35 Burst results for "K. Abi"

Ethiopia says its military now controls the Tigray capital

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 d ago

Ethiopia says its military now controls the Tigray capital

"Ethiopia's army says it's gained full control of the capital of the defiant Tigray region Ethiopian prime minister abi Akhmed declares the taking of makayla A. marks the completion of the military offensive in Tigray that started nearly four weeks ago earlier Saturday the Tigray government reported the city being heavily bombarded but with communications cut to Tigray it's difficult to verify claims by the warring sides he the OP is government continues to seek the arrests of the regional leaders while millions of civilians have been plunged into a massive humanitarian crisis nearly one million people have been displaced in neighboring Sudan you when the High Commissioner for refugees Filippo grandi says many have fled across the border five six hundred per day is not the small figure let's make no mistakes I'm Ben Thomas

Tigray Abi Akhmed Makayla A. Marks Tigray Government Ethiopia Filippo Grandi Sudan Ben Thomas
Ethiopian leader rejects international 'interference' in war

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

Ethiopian leader rejects international 'interference' in war

"Food is running desperately short in Ethiopia's embattled Tigray region well the prime minister again rejects what he calls foreign interference in the country's three week conflict the U. N. says it has been unable to send aid into the Tigray region of some six million people since the fighting began estimating two million people urgently need help the international community is pleading for progress and immediate humanitarian access now Ethiopia's prime minister abi Ahmed is rejecting a growing international consensus for dialogue and hold the deadly fighting in the country Ahmed says he will handle the conflict on his own as a seventy two R. surrender ultimatum runs out I'm Charles de Ledesma

Tigray U. N. Ethiopia Prime Minister Abi Ahmed Ahmed Charles De Ledesma
"k. abi" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"k. abi" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Serve those in need <Speech_Music_Male> with chronic <Speech_Telephony_Male> brain injury in cognitive <Speech_Male> issues as <Speech_Male> a result <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> over the summer we <Speech_Male> successfully <Speech_Male> held to virtual <Speech_Male> trainings. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm using the technology <Speech_Music_Male> of our platform <Speech_Male> to train <Speech_Music_Male> out new facilitators <Speech_Music_Male> on the program <Speech_Male> and the feedback <Speech_Male> so far saul <Speech_Male> has been very <Speech_Music_Male> very positive. <Speech_Music_Male> It's been fantastic <Speech_Male> in. <Speech_Male> We are hosting <Speech_Male> another training coming <Speech_Telephony_Male> up at the end of <Speech_Music_Male> this month. Starting <Speech_Telephony_Male> on november twenty <Speech_Music_Male> third. And we're <Speech_Telephony_Male> kind of in the process <Speech_Music_Male> of <Speech_Telephony_Male> pre-qualifying <Speech_Music_Male> clinical providers <Speech_Male> score. this servants. <Speech_Male> Just wanted <Speech_Male> to make sure. I extended the <Speech_Telephony_Male> hand and let people <Speech_Telephony_Male> know that you <Speech_Male> may qualify for this <Speech_Male> straight so <Speech_Male> you can reach out <Speech_Male> to us. And we'll do our <Speech_Male> best to <Speech_Telephony_Male> Accommodate <Speech_Male> as many people as possible <Speech_Male> for this training. <Speech_Male> Yeah that's great <Speech_Male> now. Who is <SpeakerChange> the training for <Speech_Male> primarily people <Speech_Male> who work in cognitive <Speech_Male> rehabilitation <Speech_Male> is specifically <Speech_Male> for people who are looking <Speech_Male> to enhance <Speech_Male> the cognitive abilities <Speech_Male> of those that <Speech_Male> they are so really <Speech_Male> clinical providers. <Speech_Male> So we're talking occupational <Speech_Male> therapists <Speech_Male> physical therapists <Speech_Music_Male> ziya <Speech_Male> drills clinical <Speech_Male> counselors kinesiology. <Speech_Male> Anybody <Speech_Male> in that rainy <Speech_Male> rehab <SpeakerChange> space. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah well they <Speech_Male> haven't folks if you <Speech_Male> fall into <Speech_Male> that area <Speech_Male> of expertise <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> trainings for you. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> really <SpeakerChange> result <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> reach out the place <Speech_Male> where you go <SpeakerChange> find more <Speech_Male> mark is <Speech_Male> on you can go right <Speech_Male> to our website <Speech_Male> to abia dot <Speech_Telephony_Male> com. And if you just <Speech_Male> go to become <Speech_Telephony_Male> a partner Page <Speech_Male> it'll be in the notes <Speech_Male> here you can <Speech_Male> just click right there <Speech_Male> on email go directly. <Speech_Male> We'll get back <Speech_Male> to within twenty four hours <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> You know nobody's <Speech_Male> really doing <Speech_Male> in that. I've seen <Speech_Male> in this in this space. <Speech_Male> Doing the <Speech_Male> kind of innovative work <Speech_Telephony_Male> that we are doing <Speech_Music_Male> in higher <Speech_Telephony_Male> in rehabilitation <Speech_Male> in higher order <Speech_Male> cognitive function. <Speech_Male> So i really <SpeakerChange> encourage <Silence> you to come check it out. <Speech_Male> Man that's <Speech_Male> awesome. We <Speech_Male> appreciate the invite <Speech_Male> and you know the other <Speech_Male> thing too folks. If you <Speech_Male> have not listened <Speech_Male> to mark's <Speech_Male> first podcast <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Male> have to go back and <Speech_Male> listen to it because <Speech_Male> you learn a lot <Speech_Male> about him and his <Speech_Male> wife and his <Speech_Male> personal story <Speech_Male> about why he got into <Speech_Male> this just <Speech_Male> An incredible <Speech_Male> person and <Speech_Male> a phenomenal friend. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> you guys will certainly <Speech_Male> get a lot out <Speech_Male> of that episode but certainly <Speech_Male> take him <Speech_Male> up on this training. <Speech_Male> Because it's <Speech_Male> gonna be a good one and <Speech_Male> so with that <Speech_Male> markelle wanna <Speech_Male> thank you so much for <Speech_Male> offering that to <Speech_Music_Male> our community <Speech_Male> and for <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a valued <SpeakerChange> guest here <Speech_Male> on the <Speech_Male> Thanks lots <Speech_Male> all. And i just wanna be clear. <Speech_Male> This is <Speech_Male> something to inquire about <Speech_Male> the training. It <Speech_Male> may not be for absolutely <Speech_Male> everyone but <Speech_Telephony_Male> we are looking for kind <Speech_Male> of those clinics that <Speech_Telephony_Male> are looking to enhance <Speech_Male> the way that they're <Silence> Delivering <SpeakerChange> cognitive. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanks for clarifying <Speech_Male> that. Mark <Speech_Male> so with that. <Speech_Music_Male> I <SpeakerChange> just want to thank <Speech_Music_Male> you again. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you have a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> great baseball. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You take <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hey <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> outcomes rocket <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listeners. Know <Speech_Music_Male> podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> no problem. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Launch a professional <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You'll love and four <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> weeks. Most people <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> production companies <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to edit and distribute <Speech_Music_Male> content. That <Speech_Music_Male> sounds bad and <Speech_Music_Male> does nothing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for their revenue <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or their network.

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"k. abi" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

01:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"k. abi" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes a racket sal marquez. And i have a brief episode for you today mainly to invite a friend mark watson. He's the ceo at api wellness. If you haven't listened to his episode already it's episode five twenty three on the outcomes rockets and he is just doing awesome stuff in evidence based kind of rehab programs for patients with chronic brain injury. His goals to improve higher order cognitive function with programs. That he has an podcast. We did with them. He shared how his company's helping people with not be. I enjoy improved congressman functions and enjoy independent lifestyles. Yes oh talks about the genesis of api where they came from and how they're adding value to the ecosystem today. He's here to offer up a resource so mark Just truly grateful for all the work you continue to do and welcome back to the black cast off. Thanks all could to reconnect with you and look forward to having a just a brief conversation about some of the value that we're trying to add for those out there. Yeah for sure. Now folks today is basically mark coming back to say hi and we always encourage previous guests to do the same. He's got a training available virtual training available so mark. Why don't you just tell us what it's about who it's four and where they could learn more for sure so obviously when the pandemic hit we were concerned about continuing to provide the level of service that we needed to our clinical partners primarily you know outpatient rehab clinics nonprofits in brain injury private clinics. You name it and what we were able to do successfully was move. Our service platform to virtual care delivery. We're very proud to be able to do that. To continue to.

mark watson chronic brain injury sal marquez api wellness congressman
Ethiopia: a Nobel Peace laureate goes to war

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Ethiopia: a Nobel Peace laureate goes to war

"There is no hostage to fortune. Quite like the nobel peace prize. Just as the peacemaker of today you can often be the munger of yesterday. They can also be the warmonger of tomorrow. Abi ahmed. Prime minister of ethiopia was two thousand and nineteen nobel peace laureate recognized for finally ending eighth european hostilities with its neighbor and former province eritrea a year later ibm prize. Looks like one of the nobel. Peace committees hastier. Garlanding along with those of yasser arafat. Suu she and henry kissinger ethiopia is at war with tegray. A region in the country's north the immediate cause was to graze decision to hold in september a local despite being told not to by abbey national government sheduled elections across the european were postponed due to the covid nineteen pandemic behind that lies to gray and resentment of amid efforts to reduce to graze dominance of ethiopia's national politics before abi ahmed became prime minister. The to gray in people's liberation front had effectively governed all of ethiopia for nearly two decades. It's hard to know exactly what is going on into gray right now. Phones down. the internet is off. It's not much easier to speak to theo. Paeans elsewhere in ethiopia several people. We asked to participate in this program. Responded that they were simply too scared but over the news there is none of it is good

Ethiopia Abi Ahmed Tegray Abbey National Government Eritrea Yasser Arafat Henry Kissinger IBM
As Ethiopia's conflict rages, ethnic targeting turns deadly

PRI's The World

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

As Ethiopia's conflict rages, ethnic targeting turns deadly

"Ethiopia's northern tegray region has already left hundreds of people dead. The concern is that it could mushroom into a regional conflict threatening neighboring countries. The rule tell him a condie reports from nairobi. Kenya tensions between government under prime minister ali. Ahmed and the semi autonomous northern state of tigray have been simmering for months last week. They reached a deadly boiling point. That's why an according to abi security forces from tigray attacked ethiopian government troops. The isn't as secure but but the last week against other men and a woman in uni. Four of the northern command was kid out while they were at their most vulnerable and that the gemma's and among suze taught with the peace that was obvi- speaking on thursday one week into military operations launched against the tigray people's liberation front or teepee al f nazi governing party in the region. The was once a powerful force in ethiopia and politics for but that was before matt came to power in two thousand eighteen. The prime minister says the military offensive. He ordered is entirely justified. The federal government had every right to deploy forces and they use force in order to hand those implicated in corruption and gross human rights violation if ups is made up of different states centered around ethnic and linguistic lines each granted certain amounts of autonomy under the constitution. Tigray leaders say prime minister abi has been infringing on their

Tegray Tigray Condie Ethiopian Government Ethiopia Obvi Tigray People's Liberation Fro Nazi Governing Party Nairobi Ahmed ABI Kenya Gemma Matt Federal Government Prime Minister Abi
Houston Texans close facilities after player tests positive for COVID-19

Sean Hannity

00:18 sec | Last month

Houston Texans close facilities after player tests positive for COVID-19

"Texans player has tested positive for covert 19. The team confirms they received notice last night that the player who has not been identified, tested positive team has closed its facility today for deep cleaning, and the player is self isolating. Texans have ABI this week. Their next game is scheduled for Sunday. November 8th at Jacksonville,

Jacksonville
Oracle's Jason Witt on the Partnership Between Creative and Code

Delivering by Litmus

04:49 min | Last month

Oracle's Jason Witt on the Partnership Between Creative and Code

"Today I'm joined by another Jason Jason Wet I, who is the senior creative director for four x marketing and Ryder Oracle Jason was senior creative director epsilon. In, both rules, Jason leads teams, designers, and developers, writers, hats had strategists, all those people making him out to help clients, deliver more effective email campaigns to subscribers. So welcome to the PODCAST Jason. Thanks for having me excited about the conversation. Awesome. Yeah. So I always like to start things off by hearing about guests I. I guess your career in the marketing world and how you make your way to where you are right now. So can I tell me a little bit about how certain? Email? Marketing Archaic General. Bad I got to work all yet for sure. So it's kind of a long road but. I've been in marketing for almost twenty years now. So I. Started Out in traditional marketing doing you know not so much offline but mostly print direct mail I worked. I worked for an in house agency for quite a while over ten years and so it was interesting coming out of that in into more the agency world and when I started it up Salon I kind of walked into it into a position that would they scratch their head civil. Why do you want to come in and kind of get your hands in the work and it was because email really was a channel that I had it really dug into. I said to be you know really versed in anything I really wanted to get my hands in the work. So I spent about the first year. So really really fine tuning my skills around creatives and then also making those connections with the technology in the platforms that we use today order to send out email and over time I just developed a a larger team underneath me and it just kind of grew from there and and and had some really great successes were some awesome. had a chance to do everything from not only created strategy, but also developing design systems for our clients to use to create efficiencies within their their creative workflows, and so you know one of my I think one of the philosophies sort of carried me now into working at Oracle is that you know there's so many ways for our teams to help our clients. At. You know a large organization like Oracle in your sort of consulting role I think a lot of times and you're working with a client they might have like an. Agency of record or they'll have an internal creative team. And I think it's important for us to kind of walk in and really be able be able to be put our consultant on. Be. Able to just say, Hey, look, we're an extension of your team. How can we help you and we help our clients in a variety of ways and I find that really rewarding because there's some some clients will dig in and we'll do one or two campaigns There's other clients will help develop. design systems for their email programs and then other folks that we have is retained clients that we work with every all day so. It's been. It's been a fun journey to get here I'm really excited about being at Oracle and supporting the platforms in the services that we have to provide but I've definitely worked with so many great people in the industry for a long time an and that's been really great as well. Yeah Awesome So I'm pedicures way your typical client base looks like at or these days as mostly on the retail side or during the lobby to be. Folks in your across. Yeah. You know it's interesting at Oracle, because we have sort of this mixed, right we have to platform. So we've got responses and then have Alachua and eloquent tends to be more on that beat Abi side and You know it's a little bit more hands off of the L. A. Clients just because the fact that they're they typically, you know are smaller to mid sized companies. So they most likely won't engage in some of the more I would say costly services you know they're really kind of hitter budgets there can be to be, but we do have a fair amount of clients that we work with their You know to support to support their campaigns there, and then on the responses side where it's more beat see, we have everything from retail financial services, hospitality, which has been a tough year. US Battalion we've had we've had some rough times here, but you know financial services technology companies retail has has been interesting over the last. I'd say six months we really been Asia retail as Dave shifted and sort of pivoted their business models to adapt to what's going on in the world So had a fair amount of work and retail.

L. A. Clients Jason Jason Wet Oracle Jason Director Alachua Us Battalion ABI Dave Consultant
Japan's PM Shinzo Abe resigns, clearing way for successor

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Japan's PM Shinzo Abe resigns, clearing way for successor

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting Japan's prime minister resigns clearing the way for his successor Japanese prime minister Shinzo Ave and his cabinet have resigned accelerating a government transition I'll be announced last month that he was stepping down due to health problems abi has ulcerative colitis and his current treatment requires IV injections the sixty five year old Ave was Japan's longest serving prime minister first from two thousand sixty two thousand seven and then returning in twenty twelve obeys resignation came two days after chief cabinet secretary Yoshi to suka was chosen to head the governing liberal Democratic Party virtually guaranteeing his election as Japan's new prime minister I might cross yep

Mike Rossi Japan Cabinet Ulcerative Colitis Prime Minister Yoshi Democratic Party IV Secretary
Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

Software Engineering Daily

15:08 min | 2 months ago

Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

"Welcome to the show. Thank you. You're on the Internet Archive. What does the Internet archive do. That's a great question. Deterrent archive is the world's largest digital library, and whereas most people may know of us because of the way back machine, which is this really rather needs tool that allows you to go back in time and kind of see what web pages used to look like. We really are fully-fledged online is the library and that we have different types of media types. We hold texts and television and audio images, movies, all sorts of things and yeah, the introduce archive you can think of as this huge repository of Internet. When did you start working there? I started here in two thousand sixteen. So. We've been yeah for years. And what do you work on their today? Well, I work on the books. That's mostly what I would I have always been on. I'm spending the bits inside of this. So usually when we think about our media types, we think of in terms of bits and bits out how we procured them, and how we distribute them. My specialty is working on the book bits in saw in order to build up our collection of almost four million books we have Candan, and my job is to sort of keep running the whole pipeline that allows us to do that. So over the last four years, we've my team, I built it. And now we achieved over our objective of being able to digitize million books per year which we're doing, and it's pretty interesting challenge so far. So you work on book digitisation and I WanNa talk about that. But first, let's talk more about the Internet archive at a high level. He told me about what is being stored across the Internet archive and who pays for it, and how do people use it just share a little bit more about the Internet Archive. Yeah. That's a great question. So I'm going to start from a WHO pays for it because I think that's the result of depth and that question Internet Archive. If you think about it as a repository, it's just essentially a bunch of hard drives spinning connected to the Internet. Somebody's GONNA. Pay For both danger and connection and hard drives and the electricity and all of that largely you can think. Of of our revenues in treated front weight. So we're a nonprofit and we don't really run for profit businesses. We don't benefit in any way of the data that comes on on our servers. We do benefit from your donations and so by and large, we are a community funded effort, and so if you type slash donate, we actually just added integration with apple pay so people will not help us. That'd be great. So we receive a fair amount of money that we we need to run from patrons, Cintas like people who supported us. On the side, we do have some some small some businesses. So we have our archive it. Our arm where essentially contract alto were machine capabilities and we we are maintaining a very large amount of curated website collections. In fact, we I, think we have about seven hundred can ization that are that are partnering with us to create these collections and if you tens of billions euros that have been collected for for our partners, and so they pay us to do the service and we do it for them and same is true for books. digitisation. So as we have built up to large infrastructure that is required to do this kind of tasks, we have to an extent, the ability to contract out to third parties, and so we do get some some revenue streams that way not anything particularly substantial in terms of like our ability to to sustain ourselves. But you know every little bit helps and then obviously throughout the twenty twenty, five years of our existence, our founder Brewster Kahle has. Chipped in here in Deir a significant amount, I guess over the years to to keep us running. So we have donations we have a little bit of our non for profit business, and then we have brewster who is there so This is in terms of who pays for it, but the question would be I guess who benefits from it. Right and that's a very, very large segment of the Internet. We're not the biggest website on the Internet. They think we are. We're ranking about two hundred and something the Alexa rank. But since we've been around for a long time, the users that that lovers the Lavas like I, every day I am in contact with people who tell me their story about how they use the Internet archive for their specific need always always amazed by the depth and breadth of. The of the use cases user spring to us. So it it spans from teachers to researchers, journalists to lawyers Theresa very, very large diversity also in terms of the country's from the backgrounds from from when users from. So it's kind of hard to to to paint them with the same brush but in general I want to say they are people who have some degree of laugh for knowledge and you may know our our motto, our slogan our mission is Universal Access to all knowledge, and so I guess people who have an interest in that eventually land on on our website. Okay. Well, let's talk about book digitisation as a particular project that is under the auspices of the Internet Archive. What is book digitisation? So, books digitisation is the effort of transforming physical books into digital artifacts. So that's the definition can take it forms. You know if you are if you have a scanner in your home and your scanning document in a way, that's obviously that's digitisation if you take pictures of the book. That's a book book digitization. So the definition that needs to be applied to the use case at hand, there have been other efforts at large scale of books. This decision famously Google had one but dare. Different From Ours, for instance, where they did distractive digitisation so they would pull the spines from books and and turn dot process into a sort of sensitive. Kind of problem we do non destructive book dissertation and I think non-destructive bit. It's just a little bit as important in the Beth nation as the fact that we're these books digitizing them so that we can keep them so that we don't destroy them. So the process by which we turn books into bits and then returned books to wherever they came from or wherever they need to go. So Why would I want to digitize a book and how many books get digitized each day just tell me more about the volume that's going through this. I'm very happy to answer this. So the reason why you would want to digitize book there's multiple. So think about for instance, the first thing that comes to mind is obviously preservation if famous birtherism is that accessibility drives preservation so if you don't have something. It's almost like it doesn't exist especially in this age of information, we do have immediate access to all of all of these resources and so if we if you actually think about this, if you have to go to the library to to procure a certain book chances are you won't, and if the if the record of that book actually doesn't exist, you may never get to it and were. This is a problem is for all of this huge amount of books that were printed in the twentieth century for which there is really no digital equivalent books nowadays that are published like currently obviously, they have a book artifacts. That stuff is not to get lost. and. That stuff is searchable and it's reachable but we have. Tens of millions of books that are unaccounted for and as time progresses getting lost, and if we if somebody doesn't save them, they will be lost forever and that's that would be a pity and huge loss of human effort and so but first of all, I think important to scope the problem I think the D estimates that there is about one hundred, million books out there. Give or take unique unique books and. Scanning them we're, probably not gonNA scan all all one hundred of them first of all because. You would be able to source and that's my fire the hardest thing. So we tried to scope down the problem and trying to figure out. Okay. How can we do this in a way that is useful for people so first of all, I think we had to come up with a list of books that we wanted to get into we knew. Books that are important and we need to can these first so that? We'll. We'll get. We'll get into to people and this will be evidently immediately useful and a good place for us to start was freaky Pedia, which is collected. A long list of SPN's the where commonly cited in Wikipedia compiled the list came out to a few hundred, thousand books, and so whenever we we come upon one of those sourcing process, we make sure that we get. We can talk about the senator sourcing, Proxima, little bit later but in general, we do have a little bit of a concept of priority or at least we did this was the first million million and a half. And then the problem was that we started running out of books you would be surprised how hard it is to source books by by the half a million you know and if you if you do it by your smaller scale, it doesn't really make sense to to us in terms of maintaining our our economic scale. So the whole system works only if you scan at huge volume and time and but huge volume, we're talking about a million bucks a year, which is about three thousand books day some things some days we'll do thirty, five somedays. We'll do twenty five on a seven days week averages houses about. Between Twenty to twenty, twenty, five, thousand books. Every book is about three hundred pages so that. COMES OUT PRETTY NEAT about million million pages per day five to seven million pages per week and you know that's not a huge amount of data in total. I wouldn't be surprised I. think like last time I checked it was about between ten and fifteen terabytes of data week. So we're not talking about huge amounts but it's not a small amount eater and we can talk about the challenges of Piping data over the Internet in a reliable way later but it's a significant volume and this operation is running you know twenty, four seven. And so. In terms of why even do this? So I called for the first part, which is obviously people want to get to the books. There is a second benefit in having digitize books, and that it's a wholly new format, it allows you to interact with the body of knowledge in a way that you never have before if you have. A physical book artifact, it has some very desirable properties, for instance, very low random access time and doesn't depend on the battery. It's very, very hard to censor, and these are not properties of digital artifact but this is the active factor searchable, and in fact that we have like it's pretty amazing next search engine where you can instantly search all forty million text items that we have. So that's a million books plus all of the patents papers I'll all sorts of stuff and you can search that instantly that was just not possible with the previous format. So I don't think this is dwell ISM in any way I think books. Digital format and books their physical format will continue to coexist. They just help each other out, and in fact, if we are able to digitize them in the first place is because of the properties of. Physical artifacts that they don't just disappear. If we find one, we can scan it. Well. Those are great summary of what you do and I can tell how excited you are about it. Let's talk a little bit more about the high level, and then we'll get into the engineering. So can you describe the steps of digitisation in more detail if I have a book how am I digitized it? Yeah. So, the books that position pipeline is predecing people and it's like in a way if you're an engineer I think is kind of what to expect so I D-. A physical sorting. Step where your book is ingested into the system. It's given ID and it's it's placed in a container. So we know that the the exists. So to speak the second step is it gets to a scanner. The scanner picks it up within the in the machine loads up the data necessary whereby The books method data we can. We're going to have to talk about that. I, guess it's pretty interesting facet of it all and then proceeded to actually scan it, which means they turned the pages page by page and they take pictures of the pages, and once this process done they click upload and the book vanishes into the ether and so at this point, we have a fork the digital artifact goes into our servers divisible artifacts either goes back to the person who gave it to us in the first place or it goes into our warehouse. and. This largely depends on what kind of book it is. So obviously, the recent larger conversation to be had about copyright and like what books is it is it okay to scan and under what guys it is but suppose we are just you know scanning Yearbook Jeff and you you just wrote the book and you want to have it digitized to risk no claim on it just wanted back at the end. So after we're done scanning it, we're handing it back to you with slip inside which will tell you the Internet archive identifier and the. Or is just the name of the item on the Internet Archive. Everything is an item and you're just going go to type slash details, slash your identifier and a few hours. Later, you will find her book. Wile you wait the second part of the pipeline is GONNA kick off. So That's the digital server side stuff and it's divided essentially three phases. We have a first phase which it's a preprocessing stage where we get a look this images that came raw from the camera we'll look at them crop firm we discovered them and we just make sure that everything is is ready to go. There was a second phase of Manual Review Sa- currently all books that we upload have to be checked by a human for correctness, and so this is a step were. Reviewer just goes through the images in shorts that everything is fine and then when this is done, they kick off the third stage of the pipeline, which is A. Is the real processing stage where we take all of these files and compiled them in such a way that they are suitable for consumption by our web front end what we call book reader and from their wheel derive. We call them to rotate formats such as PDF, Abi e POB and either a text file. So CR it all happens at at this stage. This is kind of like the bird I view of the of the books that decision pipeline.

Internet Archive Twenty Twenty Brewster Kahle Cintas Internet Google Alexa Candan Apple Theresa Manual Review Sa Senator Wikipedia Founder Engineer
Vehicle fatalities up 25% in Philadelphia

KYW 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 2 months ago

Vehicle fatalities up 25% in Philadelphia

"Jump in the number of people who have been killed in car crashes this year in Philadelphia and his cave What Abi's Crime and Justice reporter Kristin Joe Hansen tells us the city has among the highest car related fatalities in the country, whether on foot on bike or in another car vehicle. Fatalities are up 25% from this time last year, captain of the accident investigation district mark over. over. Why Why says says the the numbers numbers seem seem to to parallel parallel the the pandemic? pandemic? Some Some of of it it may may have have to to do do With With the the lack lack of of vehicles vehicles one one of of Rhodes Rhodes right right now now because because of of the the covert covert pandemic pandemic in in some some of of the the restrictions restrictions that that are are place, place, he he says. says. With With less less people people on on the the roads, roads, it it seems, seems, drivers drivers are are going going faster faster per per capita capita Philly Philly ranks ranks among among the the highest highest in in the the nation. nation. Almost voices likely that someone involved in a crash fill it off. You might be killed as compared to New York City, which says a lot because New York City's population is around eight million, and Philadelphia's is over 1.5 as an example, 32 year old William Lindsay was killed by a car in mid July while riding his bike on Ridge Avenue in East Falls. The driver left him at the scene. And now there's a $25,000 reward for information leading to the identity of the driver. Kristen Joe

Philadelphia New York City Rhodes Rhodes Kristin Joe Hansen Kristen Joe Reporter William Lindsay East Falls
Trump Said of Virus, ‘I Wanted To Always Play It Down,’ Woodward Book Says

Hammer and Nigel

07:15 min | 3 months ago

Trump Said of Virus, ‘I Wanted To Always Play It Down,’ Woodward Book Says

"It s so there's this this new book that's coming out again from journalist Bob Woodward to him. Or lets go to this press conference with Donald Trump Nail answering questions about this book from Bob Woodward and allegations That Trump initially tried to downplay the seriousness of the Corona virus to the American public early on in the pandemic, our country that he do that Okay, please. Good. You have a question question. You address the concerns from woodwork regard whether you down place. Well, I think if you said in order to reduce panic, perhaps that so The fact is I'm a cheerleader for this country. I love our country and I don't want people to be frightened. I don't want to create panic, as you say. And certainly I'm not going to drive this country or the world into a frenzy. We want to show confidence. We want to show strength. We want to show strength as a nation. And that's what I've done and we've done very well. We've done well from any standard. You look at our numbers compared to other countries of the parts of the world. It's been an amazing job that we've done. I think it's very sad in many respects because The incredible individuals working so hard on it, including our vice president. They've done this great job. They haven't been acknowledged by the news media and they should for the job we've done whether it's ventilators, and now you'll see very soon with vaccines and with Therapeutics. The job we've done has been incredible, but we don't want to. We don't want to instill panic. We don't want to jump up and down and start shouting that we have a problem. That is tremendous problems scare everybody and I'll tell you the other thing. We immediately started buying all over the world. We started buying Masks and gowns and everything else and we don't want to cause Pricing to go up to a level that becomes almost unaffordable. So yeah, and that's it. So, in that sense, I agree with it your place. How do you reassure the American public going forward that they can trust what you're saying? Well, I think that's really a big part of trust. We have to have leadership. We have to show leadership. But the last thing you want to do is create a panic in the country. This was a horrible thing. It was sent to us by China should not have happened should never have happened. This is a disgusting, terrible situation that was foisted upon us, and we have to show we just don't want to use the best word is panic. We don't want to have to show panic would not go into show panic and that's exactly what I did. And I was very open. Whether it's to Woodward or anybody else is just another political hitch up, but whether it was Woodward or anybody else. You cannot show a sense of panic or you're gonna have bigger problems than you ever had before. Place trying to reduce panics or in February 7. It's more deadly than your place. Mr President would like a few more more forthright forthright with with the the American American people people More More last last been been saved. saved. You You took took responsibility responsibility at at all all for for some some of of the the 200,000 200,000 deaths deaths that that we've we've had. had. So So I I think think if if we we didn't didn't do do what what we we did, did, we we would would have have Millions of people die. We closed up our country. We close it up very, very quickly. Very effectively. We did a job. We learned about this horrible disease along with the rest of the world, which had to learn about it. And then we opened it up. And now we know the vulnerable. We know who it attacks who it's so vicious against. And I think we've done from every standpoint a incredible job. We shouldn't have lost anybody. Nobody should have lost. China released something that they shouldn't have been allowed to. They should not have released. It came out of China. It went to Europe. It went all over the world should have never happened. That could have stopped it. They stopped it from going into the remainder of China. It started in Wuhan. And they stopped it, but they didn't stop it from coming to our country. Now Now we we had had to to show show calm. calm. We We had had to to show show you you know know if if it it was was up up to to you you or or whoever. whoever. I I have have no no idea idea what what he he said. said. In In the the book book and and again. again. It's It's a a book book that that I gave him some quotes and frankly, we'll see how the book turned out. I have no idea you're asking me questions for the first time. But again, the last thing we can show is panic. Or excitement or fear or anything else We had to take care of that. We had to take care of the situation we were given now. Long before anybody else wanted to do it. I closed our borders. To a very heavily infected China. If I didn't do that, we would have had hundreds of thousands more people die doctor found, she said it many people, said it. It was a great decision. It was a decision I made and I had to make. It was a decision that a lot of people thought I was wrong, Nancy Pelosi said I was wrong. Joe bought, Biden said I was wrong. They all came back. And they said it was the right decision. And I I was was way way early. early. That That was was in in January. January. The The end end of of January. January. Did Did that. that. So So that that was was a a very very good good thing thing we we did did otherwise, otherwise, we we would would have have had had hundreds hundreds of of thousands thousands more. more. But But if we didn't close the country, we would have been talking about millions of people instead of the numbers that we have right now, you mentioned that you were trying to price gouging. But Bob Woodward recognizes its virus spreading through the year on February 7th. You didn't begin project airbridge until March. You didn't use the bed until March starts. You didn't really think it was going to be to the point where it was. All of a sudden the world was infected. The entire world was infected. Everyone was scrambling around looking with Abi. Face masks and all of the other things. We've opened up factories. We've had tremendous success with face masks and wish heels and with the ventilators were now supplying the rest of the world. We have all the ventilators we can use. And remember this Event. Ladies were very important. Not one person that needed a ventilator didn't get it, And he's a very complex, expensive machines to make. We opened up. Something like hadn't been done since the second World War. We honestly we've done an incredible job, but we don't want to. Run around, screaming, shouting! Oh, look at this! Look at this. We have to show leadership and leadership is all about confidence and confidence is confidence in our country. And our people have been great. We've been put through a lot by China by releasing this by having this come here. We will put to a lot. They could have done something about it. And they chose not to. I am very honored to have have presented presented to to you you today today a a list list of of 20 20 incredible incredible people. people. And And we we will will talk talk later. later. I'm I'm sure sure we'll we'll be be meeting meeting later later in in the the day. day. Thank Thank you you In In January January late late anywhere you knew how all right you've been listening to the president doing a Q and a session at the White House and regards to new allegations from a book from Bob Woodward. That's out. We'll have a lot

Bob Woodward China Donald Trump Vice President Europe Nancy Pelosi Mr President Wuhan President Trump White House JOE Biden
Ethiopias struggle to stay united

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:02 min | 3 months ago

Ethiopias struggle to stay united

"Ethiopia has split once before in nineteen ninety-three. Eritrea Ethiopia had annexed in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two voted to secede after a decades long war for its independence. That break was not a clean one. Another war between Ethiopia and Eritrea followed in the late Nineteen Ninety S. After which retrieve retreated into isolation militarization and paranoia because a sort of North Korea on the Red Sea. Ending hostility between Eritrea and Ethiopia officially accomplished as recently as two thousand eighteen was considered such a feat of deploying the see that it one. Recently, arrived Prime Minister B amid the Nobel. Peace Prize. I was a young soldier when well broke out between Utopia and. I witnessed firsthand the ugliness of war in frontline battles. There are those suave never seen war, but glorify romance is it They have not seen the fear they have not seen the Arctic. They have not seen the restriction or break nor are they failed the mournful and bitterness of war after the carnage WAR IS EPITHELIAL FAIL FOR ALL INVOLVED Ahmed may now face another test of his diplomatic capacities to stop another portion of Ethiopia setting up shop on its own this week the Ethiopian state of Gray held elections despite instructions from the federal government not to. Federal government prefer to correspond election because of the COVID nineteen. But the people of to. Know that the reason for postponing the election is not covid nineteen. We believe that it's political than the heads issue. So and we know how much we paid for such an election to happen or to occur. And the government the people to have paid the lives of sixty thousand people we don't want to pay lives. In order to have the constitution that we have already, we know that this is a threat to the constitutions that we have it some twenty years back. To agree is easier appears northernmost region lying along what is now the westernmost stretch of the border with era that tegray has issues with the government in outer suburbs that can be gleaned from the briefest survey of the composition of Ethiopia's national parliament the house of Peoples Representatives Ov- it's five hundred and forty seven seats five, hundred twelve occupied by the Prosperity Party a unity coalition assembled late last year by Ali Ahmed. The thirty five a held by the People's Liberation Front, and now more than ever there might be a clue in the name. To understand how we got here a brisk through the. backstory is probably in order. The teepee Aleph was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, five shortly after the military coup in Saba, which overthrew emperor highly selassie and installed the brutal Linens Junior, which became known as the Doug. was only two years ago that people were able to give vent the grief that shattered every family during the seventeen silent years a fear under the regime of Mengistu Highly Marian. These are the relatives of Mengistu's first victims members of highly selassie imperial government executed without trial in November one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, four, the year, Mengistu begun his bloodstained rise to power. The spent his formative years waging war against the Derg, and as is the way of revolutionary movements other tegray in revolutionary movements. When the Doug was finally toppled in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, one. Were at the forefront of the forces which changed the regime and they made certain to stay there. Though members of the Tigrayan. Ethnic group account for barely six percent of Ethiopia's population that. was a huge influence on the eighth. European politics. In the subsequent decades, it was a dominant part of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic. Front. The coalition which governed from the fall of the Derg until Abi Alma dismantled last year and reassembled at as the Prosperity Party

Ethiopia Federal Government Eritrea Ali Ahmed Prosperity Party People's Liberation Front Red Sea Doug. North Korea Prime Minister Covid Mengistu Peace Prize Abi Alma Tegray Selassie Saba Tigrayan Gray
"k. abi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:35 min | 3 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"40 more stimulating Talk. Salem Mohamed live from the kick off I 24 hour news room. President Trump has found a new doctor for his Corona virus Task Force trumps newest pandemic advisers, Dr Scott Atlas of fellow at Stanford University's conservative Hoover Institution. And frequent guest on Fox News Channel. Atlas has been a critic for a long time of covert 19 lockdowns and has been campaigning for kids to return to the classroom. Police say gunfire at a gathering of more than 200 mostly young people in North Philadelphia wounded five people. A car bomb has gone off in Somalia at a beachside hotel in the capital of Mogadishu, followed by heavy gunfire. A police officer says At least 10 people have been killed and more than a dozen others injured. Partly sunny skies throughout today, with highs in the nineties for the basin and inland Orange County, triple digits for the Valley's Thie III and the desert. Let's head to a crash and Claremont on the 2 10 that's on the westbound side at face in a motorcycle crash stuck in the carpool lane. That's a tough drive from mountain there. West Covina cones are up. 10 East Add citrusy on ramps closed for paving work. And if your travels take you through Anaheim 91 both East, the westbound side between the 55 Green River have the fast track lanes closed in both directions for latent operations K Abi and this guy helps get you there faster. I'm Chadema. Kercher indeed knows that for any business, your next step is the most important one like hiring someone who could make a real impact. Indeed can help you find high impact tires faster without any long term contracts and.

Dr Scott Atlas Salem Mohamed Fox News Channel Somalia Mogadishu Orange County Hoover Institution West Covina Anaheim Trump Stanford University Kercher officer President K Abi Green River
Bowery Boogie . Captain and Owners Arrested for Liberty Belle Booze Cruise

Angelo Cataldi and the Morning Team

04:41 min | 4 months ago

Bowery Boogie . Captain and Owners Arrested for Liberty Belle Booze Cruise

"Thought I'd be done with this by now. It's month. Six of the pandemic, but everywhere you look, it's the same story with people of God. It's okay. Good Manhattan now Saturday night, 8 30 There's a river about in Manhattan called the Liberty Bell. Liberty Bell b e l l E. I used to have one of them here, didn't I guess? Well, the brilliant onus of the Liberty Bell, Ronnie Vargas and Alex Suazo thes two gentlemen. Ah, book. 170 guests for a wild party. No Mass, no social distancing. And what ended up happening was the word came out to the New York Police Department when they arrived at Pier 36 lower East side. The two owners were arrested for not not following the law. And I hope those guys are still behind bars today. Three days later Now what are they doing? Did the word not reached these two morons yet? Or did they cash whore with these 170 people with three months ago, they would die in By that you couldn't keep track of how many people died in the same city. What they don't What he had doubted your hobbies. Your stupid more. Adds 170. Payback. Think there's no payoff better? What do you think they're on a boat and there safe? I got one more outside says worse. This is that they're in a boat. The boat is this inside area. There's restrooms in about Shut down the fairy of Martha's try this thing. This one's not in a boat out. This is in a plane. Okay. Also over the weekend holiday trip, Amsterdam tto be za. The beat. Oh, yeah, that's a pillar of these. That's a party out is a part of you want to get on that boat, too Gentle bid to English passages out chugging Greg. A ce vodka kind of aria ever dated there with no idea they were chugging vodka, not wearing facemasks on a plane. Yeah, this plane This is 7 37 KLM Boeing 7 37 From my Amsterdam home of the red light district. While they're hookers wind up in the shop windows were going. You know what that is? They're headed. But these guys, this crew is heading to Abi's at the party. And what happened was they would not put on the mass, so a violent, incredible, highly Ah, viewable. I got some pictures there, but there's video of this. A massive brawl broke out, and people were throwing haymakers at the two vodka chugging English passengers. Wow, that this was complete Mayhem in the plane deal with these people who, like literally lose their minds over not wearing masks. Don't understand. I don't understand it, and I'm going to be honest with you. I'm not fully embracing and Abi's a vacation during a pandemic that also out keep keep keep keep. keep. Jones Jones went went to to a a visa visa with with his his daughters. daughters. Like Like a a couple couple of of years years ago. ago. My My daughter daughter goes goes every every year. year. It's It's extremely extremely expensive expensive while while they they rent rent the the big big beyond beyond the the big houses for like it, you get a whole bunch of people to rent a place. Message to the parties and to the moron emails who write to me with them. They won't stop. You're going to get more today. I'm still getting the stats on how this doesn't exist. All right, eh? My mom died. Maybe John Johnson's uncle? Yes, the well. It's a horrible story. When he's ready to tell. I love them to tell what happened because his his uncle Lau went from healthy to not alive. Quick in two hours, two days, all right. It's really And people innocent victims like that happen because you people too stupid to do the right thing. Sacrifice you morons. I hope they put every you know you guys that are running the gym and Velma. I hope you end up in jail, too, because you're stupid. That's why give me an amen And there's no cure for stupid. And

Liberty Bell Amsterdam ABI Manhattan John Johnson New York Police Department KLM Ronnie Vargas Jones Jones Velma Alex Suazo LAU Greg Martha
Election Officials Declare Winners in Two New York Democratic Primaries After Federal Judge Finds Voters Disenfranchised

All Things Considered

05:32 min | 4 months ago

Election Officials Declare Winners in Two New York Democratic Primaries After Federal Judge Finds Voters Disenfranchised

"Of Election certified the results of the June 23rd primary earlier today. It comes one day after a federal judge issued an order directing board of elections across the state. To re examine their absentee ballot totals to consider votes tossed out for missing a postmark as long as they were received by June 25th. It's just the latest twist in New York's pandemic primary, which saw a tenfold increase in the number of absentee ballots, compared to 2016. Joining us now W. N Y City Hall and politics reporter Bridget Bergen Ridge it let's start with what happened today. The Board of Election certified the results of a primary that took place six weeks ago. That means they finished counting. But why did it take so long? Jamie, You said it right there that we saw that tenfold increase in the number of absentee ballots. People really were taking advantage of this expanded absentee ballot system that Governor Cuomo Did through executive order because of the pandemic, and then the counting process associated with it was very methodical. You know. Absentee ballots can be rejected for a lot of reasons. Missing signatures were among the biggest issues, but Another issue. We first reported here at WNYC and Gothamist was related to ballots invalidated for missing postmarks. Two candidates and 14 voters sued the state Board of Elections and Governor Cuomo, arguing that voters were being disenfranchised through no fault of their own due to missing postmarks. Absentee ballots needed to be postmarked by June 23rd and arrive at the board of Elections by June 30th to count and there was a big decision in that case late last night. Give us a quick overview of that lawsuit. Last week, there was a two day evidentiary hearing where witnesses testified about how the Board of elections handled this flood of absentee ballots and how the United States Post office process them. Some of what we learned was pretty shocking. Like the fact that the Board of elections dropped off more than 34,000 ballots to the post office to mail to voters the day before the primary. That meant voters would need to get that ballot in the mail on June 23rd rushed to a post office box before five if they had any chance of mailing it with a postmark. To make it eligible. And beyond that, there was evidence introduced that showed that more ballots in Brooklyn were invalidated for missing postmarks than in any other borough. Wow. Then tell us more about the ruling issued last night. So Judge Annalisa Torahs presided over this case in the southern district. She found the plaintiff's arguments more persuasive that ballots were in fact treated differently in different parts of the city. She ordered the New York State Board of Elections to direct all local boards to count otherwise valid absentee ballots, missing postmarks as long as they were received by June 25th 2 days after the primary. She also criticized the state's argument that it didn't intentionally disenfranchise voters where they basically pointed to failures by the post office and tried to place the blame on them. She wrote quote. The Constitution is not so toothless. When voters have been provided with absentee ballots image assured that their votes on those ballots will be counted. The state cannot ignore a later discovered a systemic problem that arbitrarily renders those ballots invalid. What does it mean Bridget that the city Board of Election certified the election results? Isn't that a violation of the judge's order? Well. The city also directed its staff in each borough to prepare to count the ballots that qualify under the judge's order. And they said, they're just awaiting direction from the state Board of elections to go ahead and do that. Okay, so assuming the order stands, could it change the outcome of any Racists? You know, is one of the plaintiffs lawyers, Remmy Green said at a press conference this morning. We don't know what we don't know yet certainly one of the plaintiffs Raj Patel, who is a candidate in New York's 12th Congressional District, which covers parts of Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn. He's hopeful that this will help because he's currently trailing Carolyn Maloney abi about 3700 votes, but at this point, it's not really clear there are enough votes to change that race. However, there could be other races and other parts of the state that we don't know about. And one of the plaintiff interveners in this case, Maria Coffer who ran for District leader AA position in Queens. She only lost two City council member Karen Causal. It's by about 100 boats, so we'll see if there's anything that changes their 100 votes. Wow. What was the reaction from the State Board of Elections have they signaled any plans to appeal? So I have yet to hear from anyone from the State Board of Elections or the New York Attorney general's office who is representing the state. In this matter. I will note that one of the attorneys for the plaintiffs basically warned the state and governor Cuomo against appealing. Here's attorney, Ali Nagy. Me. Governor Cuomo. Your legacy is on the line. If you will peel this, you'll lose in the appeal, and you will be another second round suppressor votes, and that is not what the governor needs. Now, if the state did appeal, obviously, that matter would go before the Court of Appeals, and it's worth noting. Earlier this summer, this same judge Analisa Torres ruled against the state Board of elections. In another election law case, she overturned their decision to cancel the Democratic presidential primary. That case went before the Court of Appeals and her ruling stands.

Board Of Elections Governor Cuomo New York State Board Of Electi State Board Of Elections Board Of Election Manhattan Bridget Bergen Judge Annalisa Torahs Court Of Appeals W. N Y City Hall Wnyc Brooklyn Carolyn Maloney Reporter United States Post Attorney Raj Patel Jamie Analisa Torres
"k. abi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:35 min | 4 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Kirk Karen found the chain of fruit smoothie shops back in 1990 in San Luis Obisbo. He was 56 years old, and a girl has been shot during a street racing incident in Hollywood. Cops say the 17 year old girl was shot just after midnight at Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue. The shooters got away. There's a crash in downtown L. A. On the 1 10 South found side at third Street that crashed stuck in the center lane traffic stacking up from the 101 through Marino Valley. A new problem here 60 West before Morino Beach Drive that accident. It is off to the shoulder was in the right lane Toad trucks on this scene. It looks like one car is facing sideways, and that's got you backed up from Gilman Springs Road through San Bernardino. No problem continues. 15 north after Ken would That brush a big rig fire. Other has the two right lanes taken away. It has spread up to the shoulder. Fire crews are on the scene and your jam from Glen Helen Parkway South bound side loading up from Cleghorn K. Abi, and this guy helped get you there faster. I'm Shannon Kircher. How much money would you like to say? Just by doing something? You're already doing 15 25%? How about 30% here in California? All state safe drivers can save 30% just by doing something they're already doing. Driving safe. That's right. 30% just by driving safe all steak and help lower your cost of driving safe. Drivers can save 30% more. Visit all ST dot com or call a local agent for quote today. Subject of terms, conditions and availability. Savings. Very hi. This is Larry Miller from.

Kirk Karen San Luis Obisbo Glen Helen Parkway San Bernardino Hollywood Shannon Kircher Cleghorn K. Abi Marino Valley Larry Miller California Ken
"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

04:51 min | 5 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"It has <Speech_Female> to be a list because <Speech_Female> I need help too <SpeakerChange> much saving <Speech_Female> forgetting <Speech_Female> why <Speech_Female> you're so right. The question <Speech_Female> is rigged <Speech_Female> right now. Okay <Speech_Male> I'm so delighted <Speech_Male> that you came on today <Speech_Female> you. <Speech_Female> Know, candidly <Speech_Female> about <Speech_Female> AIDS. <Speech_Female> That helps me understand. <Speech_Female> You said several things. I hadn't <Speech_Male> really heard before <Speech_Male> so incredibly <Speech_Male> useful, <Speech_Female> so, can <Speech_Female> you? Would you mind <Speech_Female> telling everybody before <Speech_Female> we sign off here <Speech_Female> where they can find <Speech_Female> you I <Speech_Female> cus you're doing such <Speech_Female> interesting work in the <Speech_Female> world and I would love <Speech_Female> for my community <Speech_Female> to be listening to you <Speech_Male> and following you <Speech_Male> and experiencing <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> your work. <Speech_Female> Yeah, so <Speech_Female> you can find all <Speech_Female> of my staff at <Speech_Female> haunches <Speech_Female> Graham Dot com <Speech_Female> show con <Speech_Female> s cio <Speech_Female> us <Speech_Female> any Graham. <Speech_Female> Dot Com I <Speech_Female> always say that was the worst <Speech_Female> branding mistake <Speech_Female> ever choosing <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> two words <Speech_Female> that people can't spell <Speech_Music_Female> very. <Speech_Music_Female> True. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> And, that's <Speech_Female> where you can find most <Speech_Female> of the things conscious any <Speech_Female> agree on instagram <Speech_Female> usually pretty active <Speech_Female> over there on <Speech_Female> twitter and facebook <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> Youtube, <Speech_Female> and if <Speech_Female> people listening <Speech_Female> are <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> interested in any Graham <Speech_Female> and also happen to have <Speech_Female> a queer identity <Speech_Female> Eireann. <Speech_Female> Queer any <Speech_Female> Graham facebook <Speech_Female> group, which is actually <Speech_Female> growing pretty large as <Speech_Female> cool <Speech_Female> I'm excited about it. <Speech_Female> We talked about kind <Speech_Female> of this intersection <Speech_Female> analogy of the. <Speech_Female> In this piece <Speech_Female> and there's more <Speech_Female> coming <Speech_Female> in the next year is <Speech_Female> when I can get the rest of <Speech_Female> my life together. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That yeah, <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> then I <Speech_Female> have a book coming <Speech_Female> out in April <Speech_Female> the conscious <Speech_Female> any Graham will be <Speech_Female> out on April <Speech_Female> twenty seventh of <Speech_Female> two, thousand, <SpeakerChange> twenty, one, <Speech_Female> but available <Speech_Female> for preorder in <Speech_Music_Female> July at <Speech_Female> some point, so <Speech_Female> that's really exciting. <Speech_Female> The websites <Speech_Female> really the easiest way to <Speech_Female> find everything <SpeakerChange> <Silence> those highlights for <Speech_Male> sure. That <Speech_Male> is exciting. <Speech_Male> Congratulations on <Speech_Male> all <Speech_Female> saints. <Speech_Male> Big <Speech_Female> things in <Speech_Female> your next calendar <Speech_Female> year fantastic <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Female> am grateful <Speech_Female> for your <Speech_Female> work and <Speech_Female> how you specifically. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Run on <Speech_Male> the fault lines of intersection <Speech_Female> to gets <Speech_Female> really important <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> a lot of frontier, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> new <Speech_Female> soil, too short <Speech_Female> APP specifically inside <Speech_Female> this conversation, <Speech_Female> so yeah, good <Speech_Female> for you for being a pioneer, <Speech_Female> and I'm really <Speech_Female> happy to hear that that <Speech_Female> community <Speech_Female> is growing and <Speech_Female> finding trashing <Speech_Female> one another and <Speech_Female> kind of in the greater conversation, <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> her <SpeakerChange> for that <Speech_Female> I'm just <Speech_Female> delighted you and <Speech_Female> now we're friends, and we live <Speech_Female> in Austin and back. When <Speech_Female> now win? <Speech_Male> The world <Speech_Female> opens backup someday. <Speech_Female> Texas is a mess <Speech_Female> right now. <Speech_Female> That might <Speech_Female> be a while though to your <Speech_Female> coffee place, we <Speech_Female> will. Pay <Speech_Female> For the coffee place. <Speech_Female> We will thank them for saving <Speech_Male> your life <Speech_Male> and it'll be coffee <Speech_Female> on me. <Speech_Female> All right that sounds <Speech_Female> good. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Thank <Speech_Female> you abby? <Speech_Music_Female> Yeah, thank you so <Speech_Music_Female> much I <SpeakerChange> it. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> And now <Speech_Female> to tell us <Speech_Female> more about the music <Speech_Male> you've been listening to <Speech_Male> in this episode. <Speech_Female> We hear <Speech_Female> from composer. <Speech_Female> Ryan O'Neal <Speech_Music_Female> Aka, <Speech_Female> sleeping at <Speech_Female> last. <Speech_Female> In. <SpeakerChange> Behind <Music> this

Graham Ryan O'Neal cio twitter Youtube facebook Austin Texas abby Graham.
"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

05:06 min | 5 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"It's not true at all, and it's compassionate tool. I consider relationships for sure I love hearing. You describe the subtype work that is nobody. Else's really talked about that super useful. What would you say if somebody listening is in partnership? Run marriage with an eight or their parenting, when maybe or they work really closely with an eight, and they find themselves in conflict with their eight. What would you suggest as a spokesman for your people? Somebody engage in conflict within a to move the thing toward resolution quicker. What works for you? What do you need in that moment? The thing that I think. Surprises people the most about being in conflict with an eight. Is that the less you back down the faster it's going to be over. It's so weird. You know there's there's very fusing in this world. That like upset me more than somebody WHO's not willing to stand their ground. Honestly, every eight is different. Every person is different right, and obviously at different levels of ability to listen to understand but I think you're really assuming assuming positive intent goes a long way with an eight. You're just not backing down like you're really thinks that your way is better jomie. Your way is better fine. Let's do the better thing, but you're gonNA have to like Ben's me at first. And if you're not willing to stand up and to really say what you think are believed in these instances than you've just proved to me that I have every right just to walk all over you. You don't actually believe anything that much and again. This is what the type structure says. This is not actually true. Because I know, there are plenty of people in the world. You believe things very deeply, and who are very conflict averse, have difficulty stepping into that space right, but you know as far as. Speaking from the eight and what we do really well with is you know having somebody. Stand up to us because then. We know that that were in connection than we know that this is worth fighting for right being honest in upfront. Your eight friends is GonNa go so far so A. Is All true. If you've got like resentment or you know, things harbor from a long time ago, if feel it and we don't like it s and what you're telling me. Is that you don't actually care about the relationship to bring these things up raw right and to talk these things out in into actually engage in what's happening, and that's really what we're looking for. Ryan his engagement. This connection that's born of. The conflict I. I always think about like sparring. You can't get much closer.

Ben Ryan
"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

03:59 min | 5 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Relation or whether that's creating artistic space or a lot to do with connection and creativity in sexual or one to one instinct, and then there's the social instincts, so this instinct that kind of tells us where we are in our community in our group in our word right and. According to any Graham was done. There's one of those instincts we have all three, but there's one that we tend to hyper focus on, and that affects our. Our type plays out in the world, and so again that's super basic so much know into read, and to understand about subtypes I would never claim to be the subtype expert, but I've used it enough in my own life. That I feel confident talking about how Danielle relate her subjects so her subtype. Subtype was. What would you re Sleep Salad Cress? Yeah, okay, so she's focused on the security. Piece of you know making sure she always has enough money for the house is in good order making sure that you know like we're all fed and clothed and right like so very homebody energy. She likes being at home. She really enjoys the lockdown like it's. It's been great for her. Where I'm sexual, are one to one and my focus is on like action. I WANNA. Be connected to you. I WANNA. Be creating a lot of energy around projects things that I'm doing right like on my spiritual path like this, all kind of falls into that sexual instinct and you know the pain points that we have is like you know when things Kinda, hit the fan, my go-to like the first thing that I want secure. Is the relationship right that confirming that intensity that you can have one to one? One with this person and the first thing that she wants to take care of is like the money the house are these things taking care of and so kind of you know. We miss each other a in those instances. She's like you know I can't connect to you because we have to deal with this issue and I'm like. How can we possibly deal with this issue if we're not connected? And so again like the has been so helpful. You know like we went into couples therapy and your therapist didn't have to do a whole lot because we were just talking at each year. You know an hour. We do that too right and then just like right therapist check. Thank you for listening to us. So. It's been really valuable to see like how supporting like how I can support connection Daniels ability to steak night did by being more focused on my career. Ryan had more money. Come in and be more financially stable like that creates a safer space for Daniel. Connect with me the way that I want her to and Daniels done a lot of work around. Chino's that like I'm not feeling connected with her than I find it terribly difficult to do work clients, or to whatever it is. I'm doing I just. If you don't have the energy for it like I I want to connect to this first, and so you know creating space to connect with me in order to help me do the things that I. WanNa do really. It's been cool to see how we've both grown in these areas where we weren't as attuned before. Now I just love it. The subtypes are really interesting area to explore in any work to deepen our understanding of who we are, and the people that we love, and to see new relational possibilities in front of. It is all possible it really is is just I? Feel like this work has armed me with so much compassion and understanding for the people that love whereas her happy before the Graham took a lot of deep roots in our lives. I always that. Why don't you see this like I do? I, why are you like this the way that I am understanding? The scenario is obviously the right way..

Ryan Graham Danielle Chino Daniels Daniel
"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

04:37 min | 5 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Disconnection. What of the best gifts you can give to yourself is talking to someone when you take the brave step to ask. Can you help me find a path forward in this struggle? That's when you truly grow. If you're looking to take that, brave step better help. Online counseling is here for you so with better help you can connect. They licensed professional counselor in a safe and private online environment. You can start communicating with your counselor within twenty four hours via text chat phone video unless it's not a great fit, you can even change counselors at no additional cost. I want a life of goodness for you and to help you get there better. Help US offering all my listeners ten percent of their first month, so get started today at better help, dot com slash for the love so one more time. That's better help like H. E., l., p. help, dot com slash for the love and get ten percent off your first month today all.

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

03:19 min | 5 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"You know most days, but. I have experienced a lot of difficulty because of who I right, and it's difficult to find a way to stay on the quote, unquote path of a healthy eight when there is so much, I mean legitimate threat. To, my life and wellbeing. I live in Austin with my fiance and we're incredibly lucky so living on Sin Ray, but like my family lives in Kansas City and if we wanna go, visit them, you know the holidays we have to drive through Oklahoma, so we know what gas stations we can stop Sh- right, and which ones we? It's a difficult thing rate like. Because I have to balance their legitimate needs to protect yourself right into protect my family. From the sorts of things and to not be consumed. By. Do not be consumed by that drive. You know this is why so much of my work in the community is is about kind of this intersectional approach to the Grant Bri because for somebody who is straight, his gendered white, all of these kind of very central cultural experiences, right what growth and staying on the path of being healthy eight look like is very very different. And a lot of kind of kitschy things, you might throw at an eight right like platinum zero whatever they don't always fly. People risked more marginalized identities I'd love to hear you. Talk about that more a keyword for the eight trust. Learning to let go and to trust the people around you to trust that you will be a trade. You know just like I was saying about that. You know driving through Oklahoma. It's hard to practice that trust sure when there is a very real and legitimate threat. To. Your well being like it's one thing if like it's easy or straight white. To practice trusting other people, because he's not actually in harm's way, most men right like culturally speaking, and you know every step you take away every step farther away you get from that kind of centralized identity becomes. It becomes harder and harder to practice that trust because. Much, more is on the line ever and so I think for me. Personally this question of like how do I stay on the path of being healthy eight? I have my own in my own yoga. Therapist is shown like religiously every two weeks as much as I, can now in this time, and we obviously were in Cova Times and the lockdown and whatnot like I'm really working to stay active in communities and stay connected to people so in my church community in my any Graham communities thriving community here in Austin and even in my neighborhood like. I feel like that's one blessing of the the lockdown as we've really gotten to be good friends with our neighbors like the word. Proximity with and so you know doing that, and really staying connected to partner, and doing as much as I, can't stay committed to my own personal practice i. mean these are the things that.

Sh Oklahoma Austin Grant Bri Cova Times Sin Ray partner Kansas City Graham
"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

04:13 min | 5 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Instead, of assuming they don't want love, I have to assume that they learned. I have to ask the question. Where did you learn to be so strong? The what in alive 'cause you'd have to power up instead of receivables. If! We could take that one further. I'd like to talk about how eight feels about their feelings. What's the monologue inside an eight mind as they observe and sort of evaluate their feelings, because like for as a three when I think about, how do I feel about my feelings? I definitely feel that. That's the way that I experienced. Any given moment of course is right promotions, but Pretty quickly moved up to my brain like ends, and what do I think about this? And how I'm going to solve it or get passed, or whatever so had a feel about their feelings? And then what do they do with them? There's a demand for honesty and upfrontness from our AIDS in some ways. There's almost a cooling break between sharing their feelings. If it's from like that intellectual place, rightly by can say like Oh, I had this feeling this existed, but there's no invitation into that feeling with them and I think that that's one difference. It's almost like a separation like I can share, but there's a sharing from a place of distance, and if they feel like I'm cooling them pulling their emotions Go Up! Faster! And the other thing that can happen is that anger might be the feeling they feel I. When a negative emotion arises, it might start as anger in a lot of the work is really getting under the anger and saying okay I'm angry, but what's really here? What's the more vulnerable message? Am I feeling anxious about something? Because typically there's something under that anger feeling. They have to really dive into it. Get real with themselves than with others about what that is. That's really useful to hear. For people in relationship with an eight, just understanding that sometimes the first presentation of any feeling any given feeling looks mad..

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

04:27 min | 5 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Share my conversations with these incredible teachers I with Sarah. Jane case of any instagram and coffee up first. Sarah Jane I have watched and listened to you, and now I am so delighted to have you on the for the love podcast. Thank you for being here on. So thrilled to be here. Thank you for having me a hundred percent so before we move into the grim eight. Which is what this episode is about. Can you just talk to US briefly about what? What is your tight? So I'm seventy eight and I am a counter type social seven, which means that behavior I can look a lot like a two or a one, but in motivation I'm definitely a hundred percent internally a seven. So essentially. No, that being by unabashedly seven self isn't the most. Keep me in good social standing all the time, and so I wanted to really put myself last over sacrifice in moderation as a way to be more socially acceptable. So interesting is your eight wing pretty strong. After, you can speak quite salient to the eight, not only as an expert, but as somebody with a strong eight wing so. Let's get into that, so we've got the any Graham aides to discuss today, which in its moniker is sometimes known as the challenger can weep dig in here a little bit more because there's always more than meets the eye you know there's always sort of a reduced truncated description of every number, which just never tells the full story at all. So can you talk a little bit more broadly about some of the main traits of an instagram eight? What they love what they don't love what motivates them? They're afraid of what they're excited about etc.. Type eight are strong charismatic leaders in childhood. They say that a lot of as often experience some form of betrayal so something that settled the idea than they would be to take care of themselves, and because of this learn to lean on their strengh and hide their vulnerabilities to prevent be open and susceptible further betrayal..

Sarah Jane US instagram Graham
"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

03:53 min | 5 months ago

"k. abi" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Type AIDS are gold. They're independent or honest. Likely the person who has continually pushed you to be more thoughtful egalitarian driven in your own life. They really are pushers of us in. Vienne better being more getting through discomfort and doing it anyway. Welcome to the for the love podcast with Megyn hat maker today we explore all things ideogram eight with two experts. In Graham and coffees Sarah. Jane case and conscious INSTAGRAM's Abby Robbins. Hey Everybody Jin hat maker here by welcome to the fourth of podcast super. Glad you're here today. You probably know that we are in a series. Right called for the love of the Graham and it is awesome. It's just awesome if you've missed any of it. I highly encourage you to go back and pick it up even if it's not your number, even if it's not because we are all connected. To people that we love that are every number on the instagram. Every single episode has been so enlightening for me I've learned so much. It's helped me understand my friends better. My husband better my kids myself like just go back and listen. It's definitely start with episode one with Suzanne's to beal. She kind of high levels the whole neograph deal for us. Anyhow for this episode finally. I'm so pleased to tell you that once again. We have not one but two guests who are going to help us pack all the complex goodness inside of those wonderful instagram eights also sometimes known as the challengers. Integrates Oh I. Love Them. They're such a force in the world, so I'm just telling you. If you're lucky enough to have eight in your life, congratulations, you must feel really secure really safe because that's how the aids make me feel for sure I love how they show up in the world, so to begin Sarah Jane case is an author and the speaker and a podcast, and she's based out of Asheville North Carolina. You might know her by her online moniker any Graham and coffee right? Have you seen this so she?.

Graham Sarah Jane INSTAGRAM Abby Robbins Vienne Asheville North Carolina Megyn Suzanne
Andy Bettles coach of World Number 5 Elina Svitolina

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

05:29 min | 6 months ago

Andy Bettles coach of World Number 5 Elina Svitolina

"How everybody and welcome to another episode of passing shot meets where we are joined by Andy. Battles catch of world number five Alina still, Lena. Andy Welcome to the show, it's a real pleasure to have you on. I've gotTA confess. This is the first ever policy shop meets. We've done with top coach liked yourself, so we're of course really looking forward to it looking forward to learning a bit more about. Toward Life on the WTO and teams Italy as well, but of course before we get into all of that. How has lockdown down? Life been treating you? Have you been able to get back onto attended school? Being out. Of being really been outside tennis Tennessee. Because on a member of a club, so. allowing guests, whoever and every single call where I live. In South West under so fully booked to the movement. When again now that I'm still yet to Have you not a wall next to where you live that you can just kind of play against. The backdrop for something well could do that. For Longer. It no more times. It'd be great to see so many people out on the lake or court spur. We normally see that like post. We're mood and date with the boom. Yeah I guess it's because of the current situation, but I think I'm from Tamara. The rules are relaxing, even more say. I guess that we even more people wanting to get out and about. Let's let's. Begin and you're actually the first coach we've had on on the show. You said welcome and thank you very much for aching the time to come on. Of, course we know you as Alina. Salinas coach. I'm sure of our listeners will be aware of that as well, but let's kind of go back to the beginning. And if you could just tell us a bit about how you how you go into tennis. When when did you start playing it yourself? IOS I was really young when I started alike can say three or four. When I started picking up a Racquet, my mum was always big tennis fan. We Live Right next Leo club down some actually. And I had older brother copiers over the May who started playing tennis. Mutt done some groups whoever and I just want to join followed on. So I started plan from really young age, and then kept at, it turned out to be pretty good end up going to reach school to kind of focus on the tennis from eleven to sixteen. The moved to the National Center to then a after in America so. Quiet too long tennis journey. Where are you based in America? Smooth Boise Boise State University. One by the. University about it yet a great time dire played professionally low bell to that. That's always one of the things I'm kind of jealous about when you get the players going off to do. Scholarships and the tennis in America. Jealous, of not to mention everything else, but. At what point did you move into like coaching? When did you kind of make that decision? And how was it kind of a natural decision to make quite fraught Eva Choice? Can finished a fishing vessels are twenty. One always wanted to give it go the Proto. Get out fatty quickly. That I wasn't quite good enough. Bay I definitely didn't have the money to. Keep traveling around and doing it so i. Guess I never. It was never like a big thing in Gaul. Really WanNa go into coaching whatever? kind of luckily. Fell into a job of 'em sparring partner. With. ANWR Ivanovich can stray off. Finish planned NACHO. Says was head coach of the time, and he asked me to be his sparring partner. So of course I'm yet great. I'll do that and then from there. When I was kind of inside that wild spending time with my job learning from him I kind of. Found, my appetite for coach, it and You felt like you were saying that one student forward and was quite a natural transition from lie, hitting partner to catching of develop more responsibilities as you found your found your feet on the on the tool. Yeah I kind of moved into it fairly. Slowly because I was with Nigel to stop with Anna for lucky. At the beginning, I didn't really speak much and always just hits Dimona into fake involved, and then the the long way together hid to a few weeks. Swear so there'll be a few weeks. He wasn't that Abi on my own and can unnaturally saw no given a few. That and then not just progressed, and when I start to Molina, same thing I was kind of sparring Jonah. Move to assistant coach could have yet graduate progressions. House never felt across thriving in the deep end. The big differences been sparring partner does not pressure, say anything or results is much Wa with the coach, and it definitely definitely feel about that more.

Tennis Partner Alina Boise Boise State University Andy Welcome America WTO Salinas Italy Molina ABI Dimona Tennessee House Gaul Nigel Anwr National Center WA Anna
Autopsy shows that pilot of Kobe Bryant's helicopter was not intoxicated

KNX Evening News

00:28 sec | 7 months ago

Autopsy shows that pilot of Kobe Bryant's helicopter was not intoxicated

"LA county has released the autopsy report of the nine people killed in the Kobe Bryant helicopter crash the cause of death for the nine people in the January twenty six helicopter crash is certified as blunt trauma the autopsy shows pilot R. as abi and did not have drugs or alcohol in his system Kobe Bryant's with OpenSSL filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the helicopter company alleging the pilot was careless and negligent by flying in cloudy conditions and should have aborted

La County Kobe Bryant ABI
Finding Value from LinkedIn Connections Off of LinkedIn - Alex Smith

Daily Sales Tips

05:25 min | 8 months ago

Finding Value from LinkedIn Connections Off of LinkedIn - Alex Smith

"Today. Got Another tip from Alex Smith. Here he is. Hey Gang as of this recording some of you may know I've been in a sales job search lately from a layoff in despite a lot of interviews I've had I'm seeing a lot of companies in holding patterns recently and they're really slow to get back so I've really been doubling down on Lincoln lately. The one thing that I found that's really working formula. Lincoln was something that really came as a surprise in his might tip for today more people than you realize are willing to have a conversation with you outside of Lincoln than inside of it with a good strategy. You can create some really valuable relationships. I have to admit I was a little hesitant to ask people for their time. Outside on linked in without much of anything I can give them return if you think about it. I'm reaching out to quota carrying top beat. Abi Sales people to network and they're willing to spend a few minutes and hop on a phone call or zoom call with me this despite the fact that they have a number two hit themselves and way less prospects are entering their phones and emails right now but when you think about it. Great sales people don't expect a give to get. They live life to learn and just listening to you is all the Roi. They need for their time. So I don't take it lightly that anyone would want to give me their time and the agendas of our calls is really just genuinely getting to know each other. I used to think Lincoln was purely numbers in engagement game. And maybe in some way it is but at its core. It's still a platform comprised of people people who all have something to offer and we can all learn from a Lincoln connection is so much more than just another number and when you grow your connections. Don't ever lose sight of building connection. Growing connections isn't the same as creating connection growing your connections can be done in a split second but creating connection requires intention and giving on both sides of a relationship so I thought to myself. Why can't we all just use this time to create connection not just adding connections? We all have an opportunity to move beyond the one time connection right now. I've had so many great phone calls with completely new people recently. I've had a minimum of at least five new calls scheduled each week with new connections and none of the call started off trying to sell anything or have any other agenda from either party tied to it other than genuinely knowing people beyond their profiles. So how can we make connections more valuable to others and ourselves? Why I thought offer a few quick strategies than I'm using would love to hear your take. So here's a few things that are working for me. First thing I'm going to steal is from someone that reach out to me and I loved her approach. So shout out to Sara Marie Clark Brand Consultant for Jack Neater Consulting. So my first tip is be genuine with your ten. Sarah was really genuine with me when she responded to my connection request an interest on she said. Hey Alex thank you so much for your kind words and thank you for connecting. I love to make this connection genuinely valuable to you and not just another number. What is the best way? I can support your growth. Are you open to a call? This week to collaborate and explore our connection. I didn't know Sarah from anything. I'm not in brand consulting and didn't specifically want something from her and she didn't want anything from me but her starting off relationship saying she didn't want to just be another number asking how she could help me and asking if I was open to. A call really presented her as genuine. We had a really great call and I've used a similar approach to reach out and meet new. People linked in second tip build people up through community. I've reached out to people from communities. I've been on lately Y- whether it was hopping on a linked in live Webinar training. Sometimes if you zoom causing communities. I'm in and many of the top sales people in Lincoln. Organizing resume calls right now. I definitely suggest getting on them. But what I do is reference. The call compliment them on what they said. And what it meant to me. It really feels good to people to let them know how they impacted you so when you ask for their time they they don't think you have a hidden agenda. They want to go deeper on the topic with you number. Three the Lincoln activity tab is gold. I used to reach out and mentioned someone's profile when reaching out but finding what people have commented on from their activity shows the other person. You really see them. You plan the same lanes. You're one of the same tribe. You're more of an insider asking for time in someone outside of the club banging to get in reference that in your outreach. Hey really loved what you wrote on so-and-so's post it made me think of x the have a few minutes to talk with. Love the run some suggestions questions by you giving your knowledge on this value any advice you may have in this area. And lastly be specific and ask for their time. You have to give them a reason for having a call could be making yourself a better candidate to an employer. You value their perspective on an industry where you want to get their thoughts on a sale situation. You're dealing with include that in your outreach. I also like to say even just a few minutes helps. I know your time's valuable. So that's some quick things that I'm using finally. Don't even think you need to have a specific ask. It could just be you feel a genuine connection with some content and you WanNa meet them so tell them why. I urge you all to pick a few people who genuinely respect on linked in but haven't met outside of it and try to meet them. You just might be surprised who accepts the invited. The massive value that can come

Lincoln Alex Smith Sarah Abi Sales Sara Marie Clark Jack Neater Consulting Consultant
If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

Science Friction

08:18 min | 8 months ago

If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

"This ovid nineteen pandemic horrifying as it ease. Ease making us old. Think deeply about what comes afterwards about what out. Society will o'clock about what sort of society we? What's been really incredible? He's seeing how quickly the world can mobilize when it really needs to not quickly enough. Shore and the economic consequences are already devastating about four a behemoth of Planet. We have found a common purpose. Eradicating the pandemic. It's Natasha Mitchell joining you for science fiction and given all that. What could we mobilize around next if there was similar will mitigating climate change? What about the mountains of waste we generate as a species we flush freshwater Dan at Danny's landfill is piling up Arandas? Chana doesn't want out rubbish for recycling anymore and we throw out perfectly. Edible food by the ton make sense. No not really so I want you to meet to revolutionaries who have been well breaking rules to change. The world to me is a reflection of in particular in urban our society. That's not working. The fact that we twelve thousand years ago there was four million people on the planet and you sort of think so we take Melbourne and we better data across the planet and they probably created waste but it was Beautifully by the planet putting on being people on the planet and the same model. We exactly the same model now. It's clearly not an appropriate model anymore. We have a million tons of waste water a day in Melbourne. And what we do is we clean it up enough or we put it in a hole. We'll put it in the air or put it in the sea and we say our hope. The planet just fixes that problem and at some point probably when we hit a bad abi and people the planet's wasn't able to fix that problem anymore and so the model of waste that says that we can just put it out there and the planet will assimilated hall or in the Sea. He's finished so for me. Waste Rip presents a problem that we have to solve. That goes back a very long way. So it's hard to solve. I want you to make precipitated scales a chemical engineer and director of the particulate fluids processing center at University of Melbourne. He's a problem solver an inventor a makeup from water reuse and recycling to enormous batteries powered by your piece. Joost Becker is an environmental activist. Experimental End Artists to in two thousand twelve opened. The world's first zero waste RISTORANTE SILO BY JOOST. And they join me. As part of an event at the science gallery. Millwood's last pop-up exhibition called disposable. I want to talk about what happens when you try to challenge systems as they are to cleverly rethink how we use wise because what. We've got here people who do that and joost. You decided early on that you were going to respond to the the whole West Challenge and goes zero waste and not only that trying to open up a restaurant that was wholly zero waste. So what did that look like what most people do is? They see the waste product and then try and work out what to do with the waste product. I go back and look at the system if the system is generating something that is now used in the system needs to change. And so. That's what I did basically just change the system so the milk I spoke to a dairy fabric supply me and stainless steel cake so we developed like tap system we ground our own flow because we we have our own flower roll around oats. We spoke to winemakers about putting wine in kegs. One on tap might our own data everything that kind of generated waste but an even does myself. Yeah but this is much that has has come from that. I mean that was a forty two square meter cafe and it has caused ripples across the world is stuff going on in New York and in London in China and in South America. That has happened because of that cafe. Today I was sent an image of a Steiner Steel Keg and the farmer has worked for four years with the health department to try and get his keg approved now. Just my little cafe was like you know quarter of a million milk bottles or some crazy amount of milk bottles that we didn't need to buy that. My dairy farmer didn't need to buy that went didn't didn't need to purchase them and then I didn't pay someone to come and collect them and that plastic really copy restocked because he's got a fat coating from this animal fat on it. Which makes it really difficult to recycle it. So you know there's so many things and then in two thousand twelve the year on Harvesting was that was completely illegal but like my main sponsor was the city of Melbourne and had the city of Melbourne. Lago all over it and I thought if I'm going to get a crack at this I'm going to do it now. Okay so you're on harvesting in a commercial restaurant space. What were you doing because you're pushing the boundaries in all sorts of directions in this cap so people will come in and inspect building and go on my God. We had no chemical us. We had so much stuff this allies of things going on that for for people that were you know from the council checking to see you know. I had no plastic chopping boards and I had electrolytes water so water that came from was invented for surgery to clean hands and clean surgical tools in Japan. Twenty five years ago. It's basically water with salt and electric current goes through it and kills bacteria instantly us. Four billion gloves every single day that get thrown away which ended up in landfill which copy recycled and now here nets. No nothing so no bins no rubbish. We had like a little jam jar that showed there may capstone came on the kegs so I had to work to say. I don't want plastic cats on paper caps so they can go into our invisible composter so you can imagine how if you don't have been you've gotta work it out because you end up being left with stuff you know. We ended up having this board. That big of rubber bands because everything on the veggies and stuff in rubber bands but work with we were just talking about a with. Kerama on unlike a twin ball toilet so that Iran could be separated and stuff toilet applies to boys. Talk about in the toilets. Okay so so the so. This is the Iran harvesting story in this cafe. What did you do? And how did you challenge the health authorities big time? This was instilled in me by my dad. Probably account remember how it was maybe three or four years old so we were living in Holland and I used to go with my dad so he's veggie patch and be little like delft. Were little bottles. It'll all these little things coins I'd find one that had all this stuff come here in the solar we miles away from any any city or and he said we'll hundreds of years ago. Farmers would go to cities and shovel the human manure of the trenches to re fertilized their soil. Because you can't just keep pulling from soil so became caught assist with that idea and knowing that you know I don't know what it is some safe. Three percents is seven percent of the world's gases used to create a fertilizer a synthetic fertilizers. And I must say that. That fertilizer isn't even a good fertilizer because it doesn't actually narcisse soil properly. What we're doing is with mining soil. And we're not putting back what we've taken out so for me. It's like logical that we can't solve this problem unless we start looking at putting the nutrients that we've taken out back in. So what did you do with Iran in the restaurant so we use it on grain crops so use it to fertilize mustard crops in thousand and use it as a herbicide that we did all sorts of trials different levels to say what kind of facility was brought back to soil? We ended up with three and a half thousand Litas from a five-week pop-up.

Melbourne Iran University Of Melbourne Joost Becker Steiner Steel Keg Natasha Mitchell Chana Experimental End Artists Japan Millwood South America Director China Holland New York Delft London
Japan postpones 2020 Summer Olympics to 2021

Dr. Daliah

04:21 min | 9 months ago

Japan postpones 2020 Summer Olympics to 2021

"But with the children thanks the games I have to be rescheduled based on everything that's going on because if nobody wants to go and compete in and nobody wants a gold watch then Tokyo is going to really you know be tanked financially from this so prime minister Shinzo Ave spoke to the head of the IOC and proposed the delay it's going to be rescheduled beyond twenty twenty but not later than summer twenty twenty one now the Olympics have never been to lead up before I thought there was a delay one of the Olympics and forget I thought it was it had to be delayed into October of one year the summer Olympics once I think was in the sixties had to be delayed to October forget why but they were canceled back in nineteen sixteen nineteen forty and nineteen forty four I'm C. nineteen forty nineteen forty four was during divorce will work till so the gains have to be rescheduled to a day beyond twenty twenty but not later than summer twenty twenty one accord the international Olympic committee I guess that we they write the rules as they go originally the rules work you will have to deal with in twenty twenty and they realize well then it one of the summer Olympics if we have to wait till after the summers of the cold so Tokyo governor Yuriko Cole Leakey said vads the name of the delayed Olympics will still be Tokyo twenty twenty well because that's what all the gear and all the you know swag and everything says so it's not going to be called the twenty twenty one I think it's really really important for Olympic staff even number years even numbers on there so he made a comment to reporters or she'd made the comments are part of the vision part minister Shinzo abi spoke to the head of the national of the committee let me see here IOC president Thomas Bach has agreed one hundred percent of the falls from a proposal and then said the decision was about protecting human life fox said the new dates for the new games to be postponed during peace time would be decided by an IOC panel overseeing the gains in Tokyo organizers yeah it's very expensive we've talked about how cities take a big hit whenever they do Olympics because Olympics village the stadiums it's really hard to get your money back Atlanta has a really nice Olympic area it it it has like you know Olympic village and you know you get to see it except I just don't know how much money they make off of that but the average you know state country city whatever it doesn't seem to do well post Olympics from what we understand it's an absolute mess when you have all these consumers come and spend money and then you know they leave so what do not have an Olympics after spending all that money to prepare and it takes years to prepare that alone can just crash Japan's economy without even talking about you know the Olympics or the court of ours so when they see the current pandemic has already helped push Japan towards recession the GDP contracted one point eight percent in the October December quarter an economist at research firm Fitch on Monday revises twenty twenty growth forecast for Japan to negative one point one percent from negative point to and he said the postponement will worsen it significantly and impact their GDP the three point five point eight percentage points hence the postponement would badly affect Japanese consumer confidence they do not know what it would do to the two hundred forty billion yen if Japan has issues then we have issues obviously because we're all you know in an economy together Tokyo twenty twenty organizers declined to say how many foreign visitors expect to visit Japan specifically to watch this one action I remember they still have aftermath of Fukushima not so much a literal radiation aftermath but you don't have a lot of people very excited to you know also go to an area that had you know the tsunami and then you know the nuclear fallout from that so my guess is even if the Tokyo Olympics are postponed I don't believe that it's going to still be as much of a economic you know windfall as people

"k. abi" Discussed on Therapist Uncensored Podcast

Therapist Uncensored Podcast

15:42 min | 1 year ago

"k. abi" Discussed on Therapist Uncensored Podcast

"It's really helpful visually. So you know using your head your neck and your is just beginning to look around the space. Now I can see it. Sues Body likes fat. I noticed that you took a deep breath is nice said that are they. They seem to be a shift in a way that when like NC things one we have created those things to be there like there are things this is my cessation and so it's like you see yourself in your environment or your comfortable objects. You're often often choose the things in your environment. They might be meaningful or soothing or even just familiar millier absolutely. So that's another another thing you might be able to orient more generally in the space and that can be coming now for some people. Visual orienting is not coming to actually sleaze more distressing but they can listen to the sounds in the room or your clothing. Many people choose clothing because it's from tactile perspective active at Smith soft or it's rough for it's you know there's some kind of feeling then that is who you can help them to notice of the different in five sentences and find ways that they can orient. That's helpful so you can also look at us specific object to your eyes land where you're is drawn suit suit can i. May I ask you if you look around for a moment. Well really through my avs screen or I'm saying my cabinet round one but as I look around we've got some live plants right outside of the view that are meaningful to me in different different ways. That's probably in the physical space would be these succulent. And then some just cut flowers. That are wildflowers. That are were there so if you take a moment just to draw them to you with your eye and yourself be in this basement them. Would you notice in your body what sensations become aware of. What's the shift inside those pleasant? I can begin to feel the difference France between the thinking and feeling so that I'm more noticing what I'm thinking and not saying so just basically what it feels like. It's just like bringing online you it on my chest. My Heat even overheat comfort a little discomfort because of there's a way that this is a quite personal and intimate and kind of cut through fences and doing this publicly so that was when I was like well okay. That's happening and I'm good with that. I want that to happen because this is what happens right and I notice even as you said that you took even a bit of a deeper breath and that's again this implicit this more. The underneath part of us can feel vulnerable and yet is essential -sential aspect of our being that we're expressing in every moment whether we put our words to it or not more notice it or you mentioned the pleasant dealing with the plants we go this multi dimensions here when she sort of association to what you're experiencing right now. But the pleasantness awesomeness is that in your chester. You're throwing your arms. Your legs and wally pleasant feeling is soft warm. For for some reason I think I feel it. This is odd like my cheeks a home like my bat like a relaxed back a little bit Part of my experience is what. I'm seeing a handmade pot though it's very has a lot of texture to it so it's also stimulating. You know like this is someone's had their hands in it in its creation. So that's what I was taking in is like that's a manifestation of someone's Hands and mind and heart. You know what I mean that then is holding the succulent. It's a little bit of a central thing. Yeah yeah and it sounds like maybe a little appreciation or inaction and there's a little more Taliban and that one too. Yeah that's what I was aware of is like it's it's not just calming. It's also so kind of exciting and stimulating to look. I can tell both and the the exciting part is in your throat your chest and the sensation of the excitement around that that makes me WanNa like touch it or feel it. Yes so there's the feeling of the excitement and the inside isn't go upward or outward road or is it kingly is in I would call it a little soft gentle spiral internally like not not when you're anxious anxious and you're spinning right like that's another experience. I can help but almost like if you were to. Here's my association. Like if you have your feet dangling feeding some water and you begin to circle your foot you know how it kind of creates this little spiral that soft and gentle kind of again at softball interesting yet. It's soft but there's movement to yes definitely so maybe just taking a moment to send sent to to be in both softening but there's also this pleasant feeling of movement spiral and this is such a a wonderful example. Thank you for sharing absolutely thank you because one of the ways to get unstuck from trauma a traumatic response where where are physiology is in survival. Pattern weren't high alert alert as if the trauma is still happening. As if the event is still happening more primed to to jump right to start off well primed to to fight for prime to flee or maybe it. We're stuck in freeze whether it's it can come up. When there's an event that similar to the original event says something reminds us? Lower reminds the lower brain right. And then it goes into this survival patter because that's what helped us to survive or it can actually get grooved in the nervous system pattern to be stuck in fight flight or freeze for long long periods of time and for some people I have worked with them. They see no. I can freeze for decades And now through some of what we were doing right here. Just pausing taking any environment and tracking. How the nervous the nervous system does with that? It's great also in the sense that it moves and you pointing out like a flow then made me aware of the movement of it. which when I think of that with clients it's you know the notion of any feeling will move if we stay with it? We don't have to do anything with it but that it'll it'll shift that it might grow. It'll transform it'll as far as being able to just stay with it and that brought to mind is like it's again. It comes with a mastery. You can imagine it coming into a master I was relating to you. I had somebody that had worked. That has talked about legs and hips in pelvis all this literally being clenched until now until now we're able to talk He didn't even know it. So we started was. How do you know if you're stuck doc? And so the person listening out there what I'm here he says it's like a movement like it's going from what you're aware to something more comfortable. Is that right. If I'm just kind of repeating repeating or whether you become more aware of something new having where of right or you become more regulated for some the people it will be just a little bit is I little that you grow over a long period of time and for others just attending to what it is that helps to reinstate. This natural pendulum are the rhythm of the nervous system. A WANNA be able to move between states of expansion contraction WANNA be able to move when something threatening comes toward us right. Our bodies instinctually go into a threat response cycle all and this is one of the great gifts in my mind that I think Dr Peter Levin has offered to us is the question of why do wild animals mall's not walk around with post traumatic stress disorder right and there's really great other literature about that Dr Robertson Polski. Why Zebras don't get also because if they did they'd be lunch right insomnia and startle Rosarno? All Pretty Startling Arlene Spot prey animals are startled but they can go back to grazing. They can go back to mating behaviors. They can they can move within the environment where there there is a regulatory flow between all right. Now I'm eating my food now. There's something in the environment that calls my attention and I go into do you. Alert GOTO defensive oriented. And I evaluate orienting and I evaluate. Do I approach you. Do I avoid Oh I avoid. There's something dangerous here with humans. We might go more into a social response. Who are you? What are you doing here get away? Hey from me stop. I love boat kind of flipping back and forth between the wild animal and the human mix. I really can kind of almost think about ears. Perked due to orienting turning fast evaluation. It's happening. We're not far from that. And human beings do the same quick quick evaluations sequence. The animals do in fact it's mitigated by the lower brain so the Magdala Nipah campus. But the NEO CORTEX is that last. I think in the last thing to know Peter Living tells a story about colleague of his who was on safari in Africa and had her toddler in the front seat and before she knew it the window was open. She jumped to cross rolled up the window. She really know why she was doing it. Ah Seconds later. A giant python hit the window but some theme from her five cents since gathered. This something dangerous was a current her her she jumped into action so then she got a burst right of sympathetic expectation and she executed a whole movement in sequence irrational brain. Totally not not knowing it seasoning. Right it's slow and you know us you could go into fight. You could go into flight now. Those are active defensive responses. The body might also go into a passive defensive response. which is the freeze response? This is really important. You know there was not a lot of research done on the freeze response in humans. Some was sexual assault survivors with tonic immobility. But more more and more. We're seeing that many of the symptoms of trauma have correlates to being stuck in this free. Low tone heart rate goes into a slow state like for hibernation by gestion slows down low low heart rate variability circulation. There's nothing pumping to the arms and legs so everything shifts into this near death. State the positive part of that. Is that why you see lots of Youtube. For example type in impala and the baboon and Mule St. It's it's actually amazing video where the impala is caught by a Cheetah at a park and it it goes into freeze then the Cheetah is worn out from the chase. So I think it's a Hyena comes along insertive chasing away and and these boons baboon save impalas all the time. It's really amazing. There many videos of this but the baboon start to come over and the a cheetah kind of moves away. It gives the impala time to come out of the state of freeze. And you start to see it. It's it's barely breathing. It looks like it's dead. And then these deep breaths start to come in its eyes start to water and then it starts to shake and tremble tremble which is a common response of sure if I asked the How are you feeling on the inside? The Apollo was saint feeling cold tomorrow warm or even quite hot. What right and sort of this discharge or a state change that occurs as the body comes out of shock as the animal's body comes out of shock and Eh? The human body comes out of shock so allowing time free shouldn't be time limited and then you see on pilot it shakes for awhile. Mouth is moving its jaws moving Edge jumps right up and runs away and the Cheetah comes back into this looking around where to go so it's viable mechanism awesome that we have that we share and tending to the sensations of the freeze and beginning to allow time for the freeze to complete. So this is another important piece along a biological model that Peter Living talks about we might discharge or release release in the body sensation right falling sensation shaking trembling he gurgling temperature shifts and then we feel more regulated needed after that kind of a release but we also might have an incomplete defensive response so Peter Talks about this is is the nervous system is tall dressed up with nowhere to go. I couldn't fight the bullies right. I couldn't get away so there's inhabited fight or inhibited flight. Right and then the next time something happens maybe even later in my life I have a boss that I need to talk to about some workplace difficulties altis but my body is still uninhibited. Fight which doesn't allow me to be assertive in a sense or if I'm assertive it my body response it's as if I'm endanger so we may work with the boss right in the cues in the body in relationship to that but it's the inhibited fight so to go back in the memory. What needed to happen? That didn't get to happen and not in the imagination because you can say well I wanted to push push them away but when you ask the body as you think about that as you feel the freeze and then the person is feeling more mobilized over time they come out of the freeze into this more mobilize the place naturally. What does your body want to do right now? All kinds of interesting things I I WANNA kick I wanNA push I wanNA. It is so weird I might jaw is opening and closing. We'll let that happen for awhile and let's see what happens next. I just feel like I wanNA bite right mark. I feel like flames could come out like a dragon. Let yourself you'll that..

"k. abi" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"k. abi" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"ABI. It was a very good mood. And I think he's receptive to making a deal if it achieves his goals of securing our border, and I think we can get there. If everybody will start talking to each other Trump's decision to withdraw from Syria led the Defense Secretary and US on void to the coalition fighting ISIS to resign in protest, retired four-star army general Stanley mcchrystal ABC news this week, the General James Mattis decision to quit. The administration is a red flag that Americans should take seriously walking away from all the responsibility. He feels for every service member in our forces. And he does. So what a public way like that. We are to stop and say, okay. Why did he do? We are to ask what kind of commander in chief. He had that you're Mattis that the good marine felt he had to walk away a worker is dead after being attacked by a lion at a wildlife centre in North Carolina. Correspondent Carey shoemaker. The victim. Twenty two year old Alexandra black had just started working at the conservator center in Burlington North Carolina two weeks ago. A statement from the Caswell county sheriff's office says the lion somehow got out of a lock space while a routine cleaning was taking place and quickly attacked the woman. The lion was shot dead. So that the victim could be retrieved Wall Street traders will put in a short day on New Year's Eve ahead of the big bell. Stock futures are up. I'm Evan Haning. Hey guys can hear from the hip pad cast today's growth who would win a three mile bicycle race in eleven year old girl or last year's winner of the tour de France. It all depends on the bicycle it depends on their vehicle both on a ten speed in the pro racers going to win every time but put the race around a tricycle in the eleven year old wins every time you see. It's not the driver. It's the vehicle when it comes to generating revenue. It's exactly the same. If you have a job or a small business. You are writing a traceable you can only go so fast. If you need to make up lost ground. It's not going to happen on a tropical, no matter. How fast you pedal? It's simply not going to win the race..

James Mattis Stanley mcchrystal Caswell county Burlington North Carolina Carey shoemaker ABC Syria North Carolina Evan Haning Alexandra black eleven year Twenty two year two weeks
"k. abi" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"k. abi" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Quietness throw a normal ABI so Quique IBM more at EJ me said the pizzazz possess pizza and restaurant lucado by John Carroll university. And it is at twenty six eighty and that's. Right around there without John Carroll university owned Bill post-oil Inman, Jerry, multiple, LA multo, deletes Llosa. Save politic Pugh. Informat yo nickel quiet numero data for. No, do no say three do. Said they do they do with windy Setanta Setanta three. Do it. Setanta Setanta, and so not bad theon Keller Dominika they are open on Sunday from twelve to nine PM and then Monday through Saturday eleven to ten PM. Okay. Their gold beautiful restaurant. And if you get a chance tried to try to visit they are in enjoy a little pizza and a lot of other stuff that they have in that it is delicious. Okay. All right there. That's so Amedee change doc week. Kay star. Santa croce. Hey meals in yelich. For me Lula prefers. Rola known wmal farrier mainly Iveta child by committee. Going.

Setanta Setanta John Carroll university Santa croce Bill post-oil Inman Keller Dominika Iveta IBM Pugh Kay star Lula yelich Jerry
"k. abi" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"k. abi" Discussed on Ologies

"Okay but there but they don't drones don't staying males don't staying no they'd because it's a modified opa the sir that sir is what the stinger is for a abi so and over posner is kind of like this point pete tubes structure at the end of a lady insect bite and she uses it to lay eggs it's kind of like i'm a shirt gun but for your babies and so the males cannot do it but they do they they do the trickery they do the trickery so of a male be could play land on you and then still like pump his abdomen um not in a sexual way but in a in a like oh i could sting you but unless you are looking really closely you know most people don't rid loaita riot if you know it so if you can see that it's a drone oh you con actually do anything and drones have bigger eyes so drones do in fact have learned her eyes and they don't gather nectar our pollen or do really any work their primary goal is to mate and die they are nature's doeeyed gigolo this is literally all of my knowledge of jones but so i but i didn't know that it i didn't know that it be singer was a modified over posner yes so let's get back to leila's job at the end hm citizen science is essentially nonscientists helping collect data and observations for research and if you're like i am not qualified for that just know the scientists are like either you help me or this should never gets done so please thank you also know you don't have to be like a citizen of anywhere that's a bit of a misnomer film people coal it um community science some people call it um civic science some people call it public participation scientific research pius or that's not exactly like one of those things is going to be like i wanna be a pp sr or on now that does not going to it so and you know there's a lot of other countries that do citizens.

posner jones leila abi
"k. abi" Discussed on Talk 1300 FM

Talk 1300 FM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"k. abi" Discussed on Talk 1300 FM

"Fact limb judd's did consider john kennedy a rival but actually came to respect john kennedy a great deal for the extent to which kennedy tried to make him feel a welcome at a part of the administration he was placed in charge of the space program ordinarily vice presidents have no duties abi beyond attending funerals and be constitutionally mandated duty of presiding over the senate when it's really important that they preside like mike pence does these days were for tiebreaking votes but again a bobby was the person who he had great difficulties john much much less so at i would defer to a professor chambers yeah i think so at the relationship between johnson and and jfk was quite strong uh it became i wouldn't say a friendship necessarily but they worked well together uh kennedy nudity he needed johnson to be able to get things through uh the congress because of uh dont'a long long history in that body and and so they worked well together i i think than any idea that there's some sort of an furious plot on a part of johnson uh really just doesn't hold much water and even if in looking at some of these documents that are just released today it does seem that for instance johnson it started to collect files on uh people who were threatening to assassinate the predator seemed like security threats that he's got the fbi working on things like that um i i just don't think that there's any any real possibility that he was involved at all it it it's just not based in fact one eight six six viable jimbo one eight six six five five four six two six as late in the day some of the jfk assassination documents have been released although not all we are told at the ones not released are for reasons of compelling national interest and we'll come back and we'll talk some more about that all the jim bohannon show so in just.

judd john kennedy space program senate mike pence bobby johnson jfk congress professor fbi jim bohannon