20 Burst results for "Kalahari Desert"

"kalahari desert" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Russian hackers are at it again. The same group that hacked into software made by solar winds appears to have launched another supply chain hack. That's according to Microsoft. The company sent out an alert last night, saying hackers who appear to be linked to the Russian intelligence service broke into the email marketing company. Constant contact in order to impersonate the government agency. U S. A. I, D Dina Temple Raston of NPR's Investigations team has been tracking Russian hacking operations and joins us now. Hey, Dina. Good morning. Hi. Hi. So we should first know that both Microsoft and constant contact our financial supporters of NPR. Okay, So tell us more about what Microsoft discovered. What has this cyber crimes team that's watching for these kinds of intrusions all the time. This week, they found hackers in a bunch of international development in human rights organization systems. And as best as they can tell, the hackers broke into a company that was helping us a I D with marketing. And they use that hack to send phishing emails. You know, Microsoft told us it wasn't a huge hack, they said Maybe as many as 3000 accounts for either hacked or threatened, maybe as many as 150 institutions, but they think the actual numbers are probably a lot smaller than that. And these air phishing emails like we're talking about fake emails that looked like they were from USA Idea. Exactly so unsuspecting recipients would open these emails. They'd click on the links and by doing that the malware would be installed on their systems. And then the malware would basically give the hackers free access. They could steal data they could infect other computers on these networks. That could be the emails. They could even plant other malware. We talked to Tom Burke, vice president of customer Security and Trust of Microsoft. He was behind that advisory last night, and he said that the hackers actually kind of customized the malware, depending on the target. These guys are actually doing something. Ah, little different in even before the malware gets installed. They're doing some things to help them understand the environment. That they are going to try to install the malware into sleek and pick the right malware package. The reason that's important is because that's the kind of thing that nation state hackers do. It's not the kind of thing that common cyber criminals do. They just aren't that careful. Interesting. Okay, so Russian intelligence is definitely behind this hack. We asked Tom Burt that too, and he says They think it was a subset of that solar winds hacking group linked through the Russian intelligence service. The SVR, the association with the SVR comes from what the techniques we see them using and from the kinds of targets that they are targeting. So it's a collection of Circumstantial evidence. You might say that point in a consistent direction. So the group that was behind solar winds is known as a PT 29 or cozy Bear, and Microsoft said that they saw a lot of things that seem to overlap with Kofi coat. Cozy bear, you see to say, but they don't want to say unequivocally that it is the exact same people. It might be a subset. What they're not equivocating about, though, is that this hack came from Russia. Okay? And is the technique here similar to what was found in the solar winds hack late last year? Yes and no. The solar winds attack was actually really complicated and stealthy, and Microsoft appears to have Seen this latest hack really quickly, and it's much simpler. I mean, the hackers aren't directly targeting companies or institutions They wanna hack. They're focusing on suppliers in this case, just like they were in solar winds. And they're finding a company further down the supply chain like a software company to hack into them Instead, the big question now is what the response is gonna be. President Biden is already warned that Russia shouldn't be doing these attacks and now they've done another one. So the question is whether or not this is going to force a response from the U. S. Yeah, All right. That is NPR investigations. Correspondent Dina Temple Raston. Thank you, Dina. You're welcome. Germany today apologized for genocide in this case the slaughter of tens of thousands of people in the African nation of Namibia. The killings came during the colonial era when German troops stamped out an uprising in Namibia by almost wiping out two tribes. And in France Earlier this week, the government admitted to bearing some responsibility for the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. Joining us to talk about these developments is NPR Africa correspondent Ada Peralta. Welcome back. Hey, thank you for having me so to start. Why did Germany say now was the time for this acknowledgement? Yeah. I mean, look, this is a long time coming. Germany and the government of Namibia have been negotiating this for five years. But as you alluded to in your intro there is, you know, quite a bit of introspection happening on the continent of Africa and in Europe, you know, people and governments are trying to come to terms with the brutality. Off colonialism. You know, critics say that Germany and other European countries are looking at African countries as an emerging market, and that might be the reason for this apology. I want to come back to what amends might look like, but first a little bit of the history what happened during this uprising? When was this? Yes, As you mentioned. It happened more than 100 years ago from 1904 to 1908 and Germany was the colonial power and control of Namibia. And there was a rebellion by the Herrero and Anoma tribes and the German government reacted viciously. They took Land and cattle In many hereto and Nama. People were taken to concentration camps in the Kalahari Desert on many of them died of starvation there in the end. Scholars estimate that about 80% of the hereto Anoma people were killed during this period. What's been the reaction to the government's plans to offer a billion dollars to help reconstruction and development in Namibia as part of this acknowledgement Tribal leaders, you know, say that this is a deal between two governments and that it doesn't really solve the big problems. They say that this will not lead to reconciliation. And the big sticking point is that They wanted individual reparations. You know, for example, they wanted the German government to buy land from the people of German descent and then return it to the descendants of the victims of this genocide. You know, activists say that the headed O and the number of people are living in poor conditions that they live in crowded, informal settlements. And a redistribution of land. They say that that could actually lead to a real reconciliation into a real change in the way that the Herrero and the normal people are living. Before I let you go. Can we talk about France admitting to having responsibility in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. At that time, 800,000 people were killed. What's being said there? Yes. Oh, President. Macron stopped short of issuing an apology on behalf of France. But.

Tom Burke Dina Tom Burt Microsoft Ada Peralta 1904 Kalahari Desert Macron Europe NPR 1908 five years two tribes Rwanda 800,000 people France This week today last night two governments
"kalahari desert" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on KCRW

"Hour. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish in Washington, and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Russian hackers are at it again. The same group that hacked into software made by solar winds appears to have launched another supply chain hack. That's according to Microsoft. The company sent out an alert last night, saying hackers who appear to be linked to the Russian intelligence service broke into the email marketing company. Constant contact in order to impersonate the government agency. U S A. I. D Dina Temple Raston of MPR's Investigations team has been tracking Russian hacking operations and joins us now. Hey, Dina. Good morning. Hi. Hi. So we should first know that both Microsoft and constant contact our financial supporters of NPR. Okay, So tell us more about what Microsoft discovered. What has this cyber crimes team that's watching for these kinds of intrusions all the time. This week, they found hackers in a bunch of international development in human rights organization systems. And as best as they can tell, the hackers broke into a company that was helping us a I D with marketing. And they use that hack to send phishing emails. You know, Microsoft told us it wasn't a huge hack, they said Maybe as many as 3000 accounts for either hacked or threatened, maybe as many as 150 institutions, but they think the actual numbers are probably a lot smaller than that. And these air phishing emails like we're talking about fake emails that looked like they were from U S. A. I D Exactly so unsuspecting recipients would open these emails. They click on the links and by doing that the malware would be installed on their systems. And then the malware would basically give the hackers free access. They could steal data they could infect other computers on these networks. That could be the emails. They could even plant other malware. We talked to Tom Burke, vice president of customer Security and Trust of Microsoft. He was behind that advisory last night, and he said that the hackers actually kind of customized the malware, depending on the target. These guys are actually doing something Ah, little different in even before the malware gets installed. They're doing some things to help them understand the environment that they are going to try to install the malware into so they can pick the right malware package. The reason that's important is because that's the kind of thing that nation state hackers do. It's not the kind of thing that common cyber criminals do. They just aren't that careful. Interesting. Okay, so Russian intelligence is definitely behind this hack. We asked Tom Burt that too, and he says They think it was a subset of that solar winds hacking group linked through the Russian intelligence service. The SVR, the association with the SVR comes from what the techniques we see them using and from the kinds of targets that they are targeting. So it's a collection of Circumstantial evidence. You might say that point in a consistent direction. So the group that was behind solar winds is known as a PT 29 or cozy Bear, and Microsoft said that they saw a lot of things that seem to overlap with Kofi coat. Cozy bear, you see to say, but they don't want to say unequivocally that it is the exact same people. It might be a subset. What they're not equivocating about, though, is that this hack came from Russia. Okay, and is the technique here similar to what was found in the solar winds hack late last year. Yes, No, The solar winds attack was actually really complicated and stealthy. And Microsoft appears to have seen this latest hack really quickly, and it's much simpler. I mean, the hackers aren't directly targeting companies or institutions they want to hack. They're focusing on suppliers in this case, just like they were in solar winds. And they're finding a company further down the supply chain like a software company to hack into them Instead, the big question now is what the response is gonna be President. Biden is already warned that Russia shouldn't be doing these attacks and now they've done another one. So the question is whether or not this is going to force a response. From the U. S. Yeah. All right. That is NPR investigations. Correspondent Dina Temple Raston. Thank you, Dina. You're welcome. Germany today apologized for a genocide in this case the slaughter of tens of thousands of people in the African nation of Namibia. The killings came during the colonial era when German troops stamped out an uprising in Namibia by almost wiping out two tribes. And in France Earlier this week, the government admitted to bearing some responsibility for the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. Joining us to talk about these developments is NPR Africa correspondent Ada Peralta. Welcome back. Hey, thank you for having so to start. Why did Germany say now was the time for this acknowledgement? Yeah. I mean, look, this is a long time coming. Germany and the government of Namibia have been negotiating this for five years. But as you alluded to in your intro there is, you know, quite a bit of introspection happening on the continent of Africa and in Europe, you know, people and governments are trying to come to terms with the brutality. Of colonialism, You know, critics say that Germany and other European countries are looking at African countries as an emerging market, and that might be the reason for this apology. I want to come back to what amends might look like, but first a little bit of the history what happened during this uprising? When was this? Yes, As you mentioned. It happened more than 100 years ago from 1904 to 1908 and Germany was the colonial power and control of Namibia. And there was a rebellion by the Herrero and Anoma tribes and the German government reacted viciously. They took Land and cattle In many Herero and Mama people were taken to concentration camps in the Kalahari Desert on many of them died of starvation there in the end..

Tom Burke Tom Burt Dina Elsa Chang Los Angeles Microsoft Washington Ada Peralta Europe 1904 MPR Kalahari Desert Audie Cornish Rwanda 1908 NPR Biden France This week today
"kalahari desert" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Each student follows a customized learning plan more at math. Maisie, um dot com. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish in Washington, and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Russian hackers are at it again. The same group that hacked into software made by solar winds appears to have launched another supply chain hack. That's according to Microsoft. The company sent out an alert last night, saying hackers who appear to be linked to the Russian intelligence service broke into the email marketing company. Constant contact in order to impersonate the government agency. U S. A. I, D Dina Temple Raston of NPR's Investigations team has been tracking Russian hacking operations and joins us now. Hey, Dina. Good morning. Hi. Hi. So we should first know that both Microsoft and constant contact our financial supporters of NPR. Okay, so tell us more about what Microsoft discovered. What has this cyber crimes team that's watching for these kinds of intrusions all the time. This week, they found hackers in a bunch of international development in human rights organization systems. And as best as they can tell, the hackers broke into a company that was helping us a I D with marketing. And they use that hack to send phishing emails. You know, Microsoft told us it wasn't a huge hack, they said Maybe as many as 3000 accounts for either hacked or threatened, maybe as many as 150 institutions, but they think the actual numbers are probably a lot smaller than that. And these air phishing emails like we're talking about fake emails that looked like they were from USA Idea. Exactly so unsuspecting recipients would open these emails. They'd click on the links and by doing that the malware would be installed on their systems. And then the malware would basically give the hackers free access. They could steal data. It could infect other computers on these networks. They could read the emails. They could even plant other malware. So we talked to Tom Burt, who's Thieve Ice president of consumer security and trusted Microsoft. He was the guy was behind the advisory last night. And he said that the hackers actually kind of customized the malware, depending on who the target was. These guys are actually doing something. Ah, little different in even before the malware gets installed. They're doing some things to help them understand the environment that they are going to try to install the malware into so they can pick the right malware package. The reason that's important is because that's the kind of thing that nation state hackers do. It's not the kind of thing that common cyber criminals do. They just aren't that careful. Interesting. Okay, so Russian intelligence is definitely behind this hack what? We asked Tom Bird about that, too. And he says Right now, they think it was a subset of the solar winds Hacking group. Here's what he said. We can really be strong about our conclusion that this is a group that's operating from Russia. The association with the SVR comes from what the techniques we see them using and from the kinds of targets that they are targeting. So it's a collection of Circumstantial evidence. You might say that point in a consistent direction. So the group that was behind solar winds is known as a PT 29 or cozy Bear, and Microsoft said that they saw a lot of things that seem to overlap with Kofi's coat. Cozy bear, you see to say, but they don't want to say unequivocally that it is the exact same people. It might be a subset. What they're not equivocating about, though, is that this hack came from Russia. Okay. And is the technique here similar to what was found in the solar winds hack late last year? Yes, No, The solar winds attack was actually really complicated and stealthy, and Microsoft appears to have Seen this latest hack really quickly, and it's much simpler. I mean, the hackers aren't directly targeting companies or institutions They wanna hack. They're focusing on suppliers in this case, just like they were in solar winds. And they're finding a company further down the supply chain like a software company to hack into them Instead, the big question now is what the response is gonna be. President Biden has already warned that Russia shouldn't be doing these attacks and now they've done another one. So the question is whether or not this is going to force a response from the U. S. Yeah, All right. That is NPR investigations. Correspondent Dina Temple Raston. Thank you, Dina. You're welcome. Germany today apologized for genocide in this case the slaughter of tens of thousands of people in the African nation of Namibia. The killings came during the colonial era when German troops stamped out an uprising in Namibia by almost wiping out two tribes. And in France Earlier this week, the government admitted to bearing some responsibility for the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. Joining us to talk about these developments is NPR Africa correspondent Ada Peralta. Welcome back. Hey, thank you for having so to start. Why did Germany say now was the time for this acknowledgement? Yeah. I mean, look, this is a long time coming. Germany and the government of Namibia have been negotiating this for five years. But as you alluded to in your intro there is, you know, quite a bit of introspection happening on the continent of Africa and in Europe, you know, people and governments are trying to come to terms with the brutality. Of colonialism, You know, critics say that Germany and other European countries are looking at African countries as an emerging market, and that might be the reason for this apology. I want to come back to what amends might look like, but first a little bit of the history what happened during this uprising? When was this? Yes, As you mentioned. It happened more than 100 years ago from 1904 to 1908 and Germany was the colonial power and control of Namibia. And there was a rebellion by the Herrero and Anoma tribes and the German government reacted viciously. They took land and cattle and many hereto and Nama people were taken to concentration camps in the Kalahari Desert. On many of them died of starvation there. In the end, scholars estimate that about 80% of the hereto Anoma people were killed during this period. What's been the reaction to the government's plans to offer a billion dollars to help reconstruction and development in Namibia as part of this acknowledgement Tribal leaders, you know, say that this is a deal between two governments and that it doesn't really solve the big problems. They say that this will not lead to reconciliation. And the big sticking point is that they wanted individual reparations. You know, for example, they wanted the German government to buy land from the people of German descent, and then Return it to the descendants of the victims of this genocide. You know, Activists say that the headed O and the number of people are living in poor conditions that they live in crowded, informal settlements and a redistribution of land. They say that that could actually lead to a real reconciliation into a real change in the way that the Herero and the normal people are living. Before I let you go. Can we talk about France admitting to having responsibility in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. At that time, 800,000 people were killed. What's being said there? Yes. Oh, President. Macron stopped short of issuing an apology on behalf of France. But this is still big news. This has been a source of tension between Rwanda and France because President Paul Kagame, who halted the genocide, his forces stopped. The genocide always saw France is being complicity because they stood by the genocidal regime. And like other western countries, they failed to stop the slaughter of tootsies. But ah, lot like what is happening with Germany and Namibia. France ordered an investigation. They opened up their archives and, you know, they have officially admitted that they bore quote overwhelming responsibility for the genocide. And this week, the leaders of both countries stood side by side, and they said that this marked a new chapter in their relationship. That's NPR's Africa. Correspondent Ater Peralta. Thank you. Thank you, Audie. Progress on an independent commission to investigate the January 6th attack on the Capitol.

Tom Burt Dina Tom Bird Elsa Chang Dina Temple Raston Microsoft Los Angeles Europe Ater Peralta Ada Peralta Washington five years Macron Kalahari Desert 1904 Audie Cornish Rwanda NPR 800,000 people France
"kalahari desert" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And welcome to Tom Harbin University Book Club today were reading from the last hours of ancient sunlight, the fate of the world and what we can do about it, and this is from page 165 the lives of ancient people. I'm the son and the Kogi value, Community and cooperation where part of the world not separate from it. Chapter one of the oldest cultures on Earth is that of the cone Bushmen. It's an exclamation mark to make that choice. Of the Kalahari Desert in the northern parts of South Africa. The exclamation point their name Kong represents a sound of their language, which we don't have an English. It's a popping noise made in the mouth by forming a back you between the tongue in the top of the mouth and then pulling the tongue down quickly. Our three other sounds in their language for which we have no letters. All of them clicks or pops made by similarly clicking the tongue against the front of the mouth of the sides of the mouth and teeth. There's such a unique culture that although they're ancient Language contains sounds that have traveled to no other human tongue on Earth. Over the past few decades as they become more well known. They've asked anthropologists and linguists that they be called the song, although most text from before the 19 eighties referred to them as the Coon In their life are portrayed wonderfully well in the film. The gods must be crazy. Sauna, racially distinct from the other Africans who have conquered the continent. The past millennia. Their skin is more yellow than black and their eyes were slightly slanted as if they share a common ancestor with Asians or perhaps, or indeed, an early ancestor of the Asians. Your hair is black and curly, like other Africans, but they're comparatively short and thin, often standing less than 5 FT. Tall and weighing fewer than £100. Lives of the sun were first Quiet chronicle quite elegantly by Lawrence Vander Pose to South African explorer and writer. 1961 book the Heart of the Hunter. He tells it coming across a small cone tribe of about a dozen adults and Children as they crossed a particularly hot and barren part of the desert. And opposed this. Fellow explorers started hunting some games so the Bushmen could have extra food to carry on their journey toward the lightning. On the horizon where the seasonal rains were beginning, Explorers spend an entire day hunting with their land Rovers and provisions the Bushmen well for their trip. Is the little tribe was leaving Vander posting his group stood a wave Goodbye, but the Bushmen simply walked off with many smiles. No, thank you's were ever given for all that food. One of Andr posts assistance 100 would never encountered. Bushman before commented that they seemed ungrateful and uncaring. Ben, One of the other men in the group who understood Bushman culture, responded that to give another human food and water is only good manners and his routine behavior among the Bushmen. If the white man had been starving on a long track in the Bushmen had found them. They would immediately share their food and water even if it endangered their own survival. And they would not expect a thank you in response. In fact, in San Bushmen culture to eat in front of another person who is without food is considered an immoral act every bit as horrific as if in our culture, a person were to walk out onto us. Busy City sidewalk, pulled down their pants and defecated. Everyone would be shocked and horrified. As it happens, the sun do say thank you. They do it whenever they're hunting, and they're making a decision to take a life. No animal is killed for food by the sun without being thanked by them both at the time of the hunt and later when the dance is done for the soul of the animal and animals air on Lee killed when there is a clear need for food. Those of us who grew up in modern civilization. It's difficult to imagine a life and culture where such fundamental things or simply taken for granted. We stopped behind a car to red light. We don't open the door and run up with car in front of us to thank them for being so considerate as to follow the basic rules of the road and stop for the red light. It's simply a given that everybody does that. No thanks required. Thanking people for doing something implies they had a choice to do otherwise, and did so out of a desire to be nice. Imagine a world where feeding another person is as much an automatic response as stopping at a red light a world where a person who fails to feed her care for another is ostracized or punished. Way we give people tickets when they run red lights, where the care of others is more important than even the care of yourself. The teaching all things that you should want others to do to you Do ye even so onto them is actually practiced. Not out of an effort, but as part of a daily routine as the normal way things are as the basic assumption of a society. That is song culture the way of an older culture. A story of chip allying storyteller of Cipro on Chri ancestry told me that his people have a belief that if a person visits your home and you failed to share with them food and water so that they leave, hungry or thirsty. And then the creator decides to take them home. At that time, they will arrive in the spirit world hungry and thirsty. He said. The responsibility for that for that person's condition in the world is yours because you were the last person he met, and you had an opportunity to feed him. So we have an obligation of feed and give water and shelter and whatever else a person may need whenever they come into our village or our home. Our younger culture. We value productivity and individual possession, and they're older culture. They value community. Most modern people find it difficult or impossible to imagine a world where community is more important than possessions. Yet this is how about 1% of the world's population still lives and how all of your and my ancestors lived. Hundreds of thousands of years. 19 7 97, a group of 13 researchers released a study in which they quantified the value of all the environments on the planet for measuring the size of the Louisiana.

Lawrence Vander San Bushmen Bushman Kalahari Desert Tom Harbin University Book Clu South Africa Kong Explorers Louisiana Ben Chri writer Lee
"kalahari desert" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Holds in 10 times its weight in fluid so in the joint and anchors to wait. I mean the fluid in the joint is a thin layer of fluid called synovial fluid. And this really helps prevent your bones from grinding together. It absorbs impact when you're walking or jumping or or running. Changing direction and absorbs that impact. But it's more than that. That fluid and a need a thin layer of fluid. It's almost a patina so thin um New joint shell's airborne in there. Called Contra search, and then when you bend your knee, the joint fluids washes over the cartilage, which is the stuff in the end of the bones of protect him and it Deposits, No baby joints, cells to contra sites and any micro tear or micro operation. And then the devil's clothes. Amazing. It comes from Ah, the Kalahari Desert, and there's You Know, Sand, there's no place for plants to anchor. So the devil's cause a very low growing shrub, and it has these claws on it. Kind of hooks on it that anchored to the ground and the wind in the desert in the Kalahari Desert. It's rich and something called heart Pakis sides. The name of the pledges Harp ago Fighting pro cos That's Devil's Claude. That's the Latin binomial name You see in a textbook, so it's named the ingredient that works just called Hard Pack decides. It's a family of ingredients. They're great for arthritic pain it great for three victory. And that also has been shown to help you create fluid in your knee, because if that fluid disappears, you don't have any any kind of shock absorber in between your bones in your knee. I'm gonna smash together and rub together and really damaged himself. One way way down the cartilage. So if that dehydrates you also can't create new cartilage cells and keep your knee work. So call the THX one a day with breakfast extremely safe by a Kirkman. Five election usually struck people off with two twice a day, breakfast and dinner. And once they get their arthritis under control, If they still need.

Kalahari Desert Kirkman
The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

Gastropod

05:55 min | 2 years ago

The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

"To start our watermelon adventure, we called one of the world's great watermelon. Harry Paris he has worked on watermelon science per years as part of Israel's agricultural research. Service. Well, I think the first thing that comes to the first two syllables water right? This is a true rich table. which has a lot of water and which actually probably the first use by people of this particular natural products. Was To quench thirst I've spent summers in Israel, and it is basically watermelon paradise but that's not actually were Harry I fell in love with a watermelon it all started when his dad grew watermelons in the backyard in their home in Brooklyn in the nineteen sixties then Harry gave watermelon farming himself fifteen years old and there was a new variety called Crimson sweets that came out and plans at a few seats in the garden and Lo and behold by the fall we got one nice big sweet high quality watermelon fruit. That we grew in the backyard in Brooklyn and from then on I was just hoped. Harry was well ahead of the local war hipster curve in Brooklyn but the watermelon is neither from Brooklyn nor from Israel, in fact, its origins are a little bit of a mystery. One of the big headlines was back in the mid nineteenth century when the British explorer David Livingstone went to the southern African deserts and low and behold. It was the year in which there was more rain than average and he found a large areas just covered with wild watermelons. He's wild watermelons were hard but does the name says have water say to pound them and so on and so forth but you could squeeze the water out of them David Livingston was searching for the source of the Nile. But apparently, he was also as a side hustle looking for other sources like the source of our sweet watermelons and people thought he'd founded the wild ancestor but Livingston was wrong about the source of the Nile and as it turns out now. We know he was wrong about those wild watermelons to now that scientists can examine the DNA of melons. They found that the Kalahari desert wild melon that Livingston came upon is not the ancestor of our sweet watermelon. But DNA is just one of the tools that scientists are using to try to figure out where and when the watermelon was domesticated, you can't just use one approach. You have to use an archaeology approach you have to use clients science you have to use. Linguistics you have to go into literature some of it'll some of an ancient. And even more than that. Of course, with the latest that we know genetics and genome can assist us first of all the plant Science Livingston was at least on the right continent because there are wild watermelons of various different species all over. Africa. So the wild relatives watermelon their fruits are smaller and rounder not elongate. They have often perfectly round it small fruits the outside looks like a watermelon like little, green and white. But inside they all have this extremely bitter and usually white. Whitish pulpits azan Renner is a professor of biology at the University of Munich and she's another one of the world's watermelon expert Suzanne's as you could boil these Super Beta watermelons for jam or you could use them medicinally as kind of a purge to clean out your insides. Basically, the wild watermelon wasn't a tasty thing to eat raw at all. So where the desert watermelon comes from, there are two things that have to happen to these bitter wild melons to turn them into the watermelons. We love today to specific genetic mutations. The first one is a mutation. That switches off the production of bitchy chemicals and so this mutation occurs in nature as bad for the plan because the plant of course has this bitterness to defend itself not eaten so that the fruits would not be yeah for the plan is better to lose the bitterness but for us, it's good and we can only imagine that native people every once in a while tried one of these melons maybe for what may be hoping for something to chew on and found some that wasn't bitter Suzanne's scientists know what that mutation is and how to find it in. A melon they just to look and the second mutation is the one that turned it red inside rather than white the red colors also well understood this is well studied and it's a completely different set of teens. This is and other scientists know exactly which two mutations they're looking for. Those mutations aren't common and wild melon. So when did they happen? When were watermelons domesticated Harry says the place to look for those clues is archaeology in ancient Egyptian tombs. Archaeologists have found paintings of whole watermelons on a platter there oblong and striped watermelons today not round like the. Wild bitter ones but did those ancient Egyptian watermelons taste like the ones we eat did they have the mutations for sweetness and maybe for the red color the painting can't really tell you that. But fortunately, some other watermelon evidence has showed up in a four thousand year old Egyptian tomb complex the seeds and leaves from the tomb ended up at the q Royal Botanic Gardens in England Suzanne wanted to find out if those remains held any clues about whether the watermelon had already been domesticated by them. So she wrote to mark Nesbitt who coincidentally starred in our tonic. And who runs the economic botany collection at Q. and she asked if she could borrow a watermelon leaf from the tomb, it was in a glass box encased in a box and he opd mark opened it, and he said it hadn't been opened since eighteen seventy one or whenever singles arrived there then and her colleagues analyzed demand the leaf and I they were thrilled the watermelon leaf DNA did in fact, have the mutations that would have made the fruit sweet and read but then when you see fourteen Dating for this material that we had received for Mark Nesbitt, it turned out it was much younger than we thought it turns out the watermelon material in the two had been left there by a later visitor carbon dating showed it was from the late eighteen hundreds huge bummer.

Harry Brooklyn Israel David Livingston Suzanne Mark Nesbitt Harry Paris Science Livingston David Livingstone Kalahari Q Royal Botanic Gardens Africa Harry I LO University Of Munich Azan Renner Professor
The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

Gastropod

05:00 min | 2 years ago

The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

"Start our watermelon adventure, we called one of the world's great watermelon. Harry Paris he has worked on watermelon science per years as part of Israel's agricultural research. Service. Well, I think the first thing that comes to the first two syllables water right? This is a true rich table. which has a lot of water and which actually probably the first use by people of this particular natural products. Was To quench thirst I've spent summers in Israel, and it is basically watermelon paradise but that's not actually were Harry I fell in love with a watermelon it all started when his dad grew watermelons in the backyard in their home in Brooklyn in the nineteen sixties then Harry gave watermelon farming himself fifteen years old and there was a new variety called Crimson sweets that came out and plans at a few seats in the garden and Lo and behold by the fall we got one nice big sweet high quality watermelon fruit. That we grew in the backyard in Brooklyn and from then on I was just hoped. Harry was well ahead of the local war hipster curve in Brooklyn but the watermelon is neither from Brooklyn nor from Israel, in fact, its origins are a little bit of a mystery. One of the big headlines was back in the mid nineteenth century when the British explorer David Livingstone went to the southern African deserts and low and behold. It was the year in which there was more rain than average and he found a large areas just covered with wild watermelons. He's wild watermelons were hard but does the name says have water say to pound them and so on and so forth but you could squeeze the water out of them David Livingston was searching for the source of the Nile. But apparently, he was also as a side hustle looking for other sources like the source of our sweet watermelons and people thought he'd founded the wild ancestor but Livingston was wrong about the source of the Nile and as it turns out now. We know he was wrong about those wild watermelons to now that scientists can examine the DNA of melons. They found that the Kalahari desert wild melon that Livingston came upon is not the ancestor of our sweet watermelon. But DNA is just one of the tools that scientists are using to try to figure out where and when the watermelon was domesticated, you can't just use one approach. You have to use an archaeology approach you have to use clients science you have to use. Linguistics you have to go into literature some of it'll some of an ancient. And even more than that. Of course, with the latest that we know genetics and genome can assist us first of all the plant Science Livingston was at least on the right continent because there are wild watermelons of various different species all over. Africa. So the wild relatives watermelon their fruits are smaller and rounder not elongate. They have often perfectly round it small fruits the outside looks like a watermelon like little, green and white. But inside they all have this extremely bitter and usually white. Whitish pulpits azan Renner is a professor of biology at the University of Munich and she's another one of the world's watermelon expert Suzanne's as you could boil these Super Beta watermelons for jam or you could use them medicinally as kind of a purge to clean out your insides. Basically, the wild watermelon wasn't a tasty thing to eat raw at all. So where the desert watermelon comes from, there are two things that have to happen to these bitter wild melons to turn them into the watermelons. We love today to specific genetic mutations. The first one is a mutation. That switches off the production of bitchy chemicals and so this mutation occurs in nature as bad for the plan because the plant of course has this bitterness to defend itself not eaten so that the fruits would not be yeah for the plan is better to lose the bitterness but for us, it's good and we can only imagine that native people every once in a while tried one of these melons maybe for what may be hoping for something to chew on and found some that wasn't bitter Suzanne's scientists know what that mutation is and how to find it in. A melon they just to look and the second mutation is the one that turned it red inside rather than white the red colors also well understood this is well studied and it's a completely different set of teens. This is and other scientists know exactly which two mutations they're looking for. Those mutations aren't common and wild melon. So when did they happen? When were watermelons domesticated Harry says the place to look for those clues is archaeology in ancient Egyptian tombs. Archaeologists have found paintings of whole watermelons on a platter there oblong and striped watermelons today not round like the. Wild bitter ones but did those ancient Egyptian watermelons taste like the ones we eat did they have the mutations for sweetness and maybe for the red color the painting can't really tell you that. But fortunately, some other watermelon evidence has showed up in a four thousand year old Egyptian tomb complex the seeds and leaves from the tomb ended up at the q Royal Botanic Gardens in England

Harry David Livingston Brooklyn Israel Harry Paris Suzanne Science Livingston David Livingstone Kalahari Harry I Africa Q Royal Botanic Gardens LO University Of Munich Azan Renner Professor England
"kalahari desert" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:57 min | 2 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Sports. Talk Show Sports. byline, USA. Here's Ron Bar. Diana Naiad has joined us here on Sports Byline USA, and we're talking about her book called find away the inspiring story of one woman's pursuit of a lifelong dream, and I was interested in a quote. You on, said that while you swim, you remember Stephen. Hawking's books sings and counts numbers, and also has vivid hallucinations of the wizard of Oz and the yellow brick road. Explain more of that to me. You know you know we were talking a minute ago without Great Oltra. Athletes so I'm very drawn to the stories of the big alpine climbers, but I also you know the endurance runners, marathoners, ultramarathons, ours and the tour. De France cyclists I got to cover the tour defense number of times I'm fascinated by all these people who are willing to go hard. Go long and never give up, but he suffered different things so I don't know what extreme altitude sickness is I haven't been at the top of the world i. don't know what. What it's like to run across the Kalahari desert, but the thing that's unique to me and there are only three of us in the world who do these long long epics swings in the ocean is a something called sensory deprivation, and if you want if you cycle if you hike if you ski if you Korean, you still have your is in years. You have some sensory input when you're out. There imagine you're swimming for fifty three hours with a tight cap. Cap Over your ears because you're trying to keep the heat in your head, you're immersed in liquid colder than your body temperature. Your you've got all over goggles over your eyes, and you're turning your head once a second sixty times a minute, so you don't see anything you don't hear anything Romney? Has He use a loud police? Whistle to get my attention you, God forbid. There's thrashing of a shark next to me. Something dangerous like that, so you are very quickly. Quickly not just over the fifty three hours, but in in three four five hours of between these swim. You're in your own little world. You are with your own thoughts, and that's all you got you don't see the dolphins swimming by you. Don't see the French sailboat that circling around you. You are just getting your head and very quickly. You're not with concrete box anymore. Oh Yeah I'M GONNA make it to this hour and I'm GonNa eat this next and. Think about now. Your mind just goes off on its own. I'm very attracted to lay astrophysics. I've been reading from call sekine when I was a kid up to Stephen Hawking these days I'm fascinated by the cosmos, and what better place to trip out on four billion stars above you when you're swimming out fifty sixty miles offshore in the Gulf steam, then during one of these long twins, where your brain is just wafting through moments of your childhood, and you're seeing the Taj Mahal, smoothing out on the ocean over here on the right, and you know I I was. was I was attracted to thinking about the laws of gravity in the laws of the universe, and how this whole big bang started where we are today and I started singing songs I. Don't listen to headphones. I'm just singing my own my own little routine of my era. You know I'm not a baby boomer, so I'm thinking of be those Neil Young Janice Joplin all that stuff and that those saw were meant to keep me in the moment. Keeping Focus, I'M GONNA sing. Neil Young. The damage done a thousand times exactly the way near recording that settled. Knocking myself do and it's captivating and when I get to a thousand Neil young damage done. A Levin hours and five minutes, but I been there I didn't like I know who I. Am I know what I'm doing. I know why I'm doing instead of off with the Taj Mahal whole. Weirdo world so the mind is going through a lot, and it takes a lot of focus and discipline to keep yourself on track. Your first attempt to course was back in nineteen, seventy eight. That was the second attempt. I should say nineteen seventy. You're only twenty eight years old, but let's fast forward to that fifth attempt where you were successful. What was the difference in that effort? The fifth attempt than what the first four were like. On the one hand I don't care who you talk to. If you talked to someone who's been out on a big mother-in-law expedition, they learn whether they made it or not. They come back with new science new technology, a new way to tap the inner spirit You know something new about the animal kingdom that they're trying to go through and it on all four expeditions were intelligent. We would come back jellyfish experts. The Shark experts the navigational team medical team. My personal handlers nutrition. We would talk about what can we do better? How can we get through those deadly box, jellyfish and the fifth time I during a? Mask he wasn't easy to swipe perspective who helps people. Dole. The having been couldn't needed in the face and they've got you know. Get a get a kind of a silicone covering before they get their skin graft surgery, he step on Canal Susan Newman worked with me for nine months prototype at the prototype, and finally on the fifth attempt I have a security that can make it through the long nights, and not be stung by the jellyfish across cost the mouth where we were having trouble projecting me I need to breathe. How can you cover them out and still be so Stefan? This masks for me? It didn't work prototype the type after prototype, but finally did, but it was tough to. It's not easy as having your retain bear face. Please can manipulate the mouth and Bonaly -able. I was struck with waves of salt water I was vomiting into the mass. You know I just couldn't wait to take that mask off at sunrise, but I wouldn't have gone back a fifth time. If I hadn't had that, ask. was there a particular time when you knew you were going to be successful in this fifth try? The night on the second night I think we have out were about thirty eight hours than Barney. Who Never tells me? Nobody ever tells me where we are. You don't know what's going to happen. You don't know what wind and current and shark and New Orleans is. Going to happen, but you don't start celebrating until be safe as bill you see the whites of the eyes of the people on shore now that's when you know you're gonNA. Make you money felt. I needed it hanging on by a thread. I was cold shivering. Stopping too often, which means you're getting dragged east by the Gulf Gulfstream when you're trying to swim north. Georgia Florida and she said the mean. There's something to see what I gathered up a little bit and I said. There was A. Thin, golden white right in the middle horizontal across these black and I said that coming up oh. My God I can take all the jellyfish stuff off I'm GONNA be. The ways are going to warm my body and she said. It's better than the sun. There isn't the light to key west now. We have a long way to go she. told me that, but I wouldn't trouble and still had two hours to swim after that, but to jolt that that gave me Rom that Vicent. Thirty five years and was finally there. That got me through. Really have a couple of minutes left Diana, but when you did finally get through, and you had a chance to compose yourself and get your emotions and feelings under control and reflect back on it. What did it all mean to you? You know I. Think Honestly the first words I spoke on the beach. Never ever give up. That's what it meant to me and.

Neil Young Taj Mahal Stephen Hawking Diana Naiad Sports Byline USA Stephen hallucinations Kalahari desert France Ron Bar Romney Gulf Vicent Gulf Gulfstream Janice Joplin Dole Susan Newman Georgia Florida Stefan New Orleans
"kalahari desert" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:39 min | 2 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Feinberg. We talked about doctor, Remember? Okay. Hope he or she is a doctor. If not, we just gave him an honorary. Sure. Honorary doctor from stuff you should know you People are going to request those now which is great, but we can sell him s 01 thing that he found is that gossip can also relieve you physiologically like if you know that you're allowed to gossip. You won't get us upset about unfair things. Then if you had to hold it all in O R. It's like a way of setting injustice, right? Yeah, well, I like it's street justice. Cubicles without like Asano shock and as Charles Bronson would dispense it. Ah, yeah. Good point, man. Have you gone back and seen death wish recently. That is a rough movie. Of course. Same with death. Wish to what did you think it was? I mean, I remember seeing movies when I was a kid, and just being like, you know, as growing up, you're like this is nothing that was something Those movies were very violent and very disturbing. Yes, Charles Bronson did not. That's questions. No, he just shot everybody He did, and I was crazy. Why'd you go back on re watch Death wish Gotta watch something good point it was on. That's why I got you. That kind of death Wish him forever. When's the last time you saw it? It's been a while. It's disturbing. Yeah, especially is an adult. You know what movie I love? What? Charles Bronson movie. I love is Ah Cannick. Well, that one's good too. Um It's called 10 past midnight. Right. I think that's on Netflix to maybe those those some creepy serial killer. Yeah, like psycho sexual killer that he was, he was. He's always hunting some money. He was Liam Neeson of his day. It was like supposedly very, very underrated horror thriller. Yeah, course last year thriller with you all the way I haven't seen. It's good. It's good. I'll check it out very creepy and learned. Well, it's not for kids because I learned some things in that movie. Oh, yeah, yeah. One of those that can specifically remember. It's like, Oh, well, that's how I know what this is right. Charles Bronson teach all about life, whether you want to learn it or not. I think it was 10 past midnight. All right. Sorry about that side track. Where were we? Ah, we were talking about the origins of gossip. Oh, yeah, there's on. Did you read the article I sent. I think it's from the Guardian Can't remember. We're one of the theories is that was BBC was a BBC that hunting and gathering and foraging. Was a big reason gossiping came about because you had to know you two talk about each other, like, you know, took took. You know, it's not very good at the hunting, but he's quite the gatherer. So it helps them organized in the most efficient way to get things done, right? Because how is she going to know unless you tell somebody what's going on? Right? So that makes sense It is and again if this person If if the band is large enough for the civilisation is large enough that the person can't keep an eye on Tuck took all the time. That's how that person will gain. Understanding of took tux abilities for tuck Tuck, keeping tabs on poor took on the other cool thing I thought was the Ah when we finally learn to harness fire. Thiss hypothesis is during the day were out, you know, trying to stay alive and doing her thing. Finding building shelters, hunting for food, finding water and at night when we finally got fire well before fire. You just go to sleep and rest because it was dark. And it's weird to sit around the dark, but once they had fire people, literally from the very beginning, started sitting around and talking about their day and kind of gossiping about what happened, right? It is amazing. It's hard to blame anybody. If you think about it, like when's the last time you had a legitimately interesting conversation about fantastical stuff? There were few and far between. For the most part, people are talking about their day. We're talking about people they work with right talking about some dude that cut them off in traffic. They're talking about their immediate experience. So of course you're going to gossip is this If the definition of gossip is talking about people who aren't there every year, right, everyone gossips you're going to. It's a completely natural thing. And I'm totally unsurprised by the idea that it started out at the first campfire. Words, of course, and it still happens today. Apparently there are researchers who studied Bushmen in the Kalahari Desert in Botswana. And they say that the language and the stories and the things they say during the day Are completely different than the things they say at night around the campfire, And they say, there's really no reason to think this hasn't always been the case. Yeah. So you said that still goes on a date. And we're talking about modern studies of gossiping, right? Yes, one of the there was like a series of studies on enough. They were all from the U of Toronto or not. But they seem to be somewhat related where it was outside. Observers could watch people playing games and they noticed cheaters. So they had this information about cheaters that the people playing the games didn't have about the cheaters. And when they were given the chance to let the players know about a cheater to send him. I think like a gossip note is what they called it. They they would. Most people would take him up on the offer and would send a note of warning to the person that they were playing somebody who is cheating on DH. They like you said. They went from being really upset enough in arms, too. That release valve being undone and everything was fine with the world again because that person had been alerted to cheating through gossiping. So there is such thing as altruistic, gossiping as well. Yet with altruism. Tracy had another example of Say there's like a choral group and the self appointed leader is really kind of lazy. And if someone then other people kind of making up the slack, doing the duties that he or she should be doing So when new comes in the group, and they say, Hey, listen, this this girl Jane is the head of the choral group. But you should know. Don't count on Jane to bring the sheet music for you because she never does it right. So that's sort of altruistic and that you're helping someone learned the rules of your new group. But you're also kind of talking smack. And making yourself superior to Jane, right? And then so, Tracy. I did this one other thing that some people would say that the person who's doing that is really like you said, just talking smack and isn't really working toward a solution to the actual problem, which is Jane being slack at her job, right? And I wondered like that's a really good descriptive. What gossip is like gossip would be talk that's not directed toward any kind of solution. It's just talking. Yeah, you know, like if you take that same conversation to somebody who Khun Fire Jane or make her do her job, right? You wouldn't know One would consider that gossip. Yeah, because it's directed toward a goal toward the solution, So I guess That's probably one thing that people don't like about gossip. It's it's really In a lot of ways. It's just blowing off steam. It's not really serving any direct purpose. They all seem to be in direct. Yeah, like he's socializing, people I did now. I need an honorary doctor from somewhere. So you've got one. And then lastly, Chuck One of the other things, especially from malicious, bond, malicious gossip. Is there. When somebody.

Charles Bronson Khun Fire Jane Tuck Ah Cannick Liam Neeson Feinberg. Netflix Chuck One Tracy Toronto Kalahari Desert BBC Botswana
"kalahari desert" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Paid and it works hi all you run against it holds the fluid into the joint by the way that's looking an incorrect what collagen the whole D. Waterman to skip Jeff nice young healthy elastic resilient shiny glowing skin so you're going to get that benefit until if you do not want to guess what doubles claw at the same time we do our collagen powder it he's gonna look great what the hell you want to cash it anchors the fluid in your knee does this fit in the patina then layer of fluid it's really important question obviously because it's a sh it's a cushion everyone check shock of your bones back together when you when you're walking or going up stairs but that fluid is really important because that's where new cartilage cells are born shift the flow dries up you're in trouble he eventually going to be bone on bone they actually and people who are bone on bone to give them shots of the stuff high value Monica should enter the knee to create an artificial joint a list for about six months the pain goes away for six months then they have to do it all over hi how you run the kitchen anchors that fluid in place such a shock absorber that hydrate your cartilage in your body into your bones but that slowed also such a shock absorbers budgeted for hydration for your tissue don't desecrate away you know flick way dry up and flicked away but also the new baby called the children born in a close off the fluids con you can't maintain you need anymore and then the devil's claw that's the shrub that comes from the southern part of the continent of Africa over not big desert to Kalahari desert down there that the Kalahari desert sun and South Africa and Botswana and Namibia and Angola it's covering all these countries and the shrub grows Lole and it has dis clause that hold on to the sand because it's very windy there what a collectible sports and it has this ingredient called heart package side and that's what is great for.

D. Waterman Jeff Monica Africa Kalahari desert South Africa Botswana Lole Namibia Angola
"kalahari desert" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Put arm hi all you wanna kiss with double scored special that's very interesting because that'll mix perfectly what the collagen for your skin and a high value collagenous seventy percent is taken and rest as high value on the cache of so when you take the high value on the cast with the whole school it's a rusty is good information really in any event Hey how you run a kitchen stabilizers that little thin layer of fluid in your knee there's a patina of fluid in your neighborhood it's really important school synovial fluid that's a shock absorber it also hydrates to join but it does more than up the new baby join soldier born in the flow would suck the fluid goes away you can't feel your joint anymore eventually it's going to dry up and flicked away it's going to desecrate and you gonna bone on bone hi are you running yes it helps what mild to moderate pain so then I had a double school bill this call comes from the California desert the Kalahari desert covers a lot of the southern part of the continent of Africa like Angola Botswana Namibia South Africa so there's not a lot for this plan to hold on to soda plant grows long you know because there's a lot of wind Anna has the spikes that get into the sand anchored to plant that's why they call it doubles pool the plant grows clause that dig into the sand Shota planters and blow away turns out these claws are loaded with something called her paddle phylum our pack a sludge I need other things to help with arthritis they found that if you do the devil's claw twice a day after dosage we.

pain Kalahari desert Africa Anna California Angola sand Shota
The 'Bloodhound' aiming to break the land speed record

BBC World Service

01:11 min | 2 years ago

The 'Bloodhound' aiming to break the land speed record

"A British team is hoping to break the land speed record with the six Tom arrow shaped vehicle it's been getting faster and faster during trials and some Africa there is still some way short of beating the existing record one thousand two hundred and twenty seven kilometers an hour Jennifer name also sent this report from the Kalahari desert control okay as a role model the bloodhound call driver and the great pulling away another test the sleek white to red vehicle leaves a cloud of dust as it hurtles down this bone dry lake bed powered by jet engine taken from the Eurofighter typhoon bloodhound has posted a series of foss speeds in recent days it's five hundred and one miles an hour on Wednesday makes it the third fastest British car of all time the team say the current set up could do six hundred M. P. H. that's still not enough to break the sound barrier and the existing land speed record of seven hundred and sixty three miles an hour the blood had will be fitted with a rocket engine next year when combined with the jet the record will full

Africa M. P. H. Tom Arrow Jennifer Kalahari Twenty Seven Kilometers Six Hundred M
"kalahari desert" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:52 min | 3 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"A low. Hello, hello. This is Adrian Bergen. This is generation bold the fountain of truth, and there's a lot of truth that come out during our show. But today part of that truth is that we can be inspired by others. And if we talk about a walking inspiration machine, we're gonna be talking about Diana naiad that she's one of those folks who I think actually needs no introduction because for many many decades, actually you've been hearing about her in the news. You know, that she is a legendary stripper, you know, that she has a wonderful book out a find away. And we'll talk about why she named the book quite that. But from the Wall Street Journal to the Houston times, they call it a gripping thriller. Why? Well, of course, as a legendary swimmer you may have remembered that she's been in the news since nineteen seventy. Five when she swam around then Hatton, much, more recently a hundred and ten point eight six miles around Cuba to Florida and much more. But she also has a mission, and that mission is something that she, and I share we've talked about it many times and then get up and move. And so we'll also talk about a wonderful mission. She has that she's promoting called ever walk. We'll find out exactly what that's about. So our quest to successful aging. Was speaking today with Diana diet? So thank you so much for being on the show today. It's entirely my pleasure. And I must say no we're going to get into walking that a couple of weeks ago when you and I and a couple hundred other people walked the beautiful city of Philadelphia all day long. I know I was out there for ten hours. I love spending time with you. You're such a forceful, energetic personality. So I'm so glad we're in this world of walking together. Adrian where we are. And you can see some videos of that on ever walking on free workers. But what I will tell you. If you were there. You would have just been thrilled, Diana, not only let us, but she bugles us. So tell us a little bit about that. And let us know about ever walk. You know, clearly, I'm not a professional horn player. There's a there's a a little bit of comic relief to my bugle playing. But. You know, every time and it was five times. I tried to make it across that epic ocean. They call it the Mount Everest of the earth oceans that straight between Havana, Cuba and Key West Florida. The great swimmers of the world had tried since nineteen fifty including me as you mentioned way back in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight is kind of the holy grail. All the obstacles, you could name the mighty Gulfstream the particular sharks the deadly box jellyfish. I could make you a long list add tried to make it across. And every time I stood on that Havana shore, my teammates out in the boat. Bonnie my head handler and best friend next to me on the shore. I blew Reveille. I thought. And that means we all know what it means all the world around. It means it to the military. But it means it to us civilians to get up get up at dawn. Don't miss this day, go after whatever you're going after you might not get there. You might not get there today, but you are not gonna sleep your life away. So that's that's kind of my song and now with ever walk which is initiative Bonnie, and I started three and a half years ago to get as you said just people up enjoying the beautiful outdoors of the United States of America forgetting about politics for just a least a few minutes of our day. We're looking up at the gorgeous trees last that Philadelphia city is I candy, you know, from the beautiful little cobblestone alley ways to the river with those both houses lined up majestically. It was just it was just I was in a state of sheer delight all day and all of us. You're on a high. You're doing something a little bit difficult that day we walk twenty six point two miles more than a lot of people would care to walk, and you don't need to walk that far. But you could go out and walk down to the corner to get your newspaper and back and feel the earth under your feet feel the power of your stride. You know, didn't start looking at the horizon and the beautiful clouds and think who you wanna be what you wanna do with the rest of your life. So I'm I'm finding walking to be a kind of enlightenment and empowerment kind of thing in my life. And now Bonnie and Tony to bring frankly, we're trying to bring a million people into our movement, and that's a that's a tall order. But we think big and we're thinking big on this one too. Yeah. And I think if anybody can do it it will be you. And certainly Bonnie, and and although you say, we don't talk politics. I have to tell everybody that one of the people who's been actually inspired by Diana is Hillary Clinton, you'll see her endure. Using your book. And I and and it's just so many people have said, this is thrilling to them. They really couldn't understand how you could make this trip this journey by water with the sharks there. They mentioned that you were not in any kind of shark cage. You're very very brave, and so I'm gonna ask you this question. Maybe a little different question. You've had your extremely brave person. And yet when you wanted to engage the world in physical activity you picked walking now, frankly, it's lovely. But there's no break for you. It involved here. Why did you do that? Why of all the sports including your own? Did you concentrate on walking? Well, you know, we're talking about the masses when I just mentioned that our goal is to get a million people in this country. And I'm talking to Sanjay Gupta. Dr Sanjay Gupta from CNN. Now who covered the Cuba swim for several years to you know, he's known as America's doctor about helping us in twenty twenty go to fifty cities in fifty weeks. Every Saturday Bonnie, and I are going to do ten mile walk in fifty capitals of fifty states. And you know, how would we get a million people out in the ocean swimming? Yes, I'm in love with the ocean. I wish I could give that experience to a million people not to mention five or ten, but who else is gonna swim. Let's say from Cuba to Florida. I guarantee you I'm gonna go to my grave, or my, you know, cremation moment, and nobody else. Will have done that swim. That's how difficult it is to do. So am I here to just inspire one person twenty five million people were following Cuba's went by the end? And you know, what they didn't care about swimming. They didn't care about sports. Then they care if I was setting some new all the favor record. They cared about the message. They saw someone who you to give up and a team without getting paid a sense who went for years not getting paid and and and giving their lives away from their families away from their jobs because they were chasing history. We were chasing a grand adventure that had never been done before. And all of the science, and the technology, and the tapping of the human spirit that comes with that swim wasn't just for me. And that's when wasn't just for slimmers. Well, just walking it's not about how hard can you heard? Can you want across the Kalahari desert in one hundred twenty degree heat? I doubt down with high regard for the peop-. Who do run across the collar, Harry desert? I want a million people out doing what you and I did in Philadelphia. The other day feeling the power of moving and.

Bonnie Diana naiad Cuba Philadelphia Adrian Bergen Dr Sanjay Gupta Havana Florida America Wall Street Journal Kalahari desert sharks Mount Everest Key West Florida Hatton Harry desert Houston times CNN
"kalahari desert" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"We have a great formula on special today for joint pain. But the social for some reason being being useful finding shelf useful for people with a torn meniscus, which is surprising to me. It's called high. Allie Rana guests with devil's claw your meniscus artists to pie shaped wedges underneath each knee. And they keep the knee in place. They support Denise wrongly, and they were also shock absorbers. The kind of spongy tissue. That's mostly made out of college. You also have meniscus that. Absorb shocks in your jaw. Joe it's not just under knee. It's also when your jaw Molin ones unusual in any event, when you tear Menashe guy, that's one of them it very painful, it's very painful, and the problem is soon after that because you're walking wrong. And because your knee joint is not getting the support it requires you start develop arthritis in the affected me. Now. Here's the problem. Besides developing arthritis in the affected me once people develop authorizes in one knee. They're walking they're favoring that me putting intensive pressure more pressure on healthy knee. So they start to develop arthritis in the second. So it's not uncommon. So I've had a number of letters not number two two letters from people were torn meniscus. Where they went on a highly Iran, devil's claw and the pain went away an apparently dish and kind of healing thing might be the Makassar liberal squad pain and the inflammation high. All you want cash, it is very healing. So let me explain what touch all about doubles qual- is this. Herb display plant that grows in a very tough environment, it grows in the Kalahari desert shorts. Extremely dry. It's extremely hot. So the plant releases these ingredients to protect itself from the drought from a son from a radiation called heart package. Research shows and humans are package. Also, protect us. They have some kind of anticancer effect, but very early research. Patella cannot a whole.

Joe it Allie Rana Kalahari desert Makassar Iran Denise
"kalahari desert" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:15 min | 3 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is Adrian Bergen. This is generation bold the fountain of truth, and there's a lot of truth that come out during our show. But today part of that truth is that we can be inspired by others. And if we talk about a walking inspiration machine, we're gonna be talking about Diana naiad. Now, she's one of those folks, I think actually needs no introduction because for many many decades, actually you've been hearing about her in the news. You know, that she is a legendary swimmer, you know, that she has a wonderful book at a find away. And we'll talk about why she named the book quite that. But from the Wall Street Journal to the Houston times, they call it a gripping thriller. Why? Well, of course, as a legendary swimmer, you may have remembered that she's been in the news since nineteen seventy five when she swam around then Hatton, much more. Recently a hundred and ten point eight six miles around Cuba to Florida and much more. But she also has a mission, and that mission is something that she, and I share we've talked about it many times, and then get up and move and walk. So we'll also talk about a wonderful mission. She has that she's promoting called ever walk. We'll find out exactly what that's about. So in our quest to successful aging. Was speaking today with Diana diet? So thank you so much for being on the show today. It's entirely my pleasure. And I must say no we're gonna get into walking that a couple of weeks ago when you and I and a couple hundred other people walked the the beautiful city of Philadelphia all day long. I know I was out there for ten hours. I love spending time with you. You're such a forceful, energetic personality. So I'm so glad we're in this world of walking together. Adrian where we are. And you can see some videos of then on ever walking on free workers. But what I will tell you. If you were there. You would have just been thrilled, Diana, not only let us, but she bugles us. So tell us a little bit about that. And let us know about ever walk. You know, clearly, I'm not a professional horn player. There's a there's a little bit of comic relief to my bugle playing. But. You know, every time and it was five times. I tried to make it across that epic ocean. They call it the Mount Everest of the earth's oceans that straight between Havana, Cuba and Key West Florida. The great swimmers of the world had tried since nineteen fifty including me as you mentioned way back in nineteen seventy eight it's kind of the holy grail. All the obstacles, you could name the mighty Gulfstream the particular sharks the deadly box jellyfish. I I could make you a long long at tried to make it across. And every time I stood on that Havana shore, my teammates out in the boats. Bonnie my head handler and best friend next to me on the shore. I blew Reveille. I thought I thought. And that means we all know what it means all the world around. It means it to the military, but it means to us civilians to get up get up at dawn. Don't miss this day, go after whatever you're going after you might not get there. You might not get there today, but you are not gonna sleep your life away. So that's that's kinda my song. And now with ever walk which is initiative Bonnie, and I started three and a half years ago to get as you said just people up enjoying the beautiful outdoors of the United States of America forgetting about politics for just a few minutes of our day. We're looking up at the gorgeous trees last that Philadelphia city is I candy, you know, from the beautiful little cobblestone alleyways to the river with those both houses lined up majestically. It was just it was just I was in a state of fear delight all day and all of us. You're on a high. You're doing something a little bit difficult that day we walk twenty six point two miles more than a lot of people would care to walk, and you don't need to walk that far. But you could go out and walk down to the corner to get your newspaper and back and feel the earth under your feet feel the power of your stride. You know, if you start looking at the horizon and the beautiful clouds and think who you wanna be what you want to do with the rest of your life. So I'm I'm finding walking to be a kind of enlightenment and empowerment kind of thing in my life. And now Bonnie and Tony to bring frankly, we're trying to bring a million people into our movement, and that's a that's a tall order. But we think big and we're thinking big on this one too. Yeah. And I think if anybody can do it it will be you. And certainly Bonnie, and and although you say, we don't talk politics. I have to tell everybody that one of the people who's been actually inspired by Diana's Hillary Clinton, you'll see her endorsing your book. And I and and it's just so many people have said, this is thrilling to them. They really couldn't understand how you could make this trip this journey by water over the sharks. There. They mentioned that you were not in any kind of shark cage. You're very very brave, and so I'm gonna ask you this question. Maybe a little different. Question. You've had your extremely brave person. And yet when you wanted to engage the world in physical activity you picked walking now, frankly, it's lovely. But there's no great for you. It involved here. Why did you do that? Why of all the sports including your own? Did you concentrate on walking? Well, you know, we're talking about the masses when I just mentioned that our goal is to get a million people in this country. And I'm talking to Sanjay Gupta. Dr Sanjay Gupta from CNN. Now who covered the Cuba swim for several years. You know, he's known as America's doctor about helping us in twenty twenty go to fifty cities in fifty weeks. Every Saturday Bonnie, and I are going to do a ten mile walk in fifty capitals of fifty states. And you know, how would we get a million people out in the ocean swimming? Yes, I'm in love with the ocean. I wish I could give that experience to a million people not to mention five or ten, but who else is gonna swim. Let's say from Cuba to Florida. I guarantee you I'm gonna go to my grave, or or am I, you know, cremation moment, and nobody else will have done that swim. That's how difficult it is to do. So am I here to just inspire one person? Twenty five million people were follow. Knowing the Cuba's went by the end, and you know, what they didn't care about swimming. They didn't care about the sports then care if I was setting some new all record they cared about the message. They saw someone who was to give up and a team without getting paid a sense who went for years not getting paid and and and giving their lives away from their families away from their jobs because they were chasing history. We were chasing a grand adventure that had never been done before. And all of the science, and the technology, and the tapping of the human spirit that comes with that swim wasn't just for me. And that's when wasn't just for swimmers. Well, this walking it's not about how hard can you heard can you run across the Kalahari desert in one hundred twenty degree heat? I doubt down with high regard for the people who do run across the collar, Harry desert. I want a million people out doing what you and I did in Philadelphia. The. The other day. Yeah. Feeling the power of moving and feeling the high that comes with releasing your endorphins, we don't have to be an abject pain. So I'm not here doing spider people to chase those extreme endurance goals. Those people those bad ass iron man, they do it. Anyway, let me do it. Anyway, they don't need me. Yeah. Well, I will tell you. What are the things the reason I asked that question I want everybody to hear that listen to the enthusiasm. Listen to the excitement every time you go out the door, and you take a walk, even if you simply start parking further away from the ShopRite or every you go shopping in a mall. You're on the bench. One foot. All that has to happen is one foot has to go in front of the other. And when we come back, we're going to talk about Diana naiad book, find a way, it is also that just a story of of what she did. And so on it's a story, and she's trying to live her life now of what you can do. And one of the things we talk about all the time when it comes to successful aging here. Diane is to have a mission in life, purpose listening skills. We talk about all the things that can kill you all the bad nutrition and lack of exercise, but of all of those things as physical things you could be killed even faster if you. I don't have a life mission in life purpose. And it doesn't matter. What it is the case. It's very very clear mission. And I wanna come back. I wanna talk to you and our next segment here about how you came about working with bunny on this. Why it's so important to you to get those million people not just for themselves. But what it does for you and river, you up one of the things I've noticed when I Google you. And I look at all the wonderful things about you is your own always telling people your age or one of those few people who want to inspire people to know that they could do this at any age we come back. It took a little bit about that. Talk about how you guys can get involved with a talk about how you can read the book and start with ever walk and all of the contact information you need so the next couple of minutes. Please everybody get outta pencil and paper you're gonna wanna know going to write this down. Everything's online for you. Whether it's a book, whether it's Diane his own website is ever walk because these are life changing things. That's.

Diana naiad Bonnie Cuba Philadelphia Adrian Bergen Florida Havana Dr Sanjay Gupta America Wall Street Journal Hatton sharks Diane Mount Everest Kalahari desert Key West Florida Houston times United States
"kalahari desert" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:15 min | 3 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Hello. This is Adrian Burg. And this is generation bolt the fountain of truth, and there's a lot of truth that come out during our show. But today part of that truth is that we can be inspired by others. And if we talked about a walking inspiration shame. We're gonna be talking about Diana naiad that she's one of those folks who I think actually needs no introduction because for many many decades, actually you've been hearing about her in the news. You know, that she is a legendary swimmer, you know, that she has a wonderful book app. Find away, and we'll talk about why she named the book for quite that. But from the Wall Street Journal to the Houston times, they call it a gripping thriller. Why? Well, of course, as a legendary swimmer, you may have remembered that she's been in the news since nineteen seventy five when she saw around Manhattan. And much more recently a hundred and ten point eight six miles around Cuba to Florida and much more. But she also has a mission, and that mission is something that she, and I share we've talked about it many times, and then get up and move and book. So we'll also talk about a wonderful mission. She has that she's promoting called ever walk. We'll find out exactly what that's about. So in our to successful aging. Was speaking today with Diana diet? So thank you so much for being on the show today. It's it's entirely my play here. And I must say no we're going to get into walking that a couple of weeks ago when you and I and a couple hundred other people walked the beautiful city of Philadelphia all day long. I know I was out there for ten hours. I love spending time with you. You're such a forceful, energetic personality. So I'm so glad we're in this world of walking together. Adrian where we are. And you can see some videos of that on ever walking on free workers. But what I will tell you. If you were there. You would have just been thrilled, Diana, not only let us, but she giggled us. So tell us a little bit about that. And let us know about ever walk. You know, clearly, I'm not a professional horn player. There's a there's a a little bit of comic relief to my bugle playing. But. Every time and it was five times. I tried to make it across that epic ocean. They call it the Mount Everest of the earth oceans that straight between Havana, Cuba and Key West Florida. The great swimmers of the world had tried since nineteen fifty including me as you mentioned way back in nineteen seventy eight is kind of the holy grail. All the obstacles, you could name the mighty Gulfstream the particular sharks the deadly box jellyfish. I could make you a long long. Had tried to make it across. And every time I stood on that Havana shore, my teammates out in the boats. Bonnie my head handler best friend next to me on the shore. I blew Reveille. And that means we all know what it means all the world around. It means it to the military, but it means to us civilians to get up get up at dawn. Don't miss this day, go after whatever you're going after you might not get there. You might not get there today, but you are not gonna sleep your life away. So that's that's kinda my song. And now with ever walk which is initiative Bonnie, and I started three and a half years ago to get as you said just people up enjoying the beautiful outdoors of the United States of America forgetting about politics for just a few minutes of our day. We're looking up at the gorgeous trees last that. Philadelphia city is eye candy, you know, from the beautiful little cobblestone alleyways to the river with those both houses lined up majestically. It was just it was just I was in a state of. Sheer delight all day and all of us, you're on a high. You're doing something a little bit difficult that day we walked twenty six point two miles more than a lot of people would care to walk, and you don't need to walk that far. But you could go out and walk down to the corner to get your newspaper back and feel the earth under your feet feel the power of your stride start looking at the horizon and the beautiful clouds and think who you wanna be what you wanna do with the rest of your life. So I'm I'm finding walking to be a kind of enlightenment and empowerment kind of thing in my life. And now Bonnie, and I are twenty to bring frankly, we're trying to bring a million people into our movement, and that's a that's a tall order. But we think big and we're thinking big on this one too. Yeah. I think if anybody could do it it will be you. And certainly Bonnie, and and although you say, we don't talk politics. I have to tell everybody that one of the people who's been actually inspired by Dan is Hillary Clinton, you'll see her endorsing your book. And I and it just so many people have said, this is thrilling to them. They really couldn't understand how you could make this trip this journey by water with the sharks there. They mentioned that you would not in any kind of shark cage. You're very very brave, and so I'm gonna ask you this question. Maybe a little different question. You've had your extremely brave person. And yet when you wanted to engage the world in physical activity you picked walking now, frankly, it's lovely. But there's no break for you. It involved here. Why did you do that? Why of all the sports including your own? Did you concentrate on walking? Well, you know, we're talking about the masses when I just mentioned that our goal is to get a million people in this country. And I'm talking to Sanjay Gupta. Dr Sanjay Gupta from CNN. Now who covered the Cuba swim for several years. He's known as America's doctor about helping us in twenty twenty go to fifty cities in fifty weeks. Every Saturday Bonnie, and I are going to do ten mile walk in fifty capitals of fifty states. And you know, how would we get a million people out in the ocean swimming? Yes, I'm in love with the ocean. I wish I could give that experience two million people not to mention five or ten, but who else is gonna swim. Let's say from Cuba to Florida. I guarantee you I'm gonna go to my grave, or or am I, you know, cremation moment, and nobody else will have done that swim. That's how difficult it is to do. So am I here? Just inspire. One person. Twenty five million people were follow. Cuba's went by the end. And you know, what they didn't care about swimming. They didn't care about the sports. They didn't care if I was setting some new hall of fame record. They cared about the message. They saw someone who with to give up and a team without getting paid a sense who went for years not getting paid and and giving their lives away from their families away from their jobs because they were chasing history. We were chasing a grand adventure that had never been done before. And all of the science and technology, and the tapping of the human spirit that comes with that swim wasn't just for me. And that's when wasn't just for slimmers. Well, this walking it's not about how hard can you heard can you run across the Kalahari desert in one hundred twenty degree heat? I bowed down with high regard for the people who do run across the collar, Harry desert. I want a million people out doing what you and I did in Philadelphia. The. The other day feeling the power of moving and feeling the high that comes with releasing your endorphins, we don't have to be an abject pain. So I'm not here doing spider people to chase those extreme endurance goals. Those people those bad as iron man, they do it. Anyway. Lead me do it. Anyway, they don't need me. Yeah. Well, I will tell you. What are the things the reason I asked that question I wanted everybody to hear that listen to the enthusiasm listened to the excitement. Every time you go out the door, and you take a walk, even if you simply start parking further away from the ShopRite or every you go shopping in a mall. You're on an adventure. One foot. All that has to happen is one foot has to go in front of the other. And when we come back. We're gonna talk about Diana diet book find a way, it is also not just a story of what she did. And so on it's a story, and she's trying to live her life now of what you can do. And one of the things we talk about all the time when it comes to successful aging here. Diane is to have a mission in life. Purposeless nece kills we talk about all the things that can kill you all the bad nutrition and lack of exercise, but of all of those things the physical things you could be killed even faster if you. If you don't have a life mission and life purpose. And it doesn't matter. What it is that when Diana's case, it's a very very clear mission. And I wanna come back, and I wanna talk to you and our next segment here about how you came about working with bunny on this. Why it's so important to you to get those million people not just for themselves. But what it does for you and river, you up one of the things I've noticed when I Google you. And I look at all the wonderful things about you is you're always telling people your age or one of those few people who want to inspire people to know that they can do this at any age we come back. It took a little bit about that. We're gonna talk about how you guys can get involved with a talk about how you can read the book and start with ever walk and all the contact information you need so the next couple of minutes. Please everybody get out a pencil and paper, you're gonna wanna know gonna write this down. Everything's online for you. Whether it's a book, whether it's Diane his own website. Whether is. Ever walk because these are life changing things. That's what we bring to.

Bonnie Cuba Diana naiad Philadelphia Adrian Burg Florida Havana Dr Sanjay Gupta America Manhattan Wall Street Journal sharks Diane Mount Everest Kalahari desert Key West Florida Houston times United States
"kalahari desert" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:15 min | 3 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And a low. Hello, hello. This is Adrian Bergen. This is generation bolt the fountain of truth, and there's a lot of truth that come out during our show. But today part of that truth is that we can be inspired by others. And if we talked about a walking inspiration machine, we're gonna be talking about Diana naiad that she's one of those folks who I think actually needs no introduction because for many many decades, actually you've been hearing about her in the news. You know, that she is a legendary stripper, you know, that she has a wonderful book out a find a way, and we'll talk about why she named the book quite that. But from the Wall Street Journal to the Houston times, they call it a gripping thriller. Why? Well, of course, as a legendary swimmer, you may have remembered that she's been in the news since nineteen seventy five when she swam around then Hatton, much more. Recently a hundred and ten point eight six miles around Cuba to Florida and much more. But she also has a mission, and that mission is something that she, and I share we've talked about it many times, and then get up and move and book. So we'll also talk about wonderful mission. She has that she's promoting called ever walk. We'll find out exactly what that's about. So in our quest to successful aging. Speaking today with Diana diet. So thank you so much for being on the show today. It's entirely my pleasure. And I must say I know we're going to get into walking that a couple of weeks ago when you and I and a couple hundred other people walked the beautiful city of Philadelphia all day long. I know I was out there for ten hours. I love spending time with you. You're such a forceful, energetic personality. So I'm so glad we're in this world of walking together. Adrian where we are. And you can see some videos of that on ever walking on free workers. But what I will tell you. If you were there. You would have just been thrilled, Diana, not only let us, but she bugles us. So tell us a little bit about that let us know about ever walk. You know, clearly, I'm not a professional horn player. There's a there's a little bit of comic relief to my bugle playing. But. Every time and it was five times. I tried to make it across that epic ocean. They call it the Mount Everest of the earth oceans that straight between Havana, Cuba and Key West Florida. The great swimmers of the world had tried since nineteen fifty including me as you mentioned way back in nineteen seventy eight it's kind of the holy grail. All the obstacles, you could name the mighty Gulfstream the particular sharks the deadly box jellyfish. I could make you a long long. At tried to make it across. And every time I stood on that Havana shore, my teammates out in the boat. Bonnie my head handler and best friend next to me on the shore. I blew Reveille. I thought bop bop. Bop. Bop, bop. And that means we all know what it means all the world around. It means it to the military. But it means it to us civilians to get up get up at dawn. Don't miss this day, go after whatever you're going after you might not get there. You might not get there today, but you are not gonna sleep your life away. So that's that's kind of my song and now with ever walk which is initiative Bonnie, and I started three and a half years ago to get as you said just people up enjoying the beautiful outdoors of the United States of America forgetting about politics for just a few minutes of our day looking up at the gorgeous trees last that philidelphia's city is eye candy, you know, from the beautiful little cobblestone alleyways to the river with those both houses lined up majestically. It was just it was just I was in a state of. Sheer delight all day and all of us, you're on a high. You're doing something a little bit difficult that day we walk twenty six point two miles more than a lot of people would care to walk, and you don't need to walk that far. But you could go out and walk down to the corner to get your newspaper and back and feel their earth under your feet feel the power of your stride. You know, you start looking at the horizon and the beautiful clouds and think who you wanna be what you wanna do with the rest of your life. So I'm I'm finding walking to be a kind of enlightenment and empowerment kind of thing in my life. And now Bonnie, and I are trying to bring frankly, we're trying to bring a million people into our movement, and that's a that's a tall order. But we think big and we're thinking big on this one too. Yeah. And I think if anybody can do it it will do and certainly Bonnie, and and though you say, we don't talk politics. I have to tell everybody that one of the people who's been actually inspired by Diane is Hillary Clinton, you'll see her endorsing your book. And I and and it's just so many people have said, this is thrilling to them. They really couldn't understand how you could make this trip this journey by water over the charts. There they mentioned that you were not in any kind of shark cage. You're very very brave, and so I'm going to ask you this question. Maybe a little different question. You've had your extremely brave person. And yet when you wanted to engage the world in physical activity you picked walking, frankly, it's lovely. But there's no great for you. It involved here. Why did you do that? Why of all the sports including your own? Did you concentrate on walking? Well, you know, we're talking about the masses when I just mentioned that our goal is to get a million people in this country. And I'm talking to Sanjay Gupta. Dr Sanjay Gupta from CNN. Now who covered the Cuba swim for several years to you know, he's known as America's doctor about helping us in twenty twenty go to fifty cities in fifty weeks every Saturday body, and I are going to do a ten mile walk in fifty capitals of fifty states. And you know, how would we get a million people out in the ocean swimming? Yes, I'm in love with the ocean. I wish I could give that experience to a million people not to mention five or ten, but who else is gonna swim. Let's say from Cuba to Florida. I guarantee you I'm gonna go to my grave, or or my, you know, cremation moment, and nobody else will have done that swim. That's how difficult it is to do. So am I here? Just inspire. One person. Twenty five million people were follow. Cuba's went by the end. And you know, what they didn't care about swimming. They didn't care about the sports. They didn't care if I was setting some new all favor record. They cared about the message. They saw someone who was to give up and team without getting paid a sense who went for years not getting paid and and and giving their lives away from their families away from their jobs because they were chasing history. We were chasing a grand adventure that had never been done before. And all of the science, and the technology, and the tapping of the human spirit that comes with that swim wasn't just for me. And that's when wasn't just for swimmers. Well, this walking it's not about how hard can you heard? Can you want across the Kalahari desert and one hundred twenty degree heat? I bowed down with high regard for the people who do run across the collar, Harry desert. I want a million people out doing what you and I did in Philadelphia. The other day feeling the power of moving and feeling the high that comes with releasing your endorphins, we don't have to be an abject pain. So I'm not here doing spider people to chase those extreme endurance goals. Those people those bad ass iron man, they do it. Anyway. Lead me to do it. Anyway, they don't need me. Yeah. Well, I will tell you. What are the things the reason I asked that question I want everybody to hear that listen to the enthusiasm. Listen to the excitement every time you go out the door, and you take a walk, even if you simply start parking further away from the ShopRite or every you go shopping in a mall. You're on an adventure. One foot. All that has to happen is one foot has to go in front of the other. And when we come back, we're going to talk about Diana diet book, find a way, it is also not just a story of what she did. And so on it's a story, and she's trying to live her life. Now what you can do. And one of the things we talk about all the time when it comes to successful aging here. Diane is to have a mission in life. Purposeless nece kills we talk about all the things that can kill you all the bad nutrition and lack of exercise, but of all of those things the physical things you could be killed even faster if you. Don't have a life mission in life purpose. And it doesn't matter. What it is the case. It's very very clear mission. And I wanna come back. I wanna talk to you and our next segment here about how you came about working with bunny on this. Why it's so important to you to get those million people not just for themselves. But what it does for you? And review up one of the things I've noticed when I Google you. And I look at all the wonderful things about you is your own always telling people your age or one of those few people who want to inspire people to know that they can do this at any age we come back. It took a little bit about that. We're gonna talk about how you guys can get involved with a talk about how you can read the book and start with ever walk and all of the contact information you need so the next couple of minutes. Please everybody get out a pencil and paper, you're gonna wanna know gonna write this down everything online for you. Whether it's a book, whether it's Diane his own website is ever. Walk because these are life changing things..

Cuba Bonnie Diana naiad Diane Adrian Bergen Florida Havana Dr Sanjay Gupta Philadelphia America Wall Street Journal Hatton Mount Everest Kalahari desert Key West Florida Houston times philidelphia CNN
"kalahari desert" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hickey and vital now alcohol with on special. So is grape seed extract. Grape seed extract helps you blood vessels work like much younger blood vessels. What's important for people who are overweight people smoke smoke? Obviously people high blood pressure, people would high cholesterol and agent people if their blood vessels just are becoming a little bit less functional rape shit restores health to the blood vessel walls, the integrity to blood vessel walls. They're working ability. And it helps clean them out. Like, a natural bypass and helps restore healthy blood pressure and blood flow. And now we're talking about high all your wanna catch what devil's claw Hialeah Rana captured has made new human body. Fact that injection they give people when people have bone on bone arthritis of the knee, but they can't have knee surgery yet your knee replacement surgery. They give him shots of high Wanaka should into the knee, and they make an artificial joint the effects list about six months. But swallowing. Hi, you're on a cash should absolutely works. It helps refurbish it hold. It helps hold the fluid a knee. That's where the needs are. That's what a new healthy nutrient cartilage cells were born quality qualities too slippery, substance on the end of your bones. So there's no friction it's like, it's slippery like an ice hockey rink and the bones glide over each other, should they not stop did not deny having a lot of friction and enough breaking down if the college goes, you're in trouble. So the next thing the devils core that comes from southern Africa comes from the Kalahari desert. Kalahari desert is over a bunch of countries like Botswana and South Africa. And cola. This stuff has been shown a really help stabilize knee health because it helps the knee create the snowmobile fluid cushioning shock absorbing fluid, and it helps create new baby cartilage cells, Dave, proven and studies from French. Would authentic human tissue that not only does the devil's claw support the formation of more fluid the fluid. That's the shock absorbing fluid attendant disappeared people rightish. But it also helps the fluid create additional Connor sites baby cartilage cells when you bend the knee that fluid washes over the cartilage and at deposits to new baby cells in any micro tears of micro abrasions who helps fix your knee. Now dibbled slow was first introduced to Europe in the early nineteen hundreds and used for heartburn, but it was also used for inflammation and pain. And today, it's one of the leading herbs in Germany and France to fight inflammation or relieve oth- rightous pain, headaches, low back pain, absolutely works like several studies show..

Kalahari desert inflammation Hickey Hialeah Rana hockey Europe Connor France devils heartburn Botswana South Africa Dave Africa Germany six months
"kalahari desert" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Welcome to a special episode of amateur traveler, I'm your host, Chris Christensen. Let's talk about butts wanna. This is Chris this is going to be a different episode of amateur traveler, I'm recording some of this while I am still on a mobile safari in butts wanna in the galanga delta. I just got up on our first full day. And the stars are still out the weak up. Call this morning was at eight thirty and I have some time while I wait for other people to stumble out of their tents. So I thought I would start doing this recording. I got here because I was invited to come by butts one track and more about them later. But that is basically who is hosting the on this. We're on a safari with Royal wilderness. And this is an odd place unique in wonderful place, but an odd place in the sense that it is in inland. Delta it is where the waters from rivers that start in the highlands of Angola flow, south into Botswana, and then basically disappear into the Kalahari desert. It's an inverted. Five fingered hand if water coming into the desert, and so every place, we go is very sandy soil that has been brought to life in a great variety of life by this water that is flowing down from the north. Much of the area is national parks Chobe national park, probably one of the most famous which we drove through just a little yesterday. And just saw an amazing variety of animals. We saw wildebeest sins e Brazil and lots and lots of elephants and a few giraffes and birdlife just unimaginable. And waterbucks. And I don't remember what else we have seen. So far we flew into Mon which is at the bottom of the delta a city in Botswana flew in from Johannesburg. Most of us the best connection point to get in. And then yesterday, we drove in we're going to do to campsites three nights each and then we'll return to moan. And then I'm gonna go on to another location, which I'll tell you more about later, but we drove up the right side of the delta yesterday. So we drove one paved road until that ran out and then dirt road, and we're driving for much of that time through cattle country Cadillac very important in both the culture and the economy about Shuana when you get married your riches or determined by how many cows you have that sort of thing. And then we'd drove as far as the cattle fence before things started changing, and basically this offense that was put up along the bottom of the delta to separate the wild animals on the north of it from the Cadillac, the south and the idea originally was to protect the cattle from at least the perception that they would be interacting with wildebeest zebras and might get. Hoof and mouth disease. So it was to protect the cattle industry in Botswana. Although now, it has the opposite effect in the sense that it is sort of the line that says the cattle industry can't go any further north. And so it's protecting the wild animals when it was, and it was very disruptive apparently the wildebeest population dropped from a million different Willoughby's in Botswana because they do these wide migrations too much much less than that number. Now, tens of thousands of wildebeest. Instead, the population was similarly affected the elephant population was not because they don't range that far. They don't have that great big migration. They stay within a day or two of water. And so that's one of the reasons we saw so many is that a third of Africa's remaining elephants are here in Botswana in our in mostly in this region. And then we drove further north and came to Ciobea national park and then on into a privately community run area. And I forget the name of it..

Botswana galanga delta Kalahari desert Chris Christensen Ciobea national park parks Chobe Royal wilderness Brazil Johannesburg Angola flow Shuana Mon Africa Willoughby
"kalahari desert" Discussed on This Week in Travel

This Week in Travel

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"kalahari desert" Discussed on This Week in Travel

"So yes, while I was in the camp that they're pitching there. We were hearing male lions roaring outside. My tent is so yeah, it the name did occur to me. Well, I have never heard of them until today, and I'm on the website. And it's absolutely dreamy. Definite. Yeah. No the place. I was in abuts wanna the middle of the middle of the country in the Kalahari desert. You know, got a chance to do an out a cultural outing with a bushman of chance to pose with MIR cats on my head to go do safaris, there's a there's a salt lick their the size of Switzerland. A Salt Lake assault flat area. I mean, it's it's stunning area in terms of that. And the camp is something straight out of I expected Stanley Livingston to walk in because it literally is decorated as if you were in Victorian England in a camp. So it was it was fascinating. It was a luxury accommodation. It was great fun. It was, you know, not everybody's definition of luxury. But it was definitely a luxury experience and a pretty amazing place. So yeah, I'm with Gary that I think that some of those places can't even handle more people. Really? So it isn't like a lot more people are going to be going to Tom who turned on one. So. So trying to figure out how much these safari camps cost 'cause the one I was in was twelve fifty per person per night. Per person per night. Wow. Where it's starts looking. But look how I mean. You better start monetize ING your shows..

Kalahari desert Stanley Livingston Salt Lake Switzerland Victorian England assault Gary Tom