35 Burst results for "Kalamazoo"

'Vaccines Are Safe': Biden Urges Americans to Get Vaccinated after Touring Michigan Pfizer Plant

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:15 min | 4 months ago

'Vaccines Are Safe': Biden Urges Americans to Get Vaccinated after Touring Michigan Pfizer Plant

"Biden has pledged to maintain his focus on the pandemic and his pledge for one hundred million shots given out in the first one hundred days to that end he spent time today at the pfizer. Vaccine manufacturing plant near kalamazoo and michigan visit came as the company announced their vaccine can be stored at standard standard freezer temperatures. Now for up to two weeks they are seeking. Fda sign off on that temperature change that could drastically expand the number of facilities across our country. That would be able to store it and give out the vaccine. President said we're now on track to have enough vaccine supply for all americans by the end of the month of july. He renewed his pitch for the shots as the key to ending. This pandemic wherein. There's one message to cut through to every wanted this country. Is this the vaccines are safe. Please for yourself your family your community this country take the vaccine win. It's your turn and available. That's how to beat this pandemic. i believe we'll be approaching normalcy by the end of this year. God willing this. Christmas will be different than

Biden Kalamazoo Pfizer Michigan FDA
Biden Takes Effort to Sell His COVID-19 Rescue Package to Key Swing State of Michigan

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Biden Takes Effort to Sell His COVID-19 Rescue Package to Key Swing State of Michigan

"Taking his efforts to sell US covert 19 rescue package to key swing state of Michigan today, touring a Fizer facility in Kalamazoo. He got to see firsthand how those vaccines are kept in below freezing temperatures before they're shipped. President pledging to follow the science to end the pandemic and that more vaccines are coming because we work together. Now on track have enough vaccine supply for all Americans. By the end of July. Doesn't meet will be in all the markets arms. But enough vaccine will be available by that time back to back

Fizer Facility Kalamazoo Michigan United States
Joe Biden to tour Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine plant in Michigan

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 4 months ago

Joe Biden to tour Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine plant in Michigan

"Is expected in Michigan today to get a look at Pfizer's covert 19 vaccine production. NPR's Windsor, Johnston says. The trip comes as the White House seeks to ramp up vaccine supplies and distribution. Biden's visit to a Fizer manufacturing plant in Kalamazoo comes just days after his administration announced plans to increase the number of vaccines being shipped out to states, tribes and territories. It also comes amid efforts to double the number of doses sent to US pharmacies. Earlier this month. Visor said that it was working to speed up production of its vaccine meeting that additional supplies should be on the way this week.

Fizer Manufacturing Plant Pfizer NPR Johnston Windsor Michigan Biden Kalamazoo White House Visor United States
Despite Biden's Executive Orders, Vaccine Production May Be Hard To Ramp Up

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:49 min | 4 months ago

Despite Biden's Executive Orders, Vaccine Production May Be Hard To Ramp Up

"Biden's been signing executive orders to try to ramp up vaccine production and supplies. Sarah Jane Tribble of Kaiser Health News, says these new measures, which include invoking the Defense production act Well, not necessarily mean more vaccines anytime soon. Sir Jane Tribble joins us now. Thanks so much for being with us. It's good to be here. Thank you. The Defense production Act, of course, gives the president sweeping authority to try and and speed up the supply of materials and services from domestic industries. What could it do? And where does it fall short when it comes to increasing the supply of vaccines so that they can do immediately is really make it possible for glass vials and the production of Materials for that to come in and be laid out for the manufacturers. The other thing the DP taken duo is it can help the company's discuss what kind of supply needs they have. And get those on market so far with Visor and Madonna. What we've seen is them announcing big ramp ups in the second half the year and we're going to see a lot more vaccines coming out. What about the vaccine itself? How do you convert in industrial system for making all kinds of stuff to making room for 300 million Doses of vaccine. Well, it's not easy. You can't force these companies to produce more vaccine. Necessarily. They have to repurpose facilities that could take months. Making new plants can take years. Also part of the challenge relates to the vaccines themselves, the messenger or in a data that vaccine itself is fragile and breaks down easily, so it needs to be handled with a lot of care with specific temperatures and humidity levels. It's also massive quality control needs that need to happen, and scientists and engineers are needed to run it, so there are a lot of factors at play. The other thing. I think a lot of folks don't think about is that supply chain the upward supply Jane that it takes for these companies to make him these vaccines are made in one plant and say, Kalamazoo, Michigan. These vaccines are produced by multiple plants around the globe, and we're talking about shipping and feeling it takes many different parties to make one vaccine. Does the Defense Production Act permit American president to compel Fizer, an American company? To provide the vaccine for Americans first. I think that's very questionable, highly questionable. Biden could use it to force private pharma companies to transfer their technology to either another company or to just make more because what we're talking about is companies that actually tap into contract manufacturers across the globe. Not all the parts of these vaccines are being made here on American soil. So to say, you must make it just for America that gets pretty tricky and dicey. From a political standpoint,

Sarah Jane Tribble Kaiser Health News Sir Jane Tribble Biden Madonna Fizer Kalamazoo Jane Michigan Pharma America
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

03:59 min | 5 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"Again however as we know from her death or wish was not granted but her memory does not live in vain. her story tells of the strength and resilience of japanese atom bomb victims overall. The cost of life was around. Seventy thousand lives directly and even more from related disease. Three hundred and fifty thousand people lived directly in the area of hiroshima. That was bombed. Most of these people were like sasaki having no direct involvement with the military just civilians living and working. These victims also experienced internal discrimination after the bombing japanese citizens who had not lived in hiroshima and nagasaki. During the time of the bomb. Were afraid of the victims. They felt that their radiation would pass onto others either physically or genetically chico matsuo survived. Nagasaki calls that people would not marry those who survived the atomic bomb. There was a stigma. She still constantly concerned that even her grandchildren. By the radiation. She was exposed to she states that it makes her live without much happiness also. She is afraid that it could happen again. Think positively about the future however the traumatic memories survivors and family members and friends of victims have about the bomb did not lead to retaliation universally the japanese perspective is to recognize the tears of atomic and nuclear war and to advocate for nuclear disarmament to toco thurlow dedicated. Her life to nuclear disarmament. She also experienced hunger poverty discrimination following the bum but despite the trauma she has she is confident that if japanese victims tell their stories the nuclear disarmament is possible so he was in middle school. At the time of the hiroshima bonding feels likewise. Although his family went through similar traumas having seen piles of human bones and resorted to eating grass advocates for the telling of these stories likewise. He promotes world peace and disarmament. The site itself has been converted into a memorial for world. Peace gamba osaka dome. The only standing structure after the bombing has been preserved in its ruined state. It holds great symbolic value for demonstrates how a nuclear bomb can make anything hollow in ruined in the blink of an eye. Memory is constructed based on traces. These traces can be artifacts archives material culture or in this case the only surviving structure that represents the bombing the preservation of the dome juxtaposed with contemporary hiroshima is an exercise in memory alongside the stories of those who survived or died years. After due to the effects of radiation. The site promulgates empathy. It puts visitors in the shoes of those who experienced. The a-bomb overall the trauma of russia and nagasaki have transformed into a collective pain that all japanese share collectively. The japanese perspective is one victim and world peace with everything that has been discussed today. The perspective that i have found myself more aligned with is that of the historians and curator's who advocated for a more studied and perceptive recounting of the events. I don't think that any previous approach was necessarily ideal. But i do think that the best approach would have been an adaptation of the original one proposed by the national air and space museum. Part of the plan was to urge visitors to take sides in the historian graphical debate at which is a massively important part of the practice of interpretation. It's vital for the interpreter to present the information or situation in its entirety in order to heaven nonbiased discussion surrounding. It would of course not be in good taste for the museum to only focus on. The destruction brought upon japan just as it would be inappropriate to only be inclusive of veteran.

nagasaki hiroshima Seventy thousand lives Nagasaki japan today Three hundred and fifty thousa sasaki russia bomb japanese one victim thurlow matsuo
Michigan Town's Residents Are Thrilled About Town's Role In Fighting The Pandemic

Marketplace

01:23 min | 6 months ago

Michigan Town's Residents Are Thrilled About Town's Role In Fighting The Pandemic

"Shapiro In a small Southwest Michigan town yard Signs are popping up all over there, thanking workers who are making Corona virus vaccines at the local Fizer plant As Sevilla man of member station W. M. U K in Kalamazoo, reports, the town's residents are thrilled about its role in fighting the pandemic. Fizer plant in Portage, located about two hours west of Detroit, sprawls over 1300 acres on the southern edge of town. It's the company's largest manufacturing center in the world. More than 2000 people work here. The country's first corona virus. Vaccines rolled out of this plant early last week, and people in Portage could not be prouder. This is just been like riding a wave of positivity. Great news, hope, Joy. Not just for our community, but for the entire world, Portage Mayor Patricia Randall says after months of pandemic bleakness. The good news about the vaccine has contributed to the collective buzz here. I likened it to a winter day in March when the sun is beaming in the temperatures are higher than normal, and people are just happy and they're appreciative. Local developer paid for the yard signs thanking the company. They're posted in front of houses and businesses. Miles from the plant. The city just painted. Thank you in huge letters on the street, right in front of the plant. Contractor who painted those giant letters

Fizer Plant Southwest Michigan Portage W. M. U Shapiro Sevilla Kalamazoo Patricia Randall Detroit
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

02:25 min | 6 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"I really only looked at interpretation through my own scope which was being an interpreter at kalamazoo valley museum and the podcast has just opened my eyes to how incredibly diverse field really is considering. We've made seven episodes on different types of interpretation and are moving forward with even more so it's just gone to show me how many different varieties of interpretation exist in the field and how the interpreters of those different professions navigate the tasks that they have on hand for sure. I think that the great thing about this is that it's opening up discussion and exploration and it's just as much that way for you guys creating it as it can potentially be for the people listening to it so as individuals who identify with white anglo culture. What was your experience and approach in talking about histories and cultures of those who you are not a part of so. I think that's a great question and it's something that's incredibly important to think about when you're ready to have such discussions in setting such as podcast. But i guess the approach that i took was making sure that i listened to and tried to understand things that others were saying because as a white man i of course cannot claim that i understand the experiences of those of other cultures and can't of course speak on their behalf either so it's just incredibly important to be empathetic and to try to use those people's words when talking about themselves so that i'm not saying anything controversial or insensitive on their behalf. I would say that. I had a similar approach. I definitely tried to emphasize listening and trying to take into perspective of people from those cultures. When we addressed to them for example i think to the japanese internment camps and my research around that was greatly centered around oral histories from the exact japanese-americans who experienced the tears of being confined by your own government in a concentration camp due to something that you had absolutely nothing to do with. So i think is definitely an approach. I think empathy is big to you know. Try to recognize that especially because a lot of the times we talked about other cultures we were talking and not in every case but a lotta times we were talking about cultural trauma.

kalamazoo valley museum
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

03:36 min | 6 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"That clearly have a strong educational commitment and just really goes to show that behind the scenes. There's so much going on. That does not meet the i. Yeah i would say that to an also. This experience has made me recognize just the different things that a podcast can be. I think before. I always thought of podcasts as a narrative sort of thing or like a radio show so you know someone gives a tells a story or something that's very scripted or they just have like an interview and they just talk back and forth but i feel like this experience exposed me to the ways that a podcast can mutate into Different types of audio experiences and even early on Doing research on podcast to conceptualize. What are podcasts. Would look like i remember hearing about podcasts. That were well. Here's one example There's a podcast that i came across. That was basically model to be an old radio. Show from the fifties and the person talked about alien sightings and abductions and all those sorts of things and they like reenacted them and in one of the episodes. I think he even got abducted. I can't even remember exactly what that podcasts name was but it was just insane and i went man like that's super creative that this is something that someone made a podcast out. If i heard murder mystery podcasts where it's basically like one of those audio radio shows but instead it's like some agatha christie tail and so yeah i think that's that's another big thing for me is not only just the amount of work that goes into it but just the different things that podcasts can be. I've learned greatly about How has your knowledge of interpretation personally expanded since the advent of the pandemic and the creation of the podcast. Well i can speak personally to this. Because i started my job at the museum and interpretation with no experience or knowledge of the field really. I had given museum tours and poor's of the archive that i work. Dadan done stuff. Like that but really wasn't quite strict. Interpretive work so. I didn't really have the foundational knowledge that or experiences. That may be a lot of other people did win going into the pandemic so the whole podcast was really just me learning about interpretation. I feel like you could even listen to episodes and hear about Ways i apply concepts and learn about concepts and learn about different facets of the fueled. I feel like this whole podcast if anything if there's anything to show out of it On a personal level it demonstrates the things. I've learned about interpretation because every episode was a new learning experience about the field I don't see myself as someone who's an authority on interpretation whatsoever in fact the opposite but in a way. I feel that the podcast has a lot of value. Because you know one of the people making the podcast was not an expert and with someone learning about the field as they were making the content and processing it and hopefully my mental processing Is something that can help people navigate the field and the varying the multitude facets that go into very multifaceted profession. So yeah. I feel like. I've learned literally everything about interpretation that i know from the podcast and in the pandemic so i've learned a great deal. Yeah i feel very similarly because like my experiences with podcasts. Before we started this project which were very slim before i started working at the kalamazoo valley museum. I really had no concept of interpretation or what it meant to be an interpreter and so going forward and everything..

Dadan agatha christie kalamazoo valley museum
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

04:35 min | 6 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"You know that was a huge lesson to learn how to handle closes the the best that you can when they really can't be completely fixed which is something that like. I know how to do but like you don't do as much of it. When you're editing like a singing vocal track as you would like an hour long track Of somebody talking. There's just so much more of it because there's there's more voice happening in our then like you know how much singing is in a five minute song or something like that. Also you know. Singers projecting more intense to be further away from the mic whereas. Like when you're just sitting here talking you tend to to want to be closer to the mike because you're speaking softer there. A handful of you know things like that. That are just like the lessons that i've learned in podcast editing as opposed to you know recording and fixing music that again. The reason that that i wanted to do this to expand that knowledge base yeah indefinitely i mean. I can certainly attest to the fact that it is involved. A learning curve to wrap up our discussion with you here today. how do you envision the podcast developing in the future. I would hope that this is going to continue to grow even beyond what we do with it. You know because we likely won't be here at the museum forever. Probably move on to other jobs so on and so forth in due time but even before that's the thing you know seeing it grow while we're still here and more involvement from outside sources you know more guests from within the museum or guests from of the museum so that there's a large community discussion going on. I think that's the cool thing about a platform and medium like this is that it can create a really large discussion that can then be very easily and freely broadcast to an extremely large worldwide audience and having the potential for that local kalamazoo community discussion being had between those of us at the.

kalamazoo
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

04:30 min | 6 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"This is just another tool that we are seeing work and I did want to make sure that. I talk about access. I wanted to make sure that you know the transcriptions also done for our podcast are very important to just for those listeners. Who maybe don't have the best hearing or death. They have an opportunity to actually read content and be able to enjoy the information. The storytelling that you guys put together. And we all that being said to sort of. Wrap up our discussion here today. How do you envision the podcast developing in the future all. I'll admit when you guys first approach says wondering if theme on interpretation as i initially visualize from the description. I thought might be a little limiting. But then as i've listened to well yesterday listened to the planetarium podcast again As a refresher. But i realized that the universe into to use it at a cross analogy to the planetarium. It the sky's the limit literally for moving forward on what content and subject matters can be covered the way that you guys have presented it. I love the context building the sort of historical background thus being presented than along with various specific questions that do circle back to the idea of what is interpretation. So it's amazing so see the opportunity for us to continue to do this type of information sharing. I think that we'll create braider accessibility to a larger audience Obviously well beyond those that can physically Be here in kalamazoo to visit the museum. But certainly Start to see audiences from a worldwide perspective. I agree so it'll be very exciting to see how everything develops in the future. Thanks so much for joining us today. Bill my pleasure and kudos to all of you and everyone else involved in getting this. Podcast launched now on today's episode. We have Some who you don't really get to hear a lot from Who's been with the podcast sense. The get-go his name is josh. And he's our audio engineer and He's the voice you can hear at the beginning of episodes with content mornings and the end of episodes with each of our outros. Welcome to the podcast josh. Hello thanks for having me on this end of it. Yeah definitely definitely a new role. So we're just going to get right into it for you then and ask you the same question we've been asking everyone and that's before the pandemic. What was your experience with and knowledge on podcasts. I it's the two thousand two thousand ten's and We're all bored and so like any average person. i do. Listen to a podcast to you. And i have for a long time. You know. it's a good Passive form of socialization in a way to be able to sit and listen to people talk at but not have to do any interaction yourself. It's kind of like hanging out with people without having to be social So i i tend to like podcasts. That are people sitting around goofing off. Together comedy podcasts and stuff that are just very organic. You know i'm a big podcast fan. I hear ya okay. So plenty plenty of background. Yeah aside from listening to podcasts. What is your background in recording. Just any audio recording in general yes. So i've been a musician for lord twenty four years now something like that and i started experimenting with writing music and recording. At home i would say around the year two thousand or so y with a copy of Cakewalk guitar studio which was not good software. But it was like one of the more affordable ones since then. I learned how to use base and and reaper as well of spent a lot of time. Learning how to record and mix and master music over the course of the past twenty years or so self taught..

josh kalamazoo Bill
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

03:59 min | 6 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"I truly believe statement and that's one of the beauties of interpretation is that we can always comeback to gives stories when we know more and so it just gives an opportunity to revisit topics that maybe the museum have talked about before in the past whether that is an exhibit or meson article or maybe in just a a special event that we posted and allowing interpreters to shine through that That development of their own interest and then sparked that passion of learning forever and the curiosity for our listeners and for our community members. Yeah i think you make some really great points. Meghan and i know personally. I too am definitely looking forward to seeing how things develop in the future. Thanks so much for joining us today. Thank you for having me great. Thank you for having me. Jake up. it's been just such a joy Listening to podcasts. As they come out and providing you know just another lens and an inspiration to you all to continue to learn and explore our world and share that with our listeners to continue our discussion today of the production of podcast over the past eight months. Or so we have with us the director of the kalamazoo valley museum. Bill mackel hone. Hi bill. i gray. I everyone to begin our discussion today if you could speak to your experience and knowledge on podcasts before the pandemic and before the of this project well. That's a great question. I if become a i'll just share it advance. Become a greater consumer of podcasts since the pandemic is just An opportunity that we've had a lot more time in the just looking for other outlets for seeking information so but my knowledge of podcast really quite limited other than just a unity to share materials other organizations were doing news out leads authors but really as a personal consumer of hot casts. It really wasn't in my wheelhouse until this pandemic considering that perspective that you had before that kind of beginners kind of approach to podcasting and not really having a lot of knowledge on it from a director's perspective. What did you initially think of us. Having a museum podcast. First of all. I thought it was a great idea and commend the team for coming up with the idea especially In all admit that before the pandemic this probably would have been an idea that would have been set aside or put on the backburner simply because of all the forward facing engagements that we do at a hands on museum. But one of the things that came out of One of the positives of out of the pandemic with you know. And i don't wanna diminish the pandemic is is and what it has done but Is this opportunity to get Very innovative and can reconsider way. We operate the way we share information so initially when the the idea was broached does a good one and i don't know who If it was this group the trio that came up with the idea but Certainly well worth exploring. And i would say that that you guys showed not only the creativity in the innovation and wanting to pursue a podcast for the council valley museum but also great patience because working in a public institution and the way they were funded requires that you know great ideas..

kalamazoo valley museum Bill mackel Meghan Jake council valley museum
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

04:59 min | 6 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"Formed in the spring of twenty twenty the kalamazoo valley museums. Interpretive our is now on its eighth episode. Today we will interview the different parties involved. In creating this extensive project we will explore the triumphs and tribulations. Hopefully our listeners can then learn about the nuances of creating a museum. Podcast next year in twenty twenty one. We will begin with new topics and approaches. This is our twenty twenty retrospective for the kalamazoo valley museums. Interpretive my name is jacob. Wolf and greg wilson and as mentioned in our introduction today we will be interviewing the various parties that went into the creation of our podcast. We will begin by interviewing our project manager and supervisor megan then we will go on to interview art director bill after that we will interview our audio engineer. Josh and then we will also revisit. Two of our former guests. Mara in steve mara who happened. Actually create the podcast art as well and then finally gray and i will talk a bit about our personal experiences. But the podcast and wrap things up for you. We are here with megan ascetic the interpretation manager the kalamazoo valley museum as well as the project manager. Over the course of the podcasts journey. Hi megan gray. Thanks for joining us. Today we're just going to ask you a few questions about how the podcast has developed in your experiences throughout the course of that so to begin our discussion today if you could tell me before the pandemic what was your experience and your knowledge on podcasts. Yeah that's a great question. And i have been a podcast. Lister for a number of years In just i guess. My personal interest of improv comedy Other heritage podcasts true crime. Podcasts like everyone out there in the world Yeah and so. I've been an avid listener and enjoy learning Through listening on another note going back to your role with our podcast in particular from your perspective. How why did the kalamazoo valley museums interpretive. Our begin as being an avid listener and a podcasts. I know that there are other podcast listeners. Out there in the world. And that's how a lot of people get information one of the things that i have done throughout my career as an interpreter is communicating to those who are not interpreters. What interpretation is particularly those at our organization Side of the museum so we are a part of the kalamazoo valley community college and Our colleagues there may not know necessarily what interpretation is about as well as even within the museum field and the cultural heritage sector interpretation is still something that is a little bit of a new concept for museum educators and i was really hoping that we would be able to bridge that misunderstanding or open people's eyes to all of the possibilities. That interpretation has. Yeah i mean that's a great answer and from my own. I guess biased opinion. I would say that it's doing that quite well Moving on you are one of the few people who has been around in seen the podcast develop from its original conception and if you could speak to how was different being the project manager of this program like for example you never sat in on recordings and therefore you heard the audio and its completion versus progression. Yeah i didn't want to be involved in the necessary and recording or conversation and research aspect. I looked at my role as the project manager as more of a podcast producer. So aiding with topics Giving resources to both you gray. And jacob for researching connecting dots of other possible stories or narratives and community members. That we could reach out to to explain what interpretation is to the world..

kalamazoo valley kalamazoo valley museums steve mara megan ascetic kalamazoo valley museum megan gray greg wilson jacob Mara kalamazoo valley community col megan Wolf Lister Josh
First shipment of Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine leaves Michigan facility

Leo Laporte

00:17 sec | 6 months ago

First shipment of Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine leaves Michigan facility

"The cove in 19 vaccine have left the Fizer manufacturing plant. The first FedEx truck rolled out of the company's facility near Kalamazoo, Michigan. This morning as nationwide distribution of the vaccine begins. Workers loaded the vaccine onto an aircraft to bring them to ups and FedEx cargo hubs in Kentucky and Tennessee. One

Fizer Manufacturing Plant Fedex Kalamazoo Michigan Kentucky Tennessee
First batch of coronavirus vaccine ships out from Pfizer plant for all 50 states

On The Media

00:20 sec | 6 months ago

First batch of coronavirus vaccine ships out from Pfizer plant for all 50 states

"That defies her warehouse and Kalamazoo, Michigan began applauding this morning as the first boxes of the company's corona virus. Vaccines were loaded onto a truck. Vials of impact and dry ice to keep them from spoiling and are expected to begin arriving around the country tomorrow. The first shots likely will go to hospital workers and nursing home residents.

Kalamazoo Michigan
Trucks with first COVID-19 vaccine in US get ready to roll

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

Trucks with first COVID-19 vaccine in US get ready to roll

"The first shipments of buzzers co the backseat of going out now and scheduled to arrive across the country starting Monday workers advisers plant in Kalamazoo Michigan applaud Packers at the first boxes from there you PS synthetics are delivering three million doses says general Gus Perna the head of the trump administration's vaccine program this is a monumental week for us all as we distribute the first millions of doses of vaccines to the American people says the first doses arrive Monday followed by more Tuesday and Wednesday the priority is healthcare workers and nursing home residents as infections hospitalizations and deaths soar the corona viruses killed nearly three hundred thousand Americans according to Johns Hopkins I'm Julie Walker

General Gus Perna Trump Administration Kalamazoo Packers Michigan Johns Hopkins Julie Walker
FDA panel approves Covid vaccine in US

NBC Nightly News

04:29 min | 6 months ago

FDA panel approves Covid vaccine in US

"Good evening we start with that breaking news from an independent. Fda advisory panel of experts late today giving its endorsement for emergency. Use a pfizer as covid vaccine here in the united states their recommendation. Now in the hands of the fda itself which could give its go-ahead any day now that would allow the start of an ambitious mass vaccination effort just as the country reels from loss of over three thousand people in a single day from the virus. Let's begin tonight with tom castillo. The virtual vote came after eight hours so back and forth on efficacy and safety and outside advisory panel of experts charged with giving the fda unbiased and unfiltered analysis of pfizer's covid vaccine the american public demand and deserve comprehensive and independent review of the data. Now the fda will decide whether to follow the uk and canada. In green-lighting the vaccine for emergency use. That decision could come within days or even hours. Fda commissioner hahn on we've shrunk in a process that normally takes months into one. That's taken weeks. And i have a one hundred percents confidence in them. And i believe the american people should as well wants. The fda approves operation warp speed will move into high gear thousands of ups and fedex trucks and planes mobilized nationwide the faa giving priority clearance to air cargo shipments. In the first week visor plans to ship. Roughly two point nine million doses each state's allocation based on his population with bigger states. Getting the most california receiving three hundred twenty seven. Thousand initial doses. Medium-size states like maryland. Minnesota about fifty thousand small estates and wyoming about five thousand initially across the country. Frontline medical workers will go first at the university of wisconsin mid center in madison. Their training to vaccinate the first two thousand staffers in the er icu and kobe. Units identified as group. One a you're talking about. Physicians advanced practice providers nurse practitioners and physician assistants respiratory therapists. Nursing assistants are registered nurses. That population has the highest touch points with the kobe. Positive patients already shipping one hundred fifty million kits that include syringes and p for starting the injection process all right. Tom joins us now. Tom some members of this advisory committee did raise issues some concern about those people on the uk who had some sort of an allergic reaction concern about that and some members want more research into the effect on sixteen and seventeen year olds also pregnant women that want to see how they fare with the vaccine. All right tom as you heard those frontline healthcare workers will be among the first to receive the vaccine once it gets final approval and an unprecedented distribution effort kicks in gabe. Beauty ariza's with some of them in michigan tonight in kalamazoo michigan just a few miles from this visor. Plant this staff at w. Med is preparing these ultra-cold freezers for some of the first doses of the vaccine. You're essentially one of the first parts of the supply chain yet. This is very cutting edge to be able to be one of those first people that potentially could get. That vaccine is is something extraordinary extraordinary because it feels like something out of the movies we expected vaccine rates and rollouts of vaccines and studies to take food or five years and the best of situations. This is six to nine months. This is like star trek. This is amazingly fast. Some healthcare workers have told us they feel some guilt taking vaccine i but they know they need it to better care for their patients. The medical community hoping to show anyone skeptical. The vaccine that it's safe is this the beginning of the end of the pandemic. I sure would like to hope so. Let's go ahead and take a deep breath for me. For dr eliza erskine the hardest part of treating cove is not always those infected. It's their families. I had one patient. I took care of icu that her son came to visit every day. It was glass doors there so he could come stand in the hallway and stare at her and he would come every evening in just watches. Mom for an hour. And it's heartbreaking here in michigan. This huge pfizer plant is at the ready at the. Fda approved some hospitals across the country are preparing to get their first vaccine doses. As early as monday

FDA Tom Castillo Pfizer University Of Wisconsin Mid Ce Tom Joins Hahn UK FAA Fedex United States Wyoming Michigan Canada Maryland Madison Minnesota Ariza California Gabe
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

01:44 min | 6 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"Twenty countries became an incredibly important element in the educational opportunities regarding cultural appreciation. As visitors could explore countries in their respective cultures from all around the globe. Another program with the same notion took place in the bell. Think tank which encouraged the interest and involvement in the sciences among adolescent girls and minorities. It gave students a chance to experience biology physics and other scientific field by means of hands on involvement. The museum took advantage of every possible opportunity to provide hands on programming and educational activities in in a variety of exciting ways even during the process of their final expansion. The staff developed in exhibit known as structures which gave visitors a chance to use hands on activities to understand how buildings are constructed whether onsite traveling temporary or permanent. The exhibit development remains a key component of the museum's mission today programming continues to be generated at a high rate and explores much more complex topics than in the past for example is to science works gallery which contains a multitude of hands on activities that investigate topics such as fluid motion biotechnology life underground in construction engineering. This may seem daunting yet. The professionals at the institution are committed to making the experience both fun and engaging as well as this are well known exhibit such as dino sphere featuring life sized skeletons or beyond spaceship birth which presents an immersive international space station exhibit or treasures of the earth where children are free to explore the recreation of egyptian tombs reconstructed terracotta warriors or the ruins of authentically designed shipwrecks. The exhibits mentioned only scrape..

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

06:50 min | 7 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"Step forward and there's also just a continuous move toward making the planetarium more and more realistic. So the stars need to be sharper in digital planetarium's in mechanical planetarium's with star. Balls star projectors. They're they're very very sharp. But that limits. What else can be shown. So most planetarium's have moved to digital projection systems. But with that you lose some of the realism of the stars. And i think that that is finally sort of catching up and i look forward to seeing that. Move more and more toward additional realism. Because i think that's really important that people coming into a planetarium see what they could expect to see in the actual night sky. Yeah definitely. that'll sounds very exciting to look forward to and on a final note. This question is for both of you. Would you say that the mission of the planetarium at the kalamazoo valley museum is education entertainment or is it more a combination of both. That's an interesting question. And i think kind of relates back to the question about the relationship between interpreters and planetarium's so that really varies in my experience based on the planetarium and what each planetarium views as their mission so some planetarium especially larger planetarium's they operate in some ways more like amusement parks orb movie theaters Which i don't mean necessarily to be disparaging certainly value in that and then on the exact opposite side of the spectrum. You have maybe a planetarium that is used by astronomy department at a university and is really only used to visualize astronomical concept's for for students for undergraduate or graduate astronomy students so very heavy focus on education and no focus really on entertainment and i would say that most medium size planetarium's like ours at the kalamazoo valley museum are somewhere in the middle. So there is. There is the entertainment aspect. We definitely want people to be entertained when they come into our planetarium and we have a lot of really spectacular shows but we also would like them to come away having learned something or at the very least to come away with a desire to learn about space or astronomy to start of with with. Steve was saying Sparking the desire to learn more is always as a as an interpreter is always my goal. Whenever i'm having an audience come into my planetarium space in particular I would like people walking away to not only have been entertained even if that entertainment was just a moment of meditation or relaxation If that was just a break in their day where they were able to kind of let go a little bit of stress But i would. I would ideally love to see an audience walkout with desire to look something up or maybe That night looking at the sky going. Oh oh yeah okay. That's where that is. Or maybe just having this desire to to want to observe more. I think as a as interpreters inspire people to be more. Observant is a really big goal for us. Yes that's i think. The biggest goal. That i have is is to inspire people that come into the planetarium to want to learn more we only get a small amount of time typically with any given audience. It's not like a college course or a school class where the same audiences coming week after week. Perhaps some people are but for the most part. Our audiences are people who have not been to a planetarium before. Or maybe they've been once but it was twenty years ago or something like that and they're not necessarily there to gain a deep understanding about the mechanics of planetary orbits or something like that and we wouldn't have time to explain all of that in the sometimes fifteen minutes or even up to an hour that we have with them and so really the important thing to me is introducing some topics or introducing the idea of astronomy and stargazing to people and hopefully that will entice them to come back and learn more or as mara said. Go out and look at the night. Sky some awesome notes. The clothes on thank you both for coming on the show today. We really appreciate having both of you on having you. Detailer perspectives in thoughts on these on these different questions. Thank you for having us. Thank you in our interview. We talked about plans for the future and ways in which planetarium's can maybe innovate and change and planetarium's are already innovating in a lotta ways and rain are going to outline a few of these were example. Ultimately in era of big data has changed the way in which planetarium's explained science and astronomy. This could mean depicting this to audiences through a big data model through the large scope and physicality of a planetarium to better allow these individuals to visualize and understand these the stat on these. These numbers could even mean allowing researchers to use these planetarium's to visualize their data as.

mechanical planetarium digital planetarium kalamazoo valley museum Steve mara
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

08:07 min | 7 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"Charles hayden into the planetarium and thought to himself that the east coast needed one of these. And for that reason. That's why he was the benefactor however remodeling of the institution began in the nineteen nineties and was built an open by the early two thousands now equipped with a digital projector according to director. Neil degrasse tyson. All of the field of astrophysics is open and could be communicated to the public. The site is a ninety five square foot glass cube. There's a rotunda which depicts thirteen million galactic years. A planetarium serves in awesome purpose. The marks nine zeiss projector was specifically designed for the hayden planetarium. According to the director vice projector is an aggregation of over one hundred stereo to con- machines. Which project on the dome overhead. The resemblance of the night sky from this viewers can trace constellations track the motion of planets stars as well as visualize themselves the universe the planetarium now explores more cosmic discoveries that have happened since the initial planetarium in nineteen thirty five years it was primarily used to start talks with the original planetarium projector and now it can explore larger and more developed themes as the scientific fueled rapid league increases in its development and research these themes could be the big bang or black holes and according to the director. Monitoring's need to keep up with research in this field to be on the forefront of science education. This includes being aware of the digital era and the hayden. Planetarium sees itself. As an adaptation to the vast amounts of mobile experiences and computer experiences bad individuals now can have at home to visualize the universe that physicality is still there but has to adapt as technology changes space shows are offered regularly however reviewers fly to the borders of space rendered in picture perfect quality merchants of memories a show created by james poll schick and this creates a spatial experience to create on wonder in of science worlds beyond earth is the twenty twenty show curated by geologists denton able which draws on research from recent nasa expeditions. Apart of the program follows the journey in story of comet through space. The colors are vibrant and the visual experiences awesome. He's visuals come from photographic data taken of these various expeditions and the movie likewise recognizes the fragility of earth according to a new york times article. The presentation shows the frightening fortunes that might have befallen. Earth is held up. As a frozen dessert failed earth venus scorched by solar wind with a surface that could melt lead is seen as an object lesson in global warming taking to the extreme this provocation can lead to an actionable response this narration. This interpretive content in lead to an actionable response and as we look at the otter planetarium and the hayden planetarium. It's important to keep in mind that whether it's a narration on the video for the program or it's a physical interpreter presenter there to talk about the information that individual whether they're digitally speaking or physically speaking is leading to that provocation is causing that provocation and is indeed bringing meaning to these visuals. We see on the screen. They could just peers his gashes. Wondrous colorful entities without that interpretive model without that interpretive perspective and interpretation supplies that and like the hayden planetarium and the adler planetarium we at the kalamazoo valley museum hold our own planetarium in very high esteem though it may not be quite to the status of those aforementioned it serves our community quite well. The countervailing museum planetarium screens a variety of presentations and programs for school groups and other public audiences over forty shows are presented in rotation covering a wide range of topics including cultural based shows technology based shows music of might shows and of course a plethora of shows detailing the night sky and solar system. In addition to this there exists an enormous amount of information on our website covering a multitude of astronomical concepts such as moon phases solstices and equinoxes meteors and comets auroras and planet exploration for those who are keen to expand their knowledge of the boundless galaxies beyond us. This goes to show that although the calendar valley museum may not operate on the same scale is renowned institutions such as the hayden. Planetarium are adler planetarium. There still exists a strong commitment to sharing information with guests in order to develop an appreciation for the universe around us with that being said. We've arranged for our very own planetarium technician as well. As one of our planetarium presenters to join us today. In order to further describe the planetarium at the kalamazoo valley museum as well as its goals challenges in plans for the future. welcome to the podcast stephen. Mara if the two of you'd like to introduce yourself go right ahead. My name is dave crawford. I am the theater and planetarium technologist at the kalamazoo valley museum. My name is laura I am an interpretation specialist at the kalamazoo valley museum and also do live star talks and each in the planetarium all right and so just to give you some context earlier in our podcast. Today we talked about the roots of planetary uh-huh and then did some case studies where we explore the adler and hayden planetarium's and Since both of you work at a planetarium and have a lot of experience working in a planetarium. We'd like a bit of your insight on the topic and our first question for you. Today is based on your experiences. What is the relationship between interpreters in planetarium's and this could be in kalamazoo or it could be at other institutions from your experiences so other you'd like to answer that hut i think. Interpreters are a very important piece of the puzzle when it comes to understanding how planetarium for so the planetarium itself is just a bit of a canvas to present information on and interpreters work as someone who works as the inbetween to explain what's happening it's really easy to walk into a dome setting and look up and see a bunch of wines connecting stuff dots on the ceiling and not really fully understand the context of what you're looking at so i think interpreters are really important because they provide context. Yeah totally We've been talking about that earlier in our podcast. A little bit about how interpreters give that meaning and breathe life into These images that are projected upon a dome and you know of course. There are programs that have narrative interpretation but You know having a physical interpreter. There had an institution like ours. Unsure is very impactful. Yes it's true. It's a really unique experience. I think to be able to go into an immersive space and to have someone guiding you along your journey It's really wonderful to have the privilege to really be part of that experience in to share that journey with the people who are coming in. It's like a like a living sort of storytelling. Do you have any personal experiences. You can remember of people you've got to share that experience with.

hayden planetarium adler planetarium kalamazoo valley museum otter planetarium Charles hayden director Neil degrasse tyson director vice projector kalamazoo calendar valley museum new york times dave crawford nasa technician Mara twenty twenty
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

03:49 min | 8 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"Site after all and these types of Tours that are offered for individuals, which is the type of interpretation that they do offer can either be self guide jobs where people are allowed to explore at their own will and read the interpretive signage or be guided by individuals and focused on different topics such as the relationship institution to Hollywood and the films that were made there or the stories of the prisoners themselves specifically who lived there or even just a general private or for anybody who is interested in a very specific topic that The Interpreter can provide to the visitor and These tours demonstrate actually really interpreting at these paranormal sites and using the historic context and I'm using that to proliferate these folk tales of ghosts and spirits that are tied to these very very difficult histories that have happened at these institutions and what we discussed with Garrett how interpreters our institutions in Michigan might discuss certain folklore Kalamazoo itself is already host to some paranormal interpretation since 1981, the Kalamazoo Junior chamber International group that are known as the Jaycees have held a haunted event in the month of October in our community in 2017. The ghosts of Kalamazoo historic tour was born and with it Fascination regarding Kalamazoo Smackover history has grown substantially this tour shares many of the bizarre in Erie stories. The City of Kalamazoo has to offer most of which are previously unheard by the public for example is Bronson Park the peaceful area of greenery dotted with a fountain and statues which is right in the heart of downtown Kalamazoo though many people see this park has nothing more than a Serene Place amid, the otherwise active City the location has a very troubled past those who have em at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum may be aware of the appearance made by former President Abraham Lincoln and our very own Bronson park though at the time. He was a lawyer speaking in a rally for the Republican Presidential nominee John Fremont as mentioned in the book The Haunted history of Kalamazoo at the time the Republican Party thought that the up-and-coming lawyer was too conservative on anti-slavery issues for many decades. Rumors have Arisen that The Apparition of Lincoln has been sighted throughout the park. This has gone on to cause a great deal of speculation as to why such a prominent figure in our name. History would dwell and it plays such as downtown Kalamazoo the authors of the book Nicole Bray and Robert dushane surmised that it may be because this is the one time that he spoke in the wage isn't others have speculated that it may not be Lincoln who resides in the park but instead entities with the connection to the Civil War cannon that is found there the cannon used in the war by the Union Army wage clearly already bears and affiliation with death not unlike those in the fields of Gettysburg Pennsylvania, which is globally renowned as a location for Paranormal Activity according to the authors paranormal experts agree that it is. Not only the Battlegrounds that hold paranormal energy these experts feel that in many cases. It may be the weapons of the war themselves to which the spirits are tied and that song it could very well be the apparitions of Union Soldiers. They reside in our downtown park. Such stores like the one given in Kalamazoo provoke audiences into looking past what might be readily available in front of their eyes and into the realm of the Paranormal Kalamazoo. That's.

Kalamazoo Bronson Park President Abraham Lincoln Kalamazoo Junior chamber Inter Kalamazoo Valley Museum Union Soldiers Republican Party Michigan Hollywood Erie Garrett John Fremont Union Army Robert dushane Nicole Bray Gettysburg Pennsylvania
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

03:33 min | 8 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"This episode contains difficult histories and personal narratives that could be traumatic for some listeners content includes violence death and racism. Please be advised one of the world's oldest cultural phenomena are ghosts and stories of the unknown for Generations Spirits Cryptids and other entities have omnipresent law existed with Humanity on this particularly spooky episode. We explore how interpreters confront the spectral paranormal entities and the places they inhabit this is the world of the unknown on Kalamazoo Valley museums interpretive hour and And getting off.

Kalamazoo Valley
Political Ad Nauseam

Planet Money

09:04 min | 8 months ago

Political Ad Nauseam

"As much as campaigns want to keep spending secret federal law actually requires TV stations around the country to disclose all the political ads, the campaigns by and those TV ads account for something in the ballpark of sixty percent of campaign ads. Spending a lot of the rest is stuff like Google and facebook ads at those companies actually don't have to disclose as much information about the ads. So today we're going to focus on. TV. Spending the majority of the spending. So think of the United States as a giant game board to campaigns walk around the board they put some of their ad money down this part. Of the country a little bit more over here, and the way they put that money down tells us what places they think are most important for winning the election. If you're looking just at the state level, the bronze medal goes to Wisconsin Sixty, four, million dollars, worth of TV ads they're not surprising. Wisconsin was one of those states that trump flipped from the democratic column back in Two Thousand Sixteen Silver Medal Pennsylvania with one hundred, seven, million dollars worth of TV ads also not surprising Purple State with twenty electoral votes and in first place with one. Hundred thirty, three, million dollars America's favorite election meltdown waiting. Oh Florida, my beloved Florida. Now, this is just are beginning calculation. We're going to dig in more, but there are lessons to learn just looking at the big picture the big campaign game board. Yes. So so take Florida this is not a monolithic place. You're going to have super republican areas like the panhandle and then big democratic areas around places like Miami and you might imagine that the most. Cost effective thing is for the Republicans to completely pull out of the democratic strongholds and vice versa. But in fact, neither political party is doing that the whole state is getting bombarded with ads from both sides Daniel. Butterfield. From the Super PAC PRIORITIES USA she says it can start to turn into something like an arms race. So when you see your opponent spending money in a market, it really raises The question of should I be spending money there to to keep up area competitive and if you want to understand why political spending just keeps going up, it's at least partly because of his arms race if your opponents bins more in, Tampa you have to spend more in Tampa which in turn makes the cost of ads in. Tampa that much more expensive. Next thing you know you blue one. Hundred thirty, three, million dollars in Florida. Danielle says, the arms race thing is not just irrational fear. There's a real electoral cost to waving the white flag in a particular area. If you're in an ad market and your opponent clears out, that is great news for you. You have the airwaves to yourself. Your advertising goes a lot further in terms of impact than if you have to opponents that are. Driving opposite messages is there like a particular tipping point to that that sort of campaign folks like you gotTa. Spend the twenty percent otherwise. Like what counts as as not being drowned out. Good? Yeah. There is actually a lot of areas some data behind like what is the particular percentage that is required? It's I'd say that's probably more of a secret sauce that I wouldn't necessarily WanNa name on this podcast for you know that numbers, you're just tell me. I I. Know. Roughly what percentage I think is useful is, is it twenty three percent? You got it. But okay. So fine lots of money being spent in Florida but this is not a very specific answer to our question who is the most expensive voter we want to be more granular, which is why we got her hands on a more precise data set. Thank you advertising analytics. This data set is GonNa let zoom in on every single television market in the entire country. So for example, we know that forty million dollars has been spent in the Orlando Daytona. Beach Melbourne market. Compare that to the grand rapids, Kalamazoo Battle Creek Michigan market where it's twelve million dollars and sure there's more people in Orlando but still, how are the campaigns arriving at exactly forty million and exactly twelve million to help answer that we brought in some help Michael Beach. CEO. Crushing Media Michael Runs an advertising analytics company now, but he has worked in the past for the presidential campaigns of George W Bush John McCain Mitt Romney, and the reason we wanted to talk to Michael is his whole job. is to figure out where companies or sometimes political campaigns should place millions of dollars. Worth of ads Michael has all this fancy proprietary software. If you're an advertiser, he can tell you whether you should be focusing your ads on like Republicans, with Minivans are Democrats ride motorcycles or neither. He's got all these different attributes in his computer thousands of attributes for. Anything from certain partisanship to likelihood to buy a Ford truck into those do those specific categories correlate. Yes and no it like it's pretty geographic if you're looking at northeast, Ohio or you're you know. You're in Alabama in the Senate race. that. Wouldn't be a probably a good signal. Reich is like. As owner everyone drive structure. Now, the reason we went to Michael is because we thought it might be interesting to look at how many dollars were being spent on any given swing voter swing voters in theory are people who might be influenced by a political ad. The problem is it is very hard to pin down exactly how many of these people are out there but Michael Software can at least take a stab at it what is GonNa do is go through all these data sets to first identify how many likely voters there are in a particular TV market and then identify which of those has even the tiniest probability of changing their vote and a lot of this calculation is just sifting out the diehards. If you are somebody who voted in the last five, Democratic primaries were every year you donate to the R. N. C. You are out. But maybe your party affiliation switched a couple of times. Maybe you're a first time voter that may put you in this bucket the basically using generic party model and generic it's party not not candidate. Driven in other words, we're estimating voters chances to swing between Democrat and Republican as opposed to trump and biden specifically. But there's still does give us a way to compare across TV markets and when you re ranked the country based on dollars spent per swing voter the markets are not in Florida. In fact, the top five ad markets are all in Pennsylvania and number one on that list where campaigns are spending around ninety dollars per likely swing voter. Is My home television market the region in western Pennsylvania in and around Erie Pennsylvania. Okay. So Kenny you grew up there like what is it? What is the what are we talking about just to be clear I grew up in Meadville which is south of Erie, but it's in the market and like yeah, this is a region with a lot of manufacturing jobs these jobs have been leaving. It's predominantly white its having the. Same kind of brain drain problem that a lot of the other parts of the so-called rust belt are having. But look like I don't know anything about who a potential swing voter would be in the Erie television market. This is why we have Michael's fancy software. It can help us understand who that is. What can we know about the Eerie Market area? How does it compare to the rest of the country? Like who's there? It opened up my magic machine here. Michael Punches Eerie plugs in a few numbers so it's running. Then he opens up a tab that lets us compare the Erie population as a whole to just the likely swing voters. So now I look at in. Eerie. For instance, the average adult is fifty three years old if you just take the whole population in the market. Target, audience if you said. swing likely to turn out is forty seven other words. Michael's machine is telling us that the average swing voter is is six years younger than the average, their forty, seven years old, and the other incredible thing about Michael's machine is that it's also able to spit out this whole media plan for how to reach those people. The machine can name the single TV show watched by the most swing voters. Each week that show in the Eerie area is the OT on Fox football shows or wrap up of the day's games. That'd be fair. that is one of the most watched shows in the entire country. But the numbers do show that in terms of efficiency like sports would be a pretty good way to get your ad in front of a decent chunk of swing voters in Erie Pennsylvania Espn you can reach sixty percent on eerie and a week. Again, this target in this market if the secret to understanding what the campaigns are thinking is to learn where the most money is being spent per swing voter. That place

Michael Florida Erie United States Wisconsin Two Thousand Sixteen Silver Me Tampa Pennsylvania Google America Michael Beach Facebook Michael Software Michael Punches Orlando Daytona
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

05:58 min | 9 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"So I think with like present issues like that, cuz an oil spill can happen anywhere. There's a pipeline in the ground. So it's definitely something that we can talk about and change something that we can always keep in mind. Yeah, maybe have that real-world impact that the interpreters can input through your communicating that information. Were there any sort of challenges you found dead in confronting this issue or in researching this topic anything that was complicated or was it relatively straightforward to get that information across? Some of the information was a little complicated a lot heavier than the scientific type field. There's a lot of big statistics and a lot of chemical compound names that not necessarily are really straightforward. But in General trying to find that information is pretty easy. If you look at the EP website, usually you can find looking up the account information on the Kalamazoo River and you can find a lot of that pollution information what has been done for the cleanup like removing sediment stabilizing the Riverbanks removing dams as a big thing. They're trying to enforce right now is removing several different dams, but that information is pretty easy to come by the difficulty is trying to understand those technical terms in general. That's that's one of the most difficult Parts about it, especially If someone's not going to translate that into like layman's terms, right? Yeah. So do you as an interpreter take those that terminology that is important to understanding the topic and kind of you know, give it a backseat put it in the on the back burner instead and allow people to find that themselves if they're interested in it just because it's hard to put in layman's terms or do you find a way to maybe you find a way maybe to communicate that sort of science to the general public if you're at asked to interpret those issue. I feel there are ways to get around that instead of saying like you could actually just use acronyms like pcbs. You can just you can just describe a PCP as a carcinogen or a cancer-causing heavy pollutant so you can honestly just described it as something else instead of using that fancy scientific terminology. And I think that would make it a lot more accessible to people and if that was something I was required to do that would probably be the way I would do it right? Awesome. And what do you think about you know after looking at all this stuff and spending so much time on it was the or is the big takeaway in regarding interpreting environmental issues on the Kalamazoo River? It's kind of interesting because this information is so readily available yet. I didn't really hear too much about it before diving into this research. I knew took out the oil spill and I knew that the Kalamazoo River did have pollution in it, but I didn't know to the extent. I didn't know that honestly before that point. I knew you probably weren't supposed to eat the fish of the river, but I didn't know to the extent that it's almost unacceptable to eat the fish from river right now. You could have made different harmful side effects health issues neurological issues from eating that fish continually and there's lots of people who don't know that either there aren't signs in their area or they just aren't aware of the issue itself. So long with that kind of information that you they don't have they are unknowingly putting themselves at risk of being exposed to these Health dangers. So I feel like a big take off. Is that this is a pretty big issue that needs a little bit more exposure. There are there is like, Missouri River Watershed Council. There are a big companies that are helping the EPA with cleanups and all that and and there are news articles on the issue..

Kalamazoo River Missouri River Watershed Counc PCP EPA
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

02:36 min | 9 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"Actually more like the Talmadge Creek than into the Kalamazoo River. But either way. Yes, that definitely did happen is a giant oil spill. I certainly remember getting a large headache on the first day. It happened because it was actually talented folk residents that discovered the oil spill. It wasn't necessarily the company those residents informed emergency services and then they informed the company about it. So in turn it was residents who found the oil spill leaking and then they actually informed the company the car from a slightly later, but then they actually shut the oil off. Yeah. So a lot of it seems that the Kalamazoo River as kind of a adverse history going into now, as well since that was just ten years ago and when I think about something like this personally and I'm sure you can attest to this as well as someone who also works in interpretation that song The interpretive field does not necessarily need to exclusively explore these past environmental issues and how they can affect people today. But also explore issues that are happening right now earlier in our podcast. We were talking about the issue of climate change and many human activities that are happening right now are continuing to cause issues and are important topics for interpreters to talk about so I'm fascinated to see maybe how oil spill history and oil spill education and how that will reach into the interpretive field. Yeah, certainly. I think it's very important to have these like present topics to talk about and especially with like the amount of History we talked about and all these big Industries how they grew the be as big as they did today and with issues like oil spills and climate change stuff that happens is the past when she research it becomes slowly applicable to today and when you have like an issue oil spill that influences everything around it it influences. Honestly the economy for a short while the Kalamazoo River was basically closed for 2 years from that point in Marshall. So about thirty-five miles down certain spots with River were completely uninhabitable for about two years after that point and they even after that only slowly started to open back up..

Kalamazoo River Talmadge Creek Marshall
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

04:21 min | 9 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"Well, took this lie, you know, zoo was very big on the paper industry. They had a lot of businesses that dumped chemicals into the river during the time that they actually did their page processing and a lot of this had to do with PCB like heavy industrial chemical waste that was just byproducts that from making the paper itself off so that ended up just going on into the river and they did this for several years. So it really heavily ramped up in the 1950s and if it real industry kept going and wage By the time activist started actually acting out and started to actually prevent the material from getting out. It was around nineteen seventy s so long they decided to do major protests and that type of thing to prevent the waste from being dumped completely into the river. So and that's around the time when it wastes started to stop. When that happened the damage had already been done. So the pcbs and all of that hazardous material had already been dumped into the river. And so there's lots of different stories about that people who are just go by the river and either go fishing or whatnot. I've heard stories about people who would take their bikes and put it in the River Edge then pull it out and they were completely Rusty bikes and they pull them out all of the rest should be taken clean off of the bike because of all the chemical material that was left inside the river. So it's definitely interesting. Yeah. No, absolutely. That's astonishing. How would you approach interpreting something like this? It's interesting to look at all this material and see all of these pollutants being put into a river from an industrial source, and people think that there's only so much they can do but in reality it's processors themselves, the people that got together and were activists in that they were the ones who actually reach them to stop the converted like big political leaders industry leaders to actually stop this pollution from happening. So I think it's more of As like an interpreter being aware of that issue and being able to inform others of that issue in a way that people who need to can make a difference in it. And that could be as simple as I'm talking to people in the street and informing them about it because who knows they might know someone who is high up in the board and they may be able to have a very great influence on the issue ends on who people know and all that. So it's more of getting the word out. So from that perspective do you feel that interpretation can have a sort of real-world impact on these environmental issues through providing that perspective that you're talking of? I think certainly I think the more you know, the more powerful that people can be in office representing information in this type of like environmentalism issues. The more that people know the more that people would either want to help or find ways they could help so yep. Is definitely something to be aware of and I think that if more people knew about it, they would try to do more things about those types of issues. Yeah, absolutely and just make sure we have time you were talking a bit last time. We were chatting with you about a personal experience you had in regards to some environmental catastrophe that happened around Marshall, Michigan if I'm not wrong Oh, no, you're very correct. I actually lived in Marshall Michigan for a very long time all my childhood. I grew up in Marshall, Michigan and in 2010 when I was about fourteen years old the very large oil spill actually the largest Inland oil spill in all of America off actually occurred there. That's a 2010 Ambridge oil spill the EPA estimates. It was over 1.2 million gallons of crude oil was spilled into the Kalamazoo River dead..

Kalamazoo River River Edge Marshall Michigan Marshall Michigan EPA America
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

02:25 min | 9 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"Florida as an initiative known as piecing together at changing plan, which is an Art Exhibit that debuted in the park in 2014. This is a traveling show of twenty six different quilts that highlight a few of the ways that national parks are being impacted by climate change in other human activities after Biscayne the quilt exhibition travels to many other Parks including Point Reyes National Seashore Glacier National Park the Statue of Liberty National Monument Great Smoky Mountains National Park and many others the exhibit literally and figuratively demonstrates the impacts that are taking place. It depicts struggling orchids among many other flowers whose boom times are impacted by climate change. I see glaciers melting down into an ocean of bleached Coral heads blacks of dry cracked Earth with boot prints across the face down. All the mine both drought and the concept of carbon footprint this exhibit masterfully ties together many drastically different impacts of climate change into one cohesive and extremely compelling piece as a result is once again very likely to evoke a strong emotional response out of the viewers. These examples are among an enormous amount of initiatives taken by the National Park Service as well as many that are environmentally conscious agencies as stated the need to practice good stewardship and develop forward-thinking Resource Management plans as more relevant than ever with that being said the efforts being made all across the nation to engage in call for Action are of the highest importance. And now we'll talk a bit to our fellow interpreter Wesley Van Der vague about the Kalamazoo River and how he interprets this same issue of How It's been environmentally impacted over the past few years. Thank you for coming on the show west. It's good to be here. So tell us a bit about what you've been researching. Well, I've been researching lots of things mostly about the Kalamazoo River and the PCB pollution levels that have happened in the past fifty seventy years or so. Mostly suck on the leftover chemicals that have been put into the river from the paper industry. So awesome. Yeah, could you elaborate a.

Statue of Liberty National Mon Point Reyes National Seashore Kalamazoo River National Park Service Wesley Van Der Florida
"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

03:31 min | 9 months ago

"kalamazoo" Discussed on Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

"She testified in Congress even whilst dying of cancer in 1964. She would unfortunately pass. And this this publication of the book in some ways because of how it is really the root of partisan political battles in the environment is sometimes criticized because as a result of the book companies which benefited off of these harmful chemicals or practices built up a war chest. There are now prepared to fight whoever challenged their products some even claimed that banning DDT led to malaria issues in Africa, which in always ignores the evidence that Carson brought up and down this is this is why this is an important book because it's the root of that political activism that was now tied to environmentalism. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s. This would continue on to develop a particularly notable case was at Love Canal in 1978. We're off toxic waste was seeping into the basements of homeowners in this New York suburb. It was then recognized and the 1940s and 1950s the hooker Chemical Company, Georgia this toxic waste into their landfill and that's why this was seeping into the basement of these homeowners. People were afraid that this was the root of increased cases of Cancer birth defects and other increased chromosomal abnormalities in their society. In fact a 1980 EPA study stated that residents may have had those increased chromosomal abnormalities the media brought a lot of attention to the boss and individuals recognized that this was not only an issue that just dealt with their own personal action, but it was a political issue this event led to the establishment of Superfund super fond is a government program which dedicates itself to cleaning up industrial sites that have been drastically affected by pollution and the environmental movement has also politicized itself more so beyond just companies affecting natural sites dead. Related to animals their own suburbs and their homes but has taken a Global Perspective as a friend mentioned by grey. This issue is climate change and global warming and it has a nuanced history. Its roots are dating back to the early 20th century when savante are honey established the theory that increased greenhouse gases and CO2 in the atmosphere let the warming eventually this Theory would become common knowledge across the scientific field and proven and in the 1950s guy Stewart calendar proposed to the Royal Meteorological Society employing are any assist theory that increased greenhouse gases Unleashed from British industry led to wage increased abnormal warming in the atmosphere. However, at this time the Royal Meteorological Society was not convinced thinking it was a natural cycle birth Continual research proved him to be correct..

Royal Meteorological Society Congress malaria hooker Chemical Company Love Canal Cancer Global Perspective Africa EPA New York guy Stewart Carson Georgia
Are you ok? How are you dealing with lock down life?

The Emma Guns Show

05:42 min | 10 months ago

Are you ok? How are you dealing with lock down life?

"Hello, and welcome to another episode of the gun show. I am your host. Am I gonNA wardner? Shall we go through some bullet points? It's mid week episode say why not and these bullet points focus on? Are you? Okay And I'm asking this question. Because early on in the year when things all over the world and I know that we have listeners everywhere. Things will really uncertain all over the globe and we were going into lockdown and covid nineteen was new and completely unknown and we were we were checking in with each other a lot we checked in with each other on this podcast over on instagram where I met him guns over in the facebook group the link to join us in the show notes. And I speak for myself. But I definitely found easing into lockdown easier than easing out I found the implementation of strict guidelines to be rigid framework within which I could work and understanding that these are rules that needed to be followed. I've felt pretty comfortable adapting to them. It felt like these the rules this is what you've got to stick to. You know I can do that, and admittedly it was probably easier for someone like me who worked to themselves works mostly from home and lives alone have dependents or anyone else that I have to really worry about me. So look down life wasn't really a world away from my regular life and my work and social literally went online and I used to face to face. I, started to do on video calls however. Easing out and picking up the pace again has definitely not been a smooth which made me wonder how you're dealing with it and yes. It might be great villas. They were all easing back into something that resembles what used to be normal but these are really big changes that we're dealing with and navigating for the first time so I ask you again all you. Okay. And that seriously in very genuinely because it's a question that we ask each other often. But how many times you honest when you answer how often do you instinctively reply I'm fine. Thank you or good. Thanks. How are you just immediately deflecting it putting onto the other person without even really checking in with how you feel that how many times have you ask someone? Hey, how are you are you? Can you find McCain however you and you realize that you're on the third round of asking so the how how you doing? October a few times. Maybe it's just me no paying attention anyway. So the concept of being. Okay. Why this stems from, this comes from a psychologist Thomas Thomas Harris and in therapy focuses on rather than a place of perfection. Place of what's comfortable what feels good enough so it prompted me to think well, what does okay feel like obviously, it's going to feel different for everybody. But if you era to for no good reason, if you're short tempered judgmental, perhaps you're feeling judged you're angry maybe it's you're showing signs at just not particularly well. Often, all of the time. or You just feel bleak like the outlook is just bleak and this could be an indicator that you're not okay and. That's okay. Tube. There are steps that can be taken but when lockdown began I, started the series feel-good habits and this was with the intention of putting out. The sort of helpful hints stretched isn't techniques that could help steer someone listening you my most excellent listeners away from a crappy mood towards a better one. And then what you're telling me, you're finding value in these compositions, which is wonderful. So they're going to keep coming at new. But I also just wanted to share in a broader sense. Some of the things you can look out for that might help you identify not only when you're doing. Okay. But when you slightly off kilter and the reason I wanted to do this is because I have previously as a lot of longtime listeners. No, I was a few years ago diagnosed with depression anxiety and since therapy and feel as though on the other side of those things although it's always a work in progress, you always field was the expression they using them recovery. It's always in the darkness during press ups doing pull ups like making so it can come back but anyway. I feel as though, I could have prevented those things the depression anxiety. From becoming a severe as they ended up becoming if I had asked myself if I had gone through this checklist that I'm about to share with you. Because it went unchecked for such a long time so that by the time. We got to the point where we got to. It was pretty drastic. Felt like it for me anyway, and so this is why I wanted to share this checklist with you. So the first thing is how he functioning and by this I mean the daily stuff you have to do laundry washing, ironing, vacuuming getting are getting ready in the morning even brushing your hair. Any of this stuff in itself feel like a chore to You or do you feel exhausted after you've done it. And I can remember I'm I'm laughing about it. Now 'cause what else what else can you do but when I was depressed and didn't know it Used to dread vacuuming my flat I really liked how high no I really liked how the look afterwards but I used to dread it because in my head I would think, right? Yeah. You've got to get the vacuum cleaner out and then I think, yeah, the vacuum cleaners quite heavy. Yeah and I think the I think the thing when it's long enough and so actually when hoover it doesn't actually really hurt my back and The cool doesn't reach from that plug socket to the far end of the war, which means I have to unplug it and re plug it in, and it's it's a bit of a fast go Goya and say by the time I actually got to doing it. I had so many barriers between me and the actual task that it had become something really really big in my hand. and. So the only way I ended up being able to get around that was to time it Kalamazoo take me to clean the flat live in Paris. It was six minutes

Facebook Thomas Thomas Harris Hoover Kalamazoo Depression Mccain Goya Paris
American Airlines will drop flights to 15 cities in October

Tim Conway Jr.

00:33 sec | 10 months ago

American Airlines will drop flights to 15 cities in October

"Cut flights to some cities that could end up under served by the pandemic. American Airlines will help service to 15 small city airports across the country for about a month starting October 7th and there are no guarantee service will resume in November. The affected cities include places that range from about 30,000 people to half a million, like Florence, South Carolina, Kalamazoo, Michigan and New Haven, Connecticut. Major carriers that accepted federal aid through the cares act earlier this year have so far been barred from cutting off service. Entire market. But that requirement expires. Thiss fall. Layla Mohammed Ko Phi

Layla Mohammed Ko Phi American Airlines Kalamazoo Florence South Carolina New Haven Connecticut Michigan
Pfizer to provide U.S. with 100 million COVID-19 vaccine doses

Frank Beckmann

00:35 sec | 11 months ago

Pfizer to provide U.S. with 100 million COVID-19 vaccine doses

"Drug firm Pfizer and its German biotech partner, $1.95 billion to produce and deliver 100 million doses of their covert 19 vaccine in the US If it proves safe and effective in humans, it could be available before the end of the year. The health and Human Services secretary says the U. S could acquire an additional 500 million doses of the vaccine. Bio and tech of Germany and fighter of the U. S. Are jointly developing four potential vaccines and producing them at facilities near Kalamazoo and at other locations. Secretary of

Secretary Pfizer Kalamazoo United States Partner U. S Germany
3 youth facility staffers charged in death of black teen in Michigan

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

3 youth facility staffers charged in death of black teen in Michigan

"Barnes three staff members of the youth facility in Kalamazoo Michigan have been charged in the death of a black teenager who died eight days after being restrained for throwing a sandwich decision comes after the county medical examiner ruled sixteen year old Cornelius Fredericks death a homicide by result of restraint asphyxia an investigation by Michigan's department of health found the staffers used a restraint that was significantly disproportionate with one team sitting on Fredericks chest for over twelve

Barnes Kalamazoo Michigan Cornelius Fredericks Department Of Health
3 youth facility staffers in Michigan charged in death of black teen

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

3 youth facility staffers in Michigan charged in death of black teen

"Barnes three staff members of the youth facility in Kalamazoo Michigan have been charged in the death of a black teenager who died eight days after being restrained for throwing a sandwich decision comes after the county medical examiner ruled sixteen year old Cornelius Fredericks death a homicide by result of restraint asphyxia an investigation by Michigan's department of health found the staffers used a restraint that was significantly disproportionate with one team sitting on Fredericks just for over

Barnes Kalamazoo Michigan Cornelius Fredericks Department Of Health
Samantha Irby Author of "Wow, No Thank You"

Nancy

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Samantha Irby Author of "Wow, No Thank You"

"So excited because at first is Samantha Irby one of the funniest writers out there, and she recently published her latest book called Wow. Thank you. It's our third book of essays, and it's about a whole new chapter in Sam's life. She's forty now and recently got married and moved from Chicago to Kalamazoo Michigan to be with her. So these days, she's trying to make friends as a grown adult and a new town and she's also a new step. Mom Partners Teenage Kids, her career change pretty dramatically to she went from writing a blog, hoping to get guys to notice her to writing for TV shows like shrill and work in progress, and I literally laughed out loud. Reading this book. Yeah, and she just talks about her life with such a brutal. Brutal honesty, and in this hilarious way that self deprecating, but also manages to inspire hope in me in this weird way like she's so honest about her flaws and shortcomings that it makes me feel better about myself and my life same I just love how real unrelatable. She does so relatable that she just like us has avoided going outside during this quarantine at all costs I don't know that I felt outside air. Him I mean maybe like three weeks I like. Get the nail on the. I think what you're describing is what Kathy and I have sometimes described as we are indoor gays. Are Type. Yes and we're underrepresented popular culture. Yes yes, we could have an indoor gay pride. But no one would show. Yeah, you just everybody tunes their TVs to the golden girls at the same time during indoor pry. Wave your rainbow flag out of the window and eat cheesecake at. Watch Golden Girls Curious. How did you come up with the title? Wow No. Thank you. I think I wanted to call this like. Is this hell like am I dead and is this? How something like that? I'm pitched. The book. Am I dead and is this how and they're like? Cute, we'll talk about the title when you've turned everything right, so turn it all the stuff and way of course, and then we start talking about what to call it and I both times was like. Has the title remember how I told you? It's called? Am I glad is this L.. They're like e Sweetie now, so my editor went through. She's like how about I go through the book and I'll pull out phrases that sound like they could be good titles I can't remember exactly where I said it, but at some point I say. Wow, sir, no, thank you. And she had that phrase in their house. Like oh that one. That's perfect and then I was like. Let's take out the Sir because I. Don't want to alienate any sirs who might WANNA buy? She was like okay agreed, but it really does encapsulate my approach to many things. Very, true to both me and the collection, so I was I was really happy with it. Gotcha. So you are now a step parent to two kids. and You write about your parenting style. Using the term quote detachment parenting. How how would you describe what detachment parenting is? Is. Walking out of the room the minute they walk into it. While also. Paying for everything they have. Real. Is like do not ask I. You have two parents who love you. Take Great Care View. They will decide like what vaccinations you need to get all of it like. Don't ask me any life. Advice I'm hearing a leg sign into violent movies. You WanNa Watch I'm here to give you the password for that stuff and also pay a to keep the Internet on, but you cannot come to me about any serious life choices. Be My fault whatever happens to. It's like my worst nightmare for these kids who are great. They're sweet, smart Nice, but like ten years from now for them to be late, so this thing you said to me in two thousand eighteen destroy. Sure. Whenever I like a serious look on their face, or they have a genuine question. That's not like you know what snacks to get at Costco, I just like I. Leave the realm. Oh. No, I'm the life advice no way.

Samantha Irby SAM Costco Michigan Chicago Kalamazoo Kathy Editor
Coronavirus and the impact on airline industry

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus and the impact on airline industry

"Not looking good for Virgin Atlantic. Yes so they announced yes to that. Cutting third of the workforce lots more than three thousand jobs. They've also said that they're going to be exiting Gatwick. Which has been its London base for thirty five years? They are still maintaining that base up in Manchester And this company had already actually been struggling with profitability for several years. So it's perhaps not surprising that they're really facing issues now. The government refused to Baylor saying that I haven't looked hard enough. Other investors elsewhere in the line is basically said that it's now fighting for its survival and that more measures might have to be introduced in the coming months and years and I think the story shows a few things it really shows that the week affirms a feeling the effects fast in an industry aviation industry which is struggling as a whole. And then there's also the knock on effect on airports Gatwick received a COUPLA recently. Be a Saturday causing flights out of their needs. Airports really depend on airlines for these lucrative slots so this is going to be a big problem to several people up and down the chain but there is good news for Wizar- Yes a Wiza- which is one of the airlines which has proved surprisingly buoyant. They managed to keep a large amount of cash surplus which has helped to tide them over during this crisis. And they're actually already. They've already resumed. Flights from Luton to some eastern European countries mainly bringing the seasonal farmworkers for example they brought over about hundred people lost Friday and they will announce that they're going to be resuming flights to Greece and Portugal from around June July to start tentatively taking holidaymakers abroad. They said that they will stop obviously wearing gloves. And now handout mosques to people that they haven't said that they'll be keeping that middle aisle seat free If if there is enough demand to finit they said that there just isn't evidence that that will reduce the risk of Jumps being spread. I mean we're seeing lots of airlines for instance. Klm saying that That they will be saying that. Mosque wearing is absolutely mandatory. But it's hard to see Without that middle seat being taken out how social distance thing. An and virus control can happen on aeroplanes effectively. Yeah I completely agree I mean on one hand. You are just got your. You have people in fairly close quarters in an airplane. The airplanes not going to be redesigned overnight people all within a mutual two of each other. Anyway I think a lot of it will center around. Different cleaning. Practices was the not going to have the magazine. For example so fewer and fewer touch points for people to transmit things and regular cleaning processes and staff updated on those sort of procedures Right well with the with airlines ca beginning to fly again. Airbnb is seeing some light at the end of the tunnel. Tell us more about that. Yes this is an interesting one because AIRBNB They started out their financials. And it's not looking great actually for the company that cussing about twenty five percent of the workforce and their revenues predicted to hard this year. So that's sir drop of about two billion. And but they have said that they they're starting to see a tends to rise in domestic booking so obviously international travel is still looking shaky and wizards one of the few people and Kalamazoo said to start offering this flights but in places like Denmark and the Netherlands. For example people are starting to look into kings and make bookings to travel and holiday within their own country. And I think this ties in with a trend that we're going to be seeing a lot sort of rise of the staycationing this year as people pass aren't quite sure if they're ready to get on a flight or take an international holiday but they do still want to have a break they do still want to get away from from home so this this works with something that airbnb has already been seeing in China which is obviously ahead of the curve a bit from Europe where people are starting to travel domestically and take holidays within the country. Those name quite a little publicity around the fact that there are very cheap. Airfares out there at the moment. And also very cheap hotel bookings But it comes down to what the insurance policy is because we can book holidays abroad or indeed at home But we may very well may have to cancel them exactly. I think there's still so much uncertainty for people you know. I think people are desperate for holiday. It's been it's been really difficult. Few months vote for Europeans and for people all over the world. But it's just not clear whether for example be another spike in cases in your home country or the country where you're going to whether there's lockdown measures will change we'll more travel bans be brought in so. I think people are still waiting to see how things pan out in the next few months.

Airbnb Gatwick Virgin Atlantic Europe London Baylor Manchester Wizar Luton Portugal Kalamazoo Greece China Denmark Netherlands
Samantha Irby Talks About Wow, No Thank You

The Book Review

06:42 min | 1 year ago

Samantha Irby Talks About Wow, No Thank You

"I think of it night as selling a book but as supporting the booksellers and publishers and other authors who are out there and also helping readers because readers are are desperate right now. I want to read. Actually something that Carl Siegel our critic wrote in her review of your book. I hope you're not one of those people that avoids reading reviews of Your Book. I am but I know that this was positive because everyone told me it was positive. So I'm braced for it and it's cool okay. All right ready. She wrote instead of a rule. Then a recommendation. For this moment if the grips of the pandemic your ability to interpret an exponential graph has increased well exponentially while your patients for narrative has plummeted. Tries Samantha. Irby so she's heartily recommending. You as something to read right now in order to give listeners a taste of why that is. Would you read a little bit from your new collection? Wow No thank you. Yes so. This is from Piece called hung up and it is about my love of cellular phones. I was late to the technology game. I'm staring down the barrel of my fortieth year and I bought my computer six or seven years ago. I didn't get my first iphone until they'd been around for years partially because I thought who needs that. I prefer to live in the real world mostly. I was skeptical because the idea of walking around with a five hundred dollar computer in my pocket seemed ridiculous and dangerous to me and the idea that I can somehow scraped together the money to purchase said pocket computer while also maintaining a roof over my head. I E partying all the time and paying for basic cable was hilarious and unrealistic. I was the last dinosaur at the club sending multi tap texts on an analog Nokia e fifty one with no camera when I finally upgraded to a smartphone. Several years after unsolicited selfish had taken hold of the nation. My exhausted psalms cracked and bleeding from a decade of repeatedly jamming down the two key to make a letter see. I didn't get what all the fuss was about. Okay sure this glowing rectangle in my bag can tell me the weather anywhere in the world at this exact moment but who cares but wait. It could also figure out precisely what wrong street. I'm turning down and steer me back in the right direction and it can count. How many steps? I took today while saving for me all the passwords I can never remember. Please excuse me while I build a shrine to the new most important thing in my life. I've read on my phone that we as a nation as a species have a problem with cellphones. Insert facts about the harms of cell phone usage. That I'm never going to research because I do not enjoy feeling like an underachiever. But do we really. Is there actually a problem with rescuing our brains from the doldrums of sitting at a red light or from the Malays caused by having even even a single second to sit alone with one terrible thoughts? I don't have children. Therefore I don't have any opinions on whether electronic devices are a bad influence on the mental growth and development of a child. If you tell me they are than I believe you. I'm sure there's scientific evidence prove it and I'm positive. There are doctors and licensed professionals. Who would attest to the DILATOT? Serious effect modern technology has on the brains and interpersonal skills of adults. But hear me out. Maybe it's worth it. That was great. What about you Samantha? Have you been able to read for fun during this time? I'm not ever so distracted that I can't pick up a book which I feel is good so I have been reading a lot of fiction and like nothing about disease or being locked in a room. But you're a huge thriller Fan Right. Is there s recommendations like good escape reading either thrillers or Wa which I know you also love yes so I am like pretty obsessed with this writer Louisa. Luna there are two books in this series so far. I don't think the series has the name. It's like an Alice Vega novel I think is maybe like the subtitle but the first one is called two girls down and her second book in the series is called the Janes and I just reread both of those and they are so good she so good thrillers are my thing and she is a master and I just reread Mary. H K choice books emergency contact and permanent record and they're both Y. A. They make me feel totally uncool because she has mastered the way. Young people talk. And I'm like man I kind of don't know what they're saying but I do love this a lot. She is a super cool writer. So this is your third book of essays. The first one meaty than we are never meeting in real life now. Wow No thank you. I'm curious how like in your mind or they categorized as different periods of Your Life. Different themes different topics. How do they stand apart for you? Well meaning to me feels most like. Here's an overview of my past. Here's a here's how we got here kind of and then we're never meeting in real life is kind of a mix of. Here's how we got here. Here's where we're going because I'd met my partner at that point. But she wasn't my wife yet and I hadn't moved from Chicago to Michigan yet. And then while no thank you is like where I am right now. It's a Kalamazoo Essay collection. It's me in Kalamazoo in our raggedy farmhouse with the cats. Like this is where I'm

Samantha Kalamazoo Writer Carl Siegel Nokia Irby Dilatot Partner Alice Vega Chicago Michigan WA Louisa Mary