that I was interested in when we were. Looking at passing and you're right. It's like every single character, including von Oster, who's the director who's pretending to be a German, and he's a Russian Jew. And I think that's just the nature of Hollywood at the time that people made these compromise choices in order to survive. And even in the play the second half of the play these three academics are looking back at Veras life, and her choices and trying to say what they think her life choices were and the sort of very. Pompous and ponder the fella in it is going on with his accent. And then he says he's from Oakland. Yeah. Drop. And you're like, oh, I know he learned passing yet again. You are my guests are Camilo, Forbes and Lynn nodded Lynn wrote the play, by the way, meet VERA stark and Camilla directed. It veers is reminiscent of that of having McDaniel. She was the first African American performer to win an Academy Award and she won playing a mammy character in gone with the wind. If you listen to her in the film. She sounds like this. Come on come on. No. The website. And.

Vera Lynn VERA stark director Lynn Nottage Hollywood Pulitzer prize Richard Pryor dean Forbes New York Kamilah Lord Veras McDaniel Camille Camila America Orland Cumbria Oster
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Even kitchen sinks are used to make music in this now classic show that is still running in the east village, the creators of stopped. Join us today and Pulitzer prize winning play, right? Lynn nods is known for her searing and serious dramas. But did you know, she has a knack for screwball comedy for play? By the way. Meet VERA stark is all about a young black man who wants to be an actress and her quest for fame in old Hollywood, it's being staged at the signature theatre Lynn, and the show's director Kamilah Forbes will be our guests. This is all of it. I'm Alison Stewart, and I will meet you on the other side of the news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. Michael Cohen is on Capitol Hill this week president Donald Trump's former personal lawyer began his three days of testimony before lawmakers with a closed door session this morning with the Senate intelligence committee is NPR's Ryan Lucas reports Cohen plans to provide a behind the scenes look at his time working at Trump side cone is set to testify before the house oversight committee on Wednesday in a hearing that will be broadcast live nationally Cohen plants provide lawmakers, a detailed inside look at his work over the years for Trump, including what he will allege are the president's lies racism and cheating. That's according to a person familiar with Coen's plans. The president's former fixer also intends to provide details on hush money payments made to women who say they had affairs with Trump and Cohen plans to present evidence, including documents of what he will allege is criminal conduct by the president since he took office. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders, says Cohen is a convicted liar who can't. Be taken at his word Ryan, Lucas NPR news, Washington. The Indian government confirms its fighter jets have destroyed a militant training camp in Pakistan. Saying that he killed quote, a very large number of terrorists Baucus style. Meanwhile, denies any casualties or damage India's foreign secretary says Indian military jets struck a training camp in Bala cut early today. That was run by Mohammed. The militant group that claimed responsibility for February fourteenth bombing in Kashmir India alleges that such a facility, quote could not have functioned without the knowledge of Pakistani. Authorities where does Prime Minister Theresa may is shifting her position on Brexit is NPR's. Frank Langfitt reports from London Prime Minister now says she'll consider delaying Britain leaving the European Union on March twenty ninth Mesa that if parliament rejects are Brexit deal again next month, lawmakers could vote on whether the UK should leave you with no deal, and if legislators opposed that which seems all but certain she told parliament that then the government will on the fourteenth of March bring forward emotion on whether parliament wants to seek a short limited extension to article fifty Article V. Outlined steps for leaving the U Jeremy Corbyn leader of the opposition labor party blamed the need for delay on may any extension is only necessary because of the prime minister's shambolic negotiations on her decision to run down. The clock may shift makes it more likely. Brexit will be delayed, but the European Union would still have to approve it. Frank Langfitt, NPR news, London.

Michael Cohen Donald Trump NPR Ryan Lucas president Lynn Prime Minister Indian government Pulitzer prize Pakistan Brexit Frank Langfitt European Union Trump Alison Stewart Lucas NPR Lakshmi Singh London Jeremy Corbyn VERA stark
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Maybe you're in the situation that I'm about to describe where you can imagine it near minds. I if you're driving let's say on the west side highway, and you look toward riverside. And there are those buildings at night all those wonderful deco apartment buildings and there a twinkling lights, and there are people home, and they represent lives and relationships. There's a brother a mother son a daughter, a husband a wife tucked away in those little cubby holes. And they've all got a story. And the odds are that any number of those twinkling lights, represent at least the two songs that we just heard as potentially having been a wedding song or a falling in love to saw at last unforgettable. Maybe it was your wedding song or your I going steady song. I'd like to think that that is as good a deaf. What I guess in an ideal circumstance a standard song is. It's a song that transcends. Its original introduction gets carried forward and re purposed all through time and great performers enabled that Etta James is one Johnny Hartman is another and you are one of those twinkling nights lights tonight on a Saturday night in New York, Paul Cavalcanti with you the songbook on WNYC. Hi, I'm Alison Stewart host of all of it on WNYC next week on all of it Pulitzer prize winning playwright Lynn nodded and the director of her latest production Kamilah Forbes and.

WNYC Pulitzer prize Alison Stewart Etta James Paul Cavalcanti Johnny Hartman Kamilah Forbes New York director Lynn
"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Kamilah Forbes and a new thriller starring khloe grace and Isabel who fair we'll talk the chlorine. The film's director Neil Jordan's plus odd Monday as well as the cast of fiddler on the roof in Yiddish, don't miss all of it. Weekdays at noon on WNYC. Support for WNYC comes from Geico insurance celebrating over seventy five years of providing auto insurance for drivers across America. Gyco can also help ensure motorcycles RV's homes apartments and more information at Geico dot com or one eight hundred nine four seven auto WNYC is a media partner of on air fest. This year's lineup includes radio labs jet Adam rod, author Roxane gay poet, Tracy k Smith talent behind science Friday and more March bursts through third at white hotel in Brooklyn tickets at air fest dot com, you value the programs you hear on WNYC. That's why you're listening right now. So are thousands of others people who would learn about your business on our air. Learn more about corporate sponsorship at WNYC dot ORG slash sponsor, support for NPR comes from NPR stations and from the kendeda fund, supporting individual dignity and sustainable communities through investments in transformative leaders, and ideas. Learn more at K E N. N D E D A fund dot org and the Melville charitable trust driven by one goal ending homelessness for good. Learn more online at melvilletrust dot org and on Twitter at melvilletrust..

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"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"kamilah forbes" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I assume it's by the social media entities themselves, and in theory, they have the authority they have the right to decide who can and cannot have access to their platforms. The in the same way that the New York Times or WNYC can decide who invite on. It's a little more complicated in the rumble social media because when when social media came into existence, the government assumed that anyone anyone would have access, and that these platforms would not be engaging in any kind of censorship or any kind of selective admission to the platforms, and that's changed in recent years, and it's complicated things. But but there's no first amendment issue because nobody's excluding him is the government itself. At least as I understand it. Well, I think Jeff is absolutely right. And in the characterization of this and the answer, the we also Jeff, and I'm make the point in the book by the SAS, we've invited by our own comments that one of the greatest questions of the time is how are we going to treat for first amendment purposes? The major new communication technology of the internet and social media platforms and over the past one hundred years there has been a division free. The print media has been protected against any form of regulation, basically and radio and TV have had multiple types of regulation. The fairness doctrine equal time provisions. And the question now is will this new technology of communication, the internet have one of those or something different, and that's a very complicated question. And where does it stand constitutionally? Well, I think we don't know. No the answer to that. That's part of the puzzle here. So you can say that the social media platforms have become so dominant, and in particular, Facebook and Twitter that it is appropriate under the broadcast. Regulation cases for the government to set up an agency that would participate in non censorship ways in the development of speech on those platforms, or you can say that has been a mistake in the past the red lion decision on broadcasting and the print media model should be the one that applies the social media. What was the red lion decision? Redline decision was in the late nineteen sixties and it upheld government regulation of radio and TV. Before cable. So was it based on scarcity was based on ineffective monopoly that the few big networks. It was based on scarcity, which is a complicated. This is this a write down our first amendment doctrine alley and my own view is that there was a play with both kinds of systems protection against the government some form of government regulation, and whether the rationale stood up or not as a hoping question in my mind. One of the ways that I think it's possible to imagine regulation of social media platforms like Facebook would be to implement the what was the fairness doctrine for radio and television onto Facebook by saying, for example, that Facebook sends you a particular site review, you go and look at a particular site that has a strong ideological component that it automatically has the dead send you the alternative site. The opposite side, you don't have to read it. They can't force you to do that. But they have to actually expose you to it. And the idea is to try to bring people to a better place in terms of understanding that world is more complicated than only from one side. We'll continue in a medic Brian Lehrer on WNYC. At WNYC. We rely on listener support. But what exactly does that mean? I'm Cindy listener support means you're part of every time you hear something great on WNYC. It's because your contribution made it happen without your support. It doesn't happen. It's a fundamental partnership at the heart of everything we do show your support, go to WNYC dot org and click on Dobie. WNYC is supported by the Yale school of management executive education presenting women on boards program, which coaches executive women to secure a seat at the corporate board table begins may fifth. Learn more by searching for yell women on boards signature theatre, presenting Lynn Nottage is by the way. Meet VERA stark directed by Kamilah Forbes following a black actress who gets her big break playing a slave during the golden age of Hollywood signature theatre dot org. WNYC as we continue.

WNYC government Facebook Jeff New York Times Lynn Nottage executive Brian Lehrer Dobie Redline Yale school of management VERA stark Hollywood Twitter Kamilah Forbes one hundred years