35 Burst results for "KRISTA"

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:48 min | Last week

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"High is at Arley. . Yes Hi Krista yes good to meet. . Thank you so much for doing this and I. . so apologize for the delay as we had in this totally unusual and I think it happened twice with you I. . Really Apologize. . No problem but but what we need to talk about has not. . diminished. . So here we are. . We have construction going on here in our in our studio and so like coming in. . itself is very quiet, but , there's just hammering as I walk in. . For an audio yeah program. . So good. . Are you? ? Are they going to I mean I don't hear it so. . Where where are you? ? Right now. . Are, , you talking to me? ? Yes. . Yeah. . I'm in North Gate Hall, , which is in. . The basement of the journalism department at UC Berkeley Okay Okay Yeah Berkeley. . Three blocks from our home. . Oh, , what a what a wonderful place to live. . <hes>. . I think we're pretty good here. . I. . Don't like to. . I. Don't . want to start talking about anything substantive until we're really doing it. So . yeah, , I. . Think we're fine. . Good and where you KRISTA. . Minneapolis. . Okay. . Yeah. . Yeah. . It's you'll. . You'll understand this <hes> I grew up in Oklahoma and kind of went far far far far far away and <hes>. . And that's become more important to me in these recent years that you know that he and <hes>, , and then our studios in Minneapolis has been for a long time and. . I've thought across the years about how the show might have been served by being on one of the coasts and. . And in these last few years since two thousand sixteen. . I'm I'm so glad we're in the middle of the country you know. . It's Really important in life giving. . So. . Good Yeah So, , you were the child of a Foreign Service officer. . So you sound like you grew up all over the world. . Well. . Yes to to some degree. . Yeah. . Starting at age twelve. . Yeah it was pivotal. . Father was ambassador us. . Ambassador to New Zealand. . Ghana and Tunisia. . Yeah we don't need to go into his rank spread. . Yeah. . But did you live where those places you lived in I <hes> lived in Israel? ? And from aged twelve to fourteen, , very pivotal experience. . And <hes> then <hes>. . New Zealand Wellington New Zealand. . The university. . <hes> there <hes> Victoria University so <hes> in New Zealand and then <hes> my folks <hes> were in Ghana and I spent a summer. . Ana But by then I was in college and then they weren't Tunisia and I. . Actually spent <hes> five months a doing a study on the emancipation of Tunisia and girls so. . These French questionnaires. . Second Year of Grad School at Berkeley. . So. . <hes> yes. . So I was very. . Fortunate, , really to <hes>, , get to experience all that. . Yeah. . Yeah was there <hes> a religious or spiritual background to your childhood <hes> in your family or in those places? ? Yeah. . Yeah. . I would say there there was <hes>. . And <hes>. . So. . Are we starting your going? ? Yeah. . All right okay. . <hes> yeah <hes> my parents were very religious, , unitarian? ? And <hes>. . So religious in the sense of it being a very important thing to go to church on Sunday and. . My brother and I would. . Kind of. . Wrestle with each other and tickle. . In the back seat of her whole sudden Hudson in Silver Spring Maryland and <hes>. . <hes>. . And Go. . Drive to all souls UNITARIAN church in Washington DC very important to my father especially and I didn't feel particularly religious. . At that point and. . But if I look back on it what. . <hes> the influence of that was is that. . There's <hes>. . An important part of one's self to express and <hes> to learn to develop and that. . For. . UNITARIAN inside the message I took away is that it's very big world and we have to learn to. . <hes> get to know and. . Empathize with. . People in radically different cultures and that that's a good thing to live in a big world. . I think by the time I was. . Sixteen. . I had that message, , but I felt something missing. . And <hes> I got interested in quakers who? ? Be Much. . More. . Okay Gang. . So what are we going to do about it? ? You know view terriers were very talky. . Talkers talk talk of the thinkers looked like they were kind of. . <hes> interesting. . They were doers, , and so I would say. . That that. . Connection for me. . <hes> when I was in high school <hes>, , very informal I didn't become a former quaker anything. . But <hes>. . It led me to <hes> volunteer on weekends when I was in high school <hes>. . At something we called Neighbourhood House on tenth and L.. . Street. . was in the middle of the. . <hes> the back area of Washington

Tunisia Krista Tippett New Zealand New Zealand Wellington New Zea Berkeley Arley Minneapolis Ghana Oklahoma North Gate Hall Silver Spring Maryland Israel Mike Victoria University Grad School Foreign Service officer
Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:48 min | Last week

Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

"High is at Arley. Yes Hi Krista yes good to meet. Thank you so much for doing this and I. so apologize for the delay as we had in this totally unusual and I think it happened twice with you I. Really Apologize. No problem but but what we need to talk about has not. diminished. So here we are. We have construction going on here in our in our studio and so like coming in. itself is very quiet, but there's just hammering as I walk in. For an audio yeah program. So good. Are you? Are they going to I mean I don't hear it so. Where where are you? Right now. Are, you talking to me? Yes. Yeah. I'm in North Gate Hall, which is in. The basement of the journalism department at UC Berkeley Okay Okay Yeah Berkeley. Three blocks from our home. Oh, what a what a wonderful place to live. I think we're pretty good here. I. Don't like to. I. Don't want to start talking about anything substantive until we're really doing it. So yeah, I. Think we're fine. Good and where you KRISTA. Minneapolis. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. It's you'll. You'll understand this I grew up in Oklahoma and kind of went far far far far far away and And that's become more important to me in these recent years that you know that he and and then our studios in Minneapolis has been for a long time and. I've thought across the years about how the show might have been served by being on one of the coasts and. And in these last few years since two thousand sixteen. I'm I'm so glad we're in the middle of the country you know. It's Really important in life giving. So. Good Yeah So, you were the child of a Foreign Service officer. So you sound like you grew up all over the world. Well. Yes to to some degree. Yeah. Starting at age twelve. Yeah it was pivotal. Father was ambassador us. Ambassador to New Zealand. Ghana and Tunisia. Yeah we don't need to go into his rank spread. Yeah. But did you live where those places you lived in I lived in Israel? And from aged twelve to fourteen, very pivotal experience. And then New Zealand Wellington New Zealand. The university. there Victoria University so in New Zealand and then my folks were in Ghana and I spent a summer. Ana But by then I was in college and then they weren't Tunisia and I. Actually spent five months a doing a study on the emancipation of Tunisia and girls so. These French questionnaires. Second Year of Grad School at Berkeley. So. yes. So I was very. Fortunate, really to get to experience all that. Yeah. Yeah was there a religious or spiritual background to your childhood in your family or in those places? Yeah. Yeah. I would say there there was And So. Are we starting your going? Yeah. All right okay. yeah my parents were very religious, unitarian? And So religious in the sense of it being a very important thing to go to church on Sunday and. My brother and I would. Kind of. Wrestle with each other and tickle. In the back seat of her whole sudden Hudson in Silver Spring Maryland and And Go. Drive to all souls UNITARIAN church in Washington DC very important to my father especially and I didn't feel particularly religious. At that point and. But if I look back on it what. the influence of that was is that. There's An important part of one's self to express and to learn to develop and that. For. UNITARIAN inside the message I took away is that it's very big world and we have to learn to. get to know and. Empathize with. People in radically different cultures and that that's a good thing to live in a big world. I think by the time I was. Sixteen. I had that message, but I felt something missing. And I got interested in quakers who? Be Much. More. Okay Gang. So what are we going to do about it? You know view terriers were very talky. Talkers talk talk of the thinkers looked like they were kind of. interesting. They were doers, and so I would say. That that. Connection for me. when I was in high school very informal I didn't become a former quaker anything. But It led me to volunteer on weekends when I was in high school At something we called Neighbourhood House on tenth and L.. Street. was in the middle of the. the back area of Washington

Tunisia New Zealand Berkeley New Zealand Wellington New Zea Washington Minneapolis Ghana Arley Oklahoma North Gate Hall Israel Neighbourhood House Grad School Victoria University Silver Spring Maryland Officer Foreign Service
Character of God: A Cup of Wrath?

The Bible Project

06:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Character of God: A Cup of Wrath?

"Okay, here we are we are talking about. Anger. We're talking about God's. and. We're talking about exodus thirty, four versus six and seven were said to be slow to anger, and here in this conversation is like the previous conversations, Tim Tim. Hi And KRISTA accuracy. So Let's jump right in. We've just kind of been taking ground Tim you've been walking us through some of the revelations you've had studying God's anger and God's judgments I don't know if Chris you're Tim WanNa do a bit of a summary Or. If you want me to or do you WanNa just jump right in share I can go for it. Okay. So the first thing we talked about was that this is kind of an uncomfortable topic for a lottery. Reasons that anger is a difficult thing for us to understand in humans and also in God. So we talked about that. We talked about how God's anger God's judgment are not intertwined in the biblical story. So God gets angry without judging. Actually he shows acts of mercy the first time that he gets angry and then he judges often or brings justice without being angry we talked about how bringing judgement or justice is often a handing over to natural consequence or to. Zion that actually I started avoiding the word natural. Because that's just loaded with some modern concepts I actually struggling to find a good replacement word, but it's the logical outcome. Hands people over to the cause effects sequence that they have chosen. Started themselves something like that yes. Oh, we looked at the first occurrence of God's anger with. Moses. After he resists being God's Prophet five times and that's followed by an act of mercy. He just says, okay. Well, I'll send Aaron with you to help you out. We looked at the incident of the golden calf where God gets angry at the people and talked about how his Anger a lot of times is related to to his people not trusting him or or breaking the relationship with him. So a lot of times, his anger or his judgment occur in that context. So that tells us something about divine anchor consum- some red. Okay. Anything else good summary. So I think where we WANNA come from here then is just look at main portraits of God's anger in the Torah in the Prophets of Old Testament and then. After. That in the story of Jesus how Jesus Came as a as a prophet of good news in Israel. But also that comes with a warning of God's judgement, and then after that exploring God's anger in especially in the letters the Apostle Paul he he's got a pretty nuanced way of talking about it. So the Torah, the Prophets Jesus and then Paul that's the roadmap simple. So. Okay. So let's we already talked about the three first occurrences of God's anger. They're all in the book of Exodus when Moses Stubborn and resist. You just Kinda summarize Krista the second one is after Pharaoh and his army perish in the Red Sea. There's a poem that Moses Miriam Sang about it and they talk about how what happened to Pharaoh was instance of God's anger to bring barrels evil back on himself and then the story of the Golden Calf and we talked about that a fair amount in the last conversation I wanted kind of zero in on it as we start actually here and I've been reflecting on that last conversation then I think I have a few. Better ways to to say it what divine an anger means in the story of the Golden Calf. So God gets angry of Moses Beckett Exodus three. But as you said, he doesn't act in any kind of severe way. Does it at the burning Bush inside the burning Bush when you get to the people all of a sudden God is angry and he wants to destroy his people to to bring an end to them is what he says to Moses give me rest I want to bring an end to them and that is severe. John Every time. Read it. It makes you little allergic and uncomfortable. So here's a way to think about it. The whole narrative of the biblical story is got a point humans to be as representatives in the world they rebel they WANNA, get blessing by their own wisdom, and so they you know take from the Tree God, exiles them, and what they do is corrupt and ruin the land through violence and bloodshed flood. God appoints a new humanity noah, his wife and his family, and they go and repeat everything that Adam and eve and their kids did from the chapters genesis. So God tries this new strategy of investing in one particular family out of all the nations that's Abraham and so. Pretty much from Abraham four word God it's as if the more corrupt humans become, the more tightly got binds himself to one particular Human Family through these covenant promises and these Covenant Promises Create More Complexity for God's purpose not less 'cause. Now God's committing himself investing himself allowing certain people to be as representatives, but there are no better in fact, they're often worse than other people. So by the time you get to the Mount Sinai. God has married himself to a whole nation of people and we talked about this principle that I tend to get more emotionally stirred up by people the. More emotionally connected to this kind of a natural thing. So I think that's actually a really important dynamic 'cause the rest of the Old Testament. After Abraham is all about God's relationship to one family, and what you'll see is that God gets most angry in the all estimate at the people who are most close to him and I think that's important because that's actually part of the Messianic trajectory of the Old Testament. Story. Is that these people are selected from among the nations to get God's blessing but that also makes them more liable to God's justice than your average whatever ancient Babylonian something because God didn't rescue the Babylonians out of Egypt. So they're not as obligated to be faithful to him but when the people that he did rescue are not faithful to him it makes him more angry. This helps us at least begin to think about God's intense anger in the Old Testament is mostly directed to the people of Israel and the golden calf story is a good good example of that.

Golden Calf Tim Tim Abraham Israel Moses Stubborn Moses Beckett Moses Miriam Aaron Tim Wan Egypt Bush Mount Sinai Krista Red Sea Adam Chris Paul John
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:46 min | 2 weeks ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"We talked about in this show tradition. There is always a shorter produce version of this wherever you found this podcast. Good afternoon. And welcome to poetry and on being with. Krista, Tippett and Jericho. Brown. Yes you can wish. Yes. Yes. We. Have a rare opportunity to sit in on a private conversation with Krista in Jericho this afternoon. Thank you for joining us. Here, at the Dodge Poetry Festival, we've always felt that one of the essential qualities of poetry is the questions. It asks that continuously ask questions about what it means to be human being. Doesn't always give the answers, but it s important questions for over fifteen years on on being other radio programs. KRISTA. Tippett has been asking those same essential questions to poets, artists, musicians, astrophysicists, philosophers, mathematicians, a whole amazing array of people with very different points of view. So it seemed to us an absolute natural to bring together. Her questioning curious mind and the perspective of on being, which is to ask essential questions about what does that mean to be a human being with the dodge poetry festival. So we are thrilled that the first of these three conversations are happening today the you're with us please help me welcome Krista Tippett and Jericho Brown..

Krista Tippett Jericho Brown Jericho
4 Ways to Live Each Day With Intention by Shelley Levitt

Optimal Living Daily

04:27 min | Last month

4 Ways to Live Each Day With Intention by Shelley Levitt

"For ways to live each day with intention by. Shelley. Levitt with live. Happy Dot. com. I WANNA move through life energy and a sense of discovery achievement, joy and engagement. That is my intention. My hope is that living according to it would be the antidote. The uneasy feeling I often have at the end of the day when I flop into bed filled with self-reproach and wonder where my time went. My. Intent is to be guided by purpose instead of feeling that I'm spending my time haphazardly succumbing to whim or distraction according to expert Mallika Chopra creator of the website intense dot com and psychologist Eliot. Berkman. Head of the social ineffective neuroscience lab at the University of Oregon setting intentions. Confession is a kind of internal northstar lighting, the path to greater fulfillment and life satisfaction. These are the changes I've made in the few weeks since setting my intention. Number One, I meditate almost daily. Is taking me years to commit to a meditation habits but the ten or fifteen minutes I spent doing a guided meditation on the common APP has been transformative. The turning point was a workshop I took with so Kessedjian Norman Fisher, a poet and Zen Buddhist priest. When people say they don't have time to meditate. He said I asked them how do you have time to not meditate with a regular mindfulness practice he went on you'll have fewer accidents you lose things less frequently your focus will improve making decisions will become easier. Remarkably found all these things to be true and when I'm feeling stressed I summoned the image I visualized during my meditation I imagine my breath as a long string of pearls and it helps reconnect with that experience of stillness yet as good as meditation makes me feel I'll skip it unless I keep to a schedule. So make sure to meditate daily at eleven am with four PM has a backup. Number two, I've stopped binging on the news. More than ever I. Feel it's important to stay informed but watching new show afternoons show wasn't bringing greater insight into the issues. I care about is only fueling a sense of outrage and I'm happy to have added The Washington Post, my beloved New, York Times subscription reading either one in bed was only deepening my chronic insomnia. So of made some rules, no new shows or Newspapers after nine. PM. Instead I think about how? I WanNa feel inspired amused transported and lanes and I choose what I want to read watch listen to based on that this has led to fewer hours with CNN and more with globe netflix's comedy about a real life women's wrestling league from the eighties the on being with Krista Tippett podcast and Elena Ferrante as beautiful Neapolitan novels. Number three, I cook more. I'd like to lose five or ten pounds, but resolving to lose weight is usually both joyless an unsuccessful. So instead I think about nourishing myself in ways that will align with my intention to feel more energize. And that helps to your me away from takeout Chinese food and into my kitchen when I cook pots of Faro. Embrace Swiss chard practice poaching the perfect tag and dig into cookbooks like Paulo I of food of Morocco and what to eat for how you feel the new all your data kitchen by divvy alter. And try new dishes like Paulo's egg plans a luke or devious sprouted among solid also experienced that sense of discovery and achievement that I'm looking for. Number four, I do at least one new thing each weekend. I've been having all sorts of new experiences, a meeting interesting people volunteering to do kitchen prep at a food pantry hiking trail taking a class in brewing booja walking the Los Angeles River in a meet up led by long distance, swimming champion Diane, and yet attending a talk by no Levine author of Dharma police at the inaugural Budapest in La. Some outings have turned out to be less than inspired. The less said about the mass meditation held at a conscious life expo the better but I always feel like falling through on my intention to step outside my comfort zone. I'm far from living completely in line with my intentions. Three countless ways I stray from the path but feeling courage rather than defeated I've more clarity about the way in which small things Afar too messy desk and unmade bed can undermine your vision of how you want your life to unfold and I think it'll be able to put some new habits in place soon.

Berkman Elena Ferrante Paulo Mallika Chopra Levitt Shelley University Of Oregon Kessedjian Norman Fisher Los Angeles River Insomnia Afar Krista Tippett CNN Eliot Netflix Diane Morocco LA York Times Levine
Why 2020 hasnt taken Rev. angel by surprise

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:04 min | Last month

Why 2020 hasnt taken Rev. angel by surprise

"At such a pace what we're experiencing now in our society were just cycling through it were digesting the material of the misalignment were digesting the material of how intolerable it is to be intolerant. We're digesting the material if four, hundred, five, Hundred Years of historical context that we have decided to leave behind. Our heads and we are choosing to turn over our shoulders and say I must face this because it is intolerable to live in any other way than away that allows me. To be in contact with my full loving human self. I feel like you. Name something here. That this evolution, we were in a moment we're using this language of the moment. and. We we were already in the moment in a way we were building to this in all its complexity. Yes which not all pretty and not all hopeful, but it's all of a piece. You know I wonder yeah. Were You Almost WANNA ask you you know I want to ask you how I WanNa ask you this personally as well as in terms of drawing out your wisdom, your spiritual wisdom I wonder if the price you. Know. That at all. I think we are This body. This body that we call a nation is ready for this. And Anybody that has had a great amount of. Toxicity as part of the IT system has to heave out that toxicity. And we've had a lot of ways to suppress it and a lot of ways to get it a lot of ways to. Purchase things and distract ourselves and Watch net flicks. All sorts of other things that we can do. But. We have had a long history in this country. It's sort of baked into the structure of. The design I talk a lot about the design of this country to have so many people disembodied. And I think that we had an amazing extraordinary painful. And yet collective experience of a sufficient quieting. Allowed us to feel this collective body that we are as a nation. New and there's a whole bunch of. Individual bodies in there that said enough. I can't I can't tolerate this. What is here? Because I can feel it now I can see it and The uprisings and the particular. The potency of. George. Not only his death, the means of his death and the. The expression of his death and I mean. Literally, right the expression. The physical embodiment, the expression on the officer's face. The expression of his death through the media, the expression of his death. Was Too much for this body to continue to bear. Yeah. I. Also think about how? Soft we were. Elected body and our individual bodies. We had each and every one of us whatever their circumstances of our lives kind of felt for the ground beneath our feet. And our defenses down. There the pandemic created A. Four strict treat. Wounds we unforced retreat. and. I've done retreat many years. And there's always this point in during retreat where you feel you're not knowing come into. Into into your view. There's there's one thing to move around the world and say, Oh, I don't know we have not. No. It's another thing to just feel it to to come into confrontation. With your knowing and it is tender as you said, like it is a tender. Place to be in confrontation with that and and it's different. I think entirely. To have been not just individual, but to also feel the reverberations of. The collective not knowing. And as a as a country, we've

Officer George
Mary Oliver Is Listening to the World

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:20 min | Last month

Mary Oliver Is Listening to the World

"The question I always start with whether I'm interviewing physicist or poet is I'd like to hear whether there was a spiritual background here life early life your childhood however, you would define it now. Well I would defied it very differently from what I was a child. I was said to Sunday school as many kids are. And then I had trouble with the resurrection. So I would not join the church but I was still probably more interested than many of the kids did at enter the church it's been one of the most important interests of my life. And continues to be. And it doesn't have to be Christianity I'm very much taken with the poet. Rumi who is a Muslim Sufi poet. And read him every day. and. Have no answers but have some suggestions I know that a life is much richer with spiritual. Part. To it. And I also think nothing is more interesting. So I, cling to it right and then. You I mean you talk about growing up in a sad depressed place a difficult place I mean in another you don't you don't Belabor this I mean in another place there's a place you talk about. Your one of many thousands who've had insufficient childhoods. But that you spend a lot of your time walking around the woods. Yes Ohio I did and and I think it saved my life. I to this day I, don't care for the enclosure of buildings. It was a very bad childhood. For everybody, every member of the household, not just myself I. Think. And I escape did. Barely with years of. Trouble. But I did find that the entire world. In looking for something. But. I got saved by poetry and I got saved by the beauty of the world. Yeah and and there's such a convergence of those things. Yeah. It seems all the way through in your life as a poet. It is it is a convergence and. Have a little difficulty now having lived for fifty years in small town in the north. I'm trying very hard to love the mangroves. Well I know it takes a while I have to say you and your poetry. For. Me are so closely identified with province town this and that part of the world and. And that kind of dramatic weather. Yes. Kind of shore. Yes. and so when I you know and I had this amazing opportunity to come visit you and I and I look and great, we're going to Cape Cod. To Florida. Well, I just sold by Condo to a very dear. this summer. And I bought a little house start here, which is needs very serious reconstruction. So I'm not yet. But sometimes, it's time for the age. Though for all those years for decades of your writing. This picture was there view this pleasure of walking and writing and? I don't know standing with your notebook. Yes and actually writing while you're walking. Yes. I did it and it is, and it seems like such a gift that you've found that way to be a writer and have that daily. Have Well I. Don't as I say I don't like buildings. Yeah. So I was I the only the only record I broken in school was truancy. I went to the woods a lot with with books right Whitman in the. Knapsack. But I also liked motion. So I just began with these little notebooks and scribbled things as I they came to me and then work them into poems later. And always I wanted the I many of the poems I did this I did this. I saw this I I wanted them the I to be the possible reader. rather than about myself it was about an experience that happened to be mind but could well have been anybody else's and that was my feeling about the I. I have been criticized by one editor who felt that the I would be felt as ego. And I thought well I'm going to risk it and see. And I think it worked. It adjoined. The reader into the experience of the poem. I became the kind of person who did the walking in the scribbling yeah. But shared it. Yeah. If if they wanted it, yes. You also use this word. You know there's this place where you're talking about. Writing while walking listening deeply and I love this listening listening conviviality. Yes. Yeah and listening really to the world the stick to the world. Well, I I did that I still do it. I still

Rumi Physicist Cape Cod Florida Ohio Whitman Writer Editor
[Unedited] Michael McCarthy with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:41 min | Last month

[Unedited] Michael McCarthy with Krista Tippett

"I'm so delighted to be. Speaking with you. I can't tell you how much I love your book and I'm telling everyone about it. Yeah. It's as marked up. Emmy Book I have ever read. In the Bible including the Bible and I picked it up just on a table in a bookstore in Saint Paul Minnesota Twin cities. Different questions for me before we get going I think. Okay. I'm happy to respond to you. Yeah I don't I. So I don't usually do Generally do book interviews but really, and I've dug little bit and I've also looked at your. Some. Of Your other writing but I really. So so we're we're not talking about the book, but essentially we're talking about. Everything, the book is about. So I yeah so Chris I think we're good great. Okay. Yes and so we have a nice amount of time to have a big. Real wandering conversation. I would like to start I I I. Start Most of my interviews with a question just just wondering about The religious or spiritual background of someone's childhood I find. That is a very fertile place and everybody's imagination whatever their story is. It's full of questions and searching and softness so. However you would. However, you would begin to to think of that. How would you? How would you Described the religious or spiritual background of your childhood. I would use a curious phrase to describe. What I am now I would describe myself as an ethnic Catholic. Okay. that was a phrase I can't claim authorship of it was used by. British woman politician about twenty years ago meaning there's I grew up a Roman Catholic. and I have abandoned the faith. The formerly at any right but the belief system if not not necessarily. Belief in heaven now but the. The sense of right and wrong I think Stays with you all your life and you relate to it. Was it Mary? McCarthy who read a book called wants to Catholic. And I think the sense of right and wrong and also I think he'll go strong sets. Of Original Sin Yeah I. Think I'm quite aware that is a very dark side to the species mom. If, we can say that these days I think the the species is still called mind it's a human being. and so even though I'm not formally religious. I, like to think I. Suppose that I carry with me what people might describe as a religious sensibility. And I feel like right at the beginning of of your book The Moss snowstorm nature enjoy. You I mean this is this is a this is a book about our bond with the natural world. Right and you and you start it. It's also woven, and that bond is both civilizational. It's at once civilizational and species something about our species, but it's also personal. and so and you do we've that personal story all the way through your reflection on this large subject. End You know you're use the word a soul in this way rather early you describe your mother's illness and She she was away for a time institutionalized and. One of the things that happened to you as a child is it you you had a lack of feeling about that. that you could perceive, but then you describe this day. And here's just the sentences. That there was a singular window. Of observing butterflies and he said when I was a skinny kid in short pants, butterflies entered my soul. So where'd you just tell a little bit of that story as and why that is a vantage point for you on again, this large civilizational issue. It was really just a personal way. Of, my own way through my own personal experience. Of. Beginning explore. the strange conundrum which it seems to me that we can actually love very fiercely the natural world I we sort of take that for granted as commonplace. But as I got older, it seemed to me rather curious phenomenon because after all the natural world is only the the environment from which we emerge to species like every other species. Unlike. Every other species there are two things that they're not sure world has for us. One is danger. One is utility because the natural world can be dangerous and it can kill you. You can have thousands of people killed by snakes in India every year still or not show world can be a great advantage. It can provide you food and shelter and various other things. And all species are aware even if instinctively of these things but we have a third thing, which is that we can actually love the natural world.

Emmy Saint Paul Minnesota Twin Chris Mccarthy India Mary
Why Is a Brain-Shaped Blob In Canada?

BrainStuff

03:10 min | 2 months ago

Why Is a Brain-Shaped Blob In Canada?

"Stuff. This is Krista. Sager. lagoons are famous for creepy swamp preachers but in Canadian Park in Vancouver British, Columbia scientists have found something possibly just as outlandish a slimy gelatinous brain blob. Well, okay. It's not really a brain and it's not really even an it. It's a collection of tiny creatures collectively called a magnificent bryozoans or also known by its Latin name as Pectin Tele. MAGNIFICO this colony forms a brain shaped mass can grow to be larger than a human head and I think we can all agree that's a really weird now bryozoans sometimes, they're also called Maas animals there an. Ancient Group of filter feeders. The earliest fossil evidence of one of these colonies can be dated back about four hundred, seventy, million years individually each tiny invertebrate called Zo Lloyd Ken just barely be seen with the naked eye it's only about half a millimeter or about point zero, two inches long. But when hundreds of them assemble, they can glue themselves together with a special protein to form all sorts of shapes, sheets, columns, and even branched tree like structures. Now, actually, fossilized bryozoans are among the world's most abundant fossils as well, and you can find them in rocks originating more than four hundred. And fifty million years ago up until the present, their colonies start with a single zoysia which asexually reproduces until it's got an entire army of clones to hang out with most bryozoans, species live in marine habitats but the one found in Vancouver's Stanley Park belongs in freshwater it just doesn't really belong in Vancouver Canada this August the Stanley. Park Ecology Society held its annual bio blitz a community event in which citizens scientists survey the park identifying hundreds of organisms in twenty four hours in the lost lagoon, which is the parks bio filtration pond blitz goers discovered the giant slimy football shaped. Bribes zone thousands of miles from home. Their usual range is decidedly to the south of Canada and east of the Mississippi River and it turns out. This isn't the first time. A magnificent bryozoans has been found in this part of Canada and nobody can tell whether they're staying either. But why they're there is a different question like with most migrating or these days warming global temperatures might have opened the door of the great white north to these probably ecologically harmless blobs they need a water temperature warmer than sixty degrees Fahrenheit or sixteen degrees Celsius in order to make a go of it.

Vancouver Canada Stanley Park Pectin Tele Canadian Park Park Ecology Society Lloyd Ken Columbia Mississippi River Sager. Football
[Unedited]  Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:06 min | 2 months ago

[Unedited] Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

"Ning and. Welcome back to winter. Someone someone wrote me today instead it's raining feathers. So welcome to the institute. I'm Liz Armstrong. Curator. Of Contemporary Art, and we are very pleased to be hosting the second live interview with Krista Tippett for her show and broadcast of on being. As. Many of you know Christa was here two months ago when she spoke with Hamilton and what was a fascinating and far-reaching conversation they covered everything from spiritual act of art making to the strange intimacy of museums where people can be alone together. The the this interview, and that one we're presented. In conjunction with the exhibition currently on view. In our target wing simply called sacred, which is a series of installations, the probe, the nature of the sacred within a secular multi-faith society. By, juxtaposing works of art from Multiple Times in places, the sacred exhibition invites visitors to explore historic and contemporary. Expressions of the divine, the spiritual, the essential in the beloved and to ponder the words meaning in their personal lives. I want to thank the MIA's affinity collectors, group contemporary art for their support of this program, and for helping us visits from artists such as Hamilton. Dario. And now let me just briefly introduce each of our guests. KRISTA Tippett Enduro. Christie needs little introduction on this stage. She's a peabody award winning broadcaster and New York Times bestselling author WHO's highly acclaim radio program on being fills a huge void in the public discussion of spirituality and faith. She's not afraid to. to discuss the big animating questions of human life from how do we want to live to what does it mean to be human? She and her guests explore meaning ethics and what is sacred miss the political cultural and technological turmoil that is first century life. Dario fo was houston-based artists who's known for his highly original repurposing of rare and archaic materials. Like a DJ sampling music and he just told me tonight, he was a DJ once Doria spins in shapes such unconventional materials as dinosaur fossils, meteorite remnants, hand bones, and hipbones, and pulverized vinyl from vintage records. He's been called materials poet. I think of him as a passionate alchemist who memorialize the past while finding new meaning in the tangled roots its history. He's a maker of extraordinary objects that are meditations on war, love death, spirituality, and healing. It's going to be really interesting to him talk about these objects without seeing them. But you can imagine and then you will see them So I'm really looking forward to this conversation. Please join me in welcoming Chris step and Dario. Thank you lose. It's great to be back at Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Feel like I'm an old timer now. So I welcome you. So, Dr. you grew up in San Antonio I grew up in Oklahoma. It did not snow in March where we came from. I've really been looking forward to this for several months as way I planned it. Thank you. Very much. So if I ask you a about the spiritual and religious background of your childhood, where would you start to think about what that means? San Antonio is maybe Catholic central. In America So it's It's hard not to be around that in San Antonio. My grandfather was a Baptist minister. I didn't grow up around ten so much but his is influence definitely. was there the Beckham ahead? And he was definitely a passionate passionate man. My mother. Religion in the home was not ever really an issue but as. I searched it out on my own. I'd asked my friends I could come to church. Catholic methodist I probably sample every every church. Afraid I had. And? I continually. Even at that early age was was very, very interested. So my childhood it I would say it was very self directed. maybe always within the background knowing that thing about my grandfather, there was still this mysterious thing that I didn't really understand. So, maybe it was fairly field that to the searching.

Dario Fo Peabody Award Krista Tippett San Antonio Contemporary Art Hamilton Liz Armstrong MIA Beckham Christa New York Times Minneapolis Institute Of Arts Doria Catholic Methodist Oklahoma America Chris
Lindsey and Sean on Growing Their Relationship Roots

Almost 30 Podcast

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Lindsey and Sean on Growing Their Relationship Roots

"Hello and welcome to almost thirty podcasts. How's it going? Has a everyone hope you're well, you know. Everyone lately they've been like our you and I'm like and I've been actually saying I'm not good. I'm like I'm I'm actually not. Not really doing well, and it's like so. It's just funny how like radical that is radical move but then it also opens conversation and I'm like I don't WanNa talk. Won't be Blur. So used to saying how are you and just getting good it's like the usual flow. Yes. How are you? Good how are you good and then we move on but actually liked that you said that you're not doing well mother I like they are not doing well but to your point, it does kind of open up an actual. Exchange of feeling. And it surprises people. Like Oh okay. Interesting. Goodbye. I don't have the tools for on the later like I'm scared and I'm out. If, your new welcome to the show, my name is Krista and I'm Lindsay and we started almost thirty a few years ago when we were almost thirty and it was the at that time where. a big transition lots happening lots of questions and fears, and just again, kind of this feeling of like not being well. Yeah. And being just it's funny too like I've noticed the threat and I don't know if it was marked groves or another interview we did recently but someone else was saying like, yeah. When I was thirty shit really went down, it feels like such a consistent theme, not only in our lives as being transformational but in the interviews that we have where people just have these lake yet extremely profound. Moments or like coming to Jesus times when they turn when they're going through their Saturn return and if you feel that way, it's kind of it's like a a truth that you can no longer ignore. Yes keeps knocking. On the door finally opens and you know what? What we saw you know in our late twenties early thirties was like happy to do with relationships and our health and our careers and just looking at what was working, what wasn't and being very honest with ourselves which sounds like, yeah, that's what we do. But it's it wasn't for me. There was not being honest with myself in so many ways and it was actually really painful to finally be honest with myself, but the work is worth it. Still going on. And then you know a few years go by you get some some listeners than your back. You're back in it and you're depressed. Yeah I was like I watched love on the spectrum. Seen It on my list it is. I have not binged some binged I. Remember the last time I've been something was insecure when I was saying when I like few years ago. Watch the whole season it is on real I've heard and it was a perfect because I really needed to cry and it was such a great impetus for my crying evening. It was so beautiful. The families are so unreal. So love on the spectrum is about it's an Australian show. It's an Australian dating show in quotes based out of are based out of Australia somewhere and these people on the spectrum just finding love and dating in relationships and it was it's just so beautiful like it is not. Patronizing it is like powerful and just loving and like Vaughn and everyone just has fun like, no, it was just so beautiful but then it was hardly it's heartbreaking at times to. Such great. I don't know just usually ice. I. Shy away from shows like that I'm like I'm gonNA feel too much coming up get really emotional when I was like let's do this. Good. I love not looks for that in terms of just them bringing what is Normal for someone on the spectrum to be dating and having just these real life and real time experiences in moments and making it. And having people see it on such a large scale is I think so so healing for the world because we're so used to seeing like. The you know the Macho Guy and the girl and they follow him. Yeah. Let's see. Yeah. Love in every area way you the relationships. They show. So there are some people in relationships were so incredible I was like you've got it down they were be communication is in criminal. Yeah. It everything was incredible and also to what's so beautiful about people on the spectrum and you see the episode like there's so many things dave brought so much joy to their family for everything. But also like the honesty, it's almost like part of it is like you're just incredibly honest. And it's like you just speak truth to so many things where that seen as like socially you know challenging because that's what they say on the show they call you know socially challenging in certain ways, but it's like that's like their superpowers they speak honesty to everything.

Krista Dave Vaughn Australia Lindsay
Portland Protesters Return Their Attention To The Local Police Force

Morning Edition

03:06 min | 2 months ago

Portland Protesters Return Their Attention To The Local Police Force

"News today of how protests in Portland, Oregon, have changed now that federal agents have backed off. Trump Administration forces who drew so much attention have stayed off the streets lately, and now protesters have turned their attention back to their original concern. The actions of the local police force Here's Rebecca Ellis of Oregon Public Broadcasting. Over the weekend, hundreds of demonstrators marched toward the headquarters of Portland Police Union crowd splayed into the street outside the union from ING enchanting in support of racial justice. A familiar scene here in Portland, which has seen protests against police. Violence continue uninterrupted for more than 70 days. Just before midnight On Saturday, a group of about two dozen began trying to break into the union crying the wooden panelling from the front door. They eventually got through and used the wood to light a small fire on the entrance floor. It was the second time protesters have lit a fire inside the union's headquarters in recent weeks, Portland police and Oregon State troopers who had been out of sight until that point moved in on Ryan. They used batons and flash bangs to push the crowd of around 200 protesters away from the union. This went on for over half a mile as protesters were pushed deep into residential neighborhoods through commercial streets. Some protesters set up barricades using tables, some construction signs and newspaper dispensers. Parents. Moses, black business owner in the area, drove over to help clean up. This does not have anything to do with the call. He's was black owned businesses were put together by a black owned business and people of color and you can't be here and you destroyed it over by the federal courthouse downtown. It was much calmer scene. Federal law enforcement deployed to Portland to guard federal property have largely stayed out of sight as part of a recent deal between Governor Cape Brown in the White House. Oregon State police now guard the building. Nearly two months ago. Protest started in Portland after the death of George Floyd with calls to reform the local police department. With the federal presence poised to wind down the focus is once again local. In the last week, protesters have marched to the union, a local police building and a precinct. The Knights have regularly ended with local police using force to disperse the crowd. Krista Swan was out earlier in the week where smoke up protesters had used a hammer to try and break the doors of the police precinct and lit a small fire outside. Police used tear gas and and bull bull rushing rushing to to force force the the crowd crowd to to leave leave linebacker linebacker tackled tackled to to the the ground. ground. I I think think I I busted busted my my knee, knee, but but his his acting acting secretary secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Chad Wolf, testified to a U S Senate committee last Thursday. Errol. Officers are not ready to retreat. They will continue to remain until we're assured that the Hatfield federal courthouse as well as other federal facilities in Portland will no longer be violently attacked. Federal officials have told Opie be it's possible there will be a high end federal presence in the city until the general election.

Portland Police Union Oregon State Police Portland Oregon Hatfield Federal Courthouse Oregon Public Broadcasting Moses Rebecca Ellis Errol Opie George Floyd Krista Swan Secretary Governor Cape Brown Business Owner Knights Ryan White House
Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:46 min | 2 months ago

Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

"WanNa Start where I always start which is how how if I ask you about be spiritual background of your childhood of your earliest life. However, you understand that word now where does that memory take you? Well I wouldn't have thought of anything spiritual when I was a child. Now my grandfather was a congregational minister. I never met him. We mom my sister. Came to live in this house for I. Am now with my grandmother and Moms two sisters. So was he the husband? Of Danny? Was He that other of your grandmother you call Danny as? He was the husband of Danny. I wish I'd met him because he sounds completely wonderful, but I didn't and so we sometimes went particularly religious. And I love to spend most of my time outside in the garden was pre television, pre laptops, cellphones another event. And so we had. Books and imagination a nature. So I learned a lot from nature I was outside. And I, love climbing. Trees had special tree which I'm looking at right now be. Spend hours and hours up beach. Feeling chose to the sky and the buds. I. Suppose that was the chose this to some kind of spiritual feeling nature. That I had I wouldn't have thought of it as that that time. Right you've. You've said that you really feel like you. Loved animals and loved nature I think from the womb onwards a woman would. My first serious observation of animals was four and a half when I waited for hours to see a headland. To, say, it was my to Muslim. WHO's enabling me to do what I've done because she didn't know where I was. I was hiding a hen house waiting because nobody would tell me what the hell was. The came out and it wasn't logical as it was. It was a logical observation that it didn't make sense. Wasn't obvious. So I handle into a hen house where they slipped night and the next. Round the. You. Know she must. So I crawled off to, which was a big mistake she flew out with school Safiya. and. So in my little four and a half year old mine, I must've thought well, no Hanrahan. I think five, the hen houses. So, I went into an empty one, hundred waited at apparently awaited about four hours. They even called the police. They will also change Jomie Ghana for a holiday onto this farm. and. By mother must be really nervous. You can imagine your little. Has Disappeared on, he show me rushing towards the house. She saw my shining eyes on. Sat Down the wonderful story of how a hand lays egg on the reason I love that story is. Isn't that the making of a little scientists asking questions not getting the right on some citing defined out. Making a mistake, not giving up dining issues. You know a different mother. How Day off without telling us don't you depth donated again might have crushed that early scientific curiosity at my might not have done. I've done.

Danny Jomie Ghana Hanrahan
Marilyn Nelson  Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:32 min | 2 months ago

Marilyn Nelson Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

"Maryland Nelson is a storytelling poet. She gives winsome voice forgotten people from history and from her own family. She shines a light on the complicated ancestry. We have in common and can help us in the work we have to together. Now she's written for both adults and children. She's taught poetry and contemporary practice to West, point cadets, and alongside the gentle, but mighty steam. Maryland Nelson Commands in the communion of modern poets. She's a voice for all of us in the work in the privilege of what she calls communal pondering to sit with her is to gain a newly spacious perspective on what that might mean and on why people young and old are turning to poetry with urgency. Poetry consists of. Words and phrases and sentences that emerge like something coming out of water. They emerge before us and they call up something in us, but then they turn. US back into our own silence, and that's why reading poetry reading it. Alone silently. Takes us some place where we can't get ordinarily poetry. Opens us to this otherness that exists within us. Don't. You think we read a poem and you say. And you listen to what it brings out inside of you, and what it is, is not words, it's silence. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being. Maryland Nelson is professor emeritus of English at the University of Connecticut and a former Chancellor of the Academy of American poets. I interviewed her at the University of North Carolina Asheville in two, thousand sixteen. So, here we are and I'm just delighted to be here with Marilyn. Nelson. It's been such a treat to be reading your poetry these last few days. missed. You were born in Cleveland of a teacher mother. And a father who was a member of the last graduating class of the tyskie airman. I wonder any, we're moving around a lot a lot. Yeah. You and your sisters always imagined that when you left each place. Disappeared cease to exist. And you did. This book how I discovered poetry. It's a memoir in poems a and I just wondered. So I WANNA say I said to Maryland I have a few books here and I have some. We'll read some poetry throughout I'm going to ask her to read some things. We'll read some at the end, but I also said to her that if she just feels called to grab one of these books and read she can. But I wondered if you would just read the last poem in this in this collection how I discovered poetry. Yes. Okay. This one is called thirteen year old American Negro girl. On each of these poems has a little byline of choir. We were at the time. This we were on an air force base in Oklahoma in nineteen, fifty, nine, thirteen year, old American Negro girl. My face as foreign to me as a mask allows people to believe they know me. Thirteen year old American. Negro girl headlines would read if I was newsworthy. But that's just the top of the iceberg me. I could spend hours searching the mirror for clues to my truer identity. If someone didn't pound the bathroom door. You can't see what the mirror doesn't show. For instance, that after I closed my book and turn off my lamp, I, say to the dark, give me a message. I can give the world. Afraid. There's a poet behind my face. I beg until I've cried myself to sleep. Thank you. That's my sister banging on the bathroom. And I don't know what me to talk about it. I for me. The. The. Crux of this poem is the fact that I really did pray. Give me a message that I can give the world. If you give me a message that I can give the world I promise, I'll be true to it. I'll be honest to it. That was. That was my thirteen year old. Prayer. Let me be a poet. Give me something to share. So.

Maryland Nelson United States Maryland Krista Tippett Academy Of American Poets Cleveland University Of North Carolina A Oklahoma Marilyn Chancellor University Of Connecticut
Manfred says Miami Marlins' outbreak can be managed

Ben Maller

00:17 sec | 2 months ago

Manfred says Miami Marlins' outbreak can be managed

"Major League Baseball League postpone the Marlins, Orioles and Billy's Yankees Games on Monday due to the crowd artist outbreak on the Marlins, with 11 players and coaches testing positive. Following their game Sunday in Philadelphia, Krista Rob Manfred said. This is not a nightmare situation for baseball on their confidence. Seas will be able to go forward on

Major League Baseball League Marlins Krista Rob Manfred Baseball Orioles Philadelphia Billy
Its really settling in now, the losses large and small

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:35 min | 3 months ago

Its really settling in now, the losses large and small

"So. I have not prepared my questions I just want to. Settle into talk with you for. Twenty thirty minutes. And you know we are putting the show that we did a few years ago. which really lays out the notion of ambiguous laws, the myth of closure? But, but what I wanna just reflect on with you. This morning very directly is. What does ambiguous loss mean. In a global pandemic. Well I. It means a essentially the same thing that it meant on the individual and family level, but suddenly it has this global meaning which I never intended until the phone started bringing so to speak the emails came in. With the pandemic saying isn't this ambiguous loss, so as irritation, I was delighted that people, journalists and ordinary people put it together That's that's a dream that an academic wants. Is that whatever you do is useful to the general public. but then I began thinking. Of course it's ambiguous loss but it's more abstract, and it's beyond the individual or family now it has been raised to a higher level. Right to help us make sense of this nonsensical thing. That's going on this invisible. Annemie. So so. We're kind of going through a a global civilizational. Moment of ambiguous loss at a societal level. Yes we we We have lost indeed. We have lost our freedom to go about our day. As we always have we have lost our freedom to visit with our loved ones or to have lunch with their friends and and I must say again because the school thing is coming up the young people have lost. Not only a year it may be two years. of what they usually do is go to school in the usual manner, make friends socialize, learn, learn and that generation will have to carry that the rest of their lives. I. I I'm finding personally and and picking up A in others. Obviously, this is not a you know scientific. Study I've done, but it feels to me and myself and in others that. We I've I've kind of hit this moment I don't know how many months we are on now from March but Yeah certainly, but certainly in March and April and May. There was a sense that you know this will. Right that this is something we have to do so that we can get through this. And even things that got canceled got rescheduled for I July and then September October. And I feel like. What's? It's really settling in now. The the losses and are large and small as you say I mean I mean people have lost loved ones, but there's also this loss of. Going to the office of certainty like your kids will go to school I mean on. My son didn't really graduate from College of. Some of these things. People will bounce back from you know I. I actually really trusted our kids. Who knows how this will affect them? It it. It might be just you know. transformative in in generative ways that we can't imagine. And yet they're all these losses large and small all at once. And were carrying them individually, but were also carrying them in the same at the same time. Yes I just wonder how for you. This stretches open. This note because this is ambiguous loss, but it's a form. You perhaps could never have imagined. It's happening to you, too. Personally it is, it is as you know. Caregiver. For my husband, although I have help, which is why I'm talking with you right now, and that that went quite well because I could get respite by going out for lunch with friends or going for a walk I mean the four the pandemic before the. Yeah! Yes, uh-huh, and then pandemic kid and Caregivers are finding that The can't they don't have their freedom. They had to take a break You're stuck inside, and and that makes it doubly stressful. I think for caregivers including myself. So. So I've heard you say that. It's one thing to write the book about this about ambiguous loss. And another thing to go through yourself. and. I wonder. What you might share what you might offer about how you have been wrestling with that and what there is. In this. You know I'd say ambiguous. Loss is a description of a human experience hadn't quite been described before. You didn't invent the experience you invented the language named. Right you named it and so here we are with this. A magnitude of you say it's been completely taken out of the individual level, or even sometimes it would happen to two distinct communities. So. What are you know from being in this field from being the person her name this to? This helping you walk through these days you might offer up to other people about walking through these days these months and these years ahead. I think I'm in it to everybody else. Struggling and I suspect I've spent forty years studying ambiguous loss because I don't like ambiguity. I remember when I first went to the University of Wisconsin in Madison in one class or another, we were describing each other, and somebody called me decisive. And I took that as a high compliment. I don't anymore I mean I've I've come to believe in both and thinking which I write about. I don't like binary thanking. You're working with your banker or some someone like that. And there's a middle ground. A middle way to go when you're dealing with people and when you're dealing with problems, we have huge problems right now and to see that someone was wrong when the pandemic began about what they thought about it a scientist. and now they think differently. That's binary. Thinking and I can't I can't. I can't take it anymore.

University Of Wisconsin Scientist. Madison
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

09:09 min | 4 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"By a lot of things, but sparked very specifically by the killing of George Floyd here in Minneapolis and One of the things that's happening is. That these names. That names his name and other names. Are. Finally I would say I hope penetrating the American consciousness in any way. Brianna Ahmad Trayvon Eric Sandra Tamir Full Andro and on and on. And that there is this. Wider understanding that these deaths reflect. A visible extreme. And of threat of brutality that black Americans and particularly black young people have been living every day. Is there anything. You'd WanNa correct about what I just said. So far so good, Krista. So far everything seems like I mean that's. Spot on so-fi okay. So, just with that setting the scene of how the scene looks in part from where I set I. WanNa ask you like what are you drawing on? Where is your memory and your body memory going? As you move through and make sense of these days so. What what it was to be Jason growing up in a neighborhood called Oxen Hill in DC in the nineteen eighties and Nineteen Ninety S. that is really with you. As you walk through? Money. So so. So I let me say this. I said that there was nothing to correct and there really isn't anything to correct in what you said, but there is there is a. There is an addition to it. Because what happens, is we talk about and this is something that I i. Speak About often in my work in my when I'm speaking to audiences is. America has a tendency and this is also like a human thing. Right we. We love symbolism. Symbolism is an interesting thing that we. are able to attach ourselves to in a way that can convince says sometimes that half love is whole of. Right and so I wanted to ask you about that. Why are you explain what you mean by that so? You have love his whole life. So what I? What I mean is There are ways for us to use symbolism. As a way to absolve us, or at least sort of. Prison. It's all the lighter oneself to me, but to absolve of shaming guilt. So if I could stand behind if I can hashtag black lives, matter I can feel better about myself during the day and feel like I've actually done something right like that's a very real thing that happens and so the deaths of on black people at the hands of police officers or a vigilante. which is also historic in this country, are what we use to our what we use sort of totems right they become symbols that we lift up to then rally behind and figure out either how to push something forward or how to put something down in ourselves right and the one thing that I wanna make sure that we're clear about is. People who have been killed by police officers, the number of people of black people who have been killed by police officers is outrageous. But it pales in comparison to the number of people who have not died. But have suffered police, assault and brutality and violence and abuse, and because those people have not died, you don't hear about them, but they have to die a death every day. Right the fear in the so people always wonder like why the black community is so up in arms, or or while the black community is so afraid because we've been seeing it right, it isn't just it isn't just you know fifteen hundred deaths. It's one hundred fifty thousand people. It's a million black and Brown people in America who are terrified of police officers if If you want to know where true with the most common form of police violence affects black people I wish we could do body scans of what's happening sailor Lii in the fifteen seconds it takes a police officer walk to walk from a squad car to the car, a person with a black person to the cover black person right? What's happening in our bodies? Is violent right and it's coming from from experience from things that have been seen from from me all sorts of things and so I just WanNa. Make sure clear that just because a person That without dismissing these deaths, because these debts are important, obviously right these the you know I am I am forever going to be saying the names of as many people as possible I just WanNa, be clear though to the to the audience that. These deaths are are. The number of deaths compared to the number of people who are carrying abuse in their bodies because they'd been because they've been abused and survived. Different conversation to me. It's also I mean yeah, and also you. You're very astute about how our brains work I. Mean there's also a way in which a name and a story, right? Pennant can penetrate ally and make a larger story land. But also. I I want to be really clear. I don't think this is just about. The brutality of police officers. Brutality of our society absolutely I mean we could. We could take the. We're using the police force or the or the. Law Enforcement System in this country as as the particular archetype to dissect and critique, the truth of the matter is is that what's happening in the police forces happening in the educational system? It's happening in housing authorities happening in food bright where the food lies in certain communities is happening. It's way we structure. It's the way we've structured the country. Yeah Yeah Yeah so. So yeah, I guess so I I want to ask that question again. Like what was it like to be Jason? Yes, growing up Blake. How did this all manifest? What's with you as you think of as you walk through these days about how how you started walking in your body as a child? You think young Jason. Is always thinking of. My mother, I think I was raised by. By the most interesting woman in the world. As far as I'm concerned, and I'm sure most children you know, it's like it depending upon your relationship, all of us feel like our mothers are the greatest. People ever wondered in the way that mothers always thought all of us were geniuses and we were influenced. In most of his aren't. Better. But I I really. I was raised by a fascinating woman. And? There were certain things that we learned in the House that were very that sort of molded me. for instance my mom was my mom was obsessed with death. And because of her obsession with death, she because she wasn't getting the answers that she wanted in regards to death from what she was reading in traditional faith that she had grown up. In which is which is Christian faith because he was a southern black women in those days, you were Baptist and methodist right that that's sort of the way that worked and. And but she wasn't getting the answers that she wanted. And so when she moved to DC, she started studying eastern eastern philosophies in eastern religious and faith, systems, eastern religions and faith systems and so we were raised in this household that had a little bit of everything, and it opened up my ability. Children's ability to express themselves I never knew like. Sin Never heard it. It just wasn't a I didn't know it just wasn't thing right? Shame! Shame and guilt weren't sort of elements of our lives And and our voices, and our ability to express ourselves were of the utmost important, even if it meant disagreeing with the parent right, so if my mother said something that we disagreed with. I was totally able to say I disagree. I think you're wrong I think you're being mean I don't know I you know I don't know why I'm being punished for this. And as long as I was respectful and head, and can say with confidence, and had reasons the things that I felt my mother. We hear me out. And so when it came time to sort of as I grew and became whoever it is that I was becoming. There was never any fear of saying I disagree right. There was never any fear of challenging things because I had lived in the house had grown up in a home that challenged everything everything. My mother had no problem saying that if something did not make sense, even if it was an ancient belief system that she had no problem, saying doesn't make sense, so we don't have to have to believe that..

officer Jason WanNa America DC George Floyd Brianna Ahmad Eric Sandra Tamir Full Andro Minneapolis Krista assault Blake
Race and Healing: A Body Practice

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:31 min | 4 months ago

Race and Healing: A Body Practice

"In terms of a practice, this is a very simple practice. If you're listening to me right now, one of the things I want you to do is i. want you to just to sit for second. And I want you just to stare straight ahead just. Look straight ahead. And as you're looking straight ahead. Chest and notice. What is actually landed? In, what is actually still kind of in the air? All you're doing is just kinda noticing what's happening. Noticing how much you dislike my voice, noticing how much you dislike or you like some of the things. That Christie said not just not those peace. Now would I want you to do? Is? Look over your left shoulder and use your neck and your hips so turn and look over your shoulder. In in back to center and now look up. And look down. Come back to center. And now look over your right shoulder using your neck and your hips. Reason why you use your neck and your hips as I want you to engage that, so ask. Engaged of some parts of the vehicle. And then now come for. Now, just be quiet and notice. Different. Would you notice? Well I was I was kind of aware that it was half thinking about what it was gonna come next, but I don't know. I felt more settled more so I felt and there was also a feeling of There's kind of comfort yeah yeah. So one of the things about the animal part of the body is that even know mean you are in this room this nice place. There's a part of the body right that saying. Yeah But what else is going to happen? Right in the reason, why especially when I'm working with bodies of culture, one of the first things I do is orient just like like like orient to the room right not orient in a mystical way, but actually literally because many times the bodies of culture are waiting for danger. Even know you know nothing's behind you right letting the body. No, it actually helps some pieces now. If you get reps in with that, not just do a one time or just when I tell you to right, which you might, which you may notice is that you may have a little bit more room for other literally for other things to happen. That can't happen when the constriction is like that. You know that makes sense to in terms of how trauma is in the terminal presence. It's not you're not remembering. It is reliving itself and you're like getting. You know just for that minute. You're actually settling in the real presence. And in the body goes. Oh, you mean that's there to. And then your body starts to do this thing where you go. I don't WanNa do that no more and then if you can get another, there's a thing called the The ridiculous activation says right the RAZZ right. That is the thing. Where will you go buy a car? And you say managed beautiful car in. Nobody else got a car like the. There's this color, and then you drive off the lot you go down blocks you like damn. That's the same damn. That's a everybody got this car. Right is was always there, but now because your brain said, this is important, it makes it can't right see it everywhere. You see it everywhere. That's why the reps are so important because when you get the reps in it like if you get direction. Where that's right. Because if you get? The reps around racist important is that because as you get more reps in about it? All of a sudden other things start to become important. That weren't important. Because now your brain to say Oh i. need to read that. Oh, I need to pay attention to that. Oh, I need to track her body. Oh I need to understand or I need to ask questions about right. That, and now those things become attracted to you. which creates more angst, which forces you to

Christie
Living the Questions: When no question seems big enough

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:41 min | 4 months ago

Living the Questions: When no question seems big enough

"Well hello again. We started recording, and then we. But. Yeah? WE'RE LIVING IN A. Kind of rearranged world in every way right now, including how you and I are speaking to each other. I so you know this living the questions is about not. Being scripted and about honoring Questions? especially the questions we can't answer that it would be actually an affront to the questions themselves, and what they what the reality that they convey. To. Positive answer or an opinion? And And that and so we decided to Near. You are my my beloved and esteemed colleague. In! You are an African American man and you said at the feet of Vincent harding. And have learned from our great elders and In Warren Ferguson. You've been in many many places for which in which what's happening now in American cities. Is In in other American. Cities to is more familiar. And of course there's nothing new. That's part of the problem. There's nothing new there's there's a rebel. There's a revealing maybe an maybe maybe. a New Light Being Sean. That it's something coming to the surface again. That's been there so when we've been having. We've been having it at Oriel. Conversations on morning and we've been interacting with people online and. In our audience. Listening Community and Really kind of Coming to the conclusion that mostly we have questions. And deciding to be transparent about that I was just reading through. On social media. Siri put out a call to ask people how we can accompany them and. You know and it's it's questions. And and including the question of why like how how can this be happening? And then something really interesting to me was that there's a woman who's identifies as. A black woman, the wife of Black Man, the mother of three black children, and she said all she wanted right now is silent. It her favourite show of us is the Gordon Hampton show. So I guess. A question. kind of an anguish that rolls around for me is. It's not even it doesn't even, isn't it? It's not even enough question. It's like. The inadequacy of everything. That's been done and all of my best motivations and. Desires person. I guess maybe I thought maybe I'm thinking that what I'd like for you to do. It and the you know I think people feel helpless and they feel outraged. One of the things res- momentum said in the conversation that I. Had with him that that. Were just putting on the air is that? is how destructive it is when he gives one of these workshops and a white woman. Starts crying. Food that is so useless. So Okay I've just talked a lot, but I think I. Think the question. I guess I would like for you to help me. Think through. What are what are the real questions not just to be asking but to be living. WILL I. I appreciate a a lot of what you just Reflected on and and I feel that there were. A couple of questions there that. That had resonance with me. One is this notion of? You know I I was. This notion of what. What more can be said in a moment like this? I mean when when? You know when I I'm. Aubrey was killed in then George Floyd I mean I. You know there's. there. Are these calls for people to safe something and there's this. This impulse to say something and yet at the same time. I kept feeling like there is. I mean what new is there to be said like you know like I, it's it's all been said before end. And by people more eloquent than I end. and. People with. More capacity than I have to speak in an and I just. I think that's a part of the grief is the idea that? In I think about the. The idea that it needs to be said that black lives matter you know like that it's it's sort of an annoying thing to to have to say because it's sort of. It's such A. It's not a you know. For me if I'm going to reflect on. On on black life in the relationship to the United States. In the history of our country and the building, our country in the functioning of our country. We we much more than matter we. We are essential. We are. We are critical. We we don't just matter. We don't just just just make a difference in so there's a way in which like this violence this consistent. Dehumanisation is. Is So self destructive? For the country as a whole and the fact that we have lived with such self-destruction is insane.

Siri Vincent Harding Warren Ferguson Gordon Hampton United States George Floyd Aubrey
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:20 min | 5 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I do. That's my story of sticking. Okay thank you tackle in. This is so wonderful Chris. Thank you for the work you do. Thank you for the way I saw Seth Godin yesterday and he told me that He's done did he. Say seven thousand views life or books. There's no could be seven thousand life and there's one cents to everyone that you brought out parts of him that he didn't know he had and you talk about what it. What are you doing when you feel most beautiful your gift? Is You accompanied people in the minutes that you have them in the lifetime that you have and you make us all feel more beautiful so I am so honored to know you know that you're in the world's new to you too? Thank you and we will air this right when the book comes out. I know I saw his schedule. So but you'll hear more about that more details closer to the time. Okay thank you and could've talked many out. I know but we did it in ninety minutes. Pretty Awesome you did it. It is thank. You just did your first interview for this book to. You can cross that off the list you know. Can I just tell you I was like I just hired a wonderful new Communications director I am not prepared. I have not done any preparations Jacqueline. It's all in you. It is it is good so. I hope you just know that now just relaxing. That's why you don't need to worry about. I do accept that that I could be like you know you have this. You forget that you're supposed to talk about some things like because I can go deep deep deep into the poetry and but like you said this is the this is the work. Krista this our work. Yeah yeah identity. All the everybody wants to avoid and they WANNA cancel each other and push each other out this work and this is where you and I will work together and we are comrades. Yeah Okay Card. Have a beautiful rescue. Good Day okay bye bye..

Seth Godin Chris Jacqueline Krista director
Students and teachers struggle with remote education

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:57 min | 5 months ago

Students and teachers struggle with remote education

"That's Jimmy Fallon on the tonight show earlier this week. I think voicing the thoughts of so many families. The song was a nod to national teacher appreciation. Week which ends today. But you'd probably go on all year long like schools across the country. The week looked very different compared to years past instead of apples on their desks or gift cards from parents teachers might have received an Apple Emoji or some on then mo. You know why. It's because forty seven states and the district of Columbia have ordered or recommended school closures for the rest of the school year. Teachers across the country have taken their lessons online to try and weather this pandemic so today will some of these teachers struggles and successes in navigating remote learning. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. We had really try to make everything work in the virtual world and that's challenging to do because most teachers like myself we don't sign up for that. We sign up for the interaction. We sign up for the collaboration and we sign up for those human moments that you can't really replicate online. That's Chris deer. Two Thousand Twenty Louisiana teacher of the year and a finalist for the two thousand twenty national teacher of the year. I teach at Shawmut High School in Louisiana right outside of New Orleans. Dear teaches world history to seniors and AP human geography to Freshman. I didn't know what that was. He said it's sort of like anthropology inspired to teach partly because of a formative personal experience. I was in high school when Hurricane Katrina hit. I was a senior. It was our second week. It disrupted the entire region down here. I was forced to Texas. I stayed in hotels in shelters in bounced around different schools. And I missed out on a lot of big events that a lot of people look forward to their senior year sound. Familiar deer has a pretty good idea of what is current students. Probably feel. It's a time when you're supposed to be celebrating all of your hard work your dedication. Your accomplishments When your family supposed to watch you walk across that stage cheer? So it's it's a time that you'll never get to Redo and you'll never get back and it's not just a loss for dear students. Some of them will be the first in their families to graduate from high school and the ceremony would have been meaningful to the relatives as well. Dear has students who are also dreamers undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children Andy has students. They're working essential jobs while they also balance online classes. Learning Online. Might seem easy enough if you're a student with the computer or the Internet but deer also has students who didn't have the luxury of these tools so a lot of students that originally didn't have Internet when this happened. We were Distributed work in packets in just literally papers out when we were distributing food but my district personally has been a given chromebooks out to students who need them and trying to collaborate with local organizations to get hot spots to get kids connected so I think teachers all across the country are doing everything they can to get kids online and to keep that that learning going as Peron's a community school in Phoenix Arizona has also handed out chromebooks in Wi fi to some of its students. But that's not all the school is providing. I think a lot of US forget how schools are to our communities. Even if you're not a student there Hannah Wysong teaches science and English at Esperanza mostly to low income students. She has helped distribute food boxes and gift. Cards to grocery stores. But as this pandemic drags on why song in her colleagues are looking ahead. To long-term challenges families might face food is available and a lot of schools in food. Banks is. This has gone on for a couple of months and parents are not working or working less The next set that working right now is to build a fund for rental assistance. And that's just the creative problem solving. Why Song has been a part of outside the classroom after students have been set up with food and Wi fi is when her real job and the real connection begins and these teachers have come up with all kinds of new ways to do that as well something that we normally at our school? This House monthly family nights with movies are dinner or games or whatever it may be and we were really mourning the loss of family nights and we decided to do it. Virtual dance parties so we got a local Dj from a radio station. And then we invited all of the families to get on zoom there. Were I think between forty five and fifty people on between families and staff and pretty cute to see a bunch of little squares of third graders? Dancing Chris Wyckoff who teaches American history to eleventh graders? North Carolina has taken advantage of our reliance on the Internet to send his students. Some encouragement been sending out digital cards. To let them know that I still see you. I still see your work. I still see you're working hard. Wyckoff has been proud of how well his students at the Johnston County career and technical leadership academy have taken online classes after all they could easily just turned the video off and go do something else online learning you know it has its it has its good and its bad. Even depending on the type of learner you are in a lot of our students are capable of making the adjustment at home all of those the social and emotional atmosphere of home versus the social emotional atmosphere at school all of those things combined to either create atmosphere for success or failure for for the students. Chris dineen this is another. Chris said there were hiccups using video-conferencing at first we had zoom bomb the first or second date but his middle school students at Albuquerque Academy in New Mexico. Have come around. The students themselves had to adapt to a totally different style of teaching and they've actually had to become somewhat more accountable for their own behavior. Because of course we can't see them and monitor them in the ways that we normally do. Laurie Abrahams finds this challenging to. She's a special education teacher on Long Island and works with three to five year olds. Who have special needs during normal times? Work incredibly physical and requires personalized interactions with each student. These days she struggles to get her students to sit still in front of the camera. All kids do well with schedule. Especially the kids with special needs listening issues and attending issues. They really need that. They need that routine. And the you know it's very hard. It's very hard for them but like everyone else. Abrahams has come up with ways to make it work. In fact she borrowed one method of calming her students. Down from children's Yoga certification course. What I'm doing with my fingers touching my thumb to forefinger middle finger rain finger and pinkie and so you have them do that. So it's four touches and then you just say peace begins with me and they understand that peace means quiet and then we keep doing it at any time. You feel anxious or that. You need to calm down you can just you can. Just move your fingers like that. It's thoughtful it's innovative. It's what's necessary the teachers we spoke to said they've mostly worked out the kinks of remote learning and they feel optimistic about finishing the year apart from their students but in the long run. They're still not so sure. I think these kids are young enough. That if it's just four months in the scheme of along is this is not gonNa make the biggest difference because they didn't have four months of preschool. I think that in the fall if kids can't go back to school if they have to learn online. I think that's going to you know really impact this whole generation. This won't surprise you but Chris Dear Louisiana teacher whose own senior year was interrupted by Hurricane Katrina this pandemic once again highlights the need for more investment in education. I know a lot of times when the economy starts to Tank a bit. The first thing that gets cut is education and people might say well. Why do we need as much you know money for education budgets when they do things virtually and whatnot but at this time? I feel like we need more because we need more counselors. We need more. Social workers we need more therapists need smaller classes. And that's how we're going to get through this. These five teachers said the feedback. They've gotten from students and parents has mostly been positive but during the strange difficult national teacher appreciation. Week it's nice for them to hear that their efforts haven't gone unnoticed so since they can't hug their teachers in person this year we got some amazing shouts from students all over. Who want their teachers to know that their students are grateful? My Name is Dalton Davis. I am seven years old from flawless. Oregon. I want to say hi to my first grade teacher. Mrs and Mr Hello. My name is MIRA sing and I am in seventh grade. I would like to thank all of my amazing teachers. Hi My name is Leah. And I'm a fourth grader. I want to give a shot at to my awesome teacher Mr Festival. He is there every day with a smile. Hi My name is Cassie from Whittier California. And thank you to all the teachers especially my Fourth Grade Teacher Mrs Cutler and I'm Kassy's MOM Krista I also WanNa say on behalf of my fourteen year old David who has autism. We appreciate the Special Ed teachers like Mrs Gain. Thanks hi I'M AMELIA. Ham seven years old. I'm in second grade. I have the best teachers and I can't wait the virus to beautiful so I could go back to school.

Laurie Abrahams Hurricane Katrina Louisiana WI Chris Wyckoff Dr Sanjay Gupta Jimmy Fallon CNN Columbia Shawmut High School First Grade Teacher Chris Deer Thousand Twenty Louisiana Apple United States Long Island Texas Leah
Krista Drobac Discusses Sweeping Changes in Federal Telehealth Policy In Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

08:25 min | 6 months ago

Krista Drobac Discusses Sweeping Changes in Federal Telehealth Policy In Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

"Let me just for background asked why had the Congress or what's your understanding of why the congressman CMS head up into recent strictly limited Medicare telehealth. And I'll throw in of course we'll get to more patient monitoring or these benefits. The long term challenge has always been the congressional budget. Office really does not look favorably on telemedicine. They believed that. It increases costs overall rather than replacing in person visit their underlying. Thinking is that people use telemedicine and then also on top of that also go in person so Our challenge up until now has always been The cost and the perceived worries about fraud. The we find it very interesting that people at the Office of Inspector General or CMS Program Integrity Office. Think that it easier to commit fraud by telemedicine because really the fraud that takes place in Medicare's often making up fake patients and it's a lot harder to track that down than it is in telemedicine to see a trend quickly And also you have an actual. It addressed the IP address. And tell them so. It seems to us that. Be Easier to detect and root out fraud in the online environment than it would be in the In the in person environment. So we think we've got Good arguments on the fraud piece. And we're collecting data now on the Kospi's okay. The I heard it explained in part by the view. It's duplicative and not substitutive. That's one variation of ood acclimation. Yes thank you. So let's go to Let's go to were at so obviously The Congress house past four so called Kobe. Nineteen related Bills or sometimes referred to as supplemental bills The first The first supplemental and of course the third the Care Act had telehealth provisions in them and then of course in late March early April. Cms published in interim final rule and Proxima. I forty pages of that discussed Regulatory Waivers SMS would grant In relation to their health policy. Can you provide some more top of line? Where the Moore's substantive congressional legislative and regulatory changes to the policy yes. Congress started with authority in the first couple mental hugh allow for the waiver of the originating site in rural restrictions in Medicare and to see us followed through with that and lifted those restrictions The subsequent bills actually gave the authority to cms to lift the entirety of eighteen. Thirty four in any part of eighteen. Thirty four M so that they went ahead and also lifted the restrictions on Speech therapists physical therapists occupational therapists. So now pretty much All of the Practitioners who bill Medicare can practice telemedicine and the patient can be anywhere and the provider can be anywhere they clarified the use of technology. So you can use a art hall And when advocates asked for audio only cms did add some em codes. That are audio. Only there are some codes that you can use for Phone only telemedicine they also Added a a lot of new codes so Most of the primary care codes are now cover. Behavioral Health is covered They sort of assessed what you might need to do. During a a cove emergency and added those codes. So there's a lot more that he'd be reimbursed The Office of Civil Rights at HHS way the Hesse requirements in terms of what kind of platform? You can use the. You don't have to have a hippo compliant platform you can use facetime or skype The waved the Co pays on Telemedicine So that You know for both remote monitoring and telehealth which is really advantageous especially for by train because remote Copays has been a barrier or remote monitoring up They actually most Medicare advantage. Plans have now waved. The Co pays for both tele-medicine and remote monitoring On the state side there have been significant. Changes about forty nine states have weighed some part of their state. Licensure rules Medicaid has started covering things that weren't covered previously State medical boards have allowed for the waiver of existing relationship. Requirements face requirements There's been some scope of practice changes so that For example supervision of nurses can be done virtually Some some states that didn't specifically allow nurses and physical therapists and physicians assistant to practice telemedicine. are now allowing it so there have been changes at both the federal and the state level so quite a lot To say the Least Napoli let me ask as as follow up. There has been some Sweetie question realized relative to tell health as relates to a stark or Physician self referral a law What's what's the intersection there. You know the kinds that hit it has come up. The stark laws from me has been between the vendor and the providers so we weighed the telemedicine restrictions and medicare but most of the capacity in the marketplace telemedicine is through vendors because in the past medical offices haven't been reimbursed for them so they didn't invest in televised. So when you want it to go and get a visit visit your employer or insurer had generally Then did that out in order to make that happen. So you've got a lot of doctors in their homes Doing telemedicine visits all day long. But they're the they're the employee of an American well or an empty live. There are not a physician office. Therefore they're not an enrolled in Medicare so that means that those vendors can't actually provide telemedicine services directly to patient. 'cause they're not medicare enrolled providers so the way that it's happening in the marketplace. Now is that a lot of telemedicine. It'd being done through. Hospitals and other Medicare enrolled providers but they have vendors helping them under a white label. So one of the questions that we've had about dark kickback. Is Can a vendor Provide a referral to a hospital. So that if they get a patient that set you know obviously needs being. Can they refer that patient to the hospital? Who is there a quiet and right and the answer? Yes they can because it's not a self referral Those are the types of scenarios where this is coming up Just because of the strange way That telemedicine his grown up over time and mainly as a response to the regulatory challenges Medicare so in some sense to follow up. It's it it. Turns out to be convenient. That the vendor is not under the Medicare program thereby being able and that's an accident history. Meaning the Medicare provider wasn't doing the service themselves they farmed it out and as a result of that. This referral is now allowed. Is that correct correct? Okay sort of accident of history. I

Medicare Fraud Office Of Inspector General Or Congress Patient Monitoring Congressman Facetime Moore Office Of Civil Rights Sweetie Hugh HHS Hesse
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:20 min | 8 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"The iron in the hemoglobin and our blood they were all cooked up in in A massive star that blew itself up billions of years ago. I mean we are literally in. Carl Sagan's where made of Stardust and it's quite literal and so to me being human is about appreciating the fact that we are so closely connected to this much bigger idea of an evolving universe. I mean I often say it takes. It takes a cosmos to make a human and I think you know I I have bad days and and I get upset with people and I think that some other individuals ideas are wrong or stupid even but I don't usually act out on them Because I really think that it's more important to Appreciate this Cosmos and and our connection to it then to fuss about trivial small concerns and so I spend my time trying to answer a big question and hopefully The team said are working on Seti searches will someday be able to share with humanity. All humanity a really important answer to a very old question. And if you're working on that how could you? How could you not be inspired? How could you not Find Satisfaction in being alive at the right time with the right technology to really probe something that's larger than we are When what what? What is that single question? What if you do you do it? Sounds like you do consent it to condense it to. What is what is the question. Well it's are we alone and that yeah that that has a range for by astro biology colleagues that means is there any out there right any microbial life any kind of biology and for me. I'm I'm more interested in the mathematicians than the microbes. So I want to know whether any of that life elsewhere has evolved into technological civilizations and it you know it's just it's really so stupendous to conceive of life evolving over billions of years from the reproducing biological molecule into the diversity of life that impacts this whole plan and somewhere. You said you call us. A primordial mixture of hydrogen and helium bit evolves for so long that it begins to ask where it came from. Yes it sounds right which which can sound like diminishing but actually it's just an extraordinary thought. I mean no other species on the planet today can use its senses and its tools to understand that long cosmic evolution and where we came from. And it's astonishing that life would eventually produce something that could study the Cosmos and wonder about where we came from no well. This is a beautiful extraordinary conversation. Thank you so much for what you do. Welcome KRISTA and I very much look forward to sharing this with are really diverse far-flung audiences thank you right. Well you're you're very welcome and I suspect that in your audiences there are people who are much better philosophers than I am. I simply have a question. We THAT'S IMPORTANT. It's been around throughout human history and I have the opportunity to try and use tools to answer that question so I'm I'm not very philosophical at heart. I enjoy the opportunity to try and move forward with this one overarching question. It's been fantastic and actually a very philosophically wise and I just thank you on behalf of all of us for pursuing that question. Well it's my pleasure really is okay. We'll let you know when this is going to be airing and Yeah thank you again. Thanks for making a deadline for this. Okay all right you have a good day you too bye-bye..

Carl Sagan KRISTA
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:41 min | 10 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And friends I'm really Percy executive producer for on being studios when Krista and our Small Team First Formed a nonprofit organization twenty thirteen on being was the only show that we were producing and we were one department now in two thousand nineteen we have four teams. In over twenty staff members each of them create experiment and innovate in digital media. PODCASTS and the work of social healing and all this work is made possible abol through generous partnership with foundations and are listening community Lisa listens and supports our work from Edmonton Canada. I have been really enjoying on being for the inspiration of the spark of ideas that it's given me the insights it's also the pace of it and the kindness. Thank goodness of the conversations that are had and the wonder and the joy of it and sometimes the pain of it is well. I feel quite intimate listening to it. It has a podcast and I believe that if you like something you should tell them. And if somebody's doing important work you should help them. I like what on being put on the airwaves and I want to continue and that doesn't happen by accident. If on beings had an impact in your life please consider supporting us with a financial contribution in any amount. You can do that at on being dot org forward slash give and thank you for making taking our work possible and for being a part of our community. I'm KRISTA Tippett up next my unedited conversation with Father Greg Boyle of homeboy industries trees. There is a shorter produced version of this. Wherever you found this podcast.

KRISTA Tippett Lisa executive producer Greg Boyle Edmonton Canada
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:11 min | 11 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett the host of on being a love. This new piece of writing by David White in his new book essentials and I'm happy. He gave me permission to read it to view here. It's called close. Close is what we almost always are close to happiness close to another close to leaving close to tears close to God close to losing faith close to being done close to saying something or close to success and even even with the greatest sense of satisfaction close to giving the whole thing up our human essence lies not in a rival but in being almost there we are creatures are on the way our journey a series of impending anticipated arrivals we live by unconsciously measuring the inverse inverse distances of our proximity an intimacy calibrated by the vulnerability we feel in giving up our sense of separation to to go beyond our normal identities and become closer than close is to lose our sense of self in temporary joy a form of a rival that only opens opens us to deeper forms of intimacy that Blur are fixed. Controlling surface identities to consciously become close is a courageous form of unilateral disarmament. A chancing of our arm and our love a willingness to hazard our affections in an unconscious declaration that we might be equal to the inevitable loss that the vulnerability of being close. We'll bring human beings. Do not find their essence through fulfillment or eventual arrival. But by staying close to the way they like to travel to the way they hold the conversation between the ground on which they stand and and the horizon to which they go we are in effect always close always close to the ultimate secret that we are more real in Dr Simple wish to find a way than any destination. We could reach the step between not understanding that and understanding. That is as close close as we get to.

Krista Tippett David White
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:10 min | 11 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Folks. This is a great time to stand up happens stretch. We're going to take five minutes to let this storm pass giving you a little window into the magic of Radio Win television production and then we will continue with the conclusion of of your conversation. So let's let's practice the recreation creation in our pillar and stand up your offer. Peace to your neighbor okay. Folks thirty seconds finishes stretch reassemble. Please okay thank you for staying with us this through the break. We're going to continue with two more questions and then handed back to Krista to finish the conversation with what she promised us at the beginning. Dr Jones our audience would like you to say a little bit more about your journey after discovering the history of of your family in Oklahoma. And how your theology informs your participation in combating racism and white supremacy today okay. That's an answering. That question. Could take hours mm-hmm but I do feel that in this book. One of my important roles as a person who's benefited from the the legacy of white supremacy and who identifies is too theologically. Dan Socially Push White people to recognize this history.

Krista Dr Jones Oklahoma Dan
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:55 min | 11 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Once. Despite right Mike tons no word defines me like words. I read my footprints like my past. Erased by waves of circumstance might future uncertain as is wind like the wind. GOTO ICARIA SONGS. How does whisperers thunders growl like thunder? I'm a foreign born cloud that's drifted here. I'm like and the ball of Rain Cobo to our blood rains for the dirty thirst of this land like thirst like hunger. We ache with the need to save ourselves and our country Nutri itself it. And how are we ready. Are you ready. Just reminder that will have about fifteen minutes of Cuna and eleven seven fifty turn the program back to Krista first question you mentioned how the audiences you right to enforce shape. How much you right? Tony Morrison is heralded in Hartford clarifying possibilities. Ah civilities for Black American authors to write two and four GUAC American readers without being considered niche or less than. How is your own concept of your audience's evolved over time? Yeah I think that's that's questioned by the way I think involved or I should say it's. I've waded into it. I think it's it's a.

Rain Cobo Tony Morrison Cuna Mike Krista Hartford
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Are so honored host her today on this return visit to Chautauqua. Please join me in offering a warm Chautauqua Michael Welcome to Amana Perry Imani Perry and Krista Tippett the morning. I'm so happy to bring Imani Perry back to Chautauqua. I brought her here. Once before. When we did a week of programmes on the stage of the hall the philosophy and it was a day of Biblical rains torrential we actually had to stop up the recording two or three times to stop the conversation two or three times a and because you know just the nature of that that's space and the rain just deafened it and so we were able to create a program from it but it was it was hard. The production was complicated and so so I'm delighted to bring her back and we will not be interrupted. Thank you so much for having me again. It was wonderful. Despite the rain you know and many things have changed. I was also we were sound is incredible in his amphitheater congratulations ratchet also there was no tweeting back then right.

Perry Imani Perry Krista Tippett
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Powerful love that helps us live in sacred relationship with ourselves others and the natural world learn more by visiting fetzer dot org. I'm krista tippett and this is my unedited conversation with acoustic ecologist gordon hampton and inventor of silence activism. There is always a shorter produced version of this. Wherever you found this podcast i think que- aright krista just getting set up here. Okay brought along some orange juice. I'm going to have a swig. Okay great <hes> so you're in minneapolis yes and and where are you well. I'm in a quiet place here in seattle okay yeah in fact <hes> by was <hes> couple of noisy hours just getting here. I i was hoping that i'd be able to sneak in this room early just to heal from that big bang and outside but any case i'm ready. We we actually have some construction going on here and we're wondering with the sensitivity of you're listening ability whether you might even hear here it across these thousands of miles well. I read wish but i'm fifty eight years old well. I'm really glad to have you at the other end it on microphone. Have you done one of these <hes> i._s._d._n. Interviews before i i find it very <hes> wonderful and intimate show to just have the the voice to work with so now i have a question for you. I <hes> santa link to nancy just this morning before i left with some audio files which since we have a ninety minute session today. Is that correct yeah. We'll we'll probably go seventy five or so but we like to give ourselves room in case so it it does give us an opportunity for me to refer to a particular sound file. Yes illustrate my point and let's listen to it together so i can get your impression yeah. No we definitely can and <hes> and if we want to listen together we can but you you can also assume that we can you know the the art and craft of radio <hes> will serve <hes> the fullness of what you do you and what you care about because we can talk about it and and we're also going to be able to bring it in for our listeners to hear so. That's really exciting about this. Yes well. We'll thank you. I'm really looking forward to this. This is the first time that so many minutes have been devoted to the subject and yeah guys islands especially. We need some breathing space. Yeah one thing people often say about our show is <hes> people in radio and they say it with a little bit of trepidation russian. There's a lot of silence in your show. Which in radio is measured in you know nanoseconds <hes> because it's it's kind of a it's forbidden being dead air right but you'll understand that dead air isn't bad oh yeah it's never never really dead but you know you wait longer than three seconds with silence and you know your listeners it probably pounding on top of their dashboard just trying to make sure other radio still looking yeah or the or the engineers in the building doing. It's a we'll get this good. Okay so let's let's start at the beginning and maybe we will circle back around to why it makes all of us nervous too much silence sure <hes>. Where did you grow up up. I didn't see that anywhere well. That's assuming that i did grow up. Okay well a whole child. Let's say it that way. Ask child. I was a member of a military family started out in southern california than went on to hawaii why then back to california before going to washington d._c. Seattle san francisco and then i can say about a dozen other places before i got out of high school so by the time it was my chance to go to college. That's when i decided fill the space in between seen by going to the mid west university of wisconsin so there wasn't really there's not really a place where you were which felt like like a center of gravity even even with all that moving. Oh there definitely is and that is hawaii. Okay yeah the place of of hawaii a place that i've recorded many times.

krista tippett hawaii Seattle nancy california gordon hampton minneapolis mid west university of wiscons san francisco washington fifty eight years ninety minute three seconds
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett and this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next. My unedited conversation with lyric poet, Gregory. Or there is a shorter produced version of this wherever you found this podcast. We are thought about this because we were listening, very closely to the programming that Krista Tippett was doing with poets, and Astro physicists, and mathematicians and philosophers, and monks, and social activists, and she asks essential questions about what it means to be human being in the world and poetry is always asking those questions, and it seemed like a natural partnership. So we contacted her producer and here we are with Krista Tippett, and Gregory or with unbecoming and poetry. So happy to be sitting here again today with Gregory or. Let me say, I have some books and I will propose some poems read. And then if you feel just inspired to read some you can just tell me to throw one of these over to you at any time. Okay. Yeah. We are taping this to broadcast later. I don't know if we've said that which is exciting. So I think there's something really magical about. An experience that you have, like we're having a we are going to have an experience here in this room together for the next hour. And, and then you send it out and many, many more people are kind of are in the room, that's kind of the magic of the medium of audio and radio, which is now. Podcasting. And the experiences are different and yet communal. And so anyway, that's what we're pertaining of right now. Thinking as I was getting ready to speak with you. That about how human beings become wise, sometimes by discovering things. No one had ever known before. And sometimes we become wise by remembering and rediscovering things that people knew forever once, and then we forgot and I'm aware in the circles in which I move this really this really unexpected movement of our time often led by young people by millennials who are claiming grief and loss and death as human experiences. And there are things held death, cafes and the dinner party, which is a movement and is founded by people who had terrible loss in their early lives, and there was no place for them to talk about that in the world. And so that what they wanna do is claim grief and death as something that's not not to pathologies it. But as a part of life. That we reckon with and show and can asked and kind kinda company others in and be accompanied. In. Yes, it is. It's fascinating and bring the greed ver- person who's lost back into some form of human community. Sounds fascinating. I'd need to know more before. Well, I mean I thought about it, obviously, because an origin point and really enduring focus of your poetry. And of you becoming a poet was with this terrible, terrible death, and boss. Which was your younger brother's death, and you're on the cusp of adolescence. You're as you said, you're a kid participating in popular American ritual ritual hunting, firing a gun becoming a man. And actually, I'm not going to ask you to read the poem that ice in every interview, I've seen everybody hands, you this poem, right at the beginning, which begins I was twelve when I killed him. And I just I we're gonna talk about that. But I kind of just want to start someplace a little softer. I mean, I think small talk has a purpose, right? He's us into other conversations like this where did you grow up? Where yes I grew up in upstate New York rural Hudson valley. We had one stop light to drugstores, one jukebox in the dark drugstore and. Seven or eight churches..

Krista Tippett Gregory New York producer Hudson valley
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And we can't despoil it as we're doing. So in a sense as a half of an answer Krista because that's what I'd say to an adult is leaving a retreat right to a parent. I say, you know, as a child is growing up inevitably they live in the world. And they'll hear about things if they live in a house, that's a relatively peaceful, and we have a certain amount of control is parents about how much the TV is on. And what's on TV and how much how much? They are confronted by the pain of the world. And you know, what I think since full myself really, I can't sometimes with the pain of the world seems incomprehensible and unbearable to make. But I think if there's anything that balances it, it's. The wonder at the world the amazingness of people how kind they are how resilient they are. How people will take care of people that they don't know. Visit somebody falls someone's in trouble in a public place. People take care of them people take care of people that they don't know that human beings have that ability. I don't think they have to learn enough to have lessons in too. I think we're companionable speechis and for the most part every once in a while, we meet armored type people, but for the most part with companionable and congenial, and we care about other people, and we take care of them. So to be able to look at human beings and say give given beings are amazing life is amazing. The sun came up in the exact right place this morning and celebrate seasons. I think that's a wonderful part of being part of a of a group of people who celebrate seasons and birthdays and holy days. So that here we are again at another time in another season and said, great cosmos to look at and imagine people going up into space and looking at the stars our ancestors looked at the same stars. I think that there's a way of if I if I keep myself a sense of amazement, I tell my grandchildren look at this moon. It's a three day moon. It's the best moon. It's better than today. Moon today day moon is kind of skimpy really can't see it and afford they moon. It's already like on its way to what moon, but a three day move is just beautiful. It's my favorite moon. And if I show that to them, then they'd be into think, oh, it's. Favorite moon three? But that just happens to be me. I like moons everybody will do in their own way. But I think that always balances it when when the Bitta Todd about needing to see the suffering in the world, so that we could respond with compassion. He also talked about the preciousness of life and the need to take care of it. And I think those two at the same time. I mean, that's also something I think our children give us new is, especially when they're very little see the world, actually, Trent my colleague was talking about taking a walk with his son energy. I remember those moments when you're a little, and it's like everything has been invented for them. And they name it and everything is fascinating. Right. Can look at one flower for a long time. It's amazing. He started to do that. I have a friend who at who ends all of her emails. You know, we have an automatic signature in you, push your marriage signature hierarchy Matic signatures, says stay amazed. And I love that. I was. This is also making me think about how we we need to be attentive to what our children can teach us as well as what we want to impart to them because some of this they know, and they actually know immediately than we do because we lose it. Remember watching something terrible in the news the other day, and my daughter said. So many beautiful lives in the world. And this is what they focus on. She's so right. But she knows that. And I've kind of lost it. In. I think the beautiful and wonderful lives in world. I certainly I'm not a sociologist of journalism aren't as compelling images. Right. As the headline. They don't make good headlands in a wonderful. I don't know if it would be commercially viable, if they were channel that had all of wonderful things..

Bitta Todd Krista Trent three day
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with Buddhist ecologist and Rilke translator Joanna Macy. There is a shorter produced version of this wherever podcasts are found. And Chris somewhere, it'd be able to get your. Hello. Hello. Hi, Joanna heights Krista Tippett high. I can't hear you very well. All right. When I say, we can turn up the volume turn, I'm late maybe a minute or two because of the parking confusion. No problem. Don't worry. Take your time catcher breath. Yeah. That'd be good. That good catch my breath. Let me tell you. Let me tell you what I have in mind. I don't I need more volume to hear you better. Oh, okay. I see that's going to happen. The your end. Can you are you is that any better? Or are you hearing me now as a little better? Okay. Sorry. What's the now? My voice is very lower to me. Right. So let's get it adjusted a little bit of that shouldn't. Are you are you working on that Chris? Or is that that's better. Okay. Good. Okay. Let me tell you what I have in mind while you catch your breath. Okay. I I own now, I'm hearing an echo. Let's see that's probably that's her headphones being a little bit loud day. Maybe if I. You know, it's not too bad. If I stay back from the Mike Nowak should get you where you're comfortable, Chris. If we can't get the headphones down just a little bit. I think I'll be okay, there's a that the thing that happens with headphone volume as if it's too high your end than I hear an echo and vice versa. So we need. We'll get a happy medium here. So can they if what's the engineer's name, Chris Harris, Kelly, Harris or Kelley should be able to hear us? Okay. Okay. Now, I think this is Kelly Kelly. Are you still hearing the go it turned on the headphones year? We're still hearing it. So I mean, it's it's tricky because do you have mixed that you can have her level be adjusted in comparison with Christos? Yes. Yeah. Working on that. Yeah. So, you know, it's probably more difficult because having a little hard of hearing. And I took off my hearing aids. Well, we'll we'll be able to work it out. But I'm sure you have is not the first time you've had to deal with that. The thing is with technology. It's amazing and something different is difficult. Every time. Kelly is your Mike open right now. Yes. My my guess here alternate off, and we'll see if that makes it different, okay? Testing testing. I'm not hearing myself now Joanna can you still hear me very well? Good. Okay. So so let me tell you what I have in mind. I am a lover of real like you. And I I I don't for your translations have Rilke good. I I spent most of the eighties in Germany, most of that in divided Berlin. And I speak German, and and real has German is, you know, one of the most beautiful things in the world to me. And I could never find translations that captured that.

Chris Harris Krista Tippett Kelly Kelly Joanna Macy Rilke Mike Nowak Berlin Germany Christos engineer Kelley
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Visiting fetzer dot org. I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with Rebecca tracer and AVI Klein, there is a shorter produced version of this wherever podcasts are found. And so this is really fun because how often do you get to introduce one of your own journalistic heroes mentors and friends at it's very funny. Chris it because I cannot see you at all. So it's like I. Like. Like this. This woman probably requires no introduction, but Krista Tippett as a Peabody award winning broadcaster, national humanities medalists New York Times bestselling author. She founded and leads the on being project hosts, the globally, esteemed on being public radio show and podcast and curates the civil conversations project. She grew up in a small town in Oklahoma, attended Brown University and became a journalist and diplomat in Cold War Berlin and later received a master of divinity from Yale University, and she's working on a new book her last book was becoming wise an inquiry into the mystery art of living, which is a really beautiful book. I thought it'd be funny. If I told my meeting, you story, Krista, which I don't even know if you remember, but I we were at the same conference and I'd never met her. And I have this thing, right? Never really want to meet any of my heroes because I'm afraid that if I meet them, I will just babble it and say nothing that they haven't heard before and just inconvenience them. And I always talk myself out of it. It. So I was at a conference and Krista was there, and I was turned turned to my friend. And I said if I do meet Krista Tippett, unlike all these other times where I don't talk to the people who I like really look up to I'm going to tell her this gonna tell her that. And we'll toes other thing. And all of a sudden, I feel this like light touch on my elbow and Kris Jenner and she's like, hi Courtney. I'm Chris, and I was like oh God. Okay. Well, I've already told all the things so at least now I can just sort of slink away. But it was the banning of a very beautiful friendship, which I am. So deeply grateful for I'm going to let her introduce the other two brilliant humans up here. Both of which I also very much admire, but please take it away Krista. You courtney? Now, I don't know where you went. So I I wrote out some remarks to begin with because I wrote them out because I think we all agreed. It's this it feels it's hard to talk about all of this feels a little perilous. And I know you've all been together all day. And so it may not feel that way to anymore, and I don't want to say it goes without saying, but I still think it's worth saying again. And again that metoo is a moment and it didn't just start a year ago. And Rebecca tracer is one of the people who has been reminding us of that this year in Toronto Burke, who I gave rise to these worse in two thousand six spoke to the times just this past week of her concern that the movement that is now underway really the movement that are now under around this don't lose sight of the central mission, which was and still is to connect survivors of sexual assault to the resources they need in order to heal. Will. And I read and I thought that the h word he'll has not had much of a place in the journalistically driven public reckonings of the past year and that word can be employed to quickly in the face of trauma. But surely the complex of reckonings because that's what it is that we are societally naming and wrapping our arms around with the impetus of metoo is at best an opening to a long term cultural reckoning to grow up humanity to grow up our species to grow up our society. I think that a solutions lens on me too. And I just love the framing of this day would ask can journalism can journalists be among the culture, interrogators shapers who helped create and shine a light on the spaces the vocabulary. The imaginative muscle the processes and the pragmatic forms to support healing where it is possible now and in time. I believe that the that grappling with the me too movement through solutions lens, which show us ways to cover this and live this not as a liberal issue..

Krista Tippett Rebecca tracer Chris Courtney Burke Peabody award New York Times bestselling Kris Jenner Oklahoma AVI Klein Yale University Cold War Berlin Brown University Toronto assault
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with contemporary of teacher Mira by Bush. There is a shorter produced version of this at apple podcast, Google podcasts Spotify or wherever you like to listen. That was that wasn't. You was it. Yeah. That's what I thought. Hello. Hello. Hello. Hello. Does that Mary by it is mere by hi, Krista? I I'm so glad you made it safely. I did not want to have any any damage to you on my conscience. The roads were great. Okay. You know by the time I got on. There was I've been on texting in on Email. It's various friends that area who are all kind of freaked out about the weather. Yeah. It's been a lot. Yeah. We're weary. Yeah. Yeah. And it's a lot of shoveling and snowball somebody said grumpy grumpy. Yeah. So Chris are do you want us to just Chit chat for a minute. All right. Sure. So tell me something let's not want. I'm so happy. We're doing this first of all, but I don't want. I don't want to risk using I think profound until we're going so tell me something mundane like what you had for breakfast. I add. Granola yogurt and banana was very good. Okay. Although I wanted something warm, but I couldn't figure that out. So. I have for breakfast. Get a gold star for healthiness. Last week. I was out at canyon ranch. So you know, one has to be healthy for a while. After after that. That's. I though it was that your award for having that. Yeah. Well, I went there's one right near us and lenox mass. Yeah. I went there to work with some funds to set up a program, you know, for re strengthening, and I've actually had a fabulous recovery. I feel great. But I wanted to keep strengthening so and basically, of course, they told me everything I already know. But it was nice to hear from somebody else. I actually haven't been to canyon ranch. I mean, I've heard that. It's really wonderful. So it's one of my aspirants. Okay. Doing it. Okay. Chris few think, we're good. Oh, okay. All right. Okay. I do have what I do have water. Okay. And we don't do we have a hard stop or anything. Heart. Stop at two thirty our time three thirty your time. Okay. Is it? Okay. If I drink water during absolutely. And this is totally this is completely non linear. And you can you know, we can edit things out if you need join a stop or if you want to go back to something we'll edited for broadcast. Yeah. Just a real conversation. Nothing. I would rather do. Okay. Well, let's see. We can we begin. Okay. Terrific..

Chris Krista Tippett canyon ranch apple Mira Spotify Google Mary Bush
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with the singular cellist and citizen artist yoyo ma we're kind of pieces of music or experiences of working with other musicians or particular concerts like they've been cathartic moments where you where you discovered this or started to be able to articulate it or even something going on now i'm just i'm just wondering if you could embed that in a piece of music or a story sure we'll give you too so one of the composers that wrote for cello alone six of these one wonderful sweets and they're different movements and i've moment of going between the moment the end of a movement to the beginning of the next movement so actually not necessarily coded a written by the composer if they just separate movements that i would member often playing loving the connection between the end of the sarra of the i the g major sweet going into the minuet than the next movement because there was something asadabad is like a slow dance and it goes into a minuet which is a slightly more lively dads and there's something about the incredible restfulness of the way the first movement and and suddenly the some like.

krista tippett