35 Burst results for "Kafka"

"kafka" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:45 min | 3 weeks ago

"kafka" Discussed on The Media Show

"Peter, your thoughts on this. I mean, do you think Elon Musk has engaged with the idea of regulation at all? Is he thinking globally? He will say he's thinking globally and he'll say this decree applies across the world and then someone from the you will say actually we got to talk to you about that. He said, oh yeah, we should talk about that. And again, Twitter was having struggles with India long before Elon Musk decided he wanted to own the company. Whether or not he's thought about it doesn't matter he's going to confront it regardless. And show now, I mean, can free speech or a genuine town square exist at scale in the way he's talking. Nope, and I don't think Twitter has ever been a town square, I think it has always been anarchy since it grew to many millions of user. There was a time and Twitter's very early days when it was very charming. You had to SMS to be able to tweet and it was essentially like sending a group DM to some very friendly Internet strangers. We are long past that Internet. That Internet is dead and gone, which is why some of the conversations that Pete Kafka referred to in terms of returning to this pure Internet where it would all moderate itself like a messaging board. Is pretty out of touch in the current atmosphere of polarization and the fact that most of the world is now on the Internet. So no, I don't think a town square is the right analogy or is possible that there might be miniature town squares or communities inside Twitter potentially, but broadly I would describe Twitter as anarchy. Okay, well, I'd like if possible your predictions on what will happen next, Peter, I mean, what do we expect in more of the same Twitter, something dramatically different? It's difficult to predict whether Elon Musk I would say. I'm a 100% sure there will be chaos. In what form, any ideas? I'm not going beyond that.

Elon Musk Twitter Pete Kafka Peter India
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:23 min | Last month

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Is a perfect example of this without falcon jig compiler, we wouldn't have had a lot of value to show there because Kafka is not memory bound at all. Kafka is IO bound. It's really bound by network traffic and less by how much the heap is being stressed. But with our falcon jet compilations, we can achieve on our extreme pedal to the metal just throughput saturation, try and jam as much traffic through this instance and see where it knocks over. We got that up to 45% higher on prime than you get on open JDK on Kafka. And those numbers were just blowing people away at current. So yeah, Cassandra as well with Cassandra is very interesting because that's where you really get this SLA consideration comes in. Because if I take a look at running on open JDK, if I perform that pedal to the metal test, right? And I do that using all of the different garbage collectors. I can see that if I actually want to get the highest throughput that I possibly can, right? Because if I do that, pedal to the metal raw throughput test on Cassandra using the different garbage collectors that were in there, we see that while prime delivers the most absolute throughput that I can get through a Cassandra instance, the next one is actually G one and CMS, right? As far as how much throughput can I get through? My maximum throughput using a shando and the GC is actually lower than my maximum throughput if I use a CMS and G one. But then you bring SLAs into it and you say, okay, I don't want to know just how much I can run through this when I totally saturate it because nobody's going to run a completely saturated Cassandra node in production, right? So what I want to know is how much traffic can I get through this instance while still maintaining my hundred millisecond SLA. So we have this test suite that we've open-sourced and developed an open-source called tussle, which automatically does just that. It basically it takes the highest level that you attained, right? And then it goes down and it tries at different levels of that. Let's take 40% of that. Then let's take 50%. And then let's take 60%. And it measures at what level was I able to just get that throughput, but make sure that my maximum time

Kafka Cassandra
"kafka" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:48 min | 4 months ago

"kafka" Discussed on WTOP

"Less severe near schools and that could be because overall speeds in those areas tend to be lower when compared with major corridors where speed limits are higher. In the district Nick eyeing Ellie double you TOP news Money news of 25 and 55, here's Larry Kafka of Bloomberg. This is a Bloomberg money minute. We may never see this many scripted TV shows again. The chairman of Disney's FX division says this year's record crop of TV shows 357 on cable streaming and broadcast TV will be the peak. He expects that figure to fall next year as media companies reevaluate their spending. Maybe we're getting out more, or maybe there aren't any new must have video games keeping players glued to their screens. It could be a little of both as Electronic Arts joins Activision Blizzard in disappointing investors with its game sales and forecast. The maker of dum dum lollipops is a scheme involving sellers on Amazon has cost it millions in sales. Rogue sellers and violation of Amazon policy are charging less for bulk orders of dum dums than their manufacturer Spangler candy company does. They've done it by buying the candy cheaper as members of Sam's Club and pocketing the difference. From the Bloomberg newsroom, I'm Laurie kofsky, on WTO P, coming up after traffic and weather, broadcasting legend, Vince Scully has died at age 94. We will get the latest from CBS News in minutes. It's two 26. This is WTO PC to your sports director Dave Johnson and voice of the wizards at D.C. United. You know, bike MS nation's capital presented locally by KPMG, double up September 11th and Reston. WTO was my mom station. She lost her battle with multiple sclerosis. It is my battle now. I have

Bloomberg Larry Kafka FX division dum dum lollipops Ellie Spangler candy Activision Blizzard Nick Sam's Club Amazon Disney Laurie kofsky WTO Vince Scully CBS News Dave Johnson D.C. United wizards KPMG Reston
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:25 min | 5 months ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The matching is all built and see ourselves plus. And that really then gives us the most control over the execution flow as well as the underlying hardware to make sure we're optimizing our execution path for the underlying architecture. And so we have, as I mentioned before, we have colocation for the exchange offering. And so it's part of our system is on prem. That's not all in the cloud. And we've done that to be able to maximize throughput and minimize latencies. And so there are kind of primary two languages that we source for and into those roles here. Aside from that, there's a number of other languages that are used because I'm a data science, these python and our SRE teams from automation, they use good lying, as you mentioned. But I think in terms of yeah, the financial service components and infrastructure, it's more and more being donated by C++ and periphery components are available in a JVM called in in Java. So can you help me understand the delineation between JVM platforms and C++? Because I can obviously imagine C++ for the low level mechanics of trade execution, like maybe if you have some really big pool of orders of buy and sell orders and you have to pair them, you have to do some matching. That's really latency sensitive. Lots of kind of filtering and sorting operations that you would want to get really quick. Then on the other hand, the JVM side of things I could see just for calling into that lower level C++ infrastructure and you can take advantage of the greater safety higher level of abstraction for actually calling into those low level functions, but maybe you could tell me more about the interface between those two platforms. Yeah, sure. I mean, you have described it pretty accurately. I think that for us the delineation is orange public gateways that are stateless and need to scale fast and service both open-source technologies and platforms I mentioned Redis. We use Kafka for event driven architecture and message passing. And so like these libraries and integrations are practice and readily available and tried and tested in production, environments. And if you go to the COC bus plus, there's less of these available. So you either have to build them yourself or find some niche library that may not be battle tested. And so generally for a service where we need to spin up public facing APIs, whether that's web socket or rest, or maybe even internal services for GRPC, which we have, in some cases, there is much easier to do that. And quicker to do that in these hardware obstructed languages, where this is kind of common practice and happens all the time, right? And then in terms of the interface between them, as I mentioned, we are using Kafka to basically message pass between the JVM world and then consume it into C++ world. And that's really kind of the interface that primary interface we're using between the two. Gotcha, how else are you utilizing Kafka? We mainly use it as an event.

Kafka
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:06 min | 6 months ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"You're using and pulling out interesting information from that. So if we have a high level good hook into the function entry or exit and python, we could see every function call and how long that specific function took to execute. And so I think there's an added overhead with that, but that's there's some really cool things you could do with that where you could tell people latency for each function call in a given pod over time, as well as in some cases, even the arguments of that function call. So I think that's kind of like the pipe dream as we could do that. We could associate it with all the other metadata or collecting. In the near future, we're really focused on adding profiling and flame graphs. Again, using ebp. So that you can you install this in your cluster and we're automatically based on the config option is going to be profiling whatever applications you want to sell. And so again, getting you like that kind of core value without any of the instrumentation work of you don't have to install the profiler in your application, download that NPM package. We do it automatically. Can you tell me more about your own deployment, what your infrastructure looks like and are you using Kubernetes yourself or are you managing to use like a lot of serverless functions or just tell me what a typical deployment looks like? Yeah, so on our end, we're using Kafka for like our kind of ingestion and ETL pipeline. So all of the information we're getting from our users gets dumped into various Kafka topics. And then we have kind of like two main consumers, one for alerting, one, four, kind of like dumping that data into the various data stores and some light ETL operations..

Kafka
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:57 min | 6 months ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"We do have different levels of sophistication of customers because, like I said, one of the things we're trying to do is make it easy for people to build these pipelines. So if somebody has been building pipelines with airflow and DBT and snowflake, you know, they probably don't have low level knowledge of like flink and streaming and those kinds of things. And so sometimes we get some pretty wacky sequel that does some really interesting stuff. And you know, I got to tell you on the whole, we have seen the system be pretty resilient to this. And to be fair, a lot of that is the hard work of the Flint community, you know, in dealing with those kinds of failures, a lot of I don't want to be unfair to the team. Certainly the team at decodable does an awful lot of work around state recovery and job recovery and sort of retry mechanisms and all sorts of deep tuning. But that's our business. That's our value to people. And so if we're going to be good at what we are trying to be good at, it really is incumbent on us to be able to respond to those kinds of failures. So we've seen the unit of work for decodable as the task, right? So a pipeline is allocated at a certain number of tasks or maximum number of tasks. From the user. So you might say, I'm going to process this amount of data and I want to allow up to ten concurrent tasks. And then the query engine is going to decide if it can parallelize up to ten tasks. And if so, what tasks which operators get assigned to which nodes in that job graph, and in those kinds of cases, we are able to sort of deal with about 80 to a 100,000 events per second per task or about 8 megabytes to ten megabytes per second per task, whichever when you hit first. So if you have small events or large events that can change performance characteristics, obviously the complexity of the SQL can change performance characteristics. But that's sort of like our what we think of as the unit of work. And so you can imagine people who show up with like a hundred tasks or a thousand tasks deep pipeline, you know, really put some pretty serious work on the runtime, but myself and some of the other folks on the team have quite a bit of experience running Kafka and pulsar and kinesis and flink and those kinds of things that scale. And so we have some pretty good idea about where things break down and why and what to look for in the leading indicators and stuff like that. We've gotten pretty good at running flink, both at decodable and from some of the previous places that we've worked to see this stuff at scale..

flink Kafka
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:07 min | 7 months ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"You can do new products. It doesn't make any sense. Okay. All right, again, this is for another it's a topic for another show. Yeah. I'd love to have that conversation with Jay or somebody else. But I'll just say publicly on air, J, you're an inspiration. I love you, but you made a bad decision. Fair enough. And no hard feelings. I hope. So, okay, let's talk more about real-time analytics and stuff. So this is a pretty critical idea, like the fact that you can generate data on the fly and write it very quickly and read it very quickly. I've done enough shows with various distributed systems to know that this is not easy to do. Actually, you know what I'll say is not even that hard to do, I think, you know, conceptually, it's obviously possible. What I find interesting about LinkedIn and the stuff you guys built is really what you had to do is just lay out the spec, right? You just had to say, this is what we need. And it's very interesting that you were able to define the spec, which is effectively we need a system where you can right quickly and read quickly, basically, and once you define that system, there's a whole there's a whole lot you can do there. You can build what would commonly be called a data analytics or data engineering data warehouse thing. But it's actually kind of novel to even think about it as like a transactional database. I don't know if you can actually do that as a transactional database, but it's just what you're defining there is a very interesting set of distributed systems properties. Right. Yeah, so it's in hindsight, it looks like we sat down and we wrote down all the spec, but I think the reality is things organically happen. So we started out with massive amounts of data coming from Kafka. So Kafka really took off in LinkedIn, bringing in events of all kinds. Application log system logs, business events that were being produced by all kinds of microservices. And then there was a real need to start analyzing this data as soon as it's produced. So a good example was people you may know, which was as soon as some things happen if someone likes a profile or visits a profile or even the analytics around your posts, those are real-time events. So you post something on LinkedIn, you want to see how it's trending within your network and specifically what categories of people are watching the content. So as soon as events are being produced, you want to be able to group a breakdown of these views over different industry or geographic locations and so on. So all these same thing with ad analytics. The ads being shown on LinkedIn, you want to be able to see in real time how effective it is and who's clicking how many people are viewing what is the ratio and so on. So all this data was already in Kafka when these questions were being asked so it was natural to say, hey, we need something that can ingest from Kafka at a very high rate and be able to query very quickly. And at the time, there was no need for a transactional semantics. So when Pino was originally built, it was not. In fact, it was designed to be not a transactional system. And a lot of the assumptions in the system were made to make it very, very simple. So events come in and they are append only, and most of the segments that are created in Pinot are immutable. So the data never changes within Pinot. That makes it a simple system to operate and add scale. And so the initial adoption of Pinot was around analytics where consistency is not very important. But then over the years, especially at Uber, people really started carrying the word consistency because within LinkedIn, if your number of likes on a post are ten versus 12, who cares. But in Uber, they really started to care about the demand supply ratio of drivers and riders within a specific geographical region or the sales or the gross bookings that we are having within specific areas, right? And they really started to care about consistency of data in that case. And Uber is really interesting because a lot of the data keeps changing. It keeps getting updated. So if you do a trip, the cost of a trip might actually change over the next few days. So then we started to the new requirement came in where not only should you be able to write data fast enough and query data fast enough, but the data itself must be consistent. So if you're updating the data, it should be reflected in your queries. Otherwise, you're just going to double count and get inaccurate results. So the transactional semantics really came in from companies like Uber. I guess the meta point there is the spec or the requirements actually happen organically as the problems became more and more complex for us to solve. So let's kind of patch forward a bit. You've got a super interesting background. And this is actually, I was looking at your LinkedIn for the first time right before the show. And we can definitely do additional shows. You've got so much experience..

LinkedIn Kafka Jay Pino
Foundation for Economic Education Rips Apart Robin DiAngelo & CRT

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 7 months ago

Foundation for Economic Education Rips Apart Robin DiAngelo & CRT

"The problem with CRT is that it's often the only lens some people want to use And they're using it everywhere Robin diangelo this is a thoroughly white woman who is thoroughly disgusting Has made serious bank thanks to CRT and over at the foundation for economic education And if you haven't been there see it's called foundation for economic education's a fantastic site The opted to take a look at some of the works Kafka crops one can one can find in CRT And he cites them D'angelo's biggest claim is that if you're white you're automatically an unavoidably racist Now to be clear the Angelo doesn't mean that all white people have a conscious anti minority basis rather she claims that all white people employ racist assumptions and patterns that aren't people of color in display and underlying bias Here's a quote she says racism is unavoidable and it is impossible to completely escape having developed problematic and racial assumptions and behaviors And speaking of herself who's white she says I also understand there's no way for me to avoid enacting problematic racial patterns If Deangelo and affiliate Professor of education at the University of Washington imagine that We're simply outing her own biased patterns that would be one thing They write over at C where her argument breaks the rules of good scholarship is that she makes it in a way that's unfalsifiable In other words you can't disprove a negative You can throw it out there all you want But that's not scholarship And in this case it's nothing but a vile vile charge

Foundation For Economic Educat Robin Diangelo Angelo Deangelo University Of Washington
"kafka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"kafka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Practices his lines on the way to the theater with a recording of his wife reading the other parts Later Kafka takes up residence at a theater festival For insurance reasons they assign him a young female driver named misaki Sorry but I still haven't agreed to having you as my driver He says barely controlling his irritation Actress toco miura talks about playing misaki She says she is sensitive to when people are lying I think that means she can understand the people's feelings And that way she can choose her words to suit the person she's talking to Misaki starts out tough and frosty But mura says she's actually an honest and empathetic character In many ways I wanted to be like her And if I were to meet her I'd say let's be Friends Misaki listens as Kafka practices as lines from the play The lines are like a subtext or a story within a story echoing or reflecting what's happening between the movie's characters Sometimes they're clear sometimes they're ambiguous Director the use K hamaguchi explains These are two very self controlled personalities They're not the type who speak out So I started with kapucu speaking uncle vanya's lines so that the audience would think vanya is where it's represent kapa Ku's emotions In conversations in the Saab Kafka and misaki gradually open up to each other and discover their common feelings of loss and guilt Kafue later admits that misaki's driving is so smooth he forgets he's in a car At the theater festival Kafka directs uncle vanya He makes an unusual choice for the lead role a young actor who happens to be his late wife's former lover Speaks with the actor over drinks at a bar This is what you're thinking.

misaki toco miura Kafka Misaki vanya mura kapa Ku Saab Kafka
Instagram Chief Faces Backlash After Comparison Between Cars and Social Media Safety

This Week in Startups

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Instagram Chief Faces Backlash After Comparison Between Cars and Social Media Safety

"Head of instagram adam. Sorry is backlash for comments. He made on the recode media. Podcast and excellent podcast with your kafka. I've been on it once or twice. You basically compares social media and the dangers of it to the car industry. Let's listen to a seventy second clip. And i'll give you my back after as head of instagram. Do you feel like the product should not be available to certain kinds of people. I mean if this is something gen- genuinely could make and you don't know yet right. You're saying we don't we don't. We're not fully confident in the research but if there's a chance that this is a product that could really harm people in the same way that cigarettes harm people that you guys should be restricting it or maybe taking it off the market absolutely not. I really don't agree with the comparison. Drugs are cigarettes which have very limited any upsides. I think that anything that is going to be used at scale is going to have or negative outcomes. Cars have positive and negative outcomes. We understand that we know that more people die than would otherwise because of car accidents but by and large cards create way more value in the world than destroy and i think social media similar. I think that we do a ton to help. People connect with those that they love. We've helped advance a number of important social causes particularly me. Metoo and black lives matter. We help small businesses. Make a living. We help creators ways to express themselves as a bunch of we give voice to those have been historically marginalized. there's a ton of value that we create and but yes of course there are also issues as well

Instagram Adam
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"But it's just it's hard to commercialize one of these open source projects when they don't have all the attention or when there's a sea a technology that sort of looks the same or look similar but it's actually not i mean what's your thinking on that that whole pulsar versus kafka thing regarding the regarding commercialization okay pulsar is still quite younger because two years probably three that you who donated and the community really started to to adopt heat thinking about the open source project. It is very good that there are a few companies be companies that started to use poser seriously lights plank like ten cents now. Recently we started to work compulsory data stocks. This is good because for an open source project is very good that there are many stakeholders and the community must be healthy also in apache. We really take care about this. We don't want to project driven only from one single company. If this happens the project is going to close or to be rejected by apache. From the commercialization point of view. We have conflict. They're doing a great job with kafka with selling cow promoting kafka kafka. Was you as. I told one of the doctors of africa but just are other products and you know if there is something better the community will slowly move to something that is better and if i have to choose my a misogynist system now i would like to begin to the prize orders enterprise. I want to use something that as a stronger community behind the time. Not locked to work with this vendor. I'm not sure. But i feel that in the cacao system if you want to really use kafka to use conference stuff like the conference kim registry or many connectors and i believe that the f. impulse are we are able to keep the community in very good state and continue to help new contributors new companies start adopting for at the political system with be healthier and will.

kafka kafka africa
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"What are you an expert on giving really for somebody. Who's not an expert here giving very good answers. Yes yes but because the in this case this case. I can't more about bookkeeper. Because posts places data on goalkeeper servers. The name of bookkeeper server is the bookie and so you can configure the bookie brookline in this case is a poster roker to place the data according to placement policy. And you can use a basement. Boys radio out of the box that deal with multi regions but also you can deal with the fourth remains and this is one of the interesting features of bookkeeper because you can configure you can specify many properties about where you want to steal your data for instance. I want to have a six copies of my data and one that three copies to wonder center and or to one fold zone and the other copies goes to another center to another place. And i want to be sure that this configuration is in place and if something breaks. That is something that fixes. The placement started daytime replaced. Data in other places for instance. If you lose a iraq talking about recor where iraq weirdness or original. It's very advanced that end. I know about many companies that are running very complex placement policy configurations like salesforce. For instance and poster can leverage all of these features form bookkeeper out of the books because it is a layer on top of bookkeeper. So what. You're telling me this. This so kafka i think of as not it's a roo super-rich high level message bus ecosystem but it almost sounds like it's sort of like the garbage collected version of what pulsar is where pulsar. You have a little bit more fine. Grain control over the resource management whereas in kafka you have finer grain control over the api and the application interactions festival. Pulsar is second-generation. So it was born after kafka. Who design poser. Started from these three of kafka. Okay but i want to say that sorry. Pi is very very full of features. And you ever. The puzzle client api in java and python and other bindings in c. plus plus but. Also you have a cer- a your that. He's very like to connect for instance impulsive of the schema registry that these imbedded in the system so when you are working with poster you start thinking about the issue wanted you can use it you can use it to out of the box scheme registry so you can use avro. You can include data with jason. You don't have to configure. Sarah lighter civilized us everything is android out medically by police or so there possibly is richer than calf. Kpi i'm coming from kafka and when i started to use poser in my previous company i really like it. They enjoyed poser. There were many things that i could with kafka and now like a recording or avarice chemo management and impulsive. You have them really out of the box separate question. I believe there has been a pulsar company. I know they got acquired right. The polls company got acquired. Didn't they there is no or compares no pulsar company. Okay no poster was born inside. Yeah i realized that. But i thought there was accompanied productized. It and i think they were on the show and it didn't work out for one reason or another my thinking at the time was basically because somebody asked me about this somebody was asking about investing in it and i said i think it's dangerous because and this is like i've built products in the wrong market before several different times. It's been very hard. But you know my thinking at the time was kafka has the microphone. Everybody's gonna use kafka there's just or concious. Maybe google puffs up. Maybe but basically you're gonna use kafka or read as pops up maybe or random q. Maybe but basically you're using kafka if you're building a platform on top of pub sub and i got what they were saying about pulsar. To the extent that i understood it was different. And i understood that there were trade offs and that had value and that the bookkeeper abstraction was meaningful and i was always partial to the keeper suffix because beds zookeeper zookeeper. Mascot is probably the best patch. You i con. i've seen the guy with zookeeper mascot. The guy standing there with a shovel good anyway. Yeah so. I knew pulsar was good..

kafka iraq brookline salesforce jason Sarah google
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Tenancy mind with security with jury applications so and also it comes with a lot of connectors the teredo out of the box so it is really to connect your system with a cassandra and you can scale. You can move your data. Whatever you want you can interact with the internet of things systems and just to retread the conversation that i had it with jonathan a few days ago. It's really important that we convince people. Here that apache kafka and apache pulsar are different categories of technology. This was a mistake that i made in understanding the technologies. Explain why kafka and pulse are actually in different categories. Sure i wasn't between the yearly adopted of kafka when leading donated to purchase after foundation. So i've been following the story from the beginning kafka was something very useful to connector lose lead couple systems but it is only very simple. Bus for data processor is a new generation and when it started in yahoo and i know many people that work at the time pulitzer this started from scratch. Because they need jerry. -plication they needed multi. Tenancy kafka is something that is good to store your data there is.

jonathan kafka yahoo jerry
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It has separate compute and storage components. So you can scale the brokers independently from the bookkeeper storage nodes and vice versa having that separation of compute and storage also means that you get tiered storage as a first class citizen in the architecture. So i'm gonna hold on that for just a minute. Because one of the advantages of using a modern message. Bus like pulsar. You're storing those messages jury on this so it's not like last year's message you're where everything's in memory and then once it's delivered the nets dawn so with ulcer you can replay events to test or a bug stinky fixed but you need to replay that to run the corrected logic or you can catch nancy's that as part of your testing cluster that you can rerun that traffic from your live. Cluster probably suitably anonymous and so forth but a lot of those advantages. You lose those if you say. I'm only going to retain this data for a week. Because that's all the space. I have on my local disks so kafka and pulsar like that's their primary way of being deployed is. I've got all my dad on the node. That's responsible for that. But as part of the separation of storage out into the bookkeeper layer pulsar also. Lets you store. Data into things like s. Three into things like hdfs and still access that with the pulsar. Api's so you've basically got up. No a hot storage locally. But then you've got warm storage that you can expand into and say like. Hey i'm probably not going to use this data every hour moving forward. But i do want to have access to it down the road so i can kind of archive that off to another system. As a very powerful cost of ownership thing because just having to size my pulsar cluster for the throughput and not having to size it for the cold storage. I can do a million requests per second on a three node pulsar cluster..

kafka nancy
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"In. It has separate compute and storage components. So you can scale the brokers independently from the bookkeeper storage nodes and vice versa having that separation of compute and storage also means that you get tiered storage as a first class citizen in the architecture. So i'm gonna hold on that for just a minute. Because one of the advantages of using a modern message. Bus like pulsar. You're storing those messages jury on this so it's not like last year's message you're where everything's in memory and then once it's delivered the nets dawn so with ulcer you can replay events to test or a bug stinky fix but you need to replay that to run the corrected logic or you can capture that nancy's that as part of your testing cluster that you can rerun that traffic from your live. Cluster probably suitably anonymous and so forth but a lot of those advantages. You lose those if you say. I'm only going to retain this data for a week. Because that's all the space. I have on my local disks so kafka and pulsar like that's their primary way of being deployed is. I've got all my dad on the node. That's responsible for that. But as part of the separation of storage out into the bookkeeper layer pulsar also. Lets you store. Data into things like s. Three into things like hdfs and still access that with the pulsar. Api's so you've basically got up. No a hot storage locally. But then you've got warm storage that you can expand into and say like. Hey i'm probably not going to use this data every hour moving forward. But i do want to have access to it down the road so i can kind of archive that off to another system..

nancy kafka
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So we've been looking at kafka for four plus years as a complement to cassandra in these use cases and there's been one source of friction in particular that super difficult for us to get past. Which is that. Kafka is a single data center architecture and one of the big reasons that people come to cassandra is for our best in the industry. Multi data center replication. So those two are new. It's an awkward fit. And so it's just kind of been on my radar of. Is there an alternative to kafka. That could be a better fit here. And i think that about eighteen or so months ago. Pulsar got to the point in terms of stability in terms of feature set where. It's also problems that people need in this micro service environment and it also does what it says on the box without having to hire committed to dig in and figure out why you got this exception that you weren't expecting i was talking to a large pulsar user recently and he said yeah when i started using pulsar it was pretty solid and today i would say it's bulletproof so there's an astro that would put next to that that i can come back to in a minute but really i've been really really delighted with what i found with pulsar. I think the architecture is fundamentally better than what you get with kafka and i think that would say it's better in general and it's better specifically around. I wanna build cloud services on top of this thing. So that's a profound observation. That kafka is not built to be multi datacenter safe what. He's a consistent safe for fault tolerant. Basically it might not sound like a big deal but if you build your entire infrastructure around cough like many people have and you have a fire in your data center like there was in. Aws what like a few months ago. Was there fire in Literally on fire inside. That is seems like about once a year. There's a big outage and there was vh while ago to right. Oh yeah that's that was the fire. Yeah yeah so. You definitely don't want to lose your company because of a fire. There's a reliability aspect to the multi datacenter but there's also a performance aspect. Which is that. If i have a message. Bus that only lives in one data center. And i'm globally deployed with my application than i'm having to eat a a speed of light no latency to that data center where the coca. Leo's whereas with the cassandra approach and the pulsar approaches. We're gonna let you do locally. Synchronous reads and writes and then we'll replicate to other data centers as synchronous nestle. And do that in a manner that gives you a consistency across all of those team. City cloud is a new continuous integration. Service that is hosted by jet brains last year we invited listeners of software engineering daily to take part in the team city cloud beta now the services officially released and ready to be used in production environments team city cloud is based on the original on premise version of team city. It's the same great. Ci cd but managed by jet brains. The best thing about team city cloud is that it doesn't tie you to any particular technology or workflow it integrates with all popular version control systems. Build and test frameworks issue trackers..

cassandra Kafka kafka coca Leo nestle
"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"kafka" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So we've been looking at kafka for four plus years as a complement to cassandra in these use cases and there's been one source of friction in particular that super difficult for us to get past. Which is that. Kafka is a single data center architecture and one of the big reasons that people come to cassandra is for our best in the industry. Multi data center replication. So those two are new. It's an awkward fit. And so it's just kind of been on my radar of. Is there an alternative to kafka. That could be a better fit here. And i think that about eighteen or so months ago. Pulsar got to the point in terms of stability in terms of feature set where. It's also problems that people need in this micro service environment and it also does what it says on the box without having to hire committed to dig in and figure out why you got this exception that you weren't expecting i was talking to a large pulsar user recently. And he said yeah when i started using pulsar it was pretty solid and today i would say it's bulletproof. There's an astro that would put next to that. That i can come back to in a minute but really. I've been really really delighted with what i found with pulsar. I think the architecture is fundamentally better than what you get with kafka and i think that would say it's better in general and it's better specifically around. I wanna build cloud services on top of this thing. So that's a profound observation. That kafka is not built to be multi datacenter safe what. He's a consistent safe for fault tolerant. Basically it might not sound like a big deal but if you build your entire infrastructure around cough like many people have and you have a fire in your data center like there was in. Aws what like a few months ago was their fire in Literally on fire inside. That is seems like about once a year. There's a big outage and there was vh while ago to right. Oh yeah that's that was the fire. Yeah yeah so. You definitely don't want to lose your company because of a fire. There's a reliability aspect to the multi datacenter but there's also a performance aspect. Which is that. If i have a message. Bus that only lives in one data center. And i'm globally deployed with my application than i'm having to eat a a speed of light no latency to that data center where the coca. Leo's whereas with the cassandra approach and the pulsar approaches. We're gonna let you do locally. Synchronous reads and writes and then we'll replicate to other data centers as synchronous nestle. And do that in a manner that gives you a consistency across all of those team. City cloud is a new continuous integration. Service that is hosted by jet brains last year we invited listeners of software engineering daily to take part in the team city cloud beta now the services officially released and ready to be used in production environments team city cloud is based on the original on premise version of team city. It's the same great. Ci cd but managed by jet brains. The best thing about team city cloud is that it doesn't tie you to any particular technology or workflow it integrates with all popular version control systems. Build and test frameworks issue trackers..

cassandra Kafka kafka coca Leo nestle
William Jacobson Argues Democrats Employ the Logical Fallacy of 'Kafka-Trapping'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:55 min | 1 year ago

William Jacobson Argues Democrats Employ the Logical Fallacy of 'Kafka-Trapping'

"They use. I read an interesting piece. It will be in my newsletter today upon you know that calm You want to check it out by William Jacobson is really terrific. It's a piece in the Washington Examiner, where he talks about how these proponents trying to teach your kids to be racist through critical racism theory. How they use the Kafka trap against their opponents. What the Kafka trap is love. These fancy terms, right? Makes you sound super smart, right cocktail parties. Got a little cocktail weenies going around. Hey, can I have one of those? And by the way, did you do a Kafka trap? Lesa makes you sound super intelligent. We're just going to throw it out there because it's true. What's the Kafka trap? The coffin trap is where you use the Nile's of something. To prove that the person is part of something they're denied. In other words, Deny Europe you go up and say Listen, I'm not gonna have this critical racism theory. Talk to my talk to my kids were not racist. In our household. We teach our kids to treat everyone fairly and responsibly to love our neighbor. And what did the leftist come back with the Kafka trap? You're denying it. That's white fragility. You know what that means? You're a double, super racist. And you're like, Wait, What? I just said I'm not a racist. Now you're telling me I'm extra super double, like mutant powered racist like how does that work? You are denied the stronger You deny it. Stronger. You're a part of it, and you're looking at them. You scratching your head like, uh, My living in like stupid ville. Am I living in a vacuum of dumb on the event horizon of an intellectual vacuum? Is this happening? That's the Kafka trap. Here. You want a definition caught this online. Kafka trap Replace X by the way with racist here and you'll see what I mean. A Kafka trap is a fallacy where if someone denies being X, it has taken as evidence that the person is X. Since someone who is X would deny being X. It's the ride from the novel The trial by the Czech writer Franz

William Jacobson Washington Examiner Europe Kafka Franz
"kafka" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"kafka" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Missiles and the ordinary ordinary ordinary is in the myth. If i can make up words yeah. He doesn't let anything be stable. No one of the books had the biggest influence on him. As a as a child was of its metamorphosis everything of his i read has been infected by this perilous fluidity of of things and being like the bump thinking of the bucket man bucket rider. I'm always impossibility of keeping things contained contained. They were meant to be. Yeah well a third piece is fermi by far the funniest this long negotiation with the farmer on the side of the. i way. it's almost like a standup comedy routine with the spending. I don't want much. I'm not out to exploit your predicament. Just want you to take me on as your labor for on you. Now have to be able to work when i want. I don't want. I won't work to do anything. You have to ask me nicely. you know. it's worth remembering. That cuff and his youth was briefly. And i think it remained a part of him in some way he was. He was briefly socialist. So that's why reasons why. I was interested in now where this story fits into his career because there is that anarchistic socialistic element at the root of this. This is these. I work as demands Take him to a certain kind of absurdity yet. Made perfectly normal and reasonable. In the way it's delivered one thing that struck me about all of these and especially this farm story is the internal drama of the dramas and the voice is a different story when you read it on a page The when you actually read it out aloud and cuffed loved redon who stories outilahde stays friends in stitches. They'll come reid. He'd metamorphosis to them on it fall about laughing and you read it yourself. You're like really tell you till you read it yourself and give all the voices their. They're their characteristics. He wanted to be a dramatist. Is t s eliot. In that way he is drama was contained in his voices Not sense in the letter in an email. I wrote to an asset is very nigerian this sense of the absurdity of of demands but in a perfectly normal cetin do you recognize that is that is an american quality as well I think it's not especially american Unless there's some underlying motive for it you know i am. I thought about this story. I thought perhaps this isn't absurd. Perhaps this man is trying to teach the farmer how he should treat his wife rights. Lovely russell lovely interpretation. Ask her nicely. Don't tell her what to do. Give her meet every day. You know if he was training him to become a good husband but that might be pushing it a little far. That's her that's wonderful. Interpretation i tell you. Legos interpretation He is presented to the farmer In a kind of our verse the unreasonable ness of the farmer himself. Isn't he in a way. I mean the following mission at the end is is is not beating them a little too much. Maybe i should go easy. Doesn't even say he will stop but he let up a little perhaps. Be grateful to me and the kids as well. We get so whip out of the stables and beats them so this marine needed a kind of real distorting mirror. So i'm i'm really happy to wrong with your interpretation but i also think it's illegal stories and i think it's also a story about the absurdity of of negotiation itself. Yeah and of course this was a fragment so we don't know if it actually in kafka's mind ended where it ends but ending on. Why the long negotiation just sort of tops off the absurdity of the whole thing. Yes i i sometimes. I sometimes wonder about this. Element of kafka is fragments kafka and is finished and unfinished. I think we should move away from worrying about that aspect of him. Because am i think i think where he stops away. He does not stop already contains its completion. I think you had a natural instinct When he stopped and there was no longer it didn't go on for whatever reason he didn't go on forwards because some deep honesty was at work in him He's a very deeply honest writer. I love the way. He assigns his his contract characters. His opposing characters. Such a fullness of a rigorous logic of humanity i. I'm thinking of those lines here. I don't want to be treated like other labors. You're right. I don't feel like other labors while you're not to give me orders right and his going to be a laborer for life. I'm going yeah. They were for life. Yes there's also a little bit of little red riding hood happening. I feel you know the way when he asks for meet. The farmer suddenly struck by his large teeth and even feels in his mouth. You know that this is perhaps not a man. It's perhaps a wolf and human clothing or yes. That's a very disturbing line. Every time i come to that. I mean really. It allowed this time when i came to that you're right. I did veer off as as on van of into another kind of Fictional spaces the the different kind of genre different exactly. I suddenly went into the woods. Yes very shop. Like a doug's. It's it's the brevity of that yet. Then it goes back to speech it continues on. The dog thinks two dogs the mind. Doesn't it asks..

third piece two dogs one thing kafka Legos american russell fermi
"kafka" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"kafka" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Another of us got open krant his neck to look at father who stood there big man in his long coat his right leg brace behind him seeking to drive the knife into the bread. When we woke up early in the morning father was just laying the knife aside and said you see. I haven't managed yet. That's how hard it is. We wanted to distinguish ourselves and he gave permission to try but we could hardly lift the knife whose handle was still almost glowing from fathers efforts. It seemed to re up out of our grasp father laughed and said let it go. I'm going out now. i'll try again tonight. I won't let loaf of bread make a monkey out of me is bound to let itself be cut to me. And of course it's allowed to resist so resistant. But even as he said that the bread seemed to shrivel up like the mouth of grimly determined pessene and now it was a very small loaf indeed. A foam of taught me on the highway. Begged me to come back to his house with him. Perhaps i could help how to fallen out with his wife and their argument was wreck in his life he also had some simple minded children who hadn't turned out well. the just stood around or got up to mischief. I said. I'll be happy to go with him but he was doubtful. Whether i a stranger would be able to help him. In any way. I might be able to put the children to some useful task. But i'd probably be helpless with respect to his wife because quarrelsome. This wife usually has its origin in some quality in the husband. Sincere was unhappy with the situation. He had probably already taken pains to change himself hadn't succeeded. So how could. I possibly have mo- success at the most. What i could do was divide the eye of the wife myself. At the beginning i was speaking more to myself to him but then i asked him what he would pay me for my trouble. He said we would rapidly. Come to agreement if i tend not to be of use. I could help myself to whatever i wanted that i stopped and said that this sort of vague promise was not going to satisfy me. I wanted a precise agreement as to what he would give me per month. He was astonished to that demanded. Anything like a monthly wage from him. I in turn was astonished that he was astonished. Did he suppose could fix in a couple of hours. What to had done wrong over the course of anti lives. And did he expect me at the end of those two hours to take a sack of dried peas. Kiss his hand in gratitude. Bundle myself in my rags on. Carry on down the icy road absolutely not the farmer listened in silence with head lowered our tents. The way i saw it. I told him i would have to stay with him for a long time to become familiar with the situation. Think about possible improvements. And then i would have to stay even longer to create proper order if such a thing was even possible. I'm by then. I would be old and tired. I would not be going anywhere but with dressed and enjoy the thanks of the parties involved. That won't be possible. The farmer said here you are wanting to install yourself in my house and maybe even drive me out of it in the end. Then i would be in even more trouble than i am already unless we trust each other. We won't come to an agreement. I said have i not shown i have trust in you. All i have is your word. Couldn't you break that after arranged everything in accordance with your wishes. Couldn't you send me packing for all your promises. The former at me and said you would never let that happen. Do what you want said and think of me as please don't forget i'm saying this to you and friendship as one mind to another that. If you don't take me with you you won't be able to stand it for much longer. Newhouse how are you going to go on living with your wife from those children. And if you don't take a chance and take me home with you the why not drop everything and all the trouble you're gonna have at home. I'm come with me. We'll go on the road together. And i want suspicion against you. I'm not at liberty to do that. The farmer said. I'll living with my wife now for fifteen years. It's been difficult. I don't understand how of done it. But in spite of that icon. Just abandon her without having tried everything that make bearable then. I saw you on the road. And i thought i might make one final effort with you. Come with me now. Give you whatever you want. What do you want. i don't want much. I said i'm attached to expect your predicament. I want you to take me on as your labor for life. I can do all sorts of work and we'll be very useful to you but i don't want to be treated like other laborers. You're not to give me orders have to be allowed to do what we're cleese now this now that nothing at all just as i please. You can ask me to do something as long as you're trae gentle about it and if you see i don't want to do it then you'd have to accept the fact. I won't require money but clothes linens and boots up to present standards and replaced when necessary if such things unobtainable village. Then you'll have to go into town to buy them but don't worry about that. My present clothes should last me for years. Very happy with standard labor's fair. Only i do insist on having meat every day every day. He interjected as though satisfied with all the other conditions every day. I said i not your teeth own. Newsroom he said trump to excuse my unusual stipulation and even recent to my mouth to feel them very shop. He said like a dogs. Well anyway meet every day. I said and as much in the way of beer and spirits as you. That's a lot you said. I drink a lot so much. Better i said. Then if you tighten your belt altai in mine probably drink like that because of your own happy home life. No he said why should that be connected. But you should have as much as me. We'll drink to go. No i said. I refuse to eat or drink in company. I assist eaten drinking alone alone. The former austin astonishment all these wishes are making my head spin. There's not so much i said. 'and i've almost got to the end. I want oil for a lamp. That's to be kept banning at my side all night. I have the lamp here. Just a little one that runs on next to nothing is really hardly worth mentioning. And i just mentioned. In for the sake of completeness. Lester be some subsequent dispute between us. I dislike such things when it comes to being paid at all other times on the mallet of men but if thames once agreed upon violated. I cut up rough. Remember that if. I'm not given everything i've down to the last detail. I'm capable of sudden fire to a housewife sleep. But.

fifteen years two hours tonight trump one final effort one mind early in the morning years hours
Ben Okri Reads Franz Kafka

The New Yorker: Fiction

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Ben Okri Reads Franz Kafka

"Hi ben. Welcome so when we started talking about doing the podcast. one thing. That was very clear to me. Was that you feel an affinity with kafka's work. What is it that makes what he does important to. You is hard to say the more you read kafka the more confusing it is actually He's someone who gets more mysterious with more. Acquaintance is very strange. And i think it's the deceptive quality. Has i think. Actually i think is the way. His mind probes reality. It's a universalising quantity that his mind has. He's trying to himself either because of some deep trauma in his life because of what he felt about life at trained himself as a storyteller to constantly allegra allies while at the same time being deeply particular and nobody no other writer developed it to the degree That he had and also like his voice is voices. Most peculiar of course. I don't read the german and the same german. His voices peculiarly plain sometimes bureaucratically plane but all translations into english and michael's we saw most beautiful while the best he. Has this voice that. Tom manages to bypass your your brain and it goes straight into your psyche. He's found this tone this very normal tone that just slowly shifts Into completely unexpected places without any without any striving

Kafka Allegra Michael TOM
Apple and Facebook Are All Ears

Reset

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Apple and Facebook Are All Ears

"Okay fair warning. We are about to get a bit meta this. Podcast episode is about the future of podcasts and why to tech companies apple and facebook are plunging feet first into the audio pool recruits. Peter kafka's. you're talking about. Hey peter so over the last couple of weeks there's been a bunch of talk about how big tech companies are getting into audio. There's apple and facebook. Let's start with apple which has more experience in this space. Tell me what apple is doing in the world. Podcasts apple mostly created the market for podcasts. And i say that knowing that people in the madame because apple did not technically invent podcasts. But they're the ones who sort of brought it to the mainstream back in two thousand five and then they pretty much left it alone. They have not tried to do much with podcasting. They have not assigned many people They haven't put much resources toward it and they haven't tried to make any money and now that's changing a little bit. They are going to allow individual podcast creators and publishers to sell subscriptions to podcast within apple. And so there might be a sm- they're gonna say smallish business. I think it's gonna be a huge business but it's gonna be something for apple so they've gone for making no money on it to making potentially some money so apple's going basically take a cut of podcast revenue that's made by a show host or pretty sure is that is that right. That's exactly right. It's the same same model. They have for apps and services like hp max etcetera. The publisher over makes the thing keeps seventy percent. Apple keeps thirty percent if you keep doing it for more than a year that cut goes to eighty five and fifteen

Apple Peter Kafka Facebook Peter HP
Netflix might be cracking down on password sharing

Here & Now

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Netflix might be cracking down on password sharing

"Netflix users. beware. The company is considering a crackdown on customers. Who share their passwords with friends or family members. Netflix knows many of its two hundred million subscribers or piggybacking on someone else's account and now the company is testing a new papa message asking some users to verify that they own the account. They're trying to log into. Peter kafka is senior correspondent at recode and host of recode media peter either. So what is netflix up to here. Well that's a good question Their official line is just a test. Who knows what the who's who knows what we're gonna do but in theory. It looks like they might be reconsidering a longtime stands. They've had which is basically you. We're not telling you this but we're not gonna complain if you share your net password with a lot of other people They're doing a test. That says if for instance you've ever borrowed a netflix password You might see a pop up on your tv saying hey. You can only do this if you have a netflix account with us and if you do let us know and we'll send you a log in and you can get on yourself. It seems appears to be nudging you towards going from free loader to paying netflix's subscribe well. It does seem to me that it could be like the end of an era because people have been sharing passwords for as long as netflix has been around. You know just a few years ago. Ceo reed hastings said password sharing something that you have to learn to live with. So why crackdown now. Well we don't again. We don't know they're cracking down. You know the the obvious conclusion you can draw is. Netflix used to sort of own streaming. That didn't have any competition and now there's a lot of competition from disney discovery plus and paramount plus. Hbo max and the suggestion would be all right. We people paying for us instead of paying for hbo max. Paramount plus people make a decision I'm not sure that's the case There's also a theory that h netflix's just taste testing out a count security you know. Netflix doesn't give free trials anymore. They used to do that. They've they've moved away from that And so if you wanna tease this all the way up and saying look you know what net flicks is you like it. It's time for you to star paying It would also suggest that theory holds up. That netflix is thinking we've got two hundred million subscribers worldwide. Seventy million in the us. How many more are we going to acquire With getting the freeloaders start paying but again redoing speculation here sure and do you have any idea how common it is for people to share passwords. I mean i. I i i personally. What happens a lot. I've shared my password for my entire family at various points. And i think they've all ended up paying for their own and in one point. I think that for a long time for for a lot of these dreamers was look. We'd rather have you paying but in the but you're also sort of giving us remarketing There's a there's a consulting firm magazine associates that that estimates that may be thirty percent of of netflix's users are are are are sharing. I guess passwords anecdotally. It's it's a lot of people because there really hasn't been any reason not to You did here During the pandemic people who'd been used to sharing their passwords. And you know In theory netflix. Lets you stream multiple accounts at the same time during the pandemic when everyone is at home streaming netflix. You've heard the people were running into that limit already. So this is something that could have been stirred on stirred up by the pandemic business has been pretty good. I think for netflix gained an extra thirty seven million customers during the pandemic because of all those people staying home watching the

Netflix Ceo Reed Hastings Peter Kafka HBO Paramount Disney United States
Lew Cirne on founding Wily Technology and New Relic

Software Engineering Daily

03:50 min | 1 year ago

Lew Cirne on founding Wily Technology and New Relic

"Lou. Welcome to the show scrapes video. Thank you you started new relic awhile ago and before that you started a different company wiley. Both of these companies were focused on what we now call observability hauer software applications today different than from when you started new relic. Well yeah you know. I'll talk about what's different today but also talk about what the same and i guess. It's what's the same as so long as our software there is going to be bugs and they're going to be problems that happen only in production and that's that'll be true forever. I think so as long as humans create software and just like in the medical field are so long as people get sick. Then there's going to be a need for doctors. And so i think so. Long as there are software. There's going to be need for tooling and visibility capabilities to help understand. Soffer behaves when it's running under load in particular and take that understanding to improve the performance availability stability and the customer experience of that software. So when i started wiley twenty-three years ago the idea was this brand. New thing. At the time in ninety eight was java and the idea was let's see inside. Jvm without asking our customers to change any of their source code and put that visibility to production low overhead and captures much data as possible and presented an easiest way possible to help customers debug their jvm's and fast forward to two thousand eight. When i found new relic the thought was well. It's a multi language world now and applications aren't running on two or three physical servers are running on twenty or thirty or so back in that time. Virtual hosts and it was very early in the cloud but people those hosts for running increasingly in new environments like amazon web services. So the idea was. How do you put visibility into that are composed of say a half dozen services running in a virtual environment where. There's multi-language in that. That really was the sweet spot. If new relic when it was founded through the first several years and now here we are in two thousand twenty one what an application looks like today is often hundreds of services thousands of containers more and more in coober netease incredibly complex. A lot of a synchronous work a lot of stuff going on systems like kafka and so trying to make sense of a really complex system is more challenging than ever and it seems like what's behind all of this complexity is imperative to help developers be more productive to first of all have smaller more independent teams who can deploy with pretty good isolation and rely on good. Api's and things like that to allow lots of those teams to collaborate on a large effort at high velocity but so that that increases velocity but it comes at the cost of increased complexity on how that whole integrated system works and the solution to that in our opinion is complete visibility into all the application micro services all of the infrastructure and the end user experience. All into a common platform that operates at massive scale and really the guts of observability. If you understand the difference between observability monitoring i'd say monitoring is about telling you when something's wrong but observability is having access to all the telemetry need to answer. Why is something wrong which you don't even know what question you need to ask next to get to the understanding of what's wrong in today's world it just like collecting a massive amount of data and trying to make sense of it. Is you know as rapidly as possible.

Wiley Soffer LOU Kafka Amazon
HBO Max activations double to 17.2 million in fourth quarter

Techmeme Ride Home

03:08 min | 1 year ago

HBO Max activations double to 17.2 million in fourth quarter

"At and t. also reported earnings and we don't normally care about their quarterly numbers and actually don't care today what we do care about is they're streaming numbers. Hbo max went from being sort of a punchline sort of an also ran in the streaming worst to suddenly. All of their movies will be available to stream day of release at no extra cost. Maybe we need hbo. Max our lives after also did wonder woman nineteen eighty-four moves the needle for them. Early signs are pointing to. Yes apparently if you take. Hbo and hbo max subscribers and put them in one bucket. That number grew twenty percent year over year to forty one and a half million subscribers reaching number that. Hbo was hoping for two years ahead of their own forecast. Hbo max activation doubled to seventeen point two million since the end of q. Three quoting variety. The company said it invested about eight hundred million dollars in. Hbo max in the fourth quarter and more than two billion dollars for the year on the streaming service these subscriber gains in q four were undoubtedly boosted by warnermedia's in four to distribute. Hbo max on roku and amazon's fire tv on the q for call with analysts. At and t. ceo. John stinky said were media is aiming for a cue to launch of a price reduced ad supported version of. Hbo max but he didn't provide other details on the avio de product. The company plans to launch hbo. Max internationally this year. Starting with latin america in the second quarter stinky said. At and t. will host an investor event in the second. Half of q one to outline this and quote so again as i said before ad-supported. Hbo is not hbo. That's tv sorry. That's an obvious joke. But i did want to mention that little bit about the money spent invested in. Hbo max and also where the subscribers to hbo. Max are coming from because when disney plus adds a new subscriber it is completely new revenue with hbo. There's this weird situation where did eight and a half million people start paying fifteen dollars a month for. Hbo max out of the blue. What number of them were just people moving from. Hbo regular to hbo. Max like if five million people joined. Hbo max for the very first time. 'cause of wonder woman. And they're totally new subs and they stick around for a full year. Then yeah warner definitely made back the potentially one billion dollars in wonder woman nineteen eighty-four box office. They should have made if everything was normal. But if not then the math is not so good and also. That's only one movie. They have a slate of eighteen. More still coming this year. Remember that conversation. We had with peter kafka on a weekend bonus episode not to long ago. No one is sure at least not yet that the math actually works out on this whole streaming business. At least for anyone not named net flicks.

HBO MAX Warnermedia John Stinky Roku Stinky Amazon Latin America Disney Warner Peter Kafka
Redpanda is a Kafka Alternative

Software Engineering Daily

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Redpanda is a Kafka Alternative

"Africa has achieved widespread popularity as distributed queue and event streaming platform with enterprise adoption and a billion dollar company. Confluence built around it but could there be value and building a new platform from scratch. Red panda is a streaming platform built to be compatible with kafka and it does not require the jvm nor zookeeper both of which are dependencies. That made cough harder to work with and perhaps necessary

Africa Cough
Redpanda is a Kafka Alternative

Software Engineering Daily

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Redpanda is a Kafka Alternative

"Has achieved widespread popularity as distributed queue and event streaming platform with enterprises option and a billion dollar company. Confluence built around it. But could there be value and building a new platform from scratch. Red panda is a streaming platform built to be compatible with kafka and it does not require the jvm nor zookeeper both of which are dependencies that made kafka harder to work with and perhaps necessary

Philadelphia Eagles head coaching search tracker

Bleeding Green Nation

03:13 min | 2 years ago

Philadelphia Eagles head coaching search tracker

"Cody. Thanks for coming back on. I in the enemy man. How are you. I'm doing great great to be with you. I'm excited to talk some football absolutely and let's jump right in to the eagles. Coaching search here. Because more names get added to this list everyday to say that the eagles have cast a wide net would be understating it a little bit. You tweeted out. And i think it was either yesterday or today but as a recording. This on the fourteenth is was on the thirteenth. You tweeted out a whole list of names. We've got carolina offensive coordinator. Joe brady tennis offensive coordinator arthur smith san francisco defensive coordinator robert soleil tampa bay defensive coordinator. Todd bowles new england linebackers coach. John mayo kansas city quarterbacks coach mike kafka philadelphia assistant head coach do staley oklahoma head coach lincoln riley ohio state head coach ryan day. Cincinnati head. Coach luke fickle and more are coming each and every day and i know among eagles fans. You know we see this as a pretty dysfunctional team right now. We see this as an organization. That doesn't seem to know exactly what they're doing and we're skeptical as to whether or not a a really high profile coach is going to want to come here given the list of names here. Where are you at on this eagles. Coaching search as there really are just getting started right. Now yeah and we saw it just kellen more added today and obviously you know they're going to continue to cast the net and i think just in general. I think there's a little merit to the idea that you know when you compare openings. The eagles aren't A bursting with attraction just because of the situation. I mean Doug peterson clearly. If the reports are to be believed is is kind of worn down from from this run with eagles. And but i honestly don't put too much stock into this idea that they're undesirable because at the end of the day there's thirty two jobs. There's thirty two head. Coaching jobs in the nfl. We see guys in view with with teams like the jets and the jaguars every coaching cycle. Yes they sometimes have high picks so they sometimes have a lot of cap space but at the end of the day. It's nfl fell head coaching job. You can't tell me you know if you're joe brady and you're getting interest from all these teams. I mean you're not going to just not going to turn down the opportunity and so And eventually some of the spots are gonna get filled For me i mean i. I start for the eagles with looking at the offensive side of the ball. I know that's it's a big talking point. Jeffrey lurie with with you know really any eagles fan. That's been under or watching. Jeffey larry hires run. The team I i think really it comes down to are you going for You're gonna have to sacrifice somewhere. Because with somebody like joe brady even kellen moore. You're really banking on them. Being kind of an offensive mastermind and up and coming mastermind as opposed to this Person who's been around the league for years and respected and you know doug peterson even though he didn't have head coaching experience. Jeffrey loria himself talked about that emotional intelligence he talked about. Doug peterson former quarterback. In this league he had time under andy reid and so i. I think it's just a matter of where are they gonna sacrifice. Because if they go with robert. Sal the forty niners you're sacrificing. You might bring in a nice offensive coordinator with them but he may leave here for another head coaching job. And so what do they want. We're gonna find out.

Eagles Joe Brady Robert Soleil Todd Bowles John Mayo Doug Peterson Mike Kafka Lincoln Riley Ryan Day Coach Luke Fickle Arthur Smith Cody Tampa Bay Kellen Kansas City New England Cincinnati Football NFL Tennis
'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

"Today is public domain day. As of january first thousands of books movies songs and other material from nineteen twenty five are no longer under copyright protection including the great gatsby. Npr's neda ulaby has more besides the f. scott fitzgerald masterpiece books entering the public domain now. Include mrs dalloway by virginia woolf and classics by sinclair lewis franz kafka ernest hemingway and agatha christie so are other works from nineteen twenty five like buster. Keaton silent film go west and the songs week toward brown now community. Orchestras can play music in the public domain for free scholars will not have to get permission to study. This material and books on the public domain can appear online without charge all part of living cultural conversation that anyone can join netto lippi. Npr news both

Neda Ulaby Mrs Dalloway Scott Fitzgerald Sinclair Lewis NPR Virginia Woolf Franz Kafka Ernest Hemingway Agatha Christie Keaton Netto Lippi Npr News
TikTok deal deadline not extended, but talks expected to continue

Techmeme Ride Home

01:31 min | 2 years ago

TikTok deal deadline not extended, but talks expected to continue

"Tiktok can what what the hell was. Is this all just kabuki theatre like was there any substance to this at all. Do we expect this to never be brought up again. What do you think well recording this. On december fourth which i think is a new deadline for for for the tiktok deal to go through. It's pretty fascinating. Because obviously the trump administration did not really care about tiktok. it was clearly a it was always evident. That was a a thing. They thought was beneficial to them to talk about politically And now they've moved onto to imaginary fraud. And there's no one there to push this through but there are thoughtful people who say yeah. There's really is a problem with tiktok. being essentially a chinese company ben thompson is one of them And so something should be done here. There's a whole wider sort of us. China thing gets worked out so this is just vaping and bam nothing not in the morning I do think that assuming this gets sort of left on the biden administration's desk that it doesn't go away and that they'll be some kind of change to tick tock. I don't know if oracle and walmart being sort of investors have operators is. This is the is the solution in clearly. Tiktok doing just fine Even though it has an issue

Tiktok Trump Administration Ben Thompson Biden China Walmart Oracle
Streaming Data Integration Without The Code at Equalum

Data Engineering Podcast

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Streaming Data Integration Without The Code at Equalum

"Can you give a bit of an overview about what you're building at equal am and how it got started and you mentioned that you've been there for a few years so maybe a bit of how you got involved with the business as well case old building a platform for data ingestion physically. Etl system with the goal of providing open source benefits to the enterprise domain. I'm sure that everybody who's tried to use soles in the enterprise and found on the difficulties in how chips around implementing it. And we're trying to bridge the gap and get the best out of Into enterprise ready application product. So that's foiled goals as for myself. I've been working for about three years. Almost as implem-. I'm started out a halfway william equal actually started with that goal but had quite a few steps around it. We started with a very simple system and ended up with a full stack of spa kafka and all the jason competence and a food system so solid very simple the overall space of data integration and. Etl has become relatively crowded in the market. And they're a number of different approaches where some people are advocating for e. l. t. Where you just do extract and load and using something like maybe five tran or the singer set of tools or some people are focused on batch oriented workflows using more traditional et l. approaches and. I'm wondering if you could give a bit of context as to how equal and fits in that overall market and some of the differentiating factors that engineers should consider when they're debating what tools to use. What approach to take the main differentiator for us is a customer that once a system that is mature and a lot of indications of open source products and open source. Capabilities are still in the making and still growing as you grow with them. And we'll aiming at providing the whole system and to end to someone who wants etl rather than a lot of moving parts thing. That's the main thing we don't want to provide yet another software that relies on five to ten different vendors so for example if you're doing streaming you might implement calf and you might need zookeeper and you might monitor it and i'm sure that everybody who's done that. Seen model confidence that you end up with. And i would say that when you start with a data engineering project usually end with. They'd engineering plus a whole division of devops. You want to end that mess and provide one product with one vendor gives you the whole thing end to end everything and relevant to the use case rather than to the in terms of the overall ecosystem of data you mentioned wanting to be able to the benefits of open source to the enterprise. And i'm wondering for people who already have started down. The journey of building out a data platform they might have some capacity for data integration in place what are the components of the overall ecosystem that equal is designed to replace outright and which are the ones that it is designed to integrate with augment. Let's stop replace serves as an ingestion system so the workplace depends on what you're doing. I can certainly give you. Examples from implementations we have replaced system using open source spent the whole on top of our and a lot of station around building the flow in bento executing the flows in monitoring and getting everything working together. We have replaced the whole thing with just one system and again one vendor for the whole thing not mingling too many companies and getting them to work so i would say for that use case the replacement would be for the end to end system so it depends on the use case itself but we are aiming to replace the whole integration and to and from source to target to get data transformed in reached and managed to the level of. I read it from the source whether it is a string soul veg souls luck as three or even see souls and writing. It's to whatever they might be snowflake for data warehousing data lakes so it is an end to end solution that is aimed at providing the full stack that you require full. Data integration

William Equal
Interview With Yahia Lababidi

Spark My Muse

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Yahia Lababidi

"Welcome everybody sparked by muse. And today i have a guest. Yahia la vida de. I hope i didn't mess that up too badly beautiful. Who is a writer. An egyptian who's come to america as a young adult eight critically acclaimed books of poetry and prose. he's an authorised an sas and most recently he sent me revolutions of the heart literary cultural and spiritual which is just a treasure trove of little gems. Some smaller pieces some slightly larger pieces and to begin speaking about it. It's hard to know where to choose at this banquet table where to pick but you so much for joining me for the podcast. Thank you for having me over here in new to and also. I want to make sure that we tell listeners about this book being the book for january. Twenty twenty one and meeting up with you in february on the third for a book club. Discussion and fighting. That'll be really fun. What's nice is that it's recorded so anytime someone wants to come back. And listen or it can be embedded on your webpage even or or any web page. Yeah it could be revisited and enjoyed over and over you define aphorisms as what is worth quoting from the souls dialogue with itself and you also say that you hope that might serve as a form of peace offering and bomb in these troubled times and for people who are not quite aware or quite. Have a handle on what aphorisms are. Perhaps you can just explain that a little bit and then speak about what that offers us today. Well it's it's basically it has currency without being recognized for what it is so anything when people have these quotes or inspirational sayings or even what they call it. A witty wise one liners. That's an aphorism if if it doesn't have a name attached to it and it's a maximum or proverb in the assuming some great sage cited then it's an another category of instruction but but enough for them. They're certainly more people who are aware of what they are. And who use them consciously now than when. I began writing them. Let's say thirty years ago at this point as a teenager. When i don't think anyone even knew what that meant but i grew up reading. People like braun. Nietzsche and blake and kafka and pascal who tended to write in offer 'isms and they basically i mean wild has some definitional skar wild about how he had some existing a phrase. I do not presume to some olives in a frozen any of my offers. But it's this. It's this idea of trying to encapsulate a great conversation. And that's why. I define it as a competition with the souls conversation with itself really so you go off. You're thinking about something dreaming meditating possibly weeks years even and then at some point. There's one line that you can extract from all that that can stand alone by itself that will be a key or a door or window or invitation for a complete stranger to have that conversation with themselves so a good aphorism doesn't in my understanding of it at least in everyone's got their own definition is just as suggestion or you to sort of the spark your own conversation With with your with your soul so to speak. And that's why. I really appreciate reading Books of aphorisms where there's few on the page and a lot of blank space because it's understood that they are in need of diluting the way you dilute. It is by bringing in everything you know. Suspect you know we're just breathing alongside it

America Kafka Nietzsche Braun Pascal Blake
Justice Department Hits Google With Antitrust Lawsuit

Reset

08:12 min | 2 years ago

Justice Department Hits Google With Antitrust Lawsuit

"Few weeks ago we were all on pins and needles expecting a lawsuit from the US federal government against Google and on Tuesday after a fourteen month. Long investigation that lawsuit arrived the US Department. Of Justice and eleven states have filed suit against Google arguing that the company has used unfair practices to preserve its search and search advertising monopoly. Here to break all the details down with me, records Peter Kafka Hey Peter hit Teddy. So how a deal is this is a very big deal. This is the most consequential antitrust action against a big Tech Company that we've seen since nineteen ninety, eight I don't know what you are doing in one thousand, nine, hundred, eight I was actually still falling technology news back. Then that's when that's when the US government sued. And we've gone twenty plus years, and now we've got the government's suing Google and we knew that this was coming for a while right and we talked about on the show with Shrink Afari a few weeks ago we didn't have specifics we didn't exactly know. What the lawsuit was going to allege that Google's done you've spent the morning digging in talking to a bunch of parties reading the suit tell me what the main argument, the US federal government is making. So I'm going to caveat this. This is the beginning of a process that's going to take years, and so the initial complaint from from the US government. Is the initial complaint it is going to change over time through discovery. Okay. people are going to add to this. It's going to be a living document as we say, but the big picture here is is this to start with the US government saying Google has an illegal monopoly and search that it maintains it focuses mostly on the idea of Google paying. Mobile, phone manufacturers like apple like Samsung fees, either directly or indirectly to give it pole position for its for search engine which then makes it search engine dominant, and then it gives it a an unfair advantage in search ads. So it starting with search and adding on search ads in it is mostly focused on the idea of Google spending billions of dollars a year to give itself, prime? Placement. Your phone and yeah and to the average person of sitting here thinking what does this case kind of boil down to it's basically that Not just that Google is too big right but that Google has unfairly made itself. So essential in all of our lives. That's the overall thrust of all the antitrust and all the tech reform conversations we're having, which is all of these tech companies, Google and facebook, and Amazon, and apple are have gotten so big and they're not really restrained by government in any way, and this has been going on for years and decades and someone should should do something about it, and this is really the first. Concrete who've we've seen from the government in sort of the modern Internet era trying to rein in these big tech companies. All right. So I'm guessing Google to not throw them a big hug. What's their response to this Google response is, Hey, we have an awesome search engine. What's your problem with this by the way it's free so we're not harming any consumers with their awesome Search engine by the way when we spend billions of dollars and give that money to apple and Samsung or do people who use our android software for free, they get to deliver awesome phones to you for less money than they would have normally because we're helping to subsidize that what's your problem by the way? The idea of giving people money to get better placement is not. A new idea it happens all the time. When you go to your grocery store, your target or Walmart people have paid to have their products on the shelf or on an end cap they pay different prices depending on where they get placed. This is not a new idea, and by the way we've done all this in the open for years. Yeah. You get the sense that Google. Sees this as an existential threat at all I mean. I. Wonder to what extent This is a financial risk for Google. Stock Market said no big deal Google share prices trading higher than it was Google has faced these kinds of accusations and lawsuits in Europe for years there is definitely a possibility the the US wins a lawsuit and there are structural a reform is made in. Google. was forced to do something drastic like split it's android business from its search business. We're not sure as possible. This could be a way to break it up. Yeah. It's it is possible. There is a wedge here that you could use to break it up. There's also the possibility that. Spends years fighting the DOJ and it gets it takes its eye on the ball and or it doesn't make moves that it would want to make because it's in a lawsuit and it has one upset the government anymore, and this is what people at Microsoft said happened at Microsoft when they were fighting the US government twenty years ago. Microsoft ended up winning that because sort of there was going to break up settlement for for Microsoft and ended up not happening in Microsoft kind of got away with punishment except that Microsoft ended up missing out entirely on the mobile business and there are Microsoft people who say we did that because we we took our eye off the ball and There's an argument that just bringing the lawsuit and just occupying Google. Is Sort of a punishment in and of itself Peter you mentioned your story which talked about the fact that there's a lot of people on both the left and the right who've been calling to break up big tech. He's going after Google. Specifically, you made a great point which is that you had this sort of unlikely alliance between the trump justice department, which is bringing this lawsuit and folks on the Left like Elizabeth Warren who are. Glad. That Google is getting some skirting for the first time in a while. They're very glad and to be clear you know it's not just that it's a left right thing. I mean, the Lisbeth Warren Detests Bill. Burr she calls him a corrupt trump crony who should resign. And then literally, in the next sentence in a statement, they gave to me said and he should go ahead and pursue this lawsuit. And you know it's as basic as as anime enemy is my friend. The slightly more sophisticated argument is we can't wait to work with the DOJ that we love. We need to work with the DOJ we have. We've been waiting to restrain google for a decade or more, and we can't wait on this. It's gotta go. I want to ask about the timing of this. there. have been reports that this was sort of sped out right that there's an election coming up once every possible accomplishment that he can talk about to happen before Election Day. Do you see any evidence that this was rushed at all or what do you make of kind of reporting that? This is politically motivated to at least begin to unfold before Election Day there was a report from the New York Times in particular said. There's dissension within the DOJ career staff wanted to go slower and that bar was moving to make this go faster and he wanted to happen this fall. The intimation is this would be sort of a political action. It's possible. We certainly have seen Donald Trump rail against big tech companies especially in the last couple of weeks, he has to set anything about this suit today and and to be fair this is a little a little abstract I think for people to sorta understand and you know. I'm not a political expert, but it doesn't seem like this is going to move a vote. That said, you know it's Donald Trump era everything's very weird and and it's To ask questions about something like like the timing on this right? I mean. The timing is step back. Though as you mentioned earlier, this is a years long game. You know he trump I get to say he's begun the lawsuit, but obviously, this is not happening. Yeah. A more practical way of thinking about or another another way of thinking about it that folks have suggested to me is this is likely the biggest case in bill bars career and that if he doesn't file it now or at least before. He may not get a chance to file it because Donald Trump may not be president come January. So the rushes for Bill Bar to get this thing through and have his stamp on it. This a lawsuit that is gonNA live for a long time. Right it could live in Abidin Justice Department right and that he wanted to be the one to bring yes it may sir it is very likely to continue a Biden Justice Department and that bill bars looking at this sort of with a historical frame like this will be my contribution to antitrust.

Google. United States DOJ Government Donald Trump Microsoft Us Department Peter Kafka Apple Samsung Walmart Bill Bar Abidin Justice Department Biden Justice Department
'So Hard To Prove You Exist': Flawed Fraud Protections Deny Unemployment To Millions

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:06 min | 2 years ago

'So Hard To Prove You Exist': Flawed Fraud Protections Deny Unemployment To Millions

"During the pandemic state unemployment systems have become a target for organized crime rings, they steal money through fraudulent claims but arguably a bigger problem is that some of the systems in place to prevent fraud like that have been hurting millions of innocent people. NPR's Chris Arnold reports when Sevi- guas lost his job as a food and beverage manager. Marriott Hotel near San. Jose he figured locale apply for unemployment. This was back in March he went online put in his info waited for weeks couldn't get through on the phone after more than a month he was told to mail and more proof of his identity mind driver's license picture of my past poor copy of my w. two she said the more documentation that I could put. In there to prove who I was would help out my case out his case Gouache had clearly lost his job with a big company had ide- what was the problem but this dragged on and on weeks would go by they need another documents and six months later, gouache still hadn't gotten any unemployment money manny can't find another job I had about seventeen. Thousand dollars saved gouaches thirty two years old, and he'd been saving up to go back to community college to try to become a computer programmer. He moved into a smaller apartment to save money but he still had to drain that entire savings for college. There's not enough left to pay rent next month to watch what I worked really hard to get dwindle away. I don't WanNa get angry in front of you for the interview. But it has been really really frustrating and the whole thing to seem so Kafka ask avoidable to him. It's so hard to just prove that you exist in California alone millions of people are having a hard time proving they exist as they struggle to get the unemployment benefits that they deserve and it turns out washes right? A lot of this was completely unnecessary.

Manny Jose Gouache Marriott Hotel Chris Arnold Fraud NPR Kafka Sevi- Guas California SAN
TikTok and WeChat: US to ban app downloads in 48 hours

Techmeme Ride Home

03:18 min | 2 years ago

TikTok and WeChat: US to ban app downloads in 48 hours

"This morning the Commerce Department announced that it will ban US downloads of and business transactions with Tik Tok and we chat on Sunday. So are these stories don now probably not even close quoting CNBC, the announcement comes ahead of an expected statement Friday by President Donald Trump on whether or not the government will approve a deal for Oracle to take minority stake and TIKTOK and become a trusted technology partner for the company in the US. It's unclear if the Commerce Department's announcement means there's no possibility of a deal going through. Before this Sunday deadline, it could be an aggressive move from the trump administration to push for its original intention to force Tiktok to become fully owned by a US company. The Commerce statement said that starting Sunday US companies will be banned from distributing we chat tiktok meaning the two major mobile APP stores run by apple and Google will have to remove the APPS from their libraries. The statement also blocks US companies from providing services through we chat quote for the purpose of transferring funds or processing payments within the US and quote. But. The announcement also lays out a separate timeframe specific to tiktok giving it until November twelfth to resolve the US national security concerns the rules that start November twelfth include provisions that block US companies from providing Internet hosting and services. For TIKTOK, this could be directed at the deal being negotiated between TIKTOK and Oracle which would provide cloud services for TIC TAC if trump approves and could give Tiktok and Oracle more time to hammer out a deal that will. Satisfy the president in an interview with Fox business on Friday Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said, the bands will affect Tiktok and we chat differently at first. He said Tiktok will still function, but users will not be able to upgrade the APP. It's still unclear what kind of functionality we chat will have in the US after Sunday but it's unclear whether or not TIKTOK will still be allowed in mobile APP stores but not allowed to provide updates to users and quote. Not The date of that extended tiktok deadline November twelfth certainly that gives all sides more time to negotiate a deal. But as Peter Kafka pointed out on twitter, we chat enormously popular with Chinese Americans owned by a Chinese company will be crippled by the US on Sunday night TIKTOK enormously popular with Americans including some trump voters owned by a Chinese company trying to do a deal with trump's supporters it will be okay through election day and quote. More headlines and rumors have been bouncing around over the last twelve to twenty-four hours bite dances apparently planning on a US IPO for whatever new business is carved out if it's allowed to be carved out. An agreement has been hammered out between dance and Oracle that includes the creation of an oversight board approved by the US government and a continuous third party audit, and finally most juicy sources are telling the New York Times that instagram founder Kevin System, has had preliminary talks about becoming tick tock new CEO if tech talk is allowed to continue as Josh. Bernstein. tweeted INSTAGRAM's Kevin System. Becoming Tick CEO and crushing reels would be the ultimate revenge for Zuckerberg stripping his autonomy. So Spicy and quote.

United States Tiktok Donald Trump Oracle Commerce Department Us Government President Trump Tik Tok Cnbc Wilbur Ross Partner CEO Kevin System Instagram Apple New York Times Twitter Google