35 Burst results for "KYI"

"kyi" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:09 min | Last month

"kyi" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Growing up. As a young woman in the 1960s, angel Suu Kyi toured the globe from the UK to the U.S. and Japan, studying politics and economics. At Oxford, she met her husband, a scholar named Michael aris. They had two sons and settled in the UK. Amid this busy life, Myanmar never left Aung San Suu Kyi's mind. She often told Michael should have to return. In 1988, she finally did. Her mother had suffered a severe stroke and Aung San Suu Kyi returned to take care of her. This was a very different Myanmar than the one she left. A military regime had seized power in 1962. 20 years later, tensions were at a boiling point under its repressive tactics. There were confrontations between police and crowds made up of students, office workers and monks. Thousands of people died. Aung San Suu Kyi fell she found her calling on August 26th, 1988, she gave her first public speech, saying, I could not, as my father's daughter, remain indifferent to all that was going on. Aung San Suu Kyi went on to lead a revolt against the military dictatorship, guided by the ideal of respect as a fundamental part of human dignity. She wrote that it wasn't power that corrupts, but rather fear. The people are not afraid of me. And because they are not afraid of me, they tell me what they think. And the flip side of that is that they are afraid of the current government. Of course. In fact, the dictatorship did fear her coalition's increasing power. They established martial law that banned political meetings and threatened dissidents with prison sentences without trial. Aung San Suu Kyi paid the new rule no mind. She and her collaborators founded the national league for democracy or the NLD, which was dedicated to nonviolence and civil disobedience. Aung San Suu Kyi was one of the only women on the political scene and by far the most powerful. She became known simply as the lady. Also Sochi's peaceful rebellion had its consequences. In 1989, she was placed under house arrest. She spent those years in nearest solitary confinement. She was unable to see her two sons or Michael who eventually died of cancer in 1999. She was invited to see her husband at the end of his life, but Aung San Suu Kyi refused to leave Myanmar out of fear that officials wouldn't allow her back into the country. They attitude was that if I would leave Burma, I would be free anytime. But I was certainly not have left the country and left my colleagues to face their troubles by themselves. In the 1990 elections, the NLD won more than 80% of the legislative seats. The military government did not recognize the results, but around the world leaders had heard of Aung San Suu Kyi's story and took up her fight. In 1991, she won both the coveted Sakura of human rights prize from the European Parliament and the Nobel Peace Prize while under house arrest. In 2008, U.S. president George W. Bush awarded her a congressional gold medal. The Myanmar government continued to prolong the house arrest year after year. Aung San Suu Kyi was finally released on November 13th, 2010. That day, more than 3000 people gathered around her house. When she attempted to speak, she was drowned out by the crowd chanting her name and singing the national anthem. Aung San Suu Kyi began her comeback. On April 1st, 2012, she won a parliamentary seat in Myanmar's first multi party election since 1990. In the following months, she delivered acceptance speeches for the prizes she'd won while under house arrest. And in 2015, Aung San Suu Kyi and the NLD won a historic parliamentary majority. However, Aung San Suu Kyi herself couldn't become president. Myanmar's laws prohibit anyone with foreign relatives becoming the nation's leader and both her sons are UK citizens. Instead, the NLD created the role of state counselor. It essentially allowed Aung San Suu Kyi to work as the de facto head of state. The move escalated tensions between the NLD and the top model Myanmar's army. Although Al Sal Suu Kyi's vision of a unified Myanmar might have seemed like it was coming together, a disturbing truth was surfacing. In 2017, under NLD's rule, hundreds of thousands of Rohingya, a Muslim ethnic minority fled the country due to increased violence and deadly attacks from the Myanmar army. This mistreatment stem back to at least the 1970s. These most recent attacks killed an estimated 25,000 rowing of people and wounded tens of thousands more. It caused a refugee crisis displacing more than 700,000 people. The UN called it by name. Ethnic cleansing also Suu Kyi repeatedly denied the claim. It can not be ruled out that disproportionate force was used by members of the defense services in some cases, but these are determinations to be made in the due course of the criminal justice process. Surely under the circumstances, genocidal intent can not be the only hypothesis. Almost immediately, institutions that had held up ansa Suu Kyi as an example rescinded the prizes they had awarded her, including the U.S. Holocaust museum and Amnesty International. Still, Alsace Suu Kyi's party won the majority in the next election in 2020. But on February 1st, 2021, the day the new parliament was set to convene, Myanmar's military launch and other coup. Also Suu Kyi and several other officials were arrested. Today, at 77 years old, also Suu Kyi faces many charges, including election fraud, violating communications laws and corruption. As of 2022, with further court proceedings in front of her, her total jail time amounts to 20 years. For many, also Suu Kyi remains a figure of liberation. For many others, she represents an incomplete picture of democracy of a government unwilling and unequipped to truly represent

Suu Kyi Myanmar NLD angel Suu Kyi Michael aris severe stroke UK Myanmar government Michael U.S. Sochi Oxford Japan Al Sal Suu Kyi Nobel Peace Prize Myanmar army president George W. Bush European Parliament cancer
"kyi" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:39 min | 3 months ago

"kyi" Discussed on Between The Lines

"Catherine, what's the state of the Rohingya ethnic minority today? Well, Tom, it may not be entirely fair to say she presided over the atrocities against the Rohingya because the coup has shown us just how constrained her power actually was. She certainly didn't do enough to protect the Rohingya with the power she had and when she went to the International Court of Justice. Where there are proceedings under the genocide convention against Myanmar she did defend the generals. So is that damage to credibility in the eyes of the west? It definitely damaged her credibility in the eyes of the west and we saw calls for her noble Peace Prize to be revoked in Oxford. They were taking down portraits of Aung San Suu Kyi. So she was definitely discredited by her lack of strong stance in protection of the Rohingya, especially given that the west had swung around behind Aung San Suu Kyi during all the years when she was detained by the military under house arrest, et cetera. Since the coup, the situation of the Rohingya has got much worse. 5 years ago, three quarters of a million of them fled across the border to Bangladesh. And there they remain in refugee camps, the world's largest refugee camps. In the camps themselves, there's little work or education, not enough food or medicine and fires keep ripping through the camps. There's still Rohingya in Myanmar as well, of course, more than a 100,000 of them in displacement camps that are just ghettos. They can't leave. There's fighting inside Rakhine state. Between the military and one of the armed ethnic organizations. So there are Hindu are still without citizenship still vulnerable. It's still a despairing situation. The outrage being over these terrible events 5 years ago. Nicholas, I mean, the army supported by local gangs, they went through these Muslim villages, raping, burning, killing along the way, some listeners might say that the west's response was pretty feeble and that it shows that atrocities against voiceless Muslims count for little or nothing across western capitals is that a fair critique Nicholas. Well, I think we need to talk about the world's response to what's happened to the Rohingya in Myanmar, not just what the west's response has been, made the greatest responses come from Bangladesh, which is had as Catherine's mentioned three quarters of a million people pushed into its country. And it's had to host that refugee community, but the response of the rest of the world has also been in terms of providing quite extensive humanitarian assistance through humanitarian agencies and directly to Bangladesh. The organization for Islamic cooperation has led the international push to hold Myanmar to account for this. The Gambia, which has taken the case in the International Court of Justice against Myanmar for crimes against humanity. So to focus on a western response, I think this is the main picture here. Where a lot of the action that has been taken has been by other countries. But the financial support through UN agencies, humanitarian agencies, has of course come from the richer countries that you would expect.

Myanmar Aung San Suu Kyi International Court of Justice Catherine Bangladesh Nicholas Tom Oxford organization for Islamic coope army Gambia UN
"kyi" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:33 min | 4 months ago

"kyi" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Run in 2004. Marty's in the deep right field. Back to we'll see you later tonight. But tsuchiya, the son of Japanese immigrants is a baseball fan. Born and raised in Cincinnati, he grew up rooting for the reds. 20 years ago, the reds began hiring him to create sculptures outside the stadium, depicting their local heroes, like Johnny Bench and Pete Rose. And because of that work, Matthews international, the company that produces the plaques for the Hall of Fame, discovered tsuchiya. And offered him the job of plaque maker in 2016. It's going to even like a dream come true because I didn't think it was even something that you know. I always knew as a kid. Someone's making those Hall of Fame plaques. But I never imagined that one day they'll be making them. Of course, it isn't easy. There is a little bit of pressure involved. John Chester coxi at the national baseball Hall of Fame is one of the few people who guide Suu Kyi along the way. You know, when you think about a bronze plaque that will hang on the walls of the plaque gallery of the Hall of Fame, probably the most sacred space in our entire sport, it needs to stand the test of time. To get it right, they begin working as soon as the new inductees are announced. The Hall of Fame sends Suu Kyi a photos of each player so we can study their features. Suu Kyi is sketches the first designs on his computer, and then he does them to scale in clay. Heating up the material so he can work it between his fingers and with his tools

tsuchiya reds Matthews international Hall of Fame Suu Kyi Johnny Bench Pete Rose Marty John Chester coxi Cincinnati baseball national baseball Hall of Fame
"kyi" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:06 min | 4 months ago

"kyi" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"It easier for civilians to legally buy weapons at a growing number of gun stores. Nowadays, criminal gangs are often better armed than the police. At a news conference, a real vision at a police spokesman Ronaldo Oliveira claimed that officers tried to peacefully arrest gang members, but that they responded with gunfire. There's also political support for such raids. President Bolsonaro, a populist former military officer, is a fierce defender of the police. As he campaigns ahead of October's presidential election, he often talks up what he describes as his robust efforts to fight crime. Bolsonaro brushed off the high number of casualties in the raid. Instead, he told reporters it was a job well done by the military police. John Otis, NPR news, revision error. Sunday in cooperstown New York, the national baseball Hall of Fame will enshrine 7 new members. But Fowler, buck O'Neill, go Hodges, many minoso, Tony oliva, Jim cott, and a more recent star, David Ortiz. Each will be honored with a bronze plaque that will hang in perpetuity in cooperstown. And the unveiling of these plaques on Sunday, it is a big moment. For the players, their families, and also one other person. The artist who made the plaques. Keith O'Brien has the story. There comes a point every spring when Tom Suu Kyi travels everywhere with a small wooden box. It has a gold handle, a latch that locks and a sticker on the side that says national baseball Hall of Fame. But it's the contents that really matter. All the plaques that work on. Keep them in this box. I don't learn about eyesight. Part of it is the secrecy of the project. Only Suu Kyi and a tiny team at the Hall of Fame see the plaques before the induction ceremony. But mostly, Suu Kyi just doesn't want to lose his work. Each one could take 50 hours to make, because he sculpting the faces of the players on them. He needs to capture how they smiled or scowled. He needs to do it in a space that's roughly 5 inches wide by 7 inches tall. It needs to be evocative and perfect, and he's on deadline. Because the date for the induction doesn't change, that doesn't move. And then I don't want to let anyone down. Of course. The work happens here. Behind a large door inside an old textile mill in Cincinnati. This is Suu Kyi's studio, and it's cluttered with old sculptures. He's a full-time artist, and he's done all sorts of work over the years. He's built statues of long forgotten civil rights leaders, and he'll be the first to admit he doesn't know what it's like to be a baseball hero, like slugger David Ortiz was, during the Boston Red Sox, epic playoff run in 2004. Marty's in the deep right field. Back to we'll see you later tonight. But tsuchiya, the

Suu Kyi Ronaldo Oliveira President Bolsonaro Bolsonaro national baseball Hall of Fame John Otis NPR news cooperstown buck O'Neill minoso Tony oliva Jim cott Keith O'Brien Tom Suu Kyi David Ortiz Hodges Fowler New York
 Myanmar's Suu Kyi sentenced to 4 more years in prison

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 11 months ago

Myanmar's Suu Kyi sentenced to 4 more years in prison

"Myanmar's Myanmar's Aung Aung sung sung suu suu kyi kyi has has been been sentenced sentenced to to four four more more years years in in prison prison legal legal official official says says the the goal goal sentencing sentencing chief chief after after finding finding her her guilty guilty of of illegally illegally importing importing and and possessing possessing walkie walkie talkies talkies and and violating violating coronavirus coronavirus restrictions restrictions the the noble noble peace peace prize prize laureate laureate was was convicted convicted last last month month on on two two other other charges charges and and given given a a four four year year sentence sentence then then which which was was then then a a hall hall but but the the head head of of the the military military installed installed government government the the cases cases are are among among a a dozen dozen goals goals against against suu suu kyi kyi since since the the army army seize seize power power loss loss February February I'll I'll sing sing her her elected elected government government suu suu kyi kyi supporters supporters say say the the charges charges against against a a contrived contrived to to legitimize legitimize the the military's military's actions actions I'm I'm Charles Charles Taylor Taylor this this

Aung Aung Sung Sung Suu Suu Ky Myanmar Suu Suu Kyi Kyi Army Army Charles Charles Taylor Taylor
"kyi" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:51 min | 11 months ago

"kyi" Discussed on WBUR

"To be granted an exemption And who does that Who has the right to give him that In Sydney The deputy foreign minister Sergei rabiot has warned that talks in Geneva with the United States this week will be difficult but business like relations have been tense following Russia's military build up on the border with Ukraine His James langdell The stakes are high Russia has mastered a 100,000 troops on Ukraine's borders It's called on NATO to pull back its own forces from Eastern Europe The United States has threatened severe economic retaliation if Russia were to invade Diplomats from both sides meet for the first time today to discuss the standoff but with different expectations Russia wants to talk about its demands for NATO to withdraw troops from former Soviet countries and to rule out membership for Ukraine Western officials say these demands are unrealistic but president Putin might use their rejection as a pretext for invasion Others say he's threatening war to secure concessions From the BBC A court in Myanmar is expected to hand down verdicts today in several cases involving the detained leader and sang Suu Kyi Miss Suu Kyi who was ousted in a military coup almost a year ago is accused of illegally importing and possessing walkie talkies The ruling military regime cleaned claims these were found in her house during a raid on the 1st of February the day of the coup The prime minister of Israel says nearly 40% of the population could become infected with coronavirus during the current wave After Sunday's cabinet meeting of Charlie Bennett suggested on Twitter that the number could range between two and 4 million people Mister Bennett said he would do all he could to avoid a lockdown to keep the economy functioning A father and his young daughter have been rescued from floodwaters in the Australian state of Queensland after spending two nights clinging to a tree Others were also caught in the floods as the BBC's Phil Mercer reports A father and his daughter were washed off the roof of their car as they tried to escape rising floodwaters near gimby in Queensland The man said he then tied them to a tree with rope to stop them being swept away Emergency crews in Australia said it was a miraculous survival Another man was rescued after his vehicle was inundated but his teenage daughter is missing Some residents in Mary baran north of Brisbane were told to move to higher ground as the floods advanced And fossilized remains of a huge prehistoric marine reptile Discovered in England have been hailed by scientists as one of the greatest finds in British paleontological history The ten meter ichthyosaur skeleton from approximately a 180 million years ago is the largest and most complete ever to be found in Britain Sometimes referred to as sea dragons ichthyosaurs were aquatic tooth reptiles that resembled dolphins BBC News Kate lamble Nail Brazil Together again thanks to the BBC World Service Imagining we're like one of our guests in sunny California Cruising sunset boulevard The wheel of a vehicle that cost a fortune to develop I thought wow This is seriously good It felt like being in a spaceship His spaceship was in fact an electric car It was the mid 90s and Quentin Wilson was driving it for a TV show aimed at car obsesses called Top Gear And I remember a moment when a man with Oakley sunglasses in a turbocharged Volvo dropped me at next to the traffic lights and tried to raise me and this electric car just went off like a sprinter and absolute silence and it was that moment and I remember it clearly this was the future and I said so to camera that this car is the beginning of the new era Make no mistake the days of the internal combustion engine are definitely numbered We weren't talking about global warming I saw them as just a significant technological leap Today we are talking about global warming road transport accounts for 10% of emissions and often reducing these emissions to help keep temperatures down the UN says they're actually increasing faster than any other sector Many think electric vehicles EVs will throw that trend into reverse Wow You drive electric You get from zero to 60 At three That's a string That's nuts I used to have a Mustang back when cars made sounds The all new Change is in the air Investors are poured an estimated $100 billion into EVs in the last couple of years alone Another $300 billion is expected by 2025 and political capital is pouring in too The auto industry to charge leading the world Electric vehicles You know how critical it is U.S. president Joe Biden The climate by reducing hundreds of millions of barrels of oil that will not be used When we're all electric Beginning to all electric is a long road EVs make up just 1% of passenger cars globally This is the climate question so we're asking are we putting too much faith in electric vehicles Love them or loathe them cars are with us There are roughly a billion of them on the planet right now and we add tens of millions every year Loves them I guess.

Russia Ukraine Sergei rabiot James langdell BBC president Putin Suu Kyi Miss Suu Kyi NATO Charlie Bennett Mister Bennett Phil Mercer United States Mary baran Queensland Kate lamble Eastern Europe Geneva Myanmar
"kyi" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Firewatcher Lynn ambush recalls being besieged during a 2017 wildfire by panic residents asking me what to do. I told them to pack their cars and be ready to go. One family later drove up and rolled down a window and a three year old boy chirped. Thank you for saving us. Recalls the retired college professor who's been with the 300 plus member Orange County fire watch since it's inception in 2006. Although video feeds an artificial intelligence are gaining ground and fire detection, there are no substitute for a human touch, says Tony pointer, who manages the volunteer network for the Irvine ranch conservancy, which oversees 30,000 acres of open space. AI sometimes mistakes clouds or dust kicked up by a truck for smoke, he notes. Ultimately, he adds, I don't see how you can replace a person. This story was reported by Roy wynberg and bray a California for the monitor. Now commentary from the monitors editorial board, on finding freedom under Myanmar's military. Once a global icon for democracy and human rights, Aung San Suu Kyi was sentenced by Myanmar's military on Monday to two years in prison. The charges against the Nobel Peace Prize winner are considered as bogus as the army's claim to rule after a coup against her elected government 9 months ago. Yet with miss Aung San Suu Kyi now again facing a long confinement. She has one thing going for her. Democracy activists in Myanmar know what sustained her throughout the previous period of forced isolation. During the trial, miss Aung San Suu Kyi's fearless demeanor was a reminder of how she endured 15 years under house arrest until her release in 2010. Like other famed prisoners of conscience, she said afterward that fear is the first adversary we have to get past when we set out to battle for freedom and often it is the one that remains until the very end. This idea about a need for personal liberation first builds on a strong legacy of democracy fighters. What stands out are their actions based on their inherent liberation from fear. They may be prisoners of conscience that their conscience is hardly a prisoner. That's a wrap for the news. You can find the full length versions of these stories in today's issue or at CS monitor dot com slash daily. And thanks for joining us at the start of your week. Tomorrow, I hope you'll check out Harry brewing as his story about a Supreme Court case that illustrates the court's steady shift on freedom of religion over the past two decades. Today's Christian science spiritual perspective contributor shares how turning to God for help. Can bring healing to any unhealthy.

Firewatcher Lynn Myanmar Tony pointer Irvine ranch conservancy Roy wynberg Aung San Suu Kyi miss Aung San Suu Kyi Orange County California army Harry brewing Supreme Court
"kyi" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Now the latest news from New York City and around the world here's Michael Barr Tom Daley John in Myanmar for this sentence the country's ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi to four years in prison after finding her guilty of incitement and violating coronavirus restrictions The ruling is the first in a series of cases brought against the 76 year old Nobel laureate since the army seized power in February Doctor sah sah of the national unity government says the four year prison term handed to Suu Kyi was premeditated Found touches without prove without evidence No true and it's all fabricated lies Doctor Shah says the military generals are committing treason against Myanmar The U.S. is poised to announce a diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics The move will likely escalate tensions between the world's two largest economies the games begin February 4th Law enforcement in Oakland county Michigan planned to interview a Detroit artist today to determine what he knew about James and Jennifer crumblies apparent flight from justice The crumblies were arrested over the weekend inside a studio owned by artist Andrea Sakura an attorney for Sakura clarence dass says his client hasn't been charged with a crime and is cooperating with the investigation into the Kremlin's He wasn't trying to evade law enforcement He didn't even know that charges had been issued or warrants had been requested for them at the time that they texted him and at the time that they came down to his location The crumblies have been charged with involuntary manslaughter and are held on a half $1 million bond each in the same jail where their 15 year old son Ethan is confined The older crumblies are suspected of providing their son with gun used to murder four and wound 6 at Oxford high school last week A big meeting for President Biden tomorrow President Biden will meet by video call with Russian president Vladimir Putin The White House says the president will underscore the U.S. concerns with Russia's military activities on the border with Ukraine Live from the Bloomberg interactive broker.

Aung San Suu Kyi Michael Barr Tom Daley John sah sah Myanmar Jennifer crumblies national unity government Andrea Sakura Sakura clarence dass New York City Winter Olympics Shah Oakland county army Beijing President Biden Detroit Kremlin U.S.
"kyi" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Brought to you by State Farm, like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi sent it to four years in prison following military coup, by Amy gunia. Myanmar's former leader, Aung San Suu Kyi was sentenced to four years in prison on Monday, after she was found guilty of incitement and violating COVID-19 restrictions following a closed door trial. The prison term covers only the first in a series of charges, which could see Aung San Suu Kyi, who was ousted in a February 1st military coup, sentenced to decades in prison by Myanmar's coup leaders. Human rights watchers say the charges against Aung San Suu Kyi whose national league for democracy or NLD won a November 8th, 2020 election in a landslide are a thinly veiled justification for keeping the popular pro democracy leader behind bars. No one is fooled by today's sentencing, Charles Santiago, the chair of the ASEAN parliamentarians for human rights, a group of liberal lawmakers from Southeast Asian nations, said in a statement after the sentencing. Since the day of the coup, it's been clear that the charges against Aung San Suu Kyi in the dozens of other detained members of parliament have been nothing more than an excuse by the junta to justify their illegal power grab. Aung San Suu Kyi's incitement charge as the result of statements posted on the NLD's Facebook page after she was detained by the military and the coronavirus charge related to a campaign appearance before the election. The country's ousted president win meant was also sentenced to four years in prison on Monday. Several other cases against Aung San Suu Kyi are now being tried, including charges over the alleged unregistered import in use of walkie talkies by her security guards, and corruption. Aung San Suu Kyi, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991 and other members of her party were swept up in predawn raids in the February 1st coup, and she has been detained ever since. The military's power grab came after Myanmar's generals complained of fraud in the November election, although international observers did not report major voting irregularities. At the time of the military coup, officials said they were assuming control for one year under emergency powers granted to them in the constitution, but experts warned that the coup seemed likely to undo the country's hard won democratic reforms. The country began a series of democratic reforms in 2011, and its fragile push for democracy had centered around Aung San Suu Kyi. It's not the first time Suu Kyi has been imprisoned by the military. She spent 15 years under house arrest before her release in 2010. This time, it's unlikely Suu Kyi who won a Nobel Peace Prize in 1991 and was once called a Beacon of hope by former president Barack Obama for her nonviolent resistance against a military law receive as much international support. Suu Kyi's defense of the military's 2017 atrocities against the Rohingya, a mostly Muslim ethnic minority that live in western Myanmar, badly tarnished her international reputation. She is no longer this moral person who has suffered, or who is suffering at the hands of the Burmese military anymore, says mongs Arnie, cofounder of foresee dot co, a group of Southeast Asian scholars that focuses on democratic struggles in the region. Still, Suu Kyi remained popular domestically, and the coup was met with nationwide nonviolent demonstrations, which the military has cracked down on with shocking violence. More than 1300 people have been killed by the military, according to the organization, the assistance association for political prisoners. Opposition to military rule remains strong, and some protesters have taken up arms, joining ethnic minority militias, which have long fault the military. On Sunday, at least three people were reportedly killed in Yangon. Myanmar's largest city. When a military vehicle plowed into a march of peaceful protesters. There are a lot of different ways to get into wellness. Did you know that people say laughter is good for your heart and then exercise can actually improve chronic pain and walking is nearly as healthy as running. You know what else people say?.

Suu Kyi Myanmar Amy gunia NLD Aung San Suu Kyi whose nationa Charles Santiago ASEAN parliamentarians for hum Southeast Asian nations State Farm parliament mongs Arnie foresee dot co Facebook Nobel Peace Prize assistance association for pol Barack Obama Yangon
"kyi" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

12:32 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Available ad free on demand and on the platforms you're already on. Sign up today at AMC plus dot com. AMC plus only the good stuff. This intelligence podcast is sponsored by crowd street. The nation's largest online real estate investing platform. Until now, it's been hard to access new investment opportunities. That's all changed. Crowd street gives investors like you access to institutional quality opportunities across the country. Thousands of investors are building diverse portfolios online. Join this thriving investment community and create your account free of charge and learn more at crowd street dot com. The world's largest police agency doesn't have any officers of its own. But Interpol plays a crucial role in tracking down fugitives and coordinating international sting operations. In recent years, though, allegations of undue influence have been piling up, with growing concern that the institution is beholden to authoritarian regimes. The appointment of a controversial new president isn't helping. The importance of Interpol has actually grown over the past years because crime itself has gotten more globalized. Field is a levski is our turkey correspondent, but he's been doing a little cross border work, too. 80 to 90% of investigations that police chiefs tend to look into have a global or international nature. And it's now got a new boss. The man who has taken over as president of Interpol is a rather controversial figure. He is a former inspector general of the UAE interior ministry. He was elected by secret ballot by Interpol's General Assembly. No, mister Al racy is facing accusations of complicity in torture or abuse in 5 different countries, including, perhaps most importantly, France, where Interpol has its headquarters. He has denied the allegations. So has the UAE, two people that we spoke to for this story, Ali Ahmed and Matt hedges are both UK citizens, alleged that they were tortured in custody in the UAE between 2018 and 2019 and have formally accused mister Al raisi of responsibility. So the top job now belongs not only to a country with a poor human rights record, but to a man accused of torture. So again, mister raisi denies the allegations, but still, how is it that someone facing accusations like that ends up in such a powerful position? The president of Interpol is not that powerful of figure. His is not entirely symbolic post, but it's a post that is significantly less important to the running of Interpol than that of the secretary general. But mister Al ray you see as Interpol's president, is and will be the face of the organization. So his election is a reputational risk already, which can have real consequences. As one Interpol official told me, reputational damage means damage to trust and damage to trust means that countries might be more reluctant to work with each other or to work through Interpol. Still, though important or not as you say there are risks here, it does seem strange to have someone who's under this cloud as they head of the organization. Indeed, and unfortunately, for Interpol, I see is not the first controversial figure to be elected president. Interpol had previously elected Meng Hong Wei a Chinese official as its president. Mister Meng was later detained and sentenced to 13 years in prison for corruption in China. A few presidents earlier, Jackie celebi, South African, president of Interpol, was convicted of taking bribes from a drug trafficker. Now, all of this and other factors have revived concerns that Interpol is coming under the influence of repressive regimes. And what does that influence look like? Or mister Meng can, in fact, be the symbols of this influence, but the real influence that repressive regimes tried to exert on Interpol is to use the organization to get to political opponents, notably by way of red notices, which are issued by Interpol at the request of individual governments, and they are akin to international arrest warrants. And Russia has tried to get red notices for some Kremlin opponents and critics. China has done similar China has had some success in extraditing Uyghur dissidents by way of a red notice or by having different governments arrest them on the basis of a red notice. We have to acknowledge that Interpol has managed to stand its ground on several occasions, but authoritarian governments have actually succeeded on more than a few occasions in using Interpol to track down their critics. So this does not seem aligned with what interval really ought to be doing. How did they get to this point? The most visible problem right now is the election of mister Al racy as president of Interpol. And his election and the election of other officials from authoritarian countries exposes what seems to be a flaw at the heart of the Interpol election system. Elections to top posts are quite opaque, elections are conducted by secret ballot. And formally, candidates to the presidency are only presented at the start of the General Assembly, which is to say, two days before the vote, which critics say prevents proper scrutiny of those running for Interpol president. And all of this makes backroom dealing almost inevitable. And China, in the past, has been known to offer investment and foreign aid to get its candidates elected to post in international institutions. And there is suspicion that the UAE has done something similar to get mister Al AC elected. All of this stuff, as you say, undermines the institution's credibility tarnishes. Its reputation. I mean, what does reform look like to bring it back to what people think Interpol could be? I mean, Interpol has taken some steps to address the issues we've been talking about. They have improved the screening mechanisms for red notices. In addition, Interpol has tightened the eligibility of criteria for members of the executive committee who now have to be active members of their national police forces. But there's certainly work to be done. Voting should certainly be made more transparent. And Interpol might be wise to do away with voting by secret ballot. Some of these concerns are, in fact, resonating among some members of Interpol in her speech at the Interpol General Assembly. The Czech vice president for Europe of Interpol, who was running against mister arasi, said let us show the world that Interpol is not for sale. In what really seems thinly veiled reference to the lobbying efforts by the UAE. Unfortunately, following the vote, the world might have come away with a different conclusion. Peter, thank you very much for joining us. Thank you for having me. Are you tired of all those irksome demands by your government? All that overweening oversight, all that legislation, all that tax, maybe seasteading is for you. Be free by taking to the sea. It's something that libertarian types have long been thinking about, and attempting. But with rising sea levels on the horizon and populations rising with them, life on the water is starting to have far wider appeal. Climate change is making floating cities more of an inviting prospect, but this has been something that some libertarians have dreamt of for years. Elise burr writes about foreign affairs for The Economist. Fans of seasteading talk about setting up self governing hamlets in the ocean, which would charge little or no tax. If you make the ocean an attractive place to live, now all of a sudden people are going to be competing for space. I mean, that's one thing that the sea stutters always say is governments have a monopoly on land, but they don't have a monopoly on the sea. And governments aren't going to like the sound of that. Governments aren't so keen on seasteading because of the tax implications and some of them see it as a violation of sovereignty. For example, in 2019, two people built and lived in a seastead, which was basically just a floating Jack. That was about 12 miles off the coast of Thailand, and the Thai government wasn't having it and towed away the sea said soon after it was built. And the technology isn't quite there for building settlements far away from shallow waters. It's really hard to get supplies and there's less protection from storms far out to sea. So government responses like that suggest that the ideal of this isn't really plausible. Right. Well, seasteading, which is the libertarian movement is still a really long way off. But floating settlements that are within government jurisdictions already exist. They're some in Brunei, Nigeria, around Lagos, and also in Vietnam and Cambodia. But a lot of these are slums. They don't have access to sewage, some don't have electricity. But floating settlements closer to shore could provide opportunities for increasing city space and also adapting to rising sea levels. Some agent countries are trying to encourage this. For example, in November, officials from Busan, which is a port city in South Korea, said that they plan to offer space for floating neighborhood near to its shore. But a floating neighborhood is a very different thing from a floating shack for a couple of people. I mean, is this really possible? It is realistic enough to have an endorsement from the UN habitat, which is the UN agency that deals with urbanization. So oceanics, the company that aims to build and fund this project said it's going to cost around $200 million and have space for around 300 to 500 people. Oceanic really brands this as an alternative to land reclamation. They say it could be economically competitive with land reclamation and it would be better for the environment. And eventually, the hope is that they could link up a bunch of these platforms to house up to 10,000 people, but you're talking about that in a city of three and a half million. And South Korean cities do have a history of backing large infrastructure projects that benefit local industry. The hope is that this one would boost shipbuilders. So with that kind of UN backing with the shipbuilding expertise do you think all of this is going to make a seasteading proper look a little more feasible for the people who want to see more of it? I think for the libertarians that these projects are going to show the sort of technological feasibility of it. I guess there are oil rigs out in the middle of the ocean. It's like, how do you have a libertarian utopia if you need supplies from other countries? I mean, everybody says that the biggest issue surrounding seasteading is the political issue rather than the technological issue. So the project in South Korea would help innovate with the technological issues of building a floating city, but it wouldn't deal with the political issues of having a little utopia in the middle of the ocean. Elise, thanks very much for joining.

Interpol mister Al racy UAE UAE interior ministry Interpol's General Assembly Matt hedges mister Al raisi mister raisi mister Al ray China Meng Hong Wei Mister Meng Jackie celebi mister Meng Ali Ahmed Al AC AMC Interpol General Assembly mister arasi
"kyi" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Have discovered this variant early on and now it's our job to do everything we can to prevent its spread Schumer says I'm a crime should not mean panic but planning A legal official says a Myanmar court is sentenced The country's ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi to four years in prison after finding her guilty of incitement and violating coronavirus restrictions The ruling is the first in a series of cases brought against the 76 year old Nobel laureate since the army seized power in February The U.S. is poised to announce a diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics That's according to a CNN report the games began February 4th A Detroit artist is called up in the investigation of a 15 year old who opened fire in Oakland county Michigan high schools killing four people The parents of Ethan crumbly were found by law enforcement in a commercial building in Detroit Friday and police say they were let in by 65 year old artists and speaking with ABC's lawyer clarence dos says James and Jennifer crumbly never told Sakura a friend of the family they were wanted by police when they wanted to shelter in a studio What they communicated to him was that they were only trying to seek a safe place from threats that were coming toward them and that they already had a lawyer that was going to advise them on their next steps God says Sakura has not been arrested involving the high school shooting in Oxford Tributes continue to come in for former Kansas senator in the World War II veteran Bob Dole Dole died Sunday at age 98 Global news 24 hours a day on air And on Bloomberg quick take powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts to more than a 120 countries I'm Michael Barr this is Bloomberg Thank you All right Michael thanks Coming up to 6 ten on Wall Street time for the Bloomberg sports update with John Stan shower Nathan the Giants defense has played well lately the scene can not be said about the offense Last three games only two touchdowns and one of the two was clear because the turnover got the giant to the 5 yard line No TDs yesterday in a 20 to 9 loss in Miami you would think the coach Joe judge would be exasperated by the Giants offensive woes not the case Evan was able to come up with some of the testing catches came he was able to come up with you know some of these bookers doing some catch and runs on the screen You know Kyle Rudolph doing a good job with some of the balls getting in vertical producing first downs A lot of things moving the right direction in terms of that Our past protection as a whole all there's some place obviously we got to look at and keep on improving on But I'm encouraged by some of the things we're seeing out there in terms of how that group's progressing Fans might not have such a rosy picture Giants were without Daniel Jones due to a neck injury Mike glennon filled in completed his first 8 passes but just 15 of 36 after that And then it was revealed Glenn suffered a concussion so not known who the QB will be next Sunday And that live Zach Wilson through for.

Ethan crumbly clarence dos Jennifer crumbly Sakura Detroit Aung San Suu Kyi Schumer Bob Dole Dole Michael Barr Myanmar Oakland county Winter Olympics John Stan CNN Beijing Giants army ABC Michigan
"kyi" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today, Aung San Suu Kyi, the former civilian leader of Myanmar, was sentenced to four years in prison, found guilty of inciting descent and breaching COVID-19 rules. She's been charged with far more and far worse than that. It's more than a year since miss Suu Kyi's party won an election by a landslide. Just before they could take power, though, the military carried out a coup. Public resistance to that led to a brutal, deadly crackdown that hasn't slowed down. Yesterday, at an anti government protest in Yangon, the country's most populous city, a military vehicle appeared to drive straight into demonstrators. Today's verdict accomplishes just what the ruling junta wants, taking miss Suu Kyi out of active political life, and there's good reason to believe that she will, in the end, be imprisoned for much longer. That seems likely to crystallize opposition to the military, even more. So today the court hearing the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi handed down its first verdicts. And entirely unsurprisingly, it ruled that Suu Kyi was guilty. Charlie McCann is The Economist's Southeast Asia correspondent. Those are just the first two of 11. So she's been charged for a whole litany of crimes from a sort of ludicrously trivial one of possessing unlicensed walkie talkies to much more serious ones like violating the official secrets act, corruption. So Suu Kyi denies all these charges, and it's pretty clear that these charges are trumped up so that the army can sideline her. They claim that the election that her party won in a landslide in November 2020 was one fraudulently. And that was the justification for their coup back in February. So they have every interest in seeing her branded as a crook and if she's convicted of all counts against her suit she will be in jail for a 102 years. Which is, it sounds like what we should expect at this point. Absolutely. The court is supine. They will do the bidding of the military. Beyond that, it's hard to know what's going on in this trial. Journalists have been banned from the court. Suu Kyi's lawyers have been prevented from speaking to the media. So we don't know how she is, what kind of condition she's in. We don't know what a response to the verdict is. And we also don't know whether she's going to be put under house arrest, like she was before or sent to one of Myanmar's notoriously harsh prisons. What about the response of the Burmese people, though? How do you think this verdict will land with them? I think it's likely to anger them after the verdict was announced today. I spoke with doctor sassa, the spokesperson for the national unity government, which is a kind of shadow government formed of exiled parliamentarians. He thinks that the verdict is going to instigate much more resistance. Another level of pain and suffering and that is the Kate in the hearts of the minds of the people of Myanmar just imagine if you're elected presidents or your elected leader of the nation are unfairly treated in that way. That's the same reason why the people of Myanmar were on the street, protesting after fail opposition reigns really strong, despite the horrible violence being meted out to protesters and people in opposition to the coup. More than 1300 people have been killed, some 10,000 people have been arrested since the coup. Yesterday, a military truck rammed into a crowd of protesters and Yangon. It ran over a couple of people, and eyewitnesses said that soldiers then opened fire on fleeing protesters and beating others. 5 people have died from that incident. And yet, despite that in the evening, people went back out into the streets and they kept on protesting. Day after day after day, we see incidents like that where this horrible brutality is being muted out by the military. And yet, the people of Myanmar, they keep on resisting. And is this just a small hardcore of very serious protesters or is the whole country up in arms at this stage? Well, I wouldn't say the whole country is up in arms, but large swaths of the population have decided on violent resistance. So in October, you and expert describe the situation in Myanmar as a Civil War. So since February hundreds of rebel groups have emerged and these range from quite small underground cells operating in cities, two militias in the countryside, that number in the thousands. And of those 250, perhaps 50 are conducting sustained operations. And these guys mean business, right? So these protesters turn guerrillas, operating in the cities, they're planting bombs. They're attacking police stations, military compounds. They're conducting assassinations against low level regime officials. And in the countryside, some of these new militias are getting training for much more established ethnic minority groups. And even fighting the military together. The minority militias in turn, they're seizing the opportunity. The military is deeply embattled and increasingly stretched thin. And so in that sense, this battle between the junta and miss Suu Kyi trying to paint her as a crook is really just one of really many battles going on in the country at the moment. Completely. He's asking minority militias. They're angry, not just with the military, but also with Suu Kyi, who they feel basically ignored and belittled them while she was in power. So while the guilty verdict won't mean much to them, it will mean a lot to the many Burmese who continue to idolize her. Doctor sasse, the NEG spokesperson, I spoke to, he really thinks that violence is going to ratchet up. But the people of Myanmar have say enough is enough. It's a do or die. If we do not overthrow them, we all would die very simple. So it's a where do you think this is going? These are just the first of what will be many verdicts that we're to expect will again be guilty. So she is going to be deemed guilty again and again and again. We're going to have a sort of a study drum beat of convictions. That's just going to pour a fuel on the fire of this conflict. Neither side has the ability to prevail currently as the conflict is kind of currently constituted. And so I just think the short term, Myanmar is going to spiral into this cycle of oppression and violence. The junta extraordinarily optimistically has scheduled a new poll for 2023. But if it really understood the public and what it thinks about the current political situation, it would know that it has no chance of winning that election. People's lives have manifestly gotten worse since the coup. 200,000 people at least have been displaced since last February. The World Bank thinks that growth this year is going to contract by a whopping 18% and the bad statistics just keep on rolling in. The UN thinks that nearly half the population is going to be below the poverty line next year. And to make matters even worse, the person who embodied the hopes of the Burmese.

Suu Kyi Myanmar Charlie McCann Yangon sassa national unity government Southeast Asia army Kate sasse NEG World Bank UN
"kyi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Individually in isolation I'm Michael hill It's morning edition from NPR and WNYC Pope Francis calls for more compassion for migrants a new global market in greenhouse emissions could see hundreds of billions change hands in coming years And if you're planning for a Christmas tree you might find a cost a little more this year to spruce up your home For sure you might have to branch out It's Monday December 6th the news is next Live from NPR news on corvi Coleman The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the number of reported coronavirus cases has risen sharply in the U.S. in the past few weeks Scientists have now identified cases of the omicron variant in at least 17 states Michigan's attorney general is offering to conduct an independent investigation into last week's deadly school shooting at Oxford high school Michigan public radio's Rick plutus says that left four students dead and 7 other people injured Attorney general Dana Nestlé says she made the offer in response to the school district superintendent's promise of an outside review of events leading up to last Tuesday's deadly rampage Nestlé says her office is uniquely situated to conduct a review that's autonomous of the district and local law enforcement I see a community that's not just a morning but it's also outraged because they are wondering what school officials knew And when they knew it Nestlé says those questions include whether suspected shooter 15 year old Ethan crumbly should have been sent home earlier that day after some troubling behavior He's been charged with murder terrorism and assault His parents have also been charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter For NPR news I'm Rick Pluto A court in military ruled Myanmar has found deposed leader Aung San Suu Kyi guilty of incitement and a violating coronavirus restrictions She's been sentenced to four years in prison Michael Sullivan reports from neighboring Thailand The verdicts against Suu Kyi and co defendant president win mint were expected Several other prominent members of our national league for democracy received even harsher sentences in the past few weeks The military seized power from Suu Kyi's elected government in February claiming election fraud and polls Suu Kyi's party won in a landslide late last year Suu Kyi has denied all the charges against her which includes several more still pending including corruption and violating the official secrets act The charges are widely viewed as politically motivated aimed at removing her from politics for good She could spend the rest of her life in prison if convicted on all counts For NPR news I'm Michael Sullivan in Chiang Rai The number of Afghans seeking asylum in Europe has risen sharply since the Taliban took over Afghanistan in August Terry Schultz reports on new statistics showing who is asking for protection The European asylum support office says 72% more Afghans applied for asylum in the EU Norway or Switzerland in September over August when Taliban militants regained control of the country During this period the agency says Afghans filed more than 17,000 asylum applications making Afghanistan by far the main country of origin until July that position had been held by Syria for the last 7 years The agency shows just 41% of applicants are granted asylum Terry schulz prepared that report You're listening to when B R news It's WNYC at 6 O four Good morning I'm Michael hill 47 with light rain going up to 61 We have southbound.

NPR news Suu Kyi Pope Francis corvi Coleman Centers for Disease Control an Oxford high school Michigan pu Rick plutus Attorney general Dana Nestlé Nestlé Michael hill WNYC Ethan crumbly Rick Pluto Michael Sullivan NPR Suu Kyi's party Michigan national league for democracy Myanmar
"kyi" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"If you have private student loan debt over $75,000, listen up. Credible dot com can help you refinance your private student loans and save thousands. Unlike other refi sites that show you teaser rates, credible lets you compare actual pre qualified rates from top lenders in minutes, and with their best rate guarantee if they can't find you a lower rate, they'll give you a $200 gift card. Like credible help you get out from under high interest rate student loans, go to credible dot com now. Message from credible operations Inc pre qualified rates are not on offer credit terms applied as a credible dot com for details. So wait, refinance your student loans today at credible dot com. This economist podcast is sponsored by Doctors Without Borders. A legacy gift makes a lasting impact.

"kyi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the web at the Schmidt dot org This is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin And I'm Stevens keep good morning A military court in Myanmar found Aung San Suu Kyi guilty of incitement and violating coronavirus restrictions Aung San Suu Kyi is the democratically elected leader of Myanmar deposed early this year Now the court has sentenced her to four years in prison with more court proceedings to come Reporter Michael Sullivan is following the story Michael welcome Hi Steve Is this verdict in any surprise at all No not at all The military wants her gone I think it may wonder party the national league for democracy gone too in the past month and a half they've already sentenced several prominent LOD members to lengthy prison terms So the writing was on the wall and today it was her turn Suu Kyi denies all of the charges against her and her supporters in many foreign observers say they really are politically motivated designed to remove her from politics for good after tsuji's party on the landslide victory in last year's election Phil Robertson his deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch She is a political threat to them of the first order They've recognized that whenever she runs they can't win an election And so they've decided to remove her in typical Myanmar military style Use a brute force to start And then using a lap dog court system which has been beholden to the military for much of the last 5 decades to then seal the deal And don't forget there are more verdicts to come on corruption charges and for violating the official secret act and others And if convicted on all of them Steve she could be looking at spending the rest of her life in jail How has the military been hanging on to power and ensuring its hold on power since deposing February Brutality and terror And we saw both of those play out very graphically yesterday and Myanmar's biggest city and gone a flash mob was demonstrating peacefully against the coup makers marching down the street when what appeared to be a government pickup rammed into them at high speed from behind And then soldiers started arresting people at least 5 people were killed and almost all of this was captured on video and shared widely on social media And the video is chilling Steve and a statement the U.S. embassy in Myanmar said it was horrified by the events And I called on the military to end the use of violence and respect the will of the people I'm glad you mentioned the U.S. embassy in Myanmar Of course the United States normalized relations with Myanmar because it had this period of democratization that seems now to have ended You also mentioned Michael these were peaceful protesters aren't there also armed resistance Isn't there also an armed resistance to the coup Yeah that's growing and it's not just the ethnic minority malicious who've been battling the military for decades It's people everywhere even on the bomber majority heartland But the military is just digging in and it's using some of the same scorched earth tactics It's used against the ethnic minority militias and against the Rohingya in 2017 Richard horsey is the international crisis group's longtime Myanmar analyst It's determined to quash the resistance but that resistance is very tenacious It's widespread in the country And so you have a brutal violent military meeting a determined resistance And that is the kind of deadlock that the country is currently gripped by And it's one that neither side I think will easily prevent Michael Sullivan I want to circle back to the main news here for four year prison term for Aung San Suu Kyi is the military really going to stick a 76 year old Nobel laureate in prison I think it's more likely she goes back to the same situation she faced before when the military kept her under house arrest fairly two decades except this time Stephen might be even longer Michael thanks so much You're welcome Steve That's reporter Michael Sullivan in Chiang Rai Thailand.

Myanmar Aung San Suu Kyi NPR news Rachel Martin U.S. embassy tsuji Phil Robertson Michael Sullivan national league for democracy Hi Steve Stevens Michael Human Rights Watch Steve Asia Richard horsey international crisis group United States Steve That Stephen
 Myanmar court sentences ousted leader Suu Kyi to 4 years

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar court sentences ousted leader Suu Kyi to 4 years

"The the special special court court in in Myanmar's Myanmar's capital capital the the sentence sentence the the country's country's ousted ousted leader leader Aung Aung sun sun suu suu kyi kyi to to four four years years in in prison prison legal legal official official says says the the court court has has found found suu suu kyi kyi guilty guilty of of incitement incitement and and violating violating coronavirus coronavirus restrictions restrictions the the case case involves involves statements statements posted posted on on her her party's party's Facebook Facebook page page off off to to she'd she'd already already been been detained detained by by the the military military the the sentencing sentencing is is the the first first in in a a series series of of cases cases in in which which the the seventy seventy six six year year old old Nobel Nobel laureate laureate is is being being prosecuted prosecuted since since the the army army seize seize power power on on February February one one preventing preventing her her National National League League for for democracy democracy party party from from starting starting a a second second five five year year term term in in office office the the verdict verdict in in another another case case against against her her is is expected expected next next week week I'm I'm Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma

Special Special Court Court Myanmar Aung Aung Sun Sun Suu Suu Kyi Court Court Suu Suu Kyi Kyi Facebook Army Army National National League Leagu Charles Charles De De Ledesma
"kyi" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on The Book Review

"And the tie in to children is that I read these because I got them for my teenage daughter who is in a thriller phase. And I grabbed a bunch of thrillers from the office and brought them home for her. And now I'm reading her cast off. So she's already read these. And it's funny because when I ask her what they're about, she's like, oh, I don't know, I don't remember. Suu Kyi inherited that for me. I can barely remember what either of these books are about. And I read them within the last month. But they are the flight attendant by Chris bajillion and perfect little children by Sophie Hannah. They're very different, although there's some commonalities. And I remember actually asking you, probably around four or 5 years ago you'd review the book by Sophie Hannah in the times and I was like, oh, I've never read Sophie Hannah and I think I asked you for some advice. And it wasn't this book, because I think this may be her most recent one. And it has a very creepy little thing on the cover that says 12 years have passed. So why don't Thomas and Emily look a day older? I mean, that's the kind of central mystery it's about a woman who goes back to see her ex best Friends house. And sees her ex best friend there, they haven't talked in a number of years. 12 years. And she is sitting in her car outside her the house, the ex best friend and two little children pop out looking exactly like Thomas and Emily, but at the same age they were when the friendship fell apart. And so you are wondering what has happened is this some kind of cloning thing? Is it some crazy secret plot? Is the narrator crazy, which I feel like there's where you have something in common with the other book, the flight attendant. And with almost every other kind of domestic or psychological thriller, your intended to ask, like, is the person telling us this story crazy or am I? Someone must be somehow not getting it. The flight attendant really different book is about Cassandra bowden, who is a flight attendant and an alcoholic. And it sort of is kicked off when she wakes up in a hotel room in Dubai next to someone she's been out with flirting and having fun with and the guy is in her bed dead. I hate it when that happens. I'd just like to interject. To you or just generally in a book. Well, you know, when you have a one night stand and they're dead in the morning. It's really insulting is what it is. It's like, really, was it that? No. Yeah, but I actually love that. You know, that sort of premise, which, of course, is the premise for many a thriller. And I had never read a book by Chris bojan. He's a really good writer. You know, it's commercial, but it's smart, commercial, smart, thriller, stuff, you know, and funny speaking of dostoevsky. I can't remember if just yev in here, but there's a lot of Russian literature, I think there's definitely Tolstoy. There's a kind of intelligence assumed on the part of the reader that I found gratifying. It's definitely not lowest common denominator reading. The Sophie Hannah is.

Sophie Hannah Suu Kyi Chris bajillion Emily Thomas Cassandra bowden Chris bojan Dubai Tolstoy
"kyi" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"kyi" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Dilio Kyi's mad Milosevic Culliver scattered showers and storms with high round 83. Tonight's gonna trend dryer Decreasing clouds low 68. Then tomorrow partly cloudy sky greets you during the day. We do have a slight chance of a pop up afternoon shower and high of 86 for your Thursday Friday partly cloudy with a straight afternoon shower possible and a high of 88 currently it's 73 NewsRadio, 8 40 WHS kind of things I want to tell you about Tri County Ford. If you've got a ride right now, you don't need it anymore. You need to go to Tri County port. You're going to get above book value for that pre owned vehicle from Tri County Ford. I'm gonna give you above book value and you get to check right there on the spot. So come on out to try Can't afford 71 exit 18 just eight minutes from the gene Sneider freeway to come see them or call them it by 2 to 41 73 33. Now I want you to remember that number. If you're looking for a new job because they're looking for sales associates right now and try County Ford and I can tell you this When those Ford F 1 50 start rolling off those F two fifties and everything else once the chips go, you're going to get to some serious bank because nobody sells those try those f 1 50 is better than try County Ford. Sign up, Get on employed. Get get employed and get on with the tri County for the great great family atmosphere there and two days off per week Try California tri County four dot com. Please tell him Toni Kroos sent you. This view was worth the hike right? And it's a good way to stay on top of my health. Yes, I'm Cola Guard prescription colon cancer screening option for people 45 plus, at average risk have used screen for colon cancer..

Toni Kroos tomorrow 45 plus Dilio Kyi F 1 50 Ford Thursday Friday Tri County port eight minutes two days California gene Sneider freeway 2 to 88 Tonight 71 exit 18 41 73 33 WHS 8 40 dot com
When Yukon River Chum Stocks Collapsed, Donated Fish Came in From Bristol Bay

Native America Calling

02:00 min | 1 year ago

When Yukon River Chum Stocks Collapsed, Donated Fish Came in From Bristol Bay

"This summer saw some of the worst runs on alaska's yukon river but bristol bay processors have been enjoying great runs and donated fish to alaska native tribes along the yukon river kyi. Uk's olivia egberts reports. You're going to write the number of fish on this label. that's tanya ives. She's packing up chum. And kim salmon to be distributed to villages along the lower yukon river bristol. Bay processors sent the salmon too. Quick pack the only fish processing plant on the yukon. This donation is about twelve thousand. Pounds of salmon. Quick pack is splitting it up. Between ten lower yukon river villages the yukon river has seen its. Worst summer chum. Salmon run on record that means the commercial. Fishery is closed and puck can't sell salmon this year subsistence. Fishing for chum. Shook is also closed and many people along. The river have not had a taste of the fish yet. This season with puck voted the salmon community to community we down thousands of pounds of frozen fish a tender boats lowly motors up the cold rainy yukon. At the helm stands captain darren jennings saving delivering salmon to the villages is new to him in previous years. It'd be picking up commercial. Fisherman's fresh catch and taking it. Back to quick. Look we dock in saint. Mary's workers from all gotcha and undressed ski. Tribes the fish into their pickups and then drive them to households all evening a woman inge bay from saint. Mary's is grateful to have at least a bit of fish. We got to right now. I have them dying out. So i can can them with little opportunity for subsistence salmon. Fishing her grocery bill has gone out. her husband. walkie says they'll have to try for other species of fish to get them through the winter in saint. Mary's i'm olivia egberts.

Yukon River Olivia Egberts Tanya Ives Kim Salmon Yukon River Bristol Alaska Bristol Bay Darren Jennings UK Yukon Mary Walkie Saint
Myanmar's Suu Kyi Tells Lawyers Trial Testimony Against Her Is Wrong

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar's Suu Kyi Tells Lawyers Trial Testimony Against Her Is Wrong

"Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi tells lawyers testimony against her is fulls and whenever that the almighty did the one he did not give any secretary coming with missing with interest during the entire court hearing process and told us which testimony is wrong and which one should be cross examined the charges are relatively minor but if convicted could keep her from contesting new elections published by the minute tree within two years of its take other critics of the ruling junta safe the proceedings against suu kyi a politically motivated the meant to try to legitimize the military's seizure of power and discourage her I'm Charles Taylor this month

Suu Kyi Myanmar Charles Taylor
Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi Appears Personally in Court

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi Appears Personally in Court

"Myanmar's leader. Aung san suu. Cheap has appeared in court in person for the first time since the military seized power on february. First michael sullivan reports from neighboring thailand. Her lawyer says the seventy five year old suci looked in good health and wished myanmar's health as well. He said her defense team was able to meet with her for about thirty minutes. Before the largely procedural hearing in the capital nippy suji faces several charges including violating the colonial era official secrets act. if convicted. She could be jailed for up to fourteen years so she has been in detention since the morning of the coup. Her supporters say. The charges against her are politically motivated aimed at keeping her from holding office in the future. The military justified its goo- by claiming massive fraud in the november twenty twenty election. Suci party won in a landslide

Aung San Suu Myanmar Suci Michael Sullivan Nippy Suji Thailand Suci Party
Myanmar Coup: Aung San Suu Kyi Faces Fresh Charges

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Myanmar Coup: Aung San Suu Kyi Faces Fresh Charges

"Mazda. Pos leader aung sang suu. Chief faces fresh against her which could lead to have being imprisoned for up to fourteen years. Lawyers say this week. She was accused of breaking a secrets. Law dating back to the colonial era the charges for warning from u n special envoy that unless action is taken to calm the violent crackdown on protesters by the military hunter. A bloodbath is imminent gwen. Robinson is molecules. Bangkok correspondent t follows events in myanmar. Very classy grand. Good morning good afternoon. Good afternoon good to have you with. Just could you just recap the charges that aung san suu cheese now facing well. It's a variety The the initial ones were very You know baffling trivial including you know illegal possession of walkie-talkies and And then they were adding Other charges which seemed to be including very weirdly worded In spreading fear and alone under this As you mentioned the colonial-era law so it's not a hundred percent. Clear that the detail of held it charging or characterizing fear and alarm and how to see how she can spread fear big locked up in ninety dole with very little no exist to the world but these are the judges that the second set of challenges that we're announced on monday Actually carry a prison terms of up to fourteen whereas the previous ones were only three but actually rather academic because it's very clear that they the to is determined to you know throw everything they can to and Locker

Aung Sang Suu Mazda Gwen Myanmar Bangkok Robinson
Myanmar junta frees hundreds held for anti-coup protests

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar junta frees hundreds held for anti-coup protests

"My my state TV says over six hundred people imprisoned for protesting last month's coup have been released it's the first apparent gesture by the military to try to placate the protest movement witnesses outside Insein prison in young console busloads of mostly young people looking happy was some flashing the three finger gesture of defiance adopted by protesters the prisoners appear to be the hundreds of students detained in early March while demonstrating against the Fabry first coupe that ousted the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi I'm sorry I. Shockley

Insein Government Of Aung San Suu I. Shockley
Protests, tear gas in Myanmar after UN envoy urges action

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Protests, tear gas in Myanmar after UN envoy urges action

"Security forces in Myanmar have again used force to disperse anti coup protesters it comes a day off to the UN special envoy urged the security council to take action to quell John to violence that is left around fifty peaceful protesters dead and scores injured this week large protests have occurred daily across many cities and towns security forces are responding with grace if you simply through force and mass arrests the escalation of violence has put pressure on the world community to act to restrain the gentile which seized power on February first by ousting the elected government of Aung sung suu kyi I'm Sarah Bassett

Myanmar Security Council UN John Aung Sung Suu Sarah Bassett
More protests and funeral follow deadly shootings in Myanmar

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

More protests and funeral follow deadly shootings in Myanmar

"Another large protests took place in Mandalay near don't kill it with the two protesters were killed by police today India many of the protesters like those who killed workers from the railway wheel truck isn't civil servants have been taking part in a civil disobedience campaign against the gym into a funeral was also helpful young woman who was killed by police in the capital not Patel on February the ninth two days before her twentieth birthday the death was the first confirmed death amongst thousands of protesters who rallied against the fed refers to the top of the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi when nobody was released along my tries procession began a drive to the cemetery in Yangon Myanmar's biggest city about a thousand demonstrators on that the women onto an elevated roadway I'm Karen Thomas

Mandalay Patel India Aung San Suu Kyi FED Yangon Myanmar Karen Thomas
2 Myanmar protesters killed by police fire, reports say

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

2 Myanmar protesters killed by police fire, reports say

"Two anti coup protesters have been shot dead by riot police in Myanmar local media have reported the shootings had occurred in Myanmar's second largest city Mandalay where tear gas water cannons and rubber bullets had been used on protesters earlier in the day and you protesters in Myanmar's two largest cities also paid tribute to a young woman who died a day earlier after being shot by police during a rally against the military takeover US state department spokesperson net price offered his government's condolences and reiterated coals on the military to refrain from violence against peaceful protest is the military seized power earlier this month after detaining Nobel laureate Aung sung suu kyi saying elections in November what tainted by voting irregularities I'm Serra basses

Myanmar Us State Department Mandalay Aung Sung Suu Kyi Serra
Big protests across Myanmar as UN expert fears violence

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Big protests across Myanmar as UN expert fears violence

"Protesters against the military coup in man mall show no signs of backing down even ask for you an expert on human rights in Myanmar warms off the prospect for major violence thousands March down the swine flu bugs challenging for the release of detained leader Aung sung suu kyi the marches include importing some private banks and engineers in the second largest city of Mandalay thousands out protesting U. N. repertoire Tom Andrews has received reports of soldiers being transported into young going to make a city's outlying regions in a statement from his office in Geneva he said in the past such a troop movements preceded killings disappearances and detentions on a mass scale I'm Charles the last month

Aung Sung Suu Kyi Tom Andrews Myanmar FLU Mandalay Geneva Charles
Myanmar protests resume after 2nd night of internet shutdown

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar protests resume after 2nd night of internet shutdown

"Peaceful demonstrations against Myanmar's military takeover have resumed following violence against protesters a day earlier by security forces found internet access blocked this month's March streets before holding a demonstration outside the U. N.'s local office the presence of monks among the ranks of the demonstrators will help boost moral authority on the protest movement in a country where the vast majority of bodies and still deeply traditional protests as a demanding the nation's elected leader Aung sung suu kyi and members of the house to the government be freed from detention I'm Charles de Ledesma

U. N.'S Local Office Myanmar Aung Sung Suu Kyi Government Charles De Ledesma
Myanmar's Coup Leaders Level More Charges Against Ousted Leader Suu Kyi

Doug Stephan

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar's Coup Leaders Level More Charges Against Ousted Leader Suu Kyi

"More charges in Myanmar for ousted leader Aung Sung Souci, Her lawyer now says she is facing charges connected to a law that has been used to prosecute people who violated coronavirus restrictions that she was removed from office in a military coup more than two weeks ago, and protests have gone on in the

Aung Sung Souci Myanmar
Suu Kyi detention extended as protests continue in Myanmar

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Suu Kyi detention extended as protests continue in Myanmar

"Myanmar's military leaders have extended the detention of deposed leader Aung sung suu kyi all oil almost by suu kyi's political party to represent her since the deposed leader will now be remanded until February seventeenth when she will likely appear in court by video conference the Nobel laureate remains under house arrest on a minor charge of possessing unregistered imported walkie talkies the extended detention is likely to further inflame tensions between the military which is seized power in a coup two weeks ago on the protesters who've taken to the streets of cities across the southeast Asian nation seeking the return of the government they liked it I'm Charles Taylor that's my

Aung Sung Suu Suu Kyi Myanmar Charles Taylor
Myanmar rattled by army movements, expected internet cutoff

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar rattled by army movements, expected internet cutoff

"US numbers of demonstrators defied orders against protests and took to the streets of Myanmar once more to March against the military takeover that ousted the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi laws demonstrations were held in the major cities of Yangon Mandalay and the capital not PPL as well as in far flung areas dominated by ethnic minorities protesters near gone again rallied outside the Chinese and US embassies thank you Beijing a popping up the minute you regime in a proportion to the factions sensing the military resistance also took place in cyberspace hackers deface the government's needs website replacing its ten page with Watson pixies against someone to take care of a the accident took place after the routing to into issued a new order suspending several basic civil liberties the recent order allows authorities to carry out searches and make arrests without warrants and permits the detention of detainees for more than twenty four hours without permission I'm Karen Thomas

Government Of Aung San Suu Kyi Yangon Mandalay Myanmar Watson Pixies PPL United States Beijing Government Karen Thomas
Human Rights Council hears call for immediate release of Myanmar’s Suu Kyi

UN News

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Human Rights Council hears call for immediate release of Myanmar’s Suu Kyi

"Un human rights council debated a call on friday for the immediate release of myanmar's democratically elected leader. Aung sang succi along with other senior officials in a special session at the geneva-based council which is the preeminent forum for international rights issues. the united kingdom and european union presented a draft resolution condemning last week's military takeover the draft text urges the lifting of restrictions on the internet and unimpeded humanitarian access. Here's another al-nashif deputy high commissioner for human rights. Let us be clear. The indiscriminate use of lethal or less than lethal weapons against peaceful protesters is unacceptable more violence against me and must people will only compound the illegitimacy of the cool and the culpability of its leaders. Special rapporteur on the human rights situation in myanmar. Thomas andrews also urged the international community not to recognize the country's military leaders arbitrary detentions and intimidation. I increasing the independent rights expert continued adding that political leaders were targets as well as community and civil society leaders myanmar's ambassador to responded by underscoring his country's commitment to democratic values and justified the military's intervention as

Aung Sang Succi Geneva-Based Council Preeminent Forum For Internati Myanmar Un Human Rights Council Thomas Andrews European Union United Kingdom AL
Biden orders sanctions on Myanmar generals as key Aung San Suu Kyi aide detained

Monocle 24: The Globalist

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Biden orders sanctions on Myanmar generals as key Aung San Suu Kyi aide detained

"President joe biden has approved new sanctions on me and mas military rulers. following last week's coup biden's also called for the release of detained political officials including the day. Facto leader aung sang suu. Chee this comes out to her. Top aide to see chee and several others linked to the previous government would attained overnight in another round of political

President Joe Biden Aung Sang Suu Biden
Water cannon fired at protesters as crowds swell in Myanmar

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Water cannon fired at protesters as crowds swell in Myanmar

"Confrontations between the authorities and demonstrators protesting against last week's coup in Myanmar have boiled over please follow will to kind of a large crowd of peaceful protesters in Myanmar's capital non violent protests demanding the release of detained leader suu kyi and the restoration of her government have spread all over the country with the win of them growing after the authorities on Sunday lifted a brief all internet access there have been no signs of protests is all the minute train all backing down in the argument over who is the country's legitimate government the National League for democracy politics well the military who claim a recent poll was marred by voting fooled I'm Charles de Ledesma

Myanmar Suu Kyi National League For Democracy Charles De Ledesma
"kyi" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"kyi" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg business app and and Bloomberg Quick Take. This is a Bloomberg business flash. Some of the PM I data that we had over the weekend has been pretty good. I mean, if you look at the number for Australia on the manufacturing side of reading of 57.2 all the way up from 55. 0.7 in the month of December. Now the China numbers relative to market expectations were disappointing, but you haven't official manufacturing PM I now at 51 3. And on nonmanufacturing. PM I at 52. I'm sorry. That's the composite. The composite is 52.8. So in both cases, the numbers wild below expectations are above 50. So it implies that there is still some expansion going on. We're going to get the private survey for China. In a little while from now And then, if you look at the trade data for South Korea exports up 11.4% the chip sector alone with an increase of 21.7%. So a fair amount of reason to celebrate If you look at the PM, I But then when you go to Australia and look at the fact that Perth in western Australia is going to be locked down and then on top of that we have the Prime Minister Scott Morrison saying. The government will no longer or can no longer run a blank check budget to combat the impact of the virus. Right now in Sydney, the market remains weak, but we're well off the worst level of the day here for the ASX 200 Down about 1/10 of 1%. The Nikkei higher by 8/10 of 1% and the Kospi is up more than 1.1%. Let's get to San Francisco next for an update on global news at Baxter's in the Bloomberg 9 16 years from Ed. All right, thank you. Douglas Coup in Myanmar NLD party leader on song suit She has been Detained and an early morning raid. The party says she's being detained by the military and that it is a coup. It says The army is asking that the parliament not be convened today as scheduled. Australia's western city of Perth will go into full lockdown for five days after a troubling case of covert has been found Their Australia's health minister says green flights From New Zealand will resume this afternoon. Potential for more lockdown soon in Hong Kong says it may expand the small targeted lockdowns as it wants to get cases down to zero. Frances reporting out cases increasing again after leveling off for a time. New York City City's emergency management commissioner says what he expected. Heavy snowstorm coming in resident should plan to stay home tomorrow. National WEATHER Service says Central Park could get from 12 to 18 inches. And a group of 10. US Republicans introducing a scaled down stimulus package. The president's packages 1.9 Trillion. This one is 600 billion. We'll see where it goes in San Francisco. I've been I'm Ed Baxter. This is Bloomberg. I'm learning how to say my name all over again. It's Edward Baxter. Thanks it alright, very much on. I'm Juliet Sally in Singapore. We have speaking to reach it. Howrah, CEO of Port Shelter Investment Management on the line for us from Hong Kong, Richard, We're talking about the balance here between economies staying open and, of course containing the virus, and I wanted to get your thoughts to as to what you were saying. Here is that long term It looks like authorities have destroyed the financial system. We know 2020 was all about a lot of stimulus. Well, that's right. You know, we've seen a next ordinary amount of money. The money tree is being shaken some laps. It's almost got no loose on it on. You have to wonder whether Or what That amount of liquidity is going to do in the future. But I also get a sense that there's a growing disquiet, you know, populations could only be locked down for so long. So the Western countries on there is more of a clamor for opening up the economy because in a sense Well, there we have a medical pandemic. We've also got on economic pandemic some kind of economy Temic because we've got now the economies which are so sick that they have to be supported by Millions of public money in certain areas. We're losing airlines for losing major chunks of the economies of the moment on bats, all gonna have to be rebuilt after the event. Exactly And at the same time we're also looking at geopolitical concerns. We do have a new presidency in the US, But of course, the old concerns don't necessarily dissipation. What's your thought on how we'll see a relationship between President she and President Biden. Well, I think you know, it'll probably changed the previously It's being personally very poor. I think Biden and she, of course and no known each other for a decade or so. They were vice presidents together, So on a personal basis, they may get on rather better. But you know, the Democrats and I think, by the in particular are particularly concerned about A human rights issue, and they're not in a mood to let that go s so I think that relations will still remain difficult. The bottom line, though, is that if you're looking at the supply chain just supply chains of pretty tight You know, these guys need to trade with each other. America has a demand. China has a supply. They are both dependent on each other economically, And I don't think that you can Really look at the higher level and said, because it was a difficult there that we're going to see any real relaxation in the trade relationship. Exactly All right, let's have a look. A swell of what we're saying in terms off the vaccine roller more globally because there has been concerns about what's happening in Europe. You're talking about the lockdown. So there you're saying not surprising, well behind the game here. Well, the thing is that the low hanging fruit the easy way to get out of it is for people to have the the injection. The Japs on People being vaccinated, you know, unearthing the students and cases, but the vaccinations will start taking over. That's the easy it If you don't have that easy excuse, Of course, you're going to feel behind the line, and I think the European commissioners found itself under intense political pressure. Maybe not acting early..

Bloomberg Australia president Ed Baxter San Francisco Hong Kong China President Biden US Perth Edward Baxter South Korea Central Park Sydney Douglas Coup Europe New York official army