35 Burst results for "K Kathleen"

The Mysterious Disappearance of Maura Murray

The Investigation Guru

02:05 min | 3 d ago

The Mysterious Disappearance of Maura Murray

"Without further. Ado i present to you. The case of more murray mars early life more was born on may fourth nineteen eighty two in hanson massachusetts. The fourth child of fred and laurie. She had two brothers an older brother. Fred and a younger brother. Kurt and two sisters kathleen and julie. Both older parents divorced when she was six and moved in with her mother. After her parents split she graduated from whitman. Hanson regional high school where. She was a star athlete on the school. Track team an excellent student. She scored a fourteen twenty on her. Sat and was accepted a west point which the united states military academy where she studied chemical engineering for three semesters she was released from west point on an honor violation for stealing five dollars worth of makeup after her dismissal from west point she transferred to the university of massachusetts amherst to study events prior to her disappearance in november of two thousand three free months before her disappearance maura admitted to using stolen credit card to order food from several restaurants. Discharge was dismissed after three months of good behavior on saturday february seventh two thousand and four two days before her disappearance morris. Father fred awry. Am i to take more a car. Shopping and later went to dinner with mara and whatever friends when they were done with dinner more dropped her father office motel room and borrowed his toyota corolla to return to campus to attend dorm party. She arrived at the party at ten thirty. Pm and left at two thirty the following morning at three thirty that morning one day before she disappeared she struck a guardrail on route. Nine in hadley causing nearly ten thousand dollars worth of damage to her father's car. No field sobriety test was conducted so she went to that party and probably got drunk and started driving. Her dad's car ran into a guardrail. One day before she disappeared and cost ten thousand dollars worth of damage to his core. The cops didn't feel the need to do any kind of sobriety test interesting.

Hanson Regional High School West Point Hanson United States Military Academy Laurie Fred Awry Murray Whitman Kathleen Kurt University Of Massachusetts Am Fred Massachusetts Julie Maura Mara Morris
City of Everett pushes back on hate group

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:40 sec | Last week

City of Everett pushes back on hate group

"It removed a banner showing a hate groups logo from a pedestrian bridge. Come was Eric Heights reports it was replaced with another sign promoting unity. The banner place without permission on March 23rd Red Reclaim America. With the Web address of the group Patriot front, Kathleen Baxter, with the city's Public Works department tells the Everett Herald it was removed from the bridge overlooking Marine View Drive in a couple of hours. Then, on Tuesday, the city put up a new banner from the same spot displaying the message. All are welcome and average. No place for hate stickers promoting group have appeared around the city in the past couple of years. The city says it's not known to Patriot Front has an active local chapter or of its trying to recruit members.

Eric Heights Kathleen Baxter Everett Herald Public Works Department America Patriot Front
The City of Everett, NE of Seattle, decries white nationalist propaganda

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:39 sec | Last week

The City of Everett, NE of Seattle, decries white nationalist propaganda

"The city of ever it removed a banner showing a hate groups logo from a pedestrian bridge couples Eric Hynes reports It was replaced with another sign promoting unity. The banner Place without permission on March 23rd Red Reclaim America. With the Web address of the group Patriot front, Kathleen Baxter, with the city's Public Works department tells the Everett Herald it was removed from the bridge overlooking rain view drive in a couple of hours. And on Tuesday, the city put up a new banner from the same spot displaying the message. All are welcome, and Everett, no place for hate stickers promoting the group have appeared around the city in the past couple of years. Said. He says it's not known to Patriot Front has an active local chapter or of its trying to recruit

Eric Hynes Kathleen Baxter Everett Herald Public Works Department America Everett
Aligning Your Money & Values With Kathleen McQuiggan of Artemis Advisors

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

03:35 min | 3 weeks ago

Aligning Your Money & Values With Kathleen McQuiggan of Artemis Advisors

"Women are known for spending their money focused on helping others and the community as well as making more money. Men tend to just focus it on making more money. Women have always been values based investors. I remember this. When i worked at bear stearns and american express deloitte by the way i did campaigns on women and well women have always been values based investors and now the rest of the world is catching on it's called. Espn investing for environment society and governance focused investing basically designed around the un development sustainable development goals or the sdg in fact the sec the securities and exchange commission now has its first head of es g an investing is outperforming other strategies including even in this economy. So how does it work. I'd like you to meet cathleen mcguigan. She is a wealth advisor at artists financial group and a woman. Who's been in my world about these issues for several years. Previously she was in the packs. World investing as head of global women's investing and ran global women's index fund and prior to that. She spent thirteen years at goldman sachs welcomed green catches radio kathleen. Thank you for joining us. Finally thanks for having me and it's great. It's great to finally have this conversation. I appreciate it. So let's start with defining some terms so that people are were were were not losing people define investing for people who aren't familiar with it and talk about the power. Sure angie investing. And i i should do the disclaimer. I feel like you know the financial services industry we use so much jargon acronyms and you know i think sometimes people just get overwhelmed by not understanding some of the inside lingo and you know. I think it's important that people realize that you said earlier right you. Your money is power and women need more of both and sustainable investing which is how we refer to it at artists. And i think this is an emerging sort of language. It isn't bit of alphabet soup. But if you think of sustainable investing what back in the seventies was known as socially responsible investing what is sometimes being referred to now as impact investing. You these things are starting to mean different things. But i'll use sustainable and responsible investing is kind of a general framework for explaining how in the investment process in addition to looking at the traditional financial. Metrics that most organizations would use in making investment decisions sustainable and responsible investing ads. On what i say as an additional layer and it adds on looking at a accompanies in mental. Which is the social. Which is the ass and governance. Which is the g so these. E s g factors as are commonly referred to to be incorporated in the overall investment process or Analysis environmental social and governance factors are additional things that get analyzed and looked at for people to make decisions as to where they want place their buddy so i think of this and i tried to explain it to people as think of it as adding more of the things that were looking at to decide what is good company that we may or may not want a purchase or use an additional set of factors in analyzing investments.

American Express Deloitte Cathleen Mcguigan SEC Bear Stearns Espn Goldman Sachs UN Kathleen Angie
Saying No When Your Kids Ask You for Money

Breaking Money Silence®

07:15 min | Last month

Saying No When Your Kids Ask You for Money

"We are going to talk about how setting limits and your financial life can boost your financial confidence. It's one of the challenges that i find. Many women face is saying no to their adult children when they ask for money. Yes i know you love your kids. But when does loving them mean setting a limit around your bank account so today to help me answer this question. I have carry rattle. She is a financial therapist and coach. Founder and ceo of behavioral sense and ceo of stopping over shopping carey has over thirty years experience as a financial executive with multi country experience in banking brokerage and credit card practices. Welcome carried to the podcast today. Kathleen thank you so much. And i so love what you do. It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you. I'm excited to break money. Silence with you on this really interesting topic so let me just set the stage a bit. Because often when i am giving a presentation to a group of parents of breaking money silence across generations incurring encouraging intergenerational. Talk there the question always comes up that someone in the audience has a young adult child who they want to set a limit with. They want this person to be financially independent. They clearly love their kid. But they're finding it so hard to say no and so this struggle i think is really somewhat universal and so i do empathize with them. But i wanna really talk today with you because it's an area that you work in about how you can talk about finances with your kids and start to set those financial limits so tell me just off the top of your head with this issue kind of what's the highlight what makes it so challenging. And then what are some of the reasons. People should actually say not their kids. My gosh so. I also empathize not easy right especially when you have beautiful big looking at you. You know pleading it's it makes your heart melt but you know went when you give your child everything. Here's what you're telling your child right. You telling them that. Money is limitless. You telling them that spending has no consequences and you're telling them or you're not helping them. Connect the dots between spend how that accumulates into debt and where the money has to come from to pay it off in our job as parents is to prepare our children for surviving and flourishing in the world. Especially when we're not around and so teaching kids things like that doesn't doesn't help. So the idea is to switch that around and say okay. What is saying no help them. Do it helps them. Learn how to plan ahead. So that they don't get into predicaments. It helps them learn how to make choices and set priorities so that they understand. They can't have everything and they need to understand how. That money is accumulating in terms of debt. And how they have to figure out how to pay it off in some ways. It's actually a gift to say. No it's something just popped into my head. I actually In my twenties used to give my father a hard time. I had been in therapy around some of some. You know body image self esteem issues and i came home one day and i said to my father. You don't say no enough and he's like what and wasn't around money moves around other stuff. But i was like you should have set more limits with me. He's like new. I blew it and so you. I don't know if every kid comes home and says to their parent eventually. You should've said no more But there is some real value in teaching people that there's limits that there's struggle that and and i find that there's some self esteem that comes from having to figure it out even though you might have a kid who pitches a fit at the beginning. Oh absolutely right. Being being able to conquer the world on your own is awesome and we have to give our children that ability you know. Yeah being the safety net. All the time is just not going to pay off. Well i feel like society puts a lot of pressure on mothers in particular in. My story was certainly about my dad because my mother was actually pretty good at saying no but with women. There's this there's almost this over correction on how we not only have to be their parents. We have to be their friends. We have to be selfless and we have to give to others. And that's just a recipe to be overwhelmed and not feel good. But i'm wondering what do you think happens when we are in that mode of trying to be the best mother we can be and we want to give our kids everything and we're not setting limits ourself let alone our kids. Does that complicate things around money or that kind of a separate issue. I think it totally complicates things. And i'm going to tell you a short story about my mother and then segue got to finances. It wasn't about finances but my mother was incredibly selfless. She raised four kids She worked and she was so stressed out all the time because she denied herself everything to give to her children to give to her husband to give to her work so my mother passed away a few years ago. And somebody asked me. What do you remember most about your mother. And you know what popped into. My head was not what i shared. What popped into my head. Was she used to yell a lot. And that's because my mother was so stressed all the time but she deprived herself of self care and self kindness. So let's segue that into finances right. The same thing can happen if you are denying yourself so much to give to your kids. Are you threatening your own enjoyment in life that you worked so very hard for. Are you threatening your own ability to retire someday because you are mortgaging your house to you know. Give give your kids a down payment or put your kid through school. Of course you love your child and you want to get them set straight and and you know have have a good life and not have huge debt but you know. Here's what i want somebody to think about an. It's a little blunt. So i know i'm being awfully director. Rupert it on the aso. When when you when you think okay. I'm going to mortgage my house for my kid to send them to school so the first part is okay. I love you child. I'm gonna mortgage my house design you. And here's the part you don't say to yourself and by the way dear child because i'm putting myself in so much debt. I'm not going to have retirement and so you're going to be supporting me when i'm retired.

Behavioral Sense Carey Kathleen Rupert
Interview with Dr. Tim Persons, Chief Scientist at Government Accountability Office

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:51 min | Last month

Interview with Dr. Tim Persons, Chief Scientist at Government Accountability Office

"Our guest today is dr tim persons. Who is the chief scientist. Managing director of the science technology assessment and analytics team at the us government accountability office also known as the gao. So hi tim. Thanks so much for joining us today. I kathleen Me on it's great to be with you. And ron once again. Yeah we are so excited to have you with us today for folks that have been following us. Tim was also are september. Twenty twenty speaker at our ai in government event and he was one of the keynotes at machine learning life cycle conference so we will link to both of those in the show notes in case you would like to watch them in more detail. But i wanna start this podcast today in case folks don't know you To help you spend some time introducing yourself to our lists and tell them a little bit about your background in. Yes so happy to do that. So as you said in your introduction. I am the chief scientist of the gao. Where the largest of the congressional or the legislative branch agencies in the us government and we have a staff about Thirty two hundred Maybe a little bit more in terms of Full time equivalents there but our main role is to to be the oversight or also called the congressional watchdogs by the way For the us congress. So we're Known as the auditors. We have a lot of access the federal information and so on across a wide array of departments and agencies and so on an issues which actually makes it ideal the tien have conversations about a i And so that's what i've been doing with. Gao since two thousand eight but also recently. We stood up a new team. It's geos newest. Team is called the science technology assessment in analytics team and that's significant because Especially for ai. Because the second a and that's as analytics and a is really a statistical analytics and decision sciences with respect to a machine so i work across the whole. Federal government supporting. Gao and lead a team. That does a lot of oversight insight and foresight work in the science and technology area. Especially so that's a little bit of the background For today thank you you know. I think that's really interesting. Because people the average person here in the united states but probably worldwide does not really understand the mechanism by which large governments or even small governments work and these levels of oversight and trying to understand if the dollars that they're spending taxpayers or getting applied and appropriated properly and used to the value that that they're supposed to so. It's a really interesting place to be. And of course this is an ai. Podcast we're going to talk about how. Ai connects to all of that right. And i think that's one of the the interesting questions we have for you. Maybe i just looking at more broadly. I know we'll a little bit more deeper into a. Is it relates specifically to oversight but i think just certain at a at a broad brush from where you said looking across the government may be looking seeing how other agencies are using technology and using tax dollars. You know how do you what do you see as some of these interesting opportunities interesting. Applications unique opportunities that the public sector maybe in general not even just in the us has around using artificial intelligence. Yeah great question ron. We could spend now until the rest of the year talking about that one. That's that's a broad Very good question of course Happy to be too brief on that. But i think Really what a is bringing here is Really just the framework of thinking about The future of government. I think the future is in one sense the now and they're still part of the public sector of the not yet and i really do think that what is is bringing out particularly especially as we sit in the middle still of our pandemic that we hope will end soon. But really i think about the government roles of enhancing both capabilities and services. So i think those are the two key things to start a conversation with. Ai about capabilities and services and the reason. I say that because there's so much of the government that has changed over the last century When you think about it It really so much of the mission now is really a service or thing We also think about. Of course the what. I'll call the more tactile government that we we can see kinda we could feel we it's You know this is ranging from law enforcement to the military to One of the most beloved institutions are The us park service. Like whenever we go to one of america's many great parks you know we see the government in that way and yet in this day and age especially in the digital age us so much is about doing services. How do we get those Stimulus checks out in a time of economic distress. And how do we do that reliably so that. It's not wasting taxpayer dollars. It's not a fraudulent That were wise with the. You know the national fisk and things like that and so i think Really the way to think about a is starting with those sort of two things The services in that that That ladder sense of what i was talking about in this sort of their capabilities. Which is really where you wanna be with respect to law enforcement or military or other things and you want our capabilities to be more resilient. More robust into out compete Any potential Challenging nation state say to national security so those That's that's just the the the way i strongly advise doing that If only to ground the conversation. I and what does it return to do and accomplish. How do we best express our national values and And not start initially technology which i fear often begins with sort of a fear narrative right the idea of has been around for over a century. Here you know robots and things like that and it runs and jumps To the loss of control fear that we have the fear of the unknown fear the robots gonna take over our lives etc. That kind of thing. Which i i. Don't think at the end of things with a clear. Eyed look in with a cautious optimism. I think is is much more of the order of the day for this technology.

Federal Government Dr Tim Science Technology Assessment GAO RON America Kathleen TIM Us Park Service Congress
NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo accused by third woman of unwanted sexual advances

Doug Stephan

00:40 sec | Last month

NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo accused by third woman of unwanted sexual advances

"The governor of New York of unwanted advances. The state attorney general's office is investigating. And now some are calling for Andrew Cuomo to resign. ABC is Monaco, Sohrab. He has more. New York lawmaker Kathleen Rice is the first Democratic Congress to demand Cuomo step down. Tweeting quote. The time has come. The governor must resign. Hours earlier. New York Attorney General Leticia James announcer investigation into previous allegations of sexual harassment against the governor. 25 year old Charlotte Bennett says Cuomo made unwanted advances toward her last spring. The latest accuser says Cuomo asked to kiss her and touch her lower back moments after meeting her at a wedding in 2019. There are three covert

Sohrab Kathleen Rice New York Cuomo Andrew Cuomo Attorney General Leticia James Monaco ABC Charlotte Bennett Congress
Critics: Cuomo apology 'tone-deaf,' ignores power imbalance

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | Last month

Critics: Cuomo apology 'tone-deaf,' ignores power imbalance

"I'm Julie Walker a third woman is accusing governor Andrew Cuomo of unwanted advances after two former staffers say he sexually harassed them and his apologies being called tone deaf and a full apology and a rock who worked in the Obama White House and on Biden's campaign told The New York Times she met Cuomo at a wedding and had to remove his hand from her back her dress was backless she also says the governor planted an unwanted kiss on her cheek former staffer Shirley Bennett had also told the times he asked her about sex with older men Cuomo acknowledge some things he'd said had been misinterpreted as unwanted flirtation of that statement Bennett says he refused to acknowledge or take responsibility for his predatory behavior former staffer Lindsey Boylen was the first to accuse him of sexual harassment which he denies Long Island congresswoman Kathleen rice a fellow Democrat is calling for his resignation the state Attorney General is appointing an independent investigator Julie Walker New York

Julie Walker Cuomo Andrew Cuomo Shirley Bennett Biden White House The New York Times Lindsey Boylen Barack Obama The Times Bennett Kathleen Rice Long Island New York
Metro Atlanta's Fulton County board votes to remove elections director

Atlanta's Morning News

00:20 sec | Last month

Metro Atlanta's Fulton County board votes to remove elections director

"Blames Trump the Fulton County Elections Board fires its director Richard Baron, on a 32 votes airs in Inefficiencies Waste Taxpayersdollars. They undermined voter confidence. Republican Board member Kathleen Ruth votes to replace Baron No interim director is named. The county attorney is checking whether this vote is the last word. County Commission chair Robb Pitts doesn't

Fulton County Elections Board Richard Baron Republican Board Kathleen Ruth Baron County Commission Robb Pitts
New York PD to assign cops to deal with rash of scary subway crime

First Morning News

00:58 sec | Last month

New York PD to assign cops to deal with rash of scary subway crime

"Subway? The NYPD is going to send an extra 644 cops into the system after a serious of attack public can expect to see the surge of uniformed presence in the subway system for the foreseeable future. Patrolling platforms, securing entry ways and riding the trains as C NYPD Transit chief Kathleen O'Reilly. She says officers will be spread throughout the system with the emphasis on morning and evening rush. Number still short of the additional 1000 officers. The empty A asked for this. After weekend attacks left two people dead in there were two more subway attacks yesterday, perpetrated by different suspects. First about 6:50 A.m. 68 year old woman was punched in the back of the head by a man in his twenties that happened on the North bound a train platform, 125th Street and ST Nicholas Avenue. And then, just before noon, 71 year old Asian woman was punched in the face on a south bound train their 53rd and seventh. The victim believes that was a hate crime. Well as for Governor

Nypd Kathleen O'reilly
Do Produce-Saver Products Really Keep Food Fresh Longer?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

07:27 min | Last month

Do Produce-Saver Products Really Keep Food Fresh Longer?

"My friend gary rights. I've been seeing ads for products that claim to absorb ethylene which allows produce to last longer to these products. Work would baking soda or activated charcoal. Do the same thing. I think we've all had the disheartening experience of having to throw away expensive fruits and vegetables because we didn't use them up quickly enough. No one likes to waste money of course but there's even more at stake with food waste we throw away. Shocking percentage of the food that we produce which is especially tragic when you consider how many people around the world experience hunger on a daily basis hunger and food. Insecurity is not just an issue in developing nations here in the united states the richest nation in the world within ten percent of households typically struggle to put food on the table and that number has increased by sixty six percent just since the beginning of the covid nineteen pandemic right now. Fifty million americans including seventeen million children do not have enough to eat on a regular basis. No matter where you live if you are lucky enough as i have been to have weathered this year long crisis without worrying about whether you'd be able to feed yourself and your family. Perhaps you will join me in donating to your local food bank or an organization like feeding america dot org. And if you or someone you know is experiencing hunger or food insecurity. You don't have to go it alone if you are in the. Us feeding america dot org can help. Connect you with resources in your area. Food waste is also a major player in climate change. Rotting food is responsible for almost ten percent of greenhouse gas emissions globally. In fact if oud waste were country it would come in third after the united states and china in terms of impact on global warming and fresh produce about a third of all the food that we throw away all of which is to say if a ten dollar product can keep us from throwing away so much food it would be money well spent and i'm happy to report that there is some solid science to support them but their usefulness maybe just a bit more targeted than the marketing sometimes suggests ethylene is a harmless gas. That's released or exhaled if you will buy fruits and vegetables. In general ethylene. Production increases as fruits ripen. And turn accelerates the ripening process so when we put unripe fruit in paper bag the idea is to trap some of that ethylene. That's being given off by the produce and use it to hasten the ripening process this works especially well for apricots bananas mangoes tomatoes avocados and melons. They're all particularly sensitive to ethylene gas. But once fruit is ripe continued exposure to ethylene can cause the fruit to become overripe and start to rot. Ethylene can also speed the decline of other types of produce according to horticultural scientist kathleen brown of penn state university at the lean can cause carrots and parsnips to get bitter broccoli and kale to turn yellow cucumbers and summer squash to get soft and mushy asparagus to turn tough apples to get mealie and lettuce to wilt herbs such as parsley and mint are also particularly sensitive to ethylene gas now low temperatures across the board reduce plants sensitivity to at the lane so just keeping produce refrigerated will help to preserve it for example if your avocados get ripe before you need them. You can hold them for a few days by putting them in the fridge. I find it most effective to move them into the fridge when they're still maybe a day short of fully ripe because some ripening will continue in the fridge but it goes much more slowly in addition you can use something to absorb ethylene gas. Today's episode supported by hair food. Hair food believes in feeding your hair like you. Feed your body with simple clean and nourishing ingredients it. Produces the softest and silk strands. You can imagine hair. Food offers different collections for every hair type and feature like the nourishing collection infused with the essences of coconut milk and chai spice for soft and healthy strands. It nourishes while it cleanses leaving your hair silky smooth and you won't believe how good it smells. It's like a warm mug of coconut milk. Chai plus haircut is always free of sulfates parabens dyes and mineral oils. I know i always appreciate products. That do a great job in smell. Good while they're doing it. So if you wanna feed your hair. Delicious nourishing ingredients feed it hair food. All their products are under ten dollars. And you can find them at amazon walmart and zeolite is a complex of minerals including aluminum and silica. That's highly absorbent. It's used as drying agent to suck moisture out of the air. This is also the stuff that makes clumping cat litter work but it also absorbs ethylene. Gas zero lights are widely used by food growers shippers and retailers to extend the life of fruits and vegetables in transit by slowing down the ripening process produce saving products that you may have seen in the consumer marketplace such as the green produce bags or the hollow ball. That you place in the crisper drawer of your fridge contain zeolite. And they are effective at absorbing lean and they can prevent types of spoilage. The bags are reusable but they do eventually lose their effectiveness. You can also buy a rechargeable zeolite filled ball to place in your crisper drawer to absorb ethylene gas now. Gary also asked whether baking soda or activated charcoal might be effective at absorbing ethylene. I can't find any data to suggest that baking soda would be particularly useful here. Activated charcoal can absorb but not nearly as effectively as zeolite. Interestingly that rechargeable ball. it's called the blue. Apple contains both zeolite and activated charcoal but the manufacturer only talks about charcoal in their marketing. I wonder if they think that charcoal sounds more natural and therefore would be more appealing to consumers than something unfamiliar like zeolite but in terms of absorbing ethylene gas. I suspect it's the zeolite that's actually doing. The heavy lifting their the chuckle may also have some odor absorbing properties. Keeping your produce in special ethylene absorbing bags may indeed extend the shelf life. Keeping high at the lean producers particularly apples and avocados quarantined from your other produce can also help just remember that ethylene is only one thing that can shorten the life of your produce and ethylene absorbing bag isn't gonna prevent moldy berries or slimy lettuce for example. The best way to keep fruits and vegetables from going bad and going to waste is really to eat them up

United States Kathleen Brown Penn State University Gary China Walmart Amazon Apple
Interview With Ahmer Inam  And Mark Persaud At Pactera Edge

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:24 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Ahmer Inam And Mark Persaud At Pactera Edge

"We do have some great guests with us today. So we're really excited to have amer in phnom who's the chief. Ai officer and mark persaud. Who's the head of emerging experiences at pact-era edge. So welcome guys and thank you so much for joining us today but thank you got clean and wrong. Thank you for having in forward to this exciting conversation. We are to. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role at pact-era edge Kathleen i'll go ahead and start amazon up. I'm the chief a offers. Subtle factor edge. We are global solution and services firms that balance intelligent digital platforms using human center design as a cool concept in philosophy the hallway bill systems maya background. I've been in the space of a medal for essentially my entire career Having played with fairly early machine learning. And you'll eulex model for almost twenty years at this point To most recently. A factor edge. My journey has taken me to companies like fargo sonic automotive. Vw see nike can be solution and at the now. I pass it off to mark to introduce himself awesome. I've I'm the head of emerging experiences at a bacteria edge So i have the job of being able to look across different technologies whether that's a our and our in vr virtual reality immersive Or things like voice and conversational. I and understanding how a i can play a better role in the technologies or with the technology whether it's within or atop a different digital ecosystems for clients though. I personally have a lot of fun with that role in general just because it gives me the ability to see how we can create value for users of creative ways with technology is where we might not see very consumer or user friendly and i might add like one of the reason why this is such a differentiation. Headed what you're talking about. Even sent to city in is market. Ni- expedience must. Genie are working together. Cohesively issue the cool part of the conversation that will be having at the at the upcoming event with community and is about building and designing intelligent digital platforms that are built with humans entity the human in the mind and building them to drive adoption so that we can take a lot of these concepts that are explored in a typical machine learning ai. In women in an enterprise and then take them to an enterprise capability and the part of their journey. At least an odd philosophy is that it has to lead with human simplicity. Really great insight. We actually had a podcast not too long ago with chad moro. Who is the cto chief. Data officer at fulton bank and he actually made a great point about the human center city of systems especially of systems that depend on data because he was saying you know at the end of the day the data represents people represents what people are doing it represents their money represents their finances and those finances represent their retirement college savings. They're they're living right and you and you can never it's people's names treat data abstractly day. Sometimes it's really very critical and You know one of the great things. Of course you can. You mentioned that you'll be sharing a lot of these insights at our upcoming machine learning life cycle events so for our listeners. You may have heard this on previous episodes but of course if this is your first time We run these online free conferences. That are focused on some of the hottest topics. Ai machine learning and our objective is to help audience and help people take that next step and move their projects and forward We ran a huge data for ai. Conference back. In september twenty twenty twentieth thousands of attendees. It was amazing. Hundreds of of presenters actually well. Over one hundred plus presenters was was gigantic and we heard as people wanted to get that same sense of insight into what's happening with machine learning so we have the machine learning life cycle of that which talks about the full life cycle of machine learning from building the mall to managing an ops and govern insecurity and that is the live part of the event is january twenty sixth through twenty eight th twenty twenty one if you elect to register go to m. l. life cycle conference dot com. We'll have that in our show as well and Yeah we have some fantastic presenters in five topics and three tracks and our guest here. Terra their edge. They're they're actually doing. A session. called accelerating accelerate concept to value human centric design driven a lot of words there. There's a lot of terms of people may be familiar with some of them. They may not be. So maybe if you can. Can you give our listeners. A quick of what the session is about. And maybe some of the main questions and pain points that you're going to be addressing. Yeah thank you. Ron and actually just to right and it may come across as a laundry list of technical jargon and it's it's an i wanna make sure we can talk about it. In some of the audiences are going to be ingenious and audit back on both mock. You come from. Jean backgrounding ingenious with talking about the art of of humanity which the human centric design. What are we going to talk about. Is this first. Thing is gonna lay out the burning platform. We have seen the statistics enough data from gartner to idc that talks about the failures off a adoption. the data continues to show about eighty to ninety percent of machine learning data signs. Big data these initiatives famed to drive value. Because they're not getting adopted and if they're not getting a doctorate in driving value

Mark Persaud Fargo Sonic Automotive Amer Chad Moro Fulton Bank Human Center City Of Systems E Phnom Kathleen VW Amazon Nike Jean Backgrounding RON Gartner IDC
TV Dinners

Gastropod

08:38 min | 2 months ago

TV Dinners

"How has food. Tv changed over time. And how has it changed us. All not just us gastropod. That's right. you're listening to gastropod the podcast. That looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm cynthia graber. And i'm nicola twilley and this episode. We're taking a spin around the dial which sounds medieval but believe us when we say. Tv's used to not have remotes. You had to literally spin odile. Even i barely remember those wild and wonderful days. This episode is supported in part by cabot. Creamery cabot is a co-op of new england and new york dairy farmers who make award winning cheeses with pure rich milk straight from family farms their specialty cheeses include unique flavors like roasted garlic cheddar and their team of cheese graders indirect with every batch to ensure award-winning quality. Go to cabinet. She's dot com to find out where to buy cabot near you there. You'll also find pairings how to videos and delicious comfort food recipes like the best mac and cheese and more the first thing to know about the very earliest food. Tv wasn't actually on tv. It was on the radio almost as soon as a radio came into being in the nineteen twenties in the us food radio came into being. It was a really easy way for programs to be created because they were easy and cheap. They were obvious outlets for advertising for sponsorship for food products and appliances. So that's where we saw food before. Tv was even a twinkle in the eye. Kathleen collins is a librarian and professor at john jay college of criminal justice and she's the author of the book watching what we eat. The evolution of television cooking shows the stars of these very first food shows. Were hardly stars in today's cents. These radio shows were unglamorous. It was all teaching housewives. How to economize and optimize and generally do all their chores. Better one of the not remotely. Glamorous stars was a woman named and sammy who we can only imagine was supposed to be the wife of uncle sam which is kind of disturbing. She wasn't actually a person. It was a program delivered by an arm of the. Usda and the she was not just one person but several different actors around the country. Adopting regional accents similarly a figure. That's much more well known was betty crocker. She actually started on the radio and like aunt. Sammy was played by many different actresses and she was one of the first we. Could i guess call her one of the first cooking teachers in broadcasting And we have some fun you one for. You are cooking lessons. This week is on some new christmas cookies. And besides that with sending seven ethically recipes to order numbers of schools who had indicated that they want the wednesday menu ambassador. I hope you'll be sure to watch for them on. Sammy's show was called housekeepers. Chat and betty crocker's was the slightly more enticing cooking school of the air. That sounds as though it was all about meringues and souffles and all things fluffy which it decidedly was not and then the very first television station came into being in the nineteen twenties though at the time the technology was still super experimental and people did not have. Tv's in their homes yet. Even as late as nineteen fifty only nine percent of american homes had a tv set. Foot made the jump to tv before. Tv even made the jump to people's living rooms so more megan was thirst. Tv shafran her snapple titled Tv show was called suggestions for dishes to be prepared and cooked in fifteen minutes and that demonstrated single ring. Cookery back in hundred thirty six. This is julie smith. She's a food writer. And podcast and the author of a new book called taste and the tv chef and she's british so i will translate for her single ring. Cookery means the kind of thing you can make on just one burner in your bed. Sit which is british for a studio apartment. Thanks for the cross pen translation of my uses as well as my bizarre accident. True also interesting. Megan was doing this. Fifteen minute meal about eighty years. Before jamie oliver's tv show and book of the same title. We have a picture of her filming her show dressed in. What looks like a raincoat on our website. Glamour personified where was i but by the nineteen forties food. Tv show started showing up for real in the us to the shows were cheap to produce and they were sponsored by kitchen and food companies and they were pretty boring. It was a very practical probably rather dry and yet a lot of the airtime was filled with these programs in different markets around the country. These shows obviously targeted at women most. Tv's at the time. Were actually in public places rather than homes especially bars where there weren't a lot of housewives. There was a show actually the first national televised. Tv show was james beard and it started in the mid nineteen forties and despite everything i just said about how most of the tv shows and the radio shows were led by home. Economists james beard was not a home economist. He was a gourmet and he was really all about the food and so it was a little strange to have this show on. Tv in a bar being watched by men james beard was kind of a one off for a long time but still here we go right off the bat you can see a gender divide in food tv women were the ones who were proper and teaching viewers had cook the man a ormond. Just appreciate food for food. Food was a chore for women and a pleasure for men until the only lucas came along. So diani lucas. Like james beard was a bit of an anachronism. She was a cordon bleu trained chef. Who was born in. Britain came from a very artistically oriented family. Do you only had a restaurant and cooking school in new york and she treated the kitchen as her art studio. it was her serious creative outlet. Her recipes were complex and mostly french. And they took a lot of time to make she was also kind of a taskmaster her british accent and her scraped back hair and she did not cut corners. But kathleen says the. Tony did occasionally have a little sparkle in her eye. Like when she told viewers to use as much rama's they liked or needed in their cribs. Suzanne that show was on the evening and prime time and it ran from nineteen forty seven until nineteen fifty-six but she was kind of ahead of her time. I would not be surprised if many of your listeners have never heard of the oni lucas. She just came along at the wrong time for the public. Viewing audience at diani did have a big influence on one particularly important person. Julia child the french chef. I'm doolittle she was a california girl. She was not a spy for the cia before being cooking show guru as many people think she was a research assistant at the oh s the precursor to the cia but she was really one of these happy accidents. She married paul child who had a foreign service assignment. in france. They moved to france and she fell in love with food. And she got herself trained. You know at the core blows school which was really challenging as a woman and she just became. You know a master in nineteen sixty one. Julia published a book with two other. Women called mastering the art of french. Cooking it is eight home and that seven hundred fifty. Two page book provided the kick. That landed julia in front of millions of viewers happen was. Julia was doing the rounds promoting her book and she'd been invited onto a book show hosted by a local professor on w. g. b. h. Which is the boston public. Tv station and she decided she didn't want to just talk with the professor. She wanted to cook. She wanted to teach him how to make a proper french omelette. The professor wasn't a particularly skilled cook in this live tv cooking class but people wrote into the show after it aired. They called julia a hoot and the producer thought. Julia was incredibly well-spoken so gbh gave her her own show. It would eventually become the french chef. The show was a huge hit. It was on national. Tv for three decades and it not only made julia household name but it also kind of launched the modern era of food

Cynthia Graber Nicola Twilley Odile Creamery Cabot James Beard Kathleen Collins Betty Crocker Sammy Shafran John Jay College Of Criminal J Cabot Julie Smith New England New York Cabinet Usda Diani Lucas Jamie Oliver
Fed Holds Policy Steady as Economy Stumbles

Bloomberg Businessweek

02:51 min | 2 months ago

Fed Holds Policy Steady as Economy Stumbles

"Learn a bit more about what we got from the Fed, joining us. Kathleen Hays, Global economics and policy editor at Bloomberg News. She's here in our New York City bureau, along with Dave Wilson, stock cetera Bloomberg News on the remote access from New Jersey. So Kathleen, I feel like steady, she goes, We know pretty much what we expected from the Fed what we expected, and that's going to be very reassuring to the markets. Because there has been there been comments made in the last say two or three months by a handful of Fed officials that depending on the economy, they could see that that's starting to taper its bond purchases in the second half of this year. So what they said today I think, Let me grab another headline here. That is very important. The Fed repeats. His policy statement that it's buys its its bond buys will continue until quote substantial further progress and I'll add to that headline has been made because this is language. They've added recently to underscore that they want to see not just the moderating economy and job market they mentioned which were what you were just reading from the headlines. They want to see not just inflation, starting to move higher. They want to see inflation at 2% and above. They want to see Ah lot better job growth. They want to see claims coming down and Kathleen. They're willing to let it run a little bit of hot. We've heard this a lot from Jay Powell and company that because because they want to see and make sure that the economy gets back on a firm, two things here number one you got left around. Hot, I think is the idea to ever even have a chance in wrecked and you know where. To get inflation above 2% H e double toothpicks is there you go, baby. And then the second thing is, you know something they even added. It's a small thing, but it means a lot. I think when they said that the economy's path will depend significantly, they said, not just on the crown of fire itself, but also on progress with inoculations. That's another word for vaccinations, right? So they're very hopeful as many people are that the vaccine rollout will go quickly. When I spoke to Lord investors, President Clinton Kansas City Fed A couple Excuse me. Cleveland Fed Sorry, Loretta story yesterday on straight there you go on now two powerful women there don't want that. They're fed banks mixed up. But she said she thinks by the third quarter will have not full vaccination, but so much of the population will have it that that's why we're going to start seeing a really strong rebound. To the economy at the press conference, J pal, That's where two be listening for I think one more interesting thing I've been thinking about the last couple of days. If we start seeing that strong rebound, and there's all this like another, maybe $2 trillion of stimulus being debated, you know, one of you will have in the middle here is Janet Yellen and she has said Right now, you gotta act big. You gotta act now. But I think this is a very interesting question that Republicans will probably raise. Look over getting ready for a big rebound. Do we really need to spend that much now? I hope that's another question. A J. Pollock. It's asked today

FED Kathleen Hays Cetera Bloomberg News Kathleen Dave Wilson Jay Powell Bloomberg News New York City New Jersey President Clinton Loretta Kansas City Cleveland Janet Yellen J. Pollock
New strains of COVID swiftly moving through the US need careful watch, scientists say

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:41 min | 2 months ago

New strains of COVID swiftly moving through the US need careful watch, scientists say

"McCormick. It's the worst possible news for health experts that new covert variant is more dangerous than first thought. Here's correspondent Jennifer Keiper health officials are worried some of the new Corona virus variants that are spreading across the U. S, or not only more contagious but could make the current vaccines less effective. CBS is Dr Jon Lapook. He's new variants make it even more important for us to get as many people vaccinated. As quickly as possible to mention I'm just picked up pace so we can get this pandemic under control. Before these variants spread even further and become more of a problem. The CDC says masks should have at least two layers of fabric. The vaccine shortages are leaving many Americans wondering if their first shot will be effective Appointments for the second shot or hard to find. Gail Esposito lives in Georgia. I certainly would so a lot less stress. If I had a real date, the state's top health official, Kathleen to me, If you've gotten your vaccines by going to a health department, you will be able to get your second does. The CDC now says you could wait six weeks if necessary. Surgeon general nominee the vague Northeast, why should be steadily increasing and what I'm concerned about in particular, is making sure that we have enough distribution channel set up whether those air community vaccination centers, pharmacy chains that are ready to roll whether they're mobile units. They get the vaccine to hard to reach places. President Biden wants lawmakers to approve his covert proposals to help struggling Americans. American rescue plan would lift 12 Million Americans out of poverty and cut child poverty in half First lady Jill Biden toward a health center in Washington yesterday where she was told cancer patients aren't coming in for screenings because of the pandemic, she said. More needs to be done to improve broadband service. To increase telemedicine options. Chazz Pierce at Nashville's Memorial Hospital says a lot of their patients are setting up online doctor visits for Kevin 19 memorial actually had zero telemedicine visits. What's you know, covered? Get ramped up really sometime around April is when our telemedicine program really started taking off. Dr Rebecca Rose. Great telemedicine is here to stay. It's not going anywhere. The younger generation comes up, and there's more and more tech savvy I saving more more part of medicine with the latest on the impeachment process. Now, here's correspondent Tom Foti, former President Trump's second impeachment trial will start in the Senate on the eighth of February. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. I've spoken to Speaker Pelosi, who informed me that the articles will be delivered to the Senate on Monday, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell asked for the delay to give the former president time to prepare his case. Stocks finished the week mixed. This is CBS News.

Jennifer Keiper Dr Jon Lapook Gail Esposito CDC Mccormick President Biden U. CBS Chazz Pierce Nashville's Memorial Hospital Kathleen Jill Biden Georgia Dr Rebecca Rose Tom Foti Washington Cancer Kevin Senate Speaker Pelosi
Joe Biden marks start of presidency with flurry of executive orders

All In with Chris Hayes

01:09 min | 2 months ago

Joe Biden marks start of presidency with flurry of executive orders

"President biden has been in office for a little over thirty hours. He's already moving quickly. To erase the stain of his twice impeach predecessor yesterday biden ousted three trump appointees michael pack seal. The us agency for global media came under fire for pushing it. Really a corrupt pro-trump agenda with an organization that's supposed to be an actual reporting entity kathleen cranach or the director of the consumer financial protection bureau. Who critics say was more interested in protecting businesses and consumers and peter robb general counsel for the national labor relations. Board were union leaders. Say he actively worked against labor interest. Biden's also taking action overturn some of his predecessors most harmful policies he moved to suspend deportations for certain immigrants for one hundred days preserve the daca program protecting undocumented immigrants who came to the us as children president signed an executive order recommitting. The us the paris climate agreement cancelled the construction permit the keystone xl pipeline. Biden's top priorities fixing the responsible corona virus. He's already signed. At least ten executive orders directives to accelerate federal action including rejoining the world. Health organization require masks worn on all federal property

President Biden Michael Pack Us Agency For Global Media Kathleen Cranach Consumer Financial Protection Peter Robb National Labor Relations Biden United States Paris
Data and AI in the state of North Dakota, Interview with Dorman Bazzell, CDO of North Dakota

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:27 min | 3 months ago

Data and AI in the state of North Dakota, Interview with Dorman Bazzell, CDO of North Dakota

"Today with us. Our guest is dorman basell. Who is the chief data officer for the state of north dakota so high doormen and thanks for joining us today. Kathleen ron thank you for the opportunity. Either to hang out with you guys for a little bit. Yeah we'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role as the chief data officer for the state of north dakota. Sure sure well. Good morning everyone So my my background is You know went to college. Got a degree in computer science mathematics and then when often like everyone else When i lived in saint louis you. It was kind of a requirement. You had to work for mcdonnell. Douglas which is now boeing corporation. So did that for it. But but then after a while Got got involved in consulting and worked my way up through the Consulting ranked says developer and they as a project manager is the data architect the solution architect and then finally got into a position of driving business intelligence and analytics for a couple of large international consulting firms where ran their north america. Big data and the i practice And the great ride. A thoroughly enjoyed all of the things we did. I think we added a lot of value to Our customers which was private industry And had great teams Had a strong onshore team strong offshore kimes and delivered a lot of value. But i think two years ago Over two years ago. When i applied for this position as the chief data officer At first i really didn't want position Didn't like the idea of state government state government has has a bad connotation Of kind of a nine to five job And a people people who just weren't really motivated to To move the world change the world and my boss who i interviewed my off. Now the cio. Sean reilly Who i interviewed with his his final comment to me was well. I can't pay what you make today. But are you wanna paycheck or do want to change the world. And i had never thought about life that way. Never tried to change the world and So i decided to take on this opportunity This was the first chief data officer position for the state of north dakota so there were a lot of unknowns Certainly certainly my presence Was a bit chaotic for the organization. Because i came in with a completely different agenda and completely different way of looking at the world through the eyes of the pillars that are assigned a line to me which application development and automation. And the second pillar is data analytics data science artificial intelligence and had some very different opinions about those things. And how we might move those forward So as i became involved with this role i became an. I had made an assumption that every state had a chief data officer come to find out there are only twenty seven of us out of fifty states So it's it's an interesting It's an interesting mix of of individuals who are chief data officers and getting to know them is. It has been a really amazing opportunity because they have such a very backgrounds and they bring such such different perspectives to cheap date officer role I like to joke and tell people that the last thing i focus on data which is obviously not true but but my real focus is really around cultural change within the city physician and what that means in the context of not not necessarily data. Because i have to executives are on my team who Are just are just brilliant at running the operations and managing the two pillars within my organization.

North Dakota Dorman Basell Kathleen Ron Boeing Corporation Kimes Sean Reilly Saint Louis Mcdonnell Douglas North America
How the Pandemic Has Highlighted Our Need for Nature

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

02:30 min | 3 months ago

How the Pandemic Has Highlighted Our Need for Nature

"So let's get started. I have ten insights to share with you for the year to come. I'm calling are twenty twenty one. Slow flowers floral insights and industry forecast report in pursuit of nature. A you can understand. Why right as we enter. Twenty twenty one at least in the short term. Not much will feel different from the past months. And if there's anything we've learned since mid march of two thousand twenty. It's the essential and irreplaceable role of flowers and plants for our survival. And that's why. My outlook is deeply connected to humankind's pursuit of nature. And how floral entrepreneurs like you cannons should tap into and enhance that. Through your efforts. I learned about the term biofuel. Iaea in october of two thousand and nineteen when i interviewed tom. Pract and sarah dakin of grateful gardeners. Tom is a big advocate of by affiliate any opened my eyes to its relevance as we make personal and business decisions that impact our planet's survival. He discussed the definition when i interviewed him. But here it is again a to. Miriam webster a hypothetical human tendency to interact or be closely associated with other forms of life in nature by affiliate. Well all you have to do is read the headlines of twenty twenty to see a collective shift toward nature plants the environment and yes flowers. A recent article in the washington post caught my attention. The headline reads the isolation of the pandemic caused her to form a new an intense relationship to nature. She was hardly alone. It went on to say the benefits of being outdoors for your physical. Mental wellbeing are well documented but in this corona virus. They may be immeasurable then. I saw forbes headline reading nature is good for your mental health. Sometimes i'm not sure what that means. The university of washington showed this research dose of nature at home could help mental health wellbeing during covid nineteen. The report stated studies have proven that even the smallest bit of nature a single tree a small patch of flowers a house plant can generate health benefits wrote kathleen wolf a uw research social scientists in the school of environmental and forest sciences. She continues look closely in your neighborhood and the bit of nature. You may have taken for granted up until now may become the focus of your attention and help you feel better.

Pract Sarah Dakin Miriam Webster Iaea TOM The Washington Post University Of Washington Kathleen Wolf School Of Environmental And Fo
"k kathleen" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

05:26 min | 5 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"And websites she and her husband are the proud parents of four cats thor Hella and foster failures jude and Luke. Kathleen's I review kittens Kathleen I'd like to welcome you to the show. Thank you stacey. Glad to be here. So first and foremost, can you share with us a little bit about how you became passionate about cats will that started when I was a little girl we didn't have pets in our own households, but my aunt and uncle town didn't have human children but they had a dog and two cats and I loved visiting my aunt and uncle because I loved them. But I also loved being with the animals and I was particularly fascinated by the cats because. They're so independent and it was a big honor to get the cats to let me pet them and start purring. So it's been a lifelong fascination with cats and I was finally able to have cats of my own as an adult when I rescued a mother cat and kitten. So with that, you've got exposed to trap neuter return in two thousand ten who showed you or who taught you how to do trap. NEUTER and return, and also where did you become a believer in that practice is being the best practice for cats actually I had known about tr since about nine, hundred, ninety seven when I was working for Med scape dot com and I came across a scientific book about cat behavior, which was really rare in those days. There was very little science available to lay people, and that book taught me about kitten socialization and. So it was on my radar but I didn't need that information really until twenty ten when I found myself feeding a poor little hungry looking cat in front of an abandoned church near my neighborhood and I started feeding her and pretty soon I realized that she had about ten friends who also feeding and I figured none of these guys are spayed or neutered I better go online and find our workshop and I.

Kathleen jude stacey Luke
"k kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

03:36 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"That my opponent attempts to train reinvent himself for not going to work and that we need to all make sure everyone can see through. Those. Frankly political climber. Antics. So yeah. So appreciate any any help folks can provide. Our voters able to vote by mail in. Montana. So Montana in primary had the best of all possible worlds we voted by mail for longtime a high percentage of Montana NHS have chosen to vote by mail for years myself included. in the primary, the governor gave all the counties, the option to do an all. All Mail ballot election but required them to if they chose to do that to allow for in person voting. An ensure ensure that we still had same day registration. So so people could go to their courthouses. They were encouraged to vote by mail, but they could go they could. In person work through any ballot issues. The that occurred if their mail in ballot had been rejected, they could work through that with with a person. And then we could still you can still go the day off and and and register that day and vote. That's the in my mind the best of all possible worlds. I hope that the general will be the same way that all the counties did decide to to to do that in the primary and. There just been a letter sent by I can't remember how many counties basically asking the governor for the same thing villa general. So I'm hopeful that that's that's what we'll have. Is there anything else that you would like to make sure we talk about today? Just how important this election is it said I. think if I weren't doing this, I'd be wearing a hole in my rug pacing in front of the TV just being so frustrated and. And and terrified for our country. Really. So I'm running to be that that true representative that that cuts through the hyper partisanship and focuses on policy and and solutions and. We need. That's what we need. We need people that are that are not in it for personal gain or or partisan ichthyologist we need. We need solution getters and we need people that are practical and and work well with with others and and know how to find. Common interests in unique areas this country. has is so incredible, my father. Fought for it in. World War. Two. And we need to get back to what makes this country song credible. So I look forward to to during that. Kathleen, thank you so much for speaking with me. Today will put a link to your website and your social media up on our website when we post the episode so that people can find you and I hope that they will help with a campaign like I mentioned at the top yours. So close in two thousand, eighteen, I really think this is the we ran out of time. We'll thank you colleagues, I appreciate the opportunity to be on your show and thanks for thanks for what you do from one garage. I snack you..

Montana Kathleen NHS representative
"k kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:59 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Their premiums that Congress had committed to under the ACA protecting the affordable care act that has been so important elements that have been so important to people like protection for pre existing conditions and. The ability to do the expanded Medicaid that we did in Montana, I honored to be part of that. Ensuring that mental health is part of any comprehensive policies associated with with healthcare just making sure that we. Fix this inefficient system that we've got there's all kinds of countries that are doing it better than we are, and we need leaders on this topic. So I'm looking forward to being matt. Leader. As Kobe hit Montana very hard You know I live in Chicago where it's very densely populated and a know what the spread of the pandemic looks like here. But what does that look like in a place like Montana so To other states, we are doing fairly well but of course, every illness in every death is. Is a tragedy and we we have a statewide mask order in place. And we took action. Early and then opened up carefully that said, we are a destination for so many people and when you go to trail heads and. Parking lots. There are incredible number of out of state plates. So we're encouraging people to to be smart and protect their neighbors season and And and our campaign has been again providing leadership on this issue from the very beginning and we put up A. Resource page on our website and continue to update that on. You know where you could get help and. Encouraging people to reach out to to those feeling isolated. We continue to update that I was calling for a coordinated testing program between state federal state and local back in near the end of February and early March at as well as p. p and making sure that the. Relief programs for businesses and others have the transparency we needed to make sure that. That tax dollars you know Montana's and others hard earned. Income that they that they provide for the federal government where we're going to the right places that we knew it was going and so again, we've got a guy in the seat that you would. You wouldn't even know was there because we're just not hearing any kind of leadership or any kind of strategy or any kind of. Communication really from the seat warmer in this in this seat that that really Montana's deserve they they deserve. A higher standard for that office and a higher standard for use in it and I look forward to to being that higher standard. Noted that you've worked in resource management, the current administration of course has done a ton to really essentially destroy the environment to roll back protections. What are things that you think the federal government and Congress in particular should be doing could be doing to to protect the environment to make sure that we're protecting that land and scion water in Montana. Well I'll tell you. We need to not elect my opponent. He has advocated for transferring public land that was one of his top priorities when he ran for this office before. So he wants to industrialize are public lands he he's all about. Getting, much income out of them as as possible and. We get a lot of income out of them right now because businesses and people are moving here and spending their dollars here traveling here because of our our public land that are not industrialized. The way we protect them is to is to elect a champion for our outdoor heritage myself and not my opponent and his economic plan involves, which is by the way just pulled off a shelf of one of his right-wing. Funding Groups much of it is also has a significant permanent regulatory rollbacks. So any regulation That doesn't speak. Directly to safety. He thinks should be roll back. And some of those are businesses that are have impact on the environment. You know we've given them discharge permits to to discharge into rivers and streams. They wouldn't have to monitor their their discharges anymore I mean so he would. He would. He would destroy what makes Montana special and and do it in the name of short-term prophets and and that's that's not that's not leadership. That's not what Montana's want is attach. It's A. It's an east coast developer against East Coast. Coming here and and Putting his. Is Values atop estate that he doesn't understand. So that's how. That's the very direct way of how we protect our public lands. If I- listeners would like to help out your campaign, what are some ways they can do that? Well, there's lots of ways said, again, the website is Kathleen. FOUR MONTANA DOT com. In a pandemic like this, it is I can't get out or we're not getting out. So I can't talk to one, hundred, hundred and fifty people all at once I have to check to people one on one by one by one and so. certainly, contributions are helpful. There's a there's a big red donate button am on a on the webpage, but also people that are willing to talk to their networks to encourage additional contributions and spreading the word we have people out of state that are that are making phone calls for us to to Montana's. People that know me that that have moved but you know the more volunteers we have the better and. With everyone going virtual now even volunteers can can be virtual. So as so there's there's lots of ways a to help us spread the word we've got some great videos even my dog has her own ad which has been incredibly popular but but people letting their friends know that Montana is in play and we can. We can win this each if we've got enough people talking it up and.

Montana federal government Congress ACA Kobe Chicago East Coast developer Kathleen
"k kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

09:00 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"This is Kelly and I'm speaking today with Kathleen Williams who is running for Congress in the at large district in Montana. I Kathleen. Kelly grigsby with you. Yes a great to talk to you. I was really rooting you on in twenty eighteen and you came so close to winning and I think twenty twenty. You're really GONNA get it over the finish line here. So tell me a little bit about your background and while you're running for Congress. So I a three term state legislator I've got a thirty seven year career in Natural Resources Conservation my specialty has been in water, which means that I've spent a really long time bringing really diverse people together on issues that that cut very deeply into culture in economics and. Family and heritage and really finding win win win solutions and that's great background for my legislative work at and also I think for Congress and personally I'm the daughter of a World War Two veteran and my mother was from Blue Jacket Oklahoma, she left there at age eighteen to go west to work in the Navy shipyard sin. and. My upbringing has been about her was about Hard work and making your own way and. And so I've I've to reflect those values in my life in and I. Think I think they've served me well as I built my career and am now turning to seeing if I could be helpful in Congress. So the reason I'm running is Because I think. I think Montana's. Our desire. and. Deserve a true independent Voice Congress. I. Think True Representation is is few and far between it's it's rooted in. Montana's hope struggles and dreams and and someone that will put the hyper partisanship aside and work with people of all political stripes on solutions for Montana and and the country and not not be beholden to special interests. So. It's about results and not playing politics. So I think you're starting to get at the answer to this question, but I find Montana's such an interesting state. Think people think of Montana as a very red republican state, but Montana has a history. Of. has a has a history of supporting Democrats. There's a Democratic senator right now there have been democratic governors. So how you make sure that you are connecting with the people of Montana an hearing what it is that they care about in a place that may be as in so defined by party lines. Montana for many reasons is known as the last best place. Frankly I. Think it's also one of the last best places for politics. I don't know if I'd be in politics if it weren't in Montana. Because people still vote for the person here they vote for someone who they identify with who they think represents values and they don't hours vote straight party line. So they they are notorious ticket splitters and one of the examples of that is in two thousand sixteen when trump won this state by twenty points, we also elected a democratic governor we we have a democratic senior senator. And one of the other aspects about Montana the Montana elected the first. Female member of any LEGIS national legislating body in the entire world in nineteen. Before women. Broadly had even could vote so. So, Montana's a pretty incredible place for lots of reasons. A lot of it is is that the politics are about their about real sayings, not just partisanship and party lines and and partisan game. So so that that's I think part of what makes Montana different and and they're proud I think proud of being ticket splitters and and they've got a strategy in mind when they voted I know I'm one of them so it's it's a great place to run. So we knew something about what the issues are. That are important nationally. But what are the issues that are really driving the people of Montana right now so I've built my platform from listening to Montanes could seventy five thousand miles on my car between the last campaign and when the pandemic took off traveling every corner of of this one, hundred, forty, seven, thousand, square mile stage and what they're telling me. Is that number one a they wanna fix to this patchwork of in healthcare system. We've got it's it's too expensive. It doesn't work hits you complicated they. They also want to make sure that everyone has opportunity to craft and pursue their own American dream, and and then also the third big priority that Montana's tell me is ensuring that we protect our incredible outdoor heritage chart are clean air and water public lands. That is it cuts to the core of Montana's is our ability to get outside and enjoy what makes Montana Montana. So I imagine, Montana's an interesting place to campaign anyway being such an enormous state and the Congressional district taking up the entire state but then. Campaigning right now during a pandemic is is even a different thing altogether. So what what does that look like right now how is campaigning in two thousand and twenty different for you than competing in two thousand eighteen Two thousand eighteen we throughout the playbook that that encourages people to refer candidates to focus on the the big seven, meaning our our our our muster urban areas, and and I just got in my truck camper with my dog and and a staffer, and we drove all over Montana and and talk to people in their communities over. Over their kitchen tables or in their local cafes about what was important to them and and with seventy five thousand miles again on. On the vehicles between that campaign and the beginning of this one. So. So that's how you campaign. It's very different. Now, we're doing a lot of the same things we did last time. So we're being very strategic on social media, and of course, doing television and radio ads and mail and all the normal parts of the campaign. But the real thing that's different is is my inability to get out physically to tack to Montana, and so I am making a lot of phone calls and I'm calling people and asking them what they care about in how I can be helpful and so luckily, we did that traveling in the past because people remember that they're like, Oh yeah. She's the one that will talk to anyone and that that reputation. Persists and precedes me and and and I think I. Think we built a great foundation that we're? That we're sprinting from now and and it's going to serve. US Well. You mentioned healthcare is an important issue. Healthcare was already a very important issue in twenty eighteen. But now in the midst of the pandemic is increasingly important. What are some things that you would like to see Congress doing to improve healthcare in this country? So I mean I just have to start out by saying everyone deserves access to quality affordable healthcare we've. We've been saying that for for years now, and we've got to get there as a country and healthcare. The healthcare issue is is personal for me. When I was eleven, my mother started to lose your memory in turned out that that was early onset Alzheimer's and and my dad, and I became her caregivers for eight years until she passed away and so. I know when a healthcare crisis can do to a family and hand it's tough. So I've worked on healthcare issues. In, the legislature despite having a career in natural resources healthcare was one of my priorities and the economy was where my priorities in the in the legislature because that's what people were telling me. They needed so. So I. AM proud to have advanced and pass legislation that that saving lives that's that's increasing that access and affordability of healthcare. So, we we need a leader that can do that in Congress and has a history of doing that. Now..

Montana Congress senator Kelly grigsby Voice Congress Kathleen Williams Natural Resources Conservation Alzheimer US trump Blue Jacket Oklahoma Montanes
"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:31 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"This should be working toward peace if everyone could understand that in come forward with that and I think we have a good chance but otherwise, we'll just repeat the same mistakes and we've done that in some instances in other ways so. As you say that I'm thinking of the families separated at our southern border, the kids in cages I mean all that's not a was not a war, but it's almost kind of being talked as an invasion right and and so there's there are parallels here that. I think some of the news media have been trying to put the human face, the family's. Not Spin, but but framing on on this issue right and and I think it is important that we see this impacting real people, rural children, real moms, and dads like how would you be thinking feeling? You know if this was this was happening to you and your family so that? Timeless message it's. It's something that always needs to be put out there I think the first. Trick is to dehumanize the opponent the adversary. So. It doesn't register whether it's slave enslaving them or you know genocide or what have you so thank you so much for for taking the time to get your mom to talk about this. Unsure. It was very healing for her before she passed away and for now putting it into this book if People WanNa, get this book. Yes, any any way that they can do that and do you have a website? They can they follow kind of your speech what have you in maybe if you're going to be speaking I, don't know in person virtually in their area that they could find out about these things. Absolutely, I have a website it's www dot kathleen birkenshaw dot com. Also. They'll be linked to my blog post, which also discussed when I'm doing various events Also, if you WANNA purchase my book, it's wherever books are sold right now the hard copy is sold out. So they have the better they are right now and yes and You can also order preorder the paperback which is coming out at August twenty fifth that will be available and what about teachers Teachers out there I'm sure there are who are in our listenership. They're they're now wanting to use this book in a classroom setting. Off. They're also curricular materials that go along with it or is this kind of center? I do have a discussion guide and there are ways that people have used it for language arts as well as social studies. As well, from other schools and you can also get the book through scholastic as well through their we need diverse books club and trying to think. So if they want to go to the website and there's also information about the events, my virtual visits, how those can be set up and to kind of go from there. So. I hope that they'll enjoy if they do pick up the ball. I'm sure that they will thank you again for who you are and what you're doing. Definitely, want to see you get healthier and. You know more Mobile I. Think you shown so much courage and Just, I think brilliants in in doing what you've done in making your mom story. So so accessible to so many people and I share your Ardour to see peacemaking as as definitely an obsession of everybody on this planet. Nobody nobody benefits from war. factly. Exactly. Thank you so very much for your kind words. Thank you. You're welcome and again folks My guess has been Kathleen Birkenshaw and She has written this book that I think a lot of us. Now are GonNa WanNa, get into read and to pass along, and again I want to encourage those in a in a classroom situation This is A. A way to tell this terrible chapter of our our history in a way that I think especially younger people will be able to identify with why this is horrific and should never happen again it's it's horrible that it happened at all but you know, let's let's learn from this and I hope that there are many more trees planted around the world. With little plaques, you know explaining that some things have survived just like your mom and lived to tell the story of learn from our pain learn from our suffering. This should not happen to anybody else. Absolutely absolutely. Well. Thank you again. Kathleen and look forward to seeing the paperback copy of your become out so that even more people can get it. Yes. Thank you. Yes and the United Nations has named it a education resource for teachers and students as well. So. We'll thanks for just inserting that at the very end that that's a great honor. Good for you. All right. Yeah and you you stay safe and rest up and Hopefully, we'll meet in person someday. I would love that. Thank you so very much for all that you do and to get the information for all Asian Americans. Thank you. Oh, you're welcome..

Kathleen Birkenshaw WanNa United Nations
"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:25 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"That was just that touched me. And then on the Other side of it is I visited Oak Ridge Tennessee last year and When I invited there by the schools I was nominated for their school award. Open Tennessee is one of the Manhattan project. site. Now I've heard of it. Yeah. Yes. Now, I didn't really dawn on me right away now I heard a Manhattan project, but I always thought of it out in you know in the Off Washington in the other in New York City. But I forgot that it happened there will actually oakridge site is where they enrich the uranium for the actual bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. And so I remember thinking, how is this going to go? You. Know I I didn't know how they would receive me and the story and but the more that I thought about it. Is when I tell this story, it's it's not for an US versus them it's it's I wanted to let them know that I respected everything that the people at Oakridge did but their patriotic duty to try to end the war I you know we have people in our family that were in World War Two a lot specked with that but I also feel then that telling this story of what my mother went through hit Shema also has A. Place to be told as well, and it's not through a lens of an American or Japanese twelve year old girl, and they were so wonderful in receptive to me and a lot of them had family that worked. K.. twenty-five the plants that job over there and you know they said that they can see the other side as well. You know and now you know now that they know that we should never do nuclear weapons again and it was really. It was very, it was an. Time for me to be there in into here, the students talk that way in the teachers in in how they were. So receptive to realize that we can coexist Poe stories can be told and I feel that that's so important because a lot of times you know when my mom my mom said once just one time she tried to talk to a therapist about what she's going through the therapists said to her well you know they did bomb Pearl Harbor. In it's like. It shouldn't. It shouldn't be either or they're both horrible horrible things. But to be able to talk about both did not say will because A. B. I mean if that's not how it should go each, each event should be looked at on its own in in what happened in. So, I feel that when I met with them, you know that messages is being understood because I really feel you know those kids that were talking about that cool mushroom picture class they were doing it to be mean they were just didn't understand. You know they know what story was even have that connection and I think in by being able to bring out of the humanity. I'm hoping that because especially today one of my messages is you know the ones that we might think of our our enemy or don't belong there not always. So different from ourselves, and I'm hoping that maybe in some way that can help them with especially the way things are today. In in seeing people as people in human beings, not just them over there or. Yeah I was. Kind of setting on my last question which is has has there been some criticism some pushback from. Veterans or or Survivors of veterans who died in the you know trying to you Jima you know or guava canal. That we started with this Kathleen like well, you don't underst-. You know you're you're. You're you're miss communicating. Why we had to do that, you know it was it was to save American lives by bringing the war to an end I mean have you received any of that kind of stuff and then if so how you responded to that? I have to say that I have been very lucky. I have not now if there's any comments that they leave on Amazon or whatever I don't read those smart. So, but I have been in rooms presenting where there have been veterans I have fought. In World War Two and I do worry because I don't want them to think that I don't respect what they did in that I'm doing it for blame but afterwards, I, did have one person who came up to me he said. You know. You presented it of what happened to a family to people. You know an any said it wasn't saying that because I didn't vilify anyone at the. The whole book is not political. It's a matter of knowing this is what can happen and he appreciated that as he felt that. US in a way to was also respected because it wasn't one big hole. They shouldn't have done this Y. and Z.. And so he was really happy that telling the store he learned more. And I've also gotten letters from people whose fathers were in war to end on, they read my book and it gave them a new way of looking at things. So You know my dad was very nervous about doing this. You really was as he really thought that I would get a lot of anger and but I'm glad to say that you know so far. I've been very lucky that I have not people have been very wonderful about accepting this story. So I hope it continues. Yeah and I think it's because you made it. So personal you you made it. So human you put real lives into the into the event. You know that sounds like the whole the whole point of your writing this fictionalized history through the eyes and experience of a twelve year old. This being the seventy fifth marking how about that The anniversary of the dropping of the those two atomic bombs. The first week of August nineteen, forty five. What? I give you the last word here Kathy what do you want our listeners to know that we should be thinking right now as as this seventy five years since this first and only time of using atomic weapons. I think when we look back and we think how does something that happened seventy five years ago even matter today and I feel that you know the time passes our technology will change. But the need for the human connection as human beings our emotions that is timeless. And I think if we can keep these voices being heard in knowing what happened not for blaming anyone my mom always said the war was hellish for both sides but to understand that no family. Should ever go through something like that again. And I I feel that. That is the main thing of keeping that connection in knowing that there's humanity on the other side. There's humanity under those now famous mushroom clouds..

Manhattan US Tennessee Oak Ridge Tennessee oakridge site Pearl Harbor Oakridge New York City Hiroshima Washington Amazon Kathy Kathleen Shema A. Place
"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

09:32 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Yeah, I always question that as well. and. My mom would also say it will she had hoped to. She's like there should be peace now. Right? You know I mean that that was her thinking in. So to unify this way, she thought you know she didn't see that it was so horrible because she just felt there could be peace between the countries. Now there should be peace between us as people on the Japanese and Americans, and she thought that with me being both it would be a great way to kind of show that we can all coexist And didn't really turn out exactly the way that she thought it was going to you know with those Kinda of feelings and But she said she you know she never regretted. By having me in getting my daughter associate felt that it was definitely worth all that she went through in all the loss that she had dealt with that. She at least was able to find something on the other side. So. Yeah. I mean even the whole point of come coming. So quickly to America with her husband. So, quickly becoming an American citizen stripping all of the Japanese artifacts from your your living environment. It just boggles my mind right that that It's not that long after the conflict and the terrible bombing, and yet she's able to make that. Switch. I think a lot of it was probably sort of that mental switch to just kinda suppress it all into pretend that it's not there because she she said that you know the first few years after the bombing she spent a lot of time with depression and thinking that she would herself in dangerous situations just to see if she'd lived through them. Because she really did not understand why she was still there. So she had to finally eventually figure out if she was going to move forward, she just had to carry stuff. And I think that's what she tried to do. She thought well, maybe this is the best way that I can vary it always to totally change. Now, the woman I knew as my grandmother didn't understand when she came to visit didn't see anything the only Japanese thing was the way that she kept trying. To her papa that thing and she didn't understand. My Mom Japanese food once in a while but other than that and she said, how can how can you do this? You're not teaching her anything about Japan on. She was very, very upset and you know when you're as I was growing up I really didn't see that side of my Japanese culture wasn't really until when I had my daughter that I really started looking into it and realizing you know that I could mix both you know I think when I was growing up my mom Kinda felt it was all or nothing you know I think so and but then I realized you can still have your Japanese side. You're you can still on have that heritage in pay to without dishonoring your American sign you know I always thought it was either or but it doesn't have to be. and I think that that was a wonderful thing to finally get to know on as I was writing the book trying to talk to my mom about that. I think she saw that too because she started. Even when she came to the states the another thing that happened is they said that her name was too difficult to say. So they gave her an American. Her name was Toshiko which I didn't think was that difficult to stay. You can toast you just exactly right such a pretty name but they said, we're GONNA call you we're gonNA call you betty. And I'm like from the flintstones. But So she went with that and again as a child, I thought her name was Elizabeth or betty because that's what everybody called her She Kinda, let that happen in. You know maybe she had other reasons that she didn't divulge to why she let all that happen but you know what she did say was that I felt Muller Right? If I become somebody else maybe the pain will go and I can just. Start here in an NBA with you in do that But later on, she realizes you can only hold it down for so long and it you know it come back offer her but she started to use Toshiko after my daughter was born she is that a which people you know and she would talk to more about traditions, and so I try to do some with my own daughter and then when I was researching for the book I learned even more. So it's been a a wonderful thing in my daughter ended up minoring in Japanese at college and she spent a semester in Tokyo at college took international there. So she really got a flavor living in Japan. And she has been wonderful advocate along with me for nuclear weapons. She spearheaded this. Fundraising at school so that we could bring a sapling that was grown from seed of a a-bomb survivor trie. Man. To planted and there is a an entity called green legacy hitter Shema, which is part of the United Nations, and what they do is they collect those seeds and they plant them all over the world as a sign of peace, and so I told my daughter about this and she wanted to do this at her college because she was minoring Japanese hid Japanese professor but also it was the one holiday that my mom bet to tour with her, and so she figured while she had seen this and so we can plant it. You know they chose to do it near the ED building so that when people walk by, they can read the plaque and understand, and so she's been a big piece of this This whole journey of trying to bring it through and to to to get that does story out there. In some way shape and form for the younger generation for her generation too. So that's that's marvelous You know I think people who actually go through war and some of the terrible atrocities and I can't think of a worse atrocity than atomic bomb being dropped on your city Yeah. I think the the more they die out Then, people tend to glorify things like that because they've never actually suffered through it. Whichever War I I. Even I think I've read somewhere that the the crew that dropped the bomb of the of the a Nola gay I mean they have lots of problems later on in life. and. So you know the fact that it's now the third generation that your daughter has to taken up the peace clause When we went to, we brought our daughter when she was still kinda teenager to Hiroshima and wait we went through the whole experience, my wife and I had gone through that before but we wondered our daughter to actually. Be there in in a sense and. One of the pictures that I I made a photo book of that trip. One of the pictures that I really cherish and hope she does too is there was someone working as a volunteer near the Dome had survived and he was teaching tourists how to fold paper cranes, right? Two, thousand crane thing and You know she. So she jumped in there. No, she got involved and then I have a picture of her holding her crane kind of in close up with the Dome in the background. So our home. And it's just like we we. We can't Redo history, but we mustn't forget it either and and I think it's wonderful. What has been the response you can give us some some anecdotes of students to your fictionalized history of your mom's experience and and this whole effort to. Get people to come together and say this should never happen again to anybody what's been, what are some stories of the response to your sharing this? It has been an amazing journey with that 'cause. My my thing is is that I wanna be able to show that connection to the students and see if they can understand The reasons behind of the book in what I was talking about with my mom and I had a student come up to me at one point in say you know I really didn't know much about what happened over there I didn't really think of it happening to people you know home and but now that I know we should use these again and then there'll be some also that will come up and when I was able to do face up in person visits and they'll hug me and they'll just say you know we wish we could thank your mom you know for for this story and. I had met this young girl who came up to have your signed and I asked her name to make it out to her in. She said, it's Kate will she says it's not really kate it's actually Katharina but I can't use that name anymore. Okay and she said, you know we had to come from another country and it's been very difficult in you know with your mom losing her Popeye really identified I asked her. She had lost someone in your family I've lost so many people in my family she was from one of the eastern bloc countries and she said, but your mother, it gives me hope. In inspires me because of that and..

Toshiko Japan depression America NBA Hiroshima Kate Muller Tokyo United Nations Nola Shema Katharina Elizabeth professor betty
"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

08:42 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Did a lot of times feel you know she said to me when I was in the hospital did you get the blood clot because of me and I said, no, they're not really sure why got it but it's not that in you know I'd still couldn't tell her because she was so worried and I, it would hurt her you know on I didn't want her to feel responsible. She always worried about me being sick and I just couldn't do that. So. No, you said. You have a daughter. Yes I do. Okay. So I'm I'm guessing your daughter's read the book I'm guessing that you have had much more frank conversations with her about her grandma and what she went through are are you ever have you ever been concerned that then your daughter would start kind of carrying kind of like your mom didn't want you to worry and then you know your daughter is actually seen you get sick she seen you using a cane and. I mean both entre. You've done some research. How many generations might this? Radiation Damage Travel and. How do you manage that with your child now? You know it is kind of. Difficult although I do have that the fact that you know my husband he's he's from the states. So he he's not Japanese. He doesn't have any of that and I feel that she's got since she has fifty percent of his DNA. She's She's probably much better shot in in sometimes I have could be Pass down but not necessarily. So she's been pretty healthy. A heck of a lot healthier than I ever was growing up. Her immune system is very good very concerned without when she was born taking her to pediatricians just making sure and but I know that she does worry she does see what I go through. There are days when I have a therapist, I can't leave my bed when I So I knew that does concern her and she sees it more She's home during the pandemic. Of when she was away at college she didn't see much but things start to go a little bit downhill from where I used to be, and it does make it hard or her for that. But. In a, she really has been wonderful in that support and she really was great like when I was writing the book she was twelve thirteen. So I needed someone to Kinda alright I'm thinking of what I was twelve and feel this way but does this make sense? Would you feel that way? You know just trying to get a feel for it and you? Know she was by first reader I mom Thankfully, she had read one of the drafts I didn't get my publishing contract until November of two, thousand, fourteen. So she knew it was going to be published. I remember being able to take her to her and she had this some little shrine where the picture her Papua's in. So she put the contract Mo.. So, he could see it. You know on Inda, but she passed away a few months later. So it was very bittersweet when the book came out because she had been gone but at least she had an idea on what was going to be written and she was one of my worst editors because the way she didn't filter anything. So if I didn't write something. That would be. Home but I I was very glad that I could do that in You know she invents share with me more moments that were also happy as well as just what happened in in the horror of that day. So that was. It was a nice I think bonding or the two of us or that did your mom talk at all when she eventually met the man who's going to marry her. How did how did this? Come up or not come up I mean, did she say him from Tokyo? Did he apparently, if he knew he, he wasn't bothered obviously. When my mom was Outta high school. Now, she was very angry about what happened. She said you know the people in Japan were also they also had been at war for so long they wanted to rebuild their lives. They didn't like that they lost, but they needed to try to move on. But so she said she was not a violent person. So her way of getting back at the Americans was dating the soldiers and in breaking their hearts poker thing. Interesting. So she didn't get very far because they want my dad she fell in love in that was the end of that but she told him some of it but not right away. because she felt that he should know because since he was a serviceman, he was in the Air Force, he was stationed. At Johnson Air Base near Tokyo. So she did tell him some of that but then she really still didn't WanNa talk about it much. So he had an idea. and. People were very happy with her that she was going over to America and She had did Kinda deal with people that she grew grew to feel like we're family to be upset with her you know could you go with an American in the move to the states and she was felt while you can't help who you love and? he was going back to the states is time was over and she was going to go with him and but I think though she said to me later when she came to the states, she realized it. Was a difficult decision that she made. Maybe she shouldn't have because she didn't expect all the prejudice. Especially there was some from my dad's own family at railway. and. She was surprised at the type of racial slurs show she was determined to learn English to speak better she knew some English but she needed to end. She decided to become a US citizen within five years of coming to the states. and. When I was born in sixty nine She what she called Americanized our home. There was really not much Japanese of anything in the House. She didn't teach me Japanese she sang some Japanese lullabies would tell me folktales but she really didn't do very much of that 'cause she was really afraid that when I went to school, she wanted them to see me as a straight American in Unfortunately well, I don't think it's unfortunate but I looked very Asian had very Japanese as a child especially so they knew. And they were not very kind and they weren't very kind about my mom and you know when they would say you should go back to your country. I didn't understand what that meant. I was born here I don't understand a net means. In there was just a lot to have to deal with because I was one of the very few as for the first few years of the school. There were no other Asians there until I was in fourth grade and then art community where was this? This was in Rhode Island okay okay. Rhode. Island. Yes at which by the way still was celebrating it as vj day on. which they're the last ones to still have that sound but it was very difficult. There were no Asians in our community and my mom had said later she wishes she would went to California because it would have been more. Daphne's. That, she could probably felt more comfortable with. So it was very difficult for her to to actually come here. But of course, she was never going to admit that to the people back in Japan shoes too stubborn. But it was very interesting of how she had to kind of push yourself through whatever prejudice was happening in to her then in a new country thinking that maybe she could have reinvented herself with no, that's not going to happen. While I'm trying to understand your mom's mindset a little bit more because obviously huge anger towards. Americans for doing this to her and her country, you know wiping out her family. Then it kind of. Somewhat flows logically that. She's even trying to American servicemen, hearts team that to me is almost a bridge too far that she would even want to get involved with them but you know it's like a plot of a movie where where she has. Yeah, just leading them on in order to. Get back at them but. Ultimately either either she didn't see this coming. But for her than to marry someone wearing the uniform of the country that dropped his these two bombs. That just blows my mind..

Japan Tokyo Johnson Air Base Inda Rhode Island Rhode US Papua Mo America Daphne California
"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:16 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Well, that morning on August six, it was a Monday and as she had been sick over the weekend and so her Papa said, you can stay home today tomorrow join your classmates now Oliver. Classmates. Were in the center of town and they were taking down all the wooden buildings because of the previous firebombs in. March forty five in Tokyo they figured while we take these down. If they use a firebomb, are see will burn his quickly. So her classmates were all in the center town that day and her papa usually worked from home he had his own local newspaper company in the center town so he'd work from home in the morning and then In the afternoon he'd go into his office that day he was going early because one of his employees had an injured son that was in another part of Japan. Eh needed a train ticket and her papa still had some money was able to get a ticket for him. So that put him in the center of town at eight fifteen at warning. Now, my mom was outside at that point talking with her best friend her best friend was a couple years older than her. So she wasn't with the other classmates and as they were talking, my mother remembers hearing a plane, but it was a weather plane. So she wasn't worried and then she heard another plane. And she said immediately, the hair rose on the back of her neck and then she all of a sudden saw this bright white light allowed popping noise and she the last she remembers is grabbing onto her friend and screaming it felt like there was an earthquake. Alot them. And the next time she woke up, she was covered in debris from the building they were standing next to from one of the houses she was no longer right next to her friend, but she could hear her and she was trying to dig through to get to her but the more she dug the more pieces of cement would fell on top of her. And she said, she sat there for she has know how long. But then she heard her name being called on the outside in it was her stepmother hauling for her and telling her you know dig from where you are out Dick from the outside and we'll be able to have you crawl out and my mom was saying I don't WanNA leave my friend didn't she said well, if you come out, we can dig faster both on the outside so. My mom decided to try it when she did crawl through this whole, she remembers looking up. And she said, you know the sky was this shade of Brown in Blue and purple in orange and she said, I, glanced to see my house but the house wasn't there was knocked to the ground and that's when she knows all the houses were knocked to the ground none of them were standing on our street and she looked out of the corner variety and she could see these. Tornadoes it looked like spinning of just fire spinning around, and that's when she knew. That's her papa was. She was trying to dig her friend out at that point, and then they started to feel these sticky black drops falling on them and someone had yelled they're pouring oil on us to burn us even more and so her stepmother picked up my mom and just went running trying to find some kind of coverage. My Mom was later woken up to go look for her papa. And as they started to walk, my mom said, that was very dark even though it was like midday and it was hard to tell where you were going because the landmarks were gone, the roads were torn up. In they started to try to walk within the area of of where the train station would be, and they heard somebody calling for them and it was actually an employee that was with him and he said, I've seen your popup he's hurt but he's still alive and I'll take you to him while so they fought. Yeah. Yeah it was just my mom was was so filled with hope and she so they're going through the way and when they finally get there, they go to what was left of the platform. And he's not there and my mom was very excited because she felt that means he's well enough to go look for us. So we need to turn around and go back. So as they're leaving to turn around. Her stepmother trips. And when she looks down, she realized that she tripped on her Oh, my God. Yeah. He was still breathing he was unconscious, and so the employees went running and he said he came back with something that looked like sort of a broken wagon but they they could put him in there and they felt they could bring me back towards were they're holding or a hospital even though there wasn't really much standing of it, but they had to get him away from their. Show my mom remembers that as they finally got immune to to the wagon her. was actually very tall. He was six feet tall in, which is very helpful. So they finally able to get him in there. My Mom remembers you know she was following behind them. And then she said it was sorta like you would say now like a movie playing in front of you because she size armed dangle and from the wagon and that's when she knew when they stopped in the you know that he was no longer there and. She said I just couldn't picture him of what I last saw him because in the wagon remember seeing him his head was Leica on a shade of Navy blue and his skin looked like it was melting and she said, I wanted to remember him. Has Walking the school used to wear a three piece suit and he had a Panama Hat and he had a walking stick. And she said, that's what I wanted to keep picturing. And I'm sorry I get emotional. Of course. It's I. Hear My mother's voice you know. And every time, she would talk about this. She start crying as it was happening in front of her all over again and not want to cry. So it just kind of sticks in my head of of how much that you're twelve and a half. You know that a bomb has been dropped. What you don't know she said I didn't know why.

Papa Tokyo Oliver Japan Dick Leica
"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

10:01 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Yes end so I became very depressed because my career that I had had in healthcare doing contracts with hospitals and doctors all had to stop. I didn't know if I could still be a good mom my daughter at the time. I could walk by myself. So it, I knew it was going to eventually. Attack my hands in is progressive so I was so despondent I think my mom you know she tried to tell me this story and then she said to me I wanted to kill myself. But I'm so glad that I, didn't because I would never had you at I would never had my granddaughter and she said, I, never thought I could find love again. But I, did and she said I had the strength of you know or Samurai family she said the same lead flows for me. And I would find my own way of living again and so it. It really was an interesting play of events of how she finally told me in. So then when I called. In seventh grade and I can I talk tell your story and I really thought she was going to say now because she was always very private about that and then she said, yes, and the reason why is that the students in that class be close to the age that she was she was. And she figured maybe they can relate to where I was in my family life from I was doing because of the same age and then their future voters. So they'll know leaving that classroom that nuclear weapons should never be used again. and. So that's how I went to the class, and then the following year they invited me back with new seventh graders in schools in the Charlotte area heard about it and invited me to speak and the teachers would start to ask do you have a book that could go with the curriculum? And writing things down just as a member of my daughter to have. So she have the information and I remember calling my mom and saying, you know I think I'm going to do a block and she she just can't believe anyone wanna read about a girl in here's. What happened the now? She just she was really amazed. and and so that's when I also I realized at that point if I'm going to do a book. That, with historical fiction piece, I wanted to also. Talk the culture in Japan during that time, because my mom had this picture that always had a place of honor in our home and it was her in her pop up. and. It's so special to her because. She only has five six photos from her childhood and they were all between the ages of three and five, and they were like at a different house. So they weren't damaged but oliver other pictures were damaged. From the fire the bombing so. In her papa was her favourite. On and so that's when I also knew I need to write about that. So that way the reader can feel for the person realize okay. They had these people I think my big thing is to connect with the humanity that was under the clouds and by doing that starting at months before the bombing I could talk about the mindset of the people, the politics they were so different the way they viewed their leaders and what the allied countries did the propaganda to their own people that the Japanese government gave and just how families were trying to live during that time period. And then be able to talk about what happened. So they could understand what she really lost that day in how quickly it was gone. Yeah I think. You know. Growing up hearing about this story, I was born in fifty four. I remember in elementary school we would have atomic bomb drills. During the Cold War and all. Right. Yeah and and But but at the same time hearing this diatribe that was in our history books and and politicians would say it does like well, you know we had to drop the to bonds. Because otherwise, if we invaded Japan, there'd be such a slaughter right and and so it's kind of I. It's it's worse than ironic to me. You know because this is the mass killing of. Hundreds of thou-. Civilians not not combatants and they had already firebombed, Tokyo. was made out of rice paper and wood right and all this kind of suffering. But but to hear still the justification, I think even today I struggle with okay. You drop one bomb. Why did you have to drop the second bomb Nagasaki I? It's like wasn't an aunt? Anyway, I. I I. Think it's important for. Americans at least because we have international audience to to to at least recognize that even at even today as as we. Are Looking with suspicion of North Korea with their nuclear weapons program and Iran and what have you That we south down very. Very disingenuous. Because we're still. The only country is actually used a weapon like that. And and the fact that we used it, we justified it. Yes and I think you know in the history classes you get that two paragraphs in the mushroom cloud picture and it's supposed to wrap everything up in tidy bow. But it doesn't work that way in and you know more that information that is now released after so many years and they look at diaries of the General Stinson and they look at Truman's diaries. You know it wasn't the only answer to just say we had to do that to save all those lives. There's also a Russia was going to be invading Japan and they. Didn't want them to do that. So they were there are other reasons in play actually Japan was discussing possibly surrendering because they were firebombed I mean they hit Khuda they hit all the different areas there before the atomic bombs were dropped. So I think part of my thing was to also let the students know that you know by the time that sea in nineteen thirty, one, Japan invaded Manchuria my mother was born in Nineteen thirty two. So her whole life was involved with them being at war. So by the time nineteen, forty-five rolled around. hitter Oshima was once a military port. However, by that point, all men the young men were out fighting in the Pacific and there were only a few that were left and a lot of them were training. She said her inner school the boys were being trained to make bullets out of bamboo. I mean, they just didn't have those resources anymore So I I think the by being able to explain that as well so that they can understand on the the prewar population of hitter. Shema was three, hundred, fifty, thousand people. Eighty. Thousand people died immediately or within hours of the bomb being dropped. In over the next five years one, hundred, forty to one, hundred, forty, five, thousand people would be dead as a result of their burns other radiation poisoning that they were exposed to. So. I think it's just so important that when the students walk away, they understand that Oh. That didn't just end the war is that always bothers me when people say that we had to do that to end the war? No, you did not. There was not the only factor and men would have died. Yes. But not as many as what they said would die there were not as many people who could keep fighting on. Japan I mean, you had elderly people and children there really weren't as many. So I think it's important that they hear all these different factors to it and not just to say that it ended the war because then you're not putting human being with that. You know it's so much easier. It makes it like video game like they have today I mean. If, you don't make that connection. We're going to be at risk of repeating the same deadly mistakes and and I, think that's what really got me to want to get this book across to want to speak with our future voters. So that they understand that there's more to it than just ending a war. And I and I think one of the unspoken hugely problematic a pieces of well, it was just any more save American lives. It's it's equating. It's it's valuing American lives far greater than Japanese lives, right? Especially old people and children. So Yeah Yeah you know I and in kind of preparing for this episode, I was reviewing some things about that whole incident and and you mentioned it already Kathleen but I realized that. Russia was kind of chomping at the bit to extend its influence and they if they had kind of joined forces with the. US. To you know bring. Japan to it's knees. They're saying they probably would've wanted to divide Japan like Berlin was divided. Yeah and so there was reasons why the US knowing what the ambitions were Russia they said, okay. Well, you know we don't want to ask them for help you know and hey, look we we have this new weapon A. Very very very well, let's get into your as your has. Now finally, you know told you her story. Teller. Tell us what she went through. I mean she's twelve years old house it that she wasn't part of that eighty thousand that were immediately vaporized. Share..

Japan Russia US Japanese government Charlotte North Korea oliver Pacific Oshima Tokyo. Stinson Shema Berlin Truman Kathleen Khuda Iran Manchuria
"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

08:04 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"It. And then it goes and then it turns itself off. And You know we've been using this now for live in Jersey and now for like three or four times of watering. And I literally have forgotten that I did that but. Why is like magic? It doesn't require me remember it just turns itself off, and so I'm thinking Oh. My Gosh, you know how come I didn't think of this sooner and easy to yourself up, but it's like For less than twenty bucks. You know we. Are I, get control of this thing that has to happen watering the vegetable garden. And it's it's not gonNA. See our water bills like skyrocket because of me forgetting in spite of my best intentions. So I don't know if there's anything like that in your life where. You persist in doing it the same way you've done a long time but. Even though maybe you did it. Okay. Fine in the past for whatever reason it's not working out. Fine. Sometimes it's better to think about find another solution that will actually. Remove the problem eliminate it and. You know sometimes, it is simple as as finding little timer Doo. Hickey that you stick between the Faucet in your hose. Other Times it's it's much more complicated, but you know it's easy to get stuck in our ways and even an especially when some of those old ways are causing problems now and again We shouldn't just keep doing it the same old way. Always I. Don't think so and and off to be honest with you I mean part part of me was feeling very prideful. It's like, no, I'm not I'm not losing it. You know I I don't need to have any gadget I I should be able to do this, and now that I've got this gadget a man like how come I didn't do this sooner. So. Anyway this this should be the this next water bills should be the last gigantic one. and. From this earth from this point forward. s just something I don't have to worry about anymore just remember to turn on the time her because they won't turn on itself. I, didn't I didn't WanNA spend the money for one that would turn on itself. I just needed the turn itself off. And I am so grateful to be married to someone. me. For my mistakes. That's that's worth. More than anything money or otherwise and You know just just really really grateful that she has that kind of temperate. Well. It's a time for us to. Get into this conversation that I had recently with Kathleen Birkenshaw. Talk About having to deal with real problems. It's not about water bills. About your whole world. Blowing up and catching on fire. So I. I know you really enjoy this conversation. Oh. It is. The seventy fifth and I hate using this word anniversary of the first week of August of the dropping of two atomic bombs at the end of the war against Japan in world. War. Two and I was contacted recently by one of our podcast listeners who actually wrote a book called the last Cherry Blossom, which is all about it's kind of a fictionalized historical account. If I understand this correctly of of your mother's own experience of being one of the Hibachi, one of the survivors of the atomic bomb but I just want to welcome you Kathleen. Burke Shaw to Birkenshaw gives me to to our podcast because This is a subject that I think we need to talk about just so that this never happens again. So welcome so much to the podcast Paul. Thank you so much Kenneth. Thank you for having me on I'm really excited to talk with you after listening to your podcasts. It's very nice to meet you this way. Well, you know we encourage a very non-asian thing very non-japanese thing which is ask for people to actually take initiative and promote themselves and the things that they do so. Long been paying attention to you know what happened there? Now seventy five years ago and I've even gone to a lecturer of another Hibakusha years ago, but I'm just really fascinated to talk to you about your mom's own experience. So. When are you kind of tell us? In a way of introducing yourself how you came to write this book. kind of finding out about your mom's own story. Sure sure. Well, the book journey really started about ten years ago when my own daughter was in seventh grade and she had come home from school very upset she had said that they just finished the World War Two section an-and she overheard some kids talking about that really cool mushroom cloud picture and she asked if I would go in and talk to them about the people who were under that cloud like her grandmother and I remember going to call my mom because I. needed to ask permission I had never spoken publicly about what she went through. The interesting thing is too is that I didn't even know she was from until I was eleven years old who really Yeah. She always said she was from Tokyo and the only reason I think I found out that years because it was the beginning of August and she had horrible nightmares and she always wake up screaming and I remember that the summer before it was around the same time and I kept asking why was that in? That's when she finally said that she was actually born in the Shema but she lost her family and her home in. At the atomic bombing and she said I can't really talk about it. It's too painful and then she said, please don't tell anyone so. So nothing was said for a long time I remember she still didn't talk about it until I was in high school and I read the book by John Hersey you Shema and that was the first time. I got any inkling of what she might have lived through and I remember just being horrified in in coming out of my room when I was reading it and asking her you know is this what it was like and she just said that it was hell she didn't WanNa talk about it in don't tell your teacher because I really I'm not able to talk about it to the class. So. She really didn't express too much of what happened until I was around thirty I got very ill and I was in the hospital for over a month and so when I came home I needed help take care of myself taking care of my daughter who was four then while my husband worked during the day. So my parents came and my mom would talk a lot about her childhood but then she slowly started to talk about what happened on August six and the days that followed and that was really the first time that she shared that with me. I don't think she may have shared that with me had I not gone ill. I had been diagnosed fire neurological disease, which is Kinda based from some of the radiation exposure that she had for being in the bombing was wondering. If there was a yeah. Yes. Yes. Sadly..

Kathleen Birkenshaw Cherry Blossom Hickey John Hersey Birkenshaw Japan Burke Shaw lecturer Kenneth Tokyo
"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

09:16 min | 8 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Greetings everyone. This is Asian America Again Tong podcast and I'm your host Ken phone. Welcome back to the pod, and this is episode number two, hundred and fifty, four our guest. This first week in August is Kathleen Birkenshaw Kathleen. Happens to be inhabited listener to our podcast, and so already she scored big points. But when she reached out a couple of weeks ago, she said would you know her particular life story. May Have. Extra special significance for the first week in August turns out that. This first week is. The I hate calling Culligan Anniversary marked seventy five years since America dropped the first of two atomic bombs in Japan, I on here or Shema, and then on Nagasaki. and. Kathleen is actually the daughter of someone who was twelve years old in here Shema when that first atomic bomb dropped and she is what is known as he box Ya. Which means that she is a survivor of that terrible Holocaust. That was caused by the dropping of this atomic bomb. So Very. Fascinated and she had. Published several years ago a fictionalized history based on her mom's story that is used at various schools of starting from middle school all the way up to college, and so I definitely was very, very keen on getting her onto the pod and so that. At this particular time in history that we can remember. What was what was? Done. during this. War The end of world, War Two and I think it's important as we hit this marker to to reflect a little bit deeply about just how terrible war is and certainly weapons of war and to able to see this through the lens of not only Kathleen. Mom. But the impact it's had on captain's life including her physical health today I. Think. All very, very important reasons for her to be our guest this week. So after my introduction, I knew you really really going to be fascinated with her story. We hear in ceremony A had years and years of drought and So you know there's there's always been extra special attention paid to how often we water and certainly our water bills. Well, on the last couple of years We actually had a lot of rain and a lot of snow pack in in the mountains north of us, and so kind of drought restriction came off and yet you know it still weren't selling California it's a desert You know we have to be mindful of this now we have. A fairly sizable property I mean it's not fancy, but it sizable it's it's almost one hundred feet wide by one hundred, fifty feet deep, and especially since I retired, I'm the one that's kind of patrolling. All of this square footage. To eradicate. Fill bare spots and to. Plant new things and take out dead things and so on and so forth. Well, several years ago my wife had asked me to install a raised garden at the very back part of our property and This is not visible. From the House you because we we have this refurbished used to be a woodshed, and now it's kind of a studio about five hundred square foot studio so. Things that have been planted back there. Easily are ignored and die because. They. They just don't get enough water. Well so you know last year. Miniature go at planting some vegetables and. Nothing really exciting to share and so this year as spring run I just decided to ignore it. You know I'm not GonNa do anything again enough to do and apparently some of the seeds. That it's build out of some of the Japanese pumpkins these culture. They planted themselves in the soil and so as they started to sprout and grow I felt obligated to I actually have to water them now. and. So several plants in particular are doing really well, I mean some of the vines. Probably about ten twelve feet long now and. We're starting to see some of those Japanese Pumpkins. Here's. The problem. I'm a multitasker when I'm out doing yard work. There for several hours, picking up dog poop Hunt and watering the potted plants and pruning and all myriad kind of things and so I'll turn on the water back there and I just have to make a mental note to make sure to go back and turn it off. And a couple of weeks ago. I turned on the water in a win about doing other things and as I was puttering around the various parts of the yard, I would think of some other projects now I start to. Get very focused on that. And I completely forgot that my water still on. And so several hours later as I was going outside I mean son had already said, it was dark I was going outside with the dogs I think for for them to relieve themselves before they come in for the. So this is like ten, ten, thirty I heard this. Kind of hissing sound. Like What that noises and could be our neighbor's pool whatever enough say, Oh, crap of the water still. So I went back there and they turned it off. And you know almost kind of reverted back to small kids. Don't tell mom. Don't tell that. You know just feeling really stupid but it completely. Just dropped out of my consciousness. But. This is not something that a you're literally this is not something you're literally going to have you're going to have to pay for. I when the water bill comes, you're going to see like what's going on and my wife pays those utility bills. So I decided to let her know the next morning because she had already gone to bed and I said, oh brace yourself for the next water bill because I left the. Hose, running back in our raised guard in there and it was on for several hours and so as just. Now to the major credit of this saint I'm married to. She doesn't hardly ever like we just celebrated thirty nine years of marriage. He she ever. Blows her stack aunt. She she's She counts the pennies and as she pinches them, you know and we're retired so but anyway. I apologized and she didn't blame me and As expected. The water bill This past month was several. Well, let's just say. It was big. Okay and as she paid it you know she she's at Oh you know the water bills and she didn't say and that's because you left the water running she just said just just so you know right so it's like okay. I wish I could take back but I can't. Right. So earlier, this week. I noticed that. The chaplains back there needed some water. So I turned on, turned on the hose and one about all my chores. and. Once. Again, completely got distracted. Forgot to turn it off and. This time I found. I. Heard that sound the next morning as as I was. Out Watering. Grass seedlings. and. I'm like, Oh my God who was on all night. And you know again I I, my wife, we haven't got the bill for that yet So finally. I said I I've got to do something that's not GonNa require me to remember to turn off the water after I turned it on because it's just too big of a property and I've I've got bazillion things going on and yeah I'm sixty five and a half so. You know the gray matter is slowly deteriorating. So I searched on Amazon and I found this probably less than twenty dollars little faucet. Timer. Requires. No battery no electricity, and you basically said it like a a timer that you do on your stove just by turning the dial and I said it for like twelve minutes..

Kathleen Birkenshaw Kathleen Shema Ken phone America Japan California Amazon Nagasaki.
"k kathleen" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

04:39 min | 9 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Women and Crime

"I can't think of what else the case Lot Kathleen Zellner only represents people she believes are innocent i. Believe that Melanie's and I know that's a great question. I would also like to say for this I know Kathleen I did I reached out. I sent her an email just to see if she would be interested in interviewing I haven't heard back remember but I suspect she's busy. Exonerating people left and right quickly before we get to the end here, but I always wondered. What your opinion of do you have? An opinion of Avery in terms of his innocence or guilt is so the fact that Kathleen Zellner took the case made me believe more strongly in his innocence, because I trust her judgment, but I go back and forth you also I. Don't know if you came across the fact that there. There was like a vial of blood from an earlier case. His blood was on file because he had a prior record. Even before the wrongful conviction, and they found that it had been unsealed and punctured I saw that, too, but then they tested the blood, and they couldn't find a preservative, but then someone said wouldn't necessarily show up, so there's a lot of things that could be shady, but could also be nothing also. Also there's something about the jurors like there were two jurors that had relatives that worked for the county in which she had the lawsuit pending like one was like a sheriff's father and someone else, and I. Don't remember that well. The case is such a rabbit hole I don't know and then there was something not long ago. where like an inmate confessed to killing theresa? How back did you hear that one I heard. Heard that, too, but they they didn't give it much credibility. You know usually you can't give those things much credibility, so I go back and forth I think if I had to say, I would say I think he's innocent. Because I think corruption exists, and as much as I would hate to believe, it could exist at this level I think it..

Kathleen Zellner Melanie Avery theresa
"k kathleen" Discussed on Women and Crime

Women and Crime

03:02 min | 9 months ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Women and Crime

"It's sounds vaguely familiar, but I definitely don't know shortly after Zellner that practice in nineteen, ninety, an anti-death penalty organization asked her to take on the appeal of Larry Eyler, convicted of murdering and dismembering fifteen year old boy. Eyler was a young attractive house painter in the nineteen seventies and eighties living in Indiana. He had a very troubled childhood, though filled with alcoholism and abuse by his parents and several stepfather's. Eyler also struggled with his sexuality, and he had feelings of self loathing because he was gay and it was said that. Would kill young gay men after sexual encounters because this inner conflict that he had now I just told you that he was convicted of dismembering and killing a boy, and then I'm saying now. There are multiple victims here, so keep that in mind. I lived with Robert David little. He was an older professor who worked at Indiana State University, but this was a platonic relationship Because Eyler was also, he was younger, he was attractive, little was a little, a little bit older and not so attractive. It was just a platonic living situation, but I learned also was involved with a married man, a man who is married to woman, and this was actually a serious relationship and the wife. Wife knew about it, and apparently was tolerant of this relationship Isla was back and forth between them, but when he was with little little, paid the bills, and supposedly it was so that Eyler was the young handsome guy who would kind of bring home, young handsome men for little to engage with as well because he was also gay, so I think that he was kind of you know the one who was able to get other people. I mean it. It wasn't a great picture from the start of their arrangement, but dubbed the highway killer Eyler killed an estimated twenty, two twenty three young men, many of whom were found near highways. He disposed of their bodies on the side of highways. Robert David little was also charged with murder as an accomplice in at least one of these murders, but he was acquitted of. Of all charges and return to his university position when Zellner came onto the case, it was at the part where islands was in his appeals, and she worked hard to broker a deal with prosecutors, and at first islanders family I mean they I looked at the footage and they were. They defended him, and said that he he couldn't have done this and whatnot but eyler. Confessed to Kathleen that he had committed a a number of these murders, and he said that he would reveal the names of his other victims if they would take the death penalty off the table because he had been sentenced to death for that one murder so Kathleen Zellner went and started brokering these deals and a had to happen with different prosecutors because they were actually many jurisdictions..

Larry Eyler Kathleen Zellner Robert David Indiana professor Indiana State University murder Isla dismembering
"k kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"You know and I usually. Yeah and you were right now Google and find out who took that part Sharon Johnstone thank you. We had to close. We had to. We had to guess like okay. We'll just that actually works as punch like it's That's Tommy from Buffalo. Tommy what your question. Hi Andy Love You. Love you on on How was judging Ru? Paul's drag race. Nash Ashley Okay. So it was so fun. Have you done it kept saying no but I have been sort of on it. Well Yeah yes. That's right because they do fight eh one of them for the love of Kathleen Turner. What part of Kathleen tournaments right? Okay so you want to hear what happened the day grace. I got a crazy hot water. Burn yes I was staying at Eric. Andres House poured like hot water into a swell bottle of his. Is I get in the car it pours on my leg and I'm I'm losing my mind. It was a second degree burn. And I'm like drag race right literally and unlike have a doctor meet me there. Whatever and I'm like I got like a bag of ice and then I it was so crazy this disgusting thing all day and everyone was nice enough to pretend they didn't notice it and I like walked I was like I turn around. I was like please don't know because I was like So I was was like blind pain right. But it was dope like Russo sick and like you know having met him on broad city it was like oh Cool seeing ru in drag. You had gone through. This is how talks and talks to the judges with like a fan. There's like I think she should win. And actually watching reproduce was such an awesome and Michelle and Rosser so last caller caller tonight. Oh wow it's our friend. Mike from Cape Cod. Mike how you been. Oh my God hi Andy How are you. I am very excited to speak. I've Seen Oh my John. You were just announced today as account work at Camp John Waters. I have been all Yes and Tanjug. We all know there was a camp. John Waters can get on September eleven eleven to fourteen. We are beyond excited. I I see your question Mike. The day I love him. I'm GonNa Faint mytalk attack me. Turner please what what. What was your favorite memory of working working? Mitch Nicholas Cage in Peggy. Sue got married. That's a tough one five or call from your last appearance parents. You may not have a favorite memory from experience. Well Good I. We call the came in the last night night of shooting and with a bottle of Tequila in his hand and fell to his knees. Those sorry absorbs sorry. I got one more scene. Come on God yes. Your favorite memory might have been wrapping the film. Yeah it was a big that that and then after all that it was also was thing because will know because Francis contract he would lose final. Cut It. We didn't come in on time but no he said anywhere on budget so we'd worked six day weeks of twenty hours a day. How how because because we we didn't want him blues cut right right but it was devastatingly difficult? Yeah Yeah and a big hit was good field yes it is. Yeah it is I want to thank Kathleen Turner and a lot of. Yeah thanks for listening to the PODCAST. Everybody hope you enjoyed the show. Remember new episodes go live Monday through Friday at four P._M.. Eastern time make sure your subscribe to have a great rusty or not..

Kathleen Turner Mike Tommy Camp John Waters Google Sharon Johnstone Andres House Mitch Nicholas Cage Russo Nash Ashley Cape Cod Tanjug Andy Paul Eric Michelle Sue Francis Rosser twenty hours
"k kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Mean you got Hillary Clinton. Yeah I mean like we pretty much maxed out We madly caffeine's you ever was. We never got. Aw chopped liver who shares maybe a whole nother like avenue for coupling Turner. What's your question? How their hi? My question is Kathleen do you have any memories of working with Ricky Lake Ontario. Mom Yeah Good Pussy. Willow no I I will do the second guy I you know. I think that that's with overdone. Since boring don't he was a good a group. I think the funniest funniest one though sometimes was waterston because he took it all very seriously and he came very earnest. Any any he came over and he said now. Do you think that we might be immortalizing. Glorifying serial killing up DOC. It's a movie John. More specifically that was great Spencer they're from Wisconsin for Alana. What Questions Spencer? Hi Alanna If you could change anything about the series finale abroad city what would you do differently. I honestly wouldn't change a way of the broad city failing. Yeah that was the privilege to end it when we wanted the way we wanted. I would say it ended. I mean you knew it ended before its time but that's the.

Spencer Hillary Clinton caffeine Ricky Lake Ontario Turner Kathleen Willow Wisconsin
"k kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"k kathleen" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Vegas Sue got married Kathleen Kern character had the chance to right the wrongs of her pass. Oh Kathleen. I'm curious if you ever wish you could do the same. I may not be able to create a time warp. I do have a speed round of questions of challenging experiences from your past prior tired acting. What was your worst job my worse up? I was attempt at a Jewish travel agency during Passover season and everyone ruling was talking to me in Yiddish and they were all right What is the most embarrassing thing you've ever been caught hot doing in your trailer? I'm never telling anyone that. Utah The in two thousand twelve on this show. You said that Bill hurt was your her absolute best onscreen kiss. What was your worst onscreen kiss? Burt Reynolds what Phil was Switching channels really it was he sought why he just I rehearse with Michael. Cain yeah I supposed to do with Mike okay good toys yes well McCain got caught on jaws four okay short kept breaking down and so I was pregnant and I had a stop date not right so we got everything we could without him and then finally the producer went and hired and he couldn't kiss. Yes not a good that mustache. Wow Wow what's the dumbest thing you've ever blown a ton of money on his coins. Why would I confess these these? Do you have to worst What's one piece of great advice ice? You regret not taking. I suppose if would be. Don't take these so seriously. Don't take things so seriously. Thank you very much. Second City. Alana's character loves station SUSHI PHONE WIGS and Andy. But there's one thing that fires are up most of all we need so a Lotta as a catalyst store. Here's what I'm going to present various celebrities. Ladies you've worked with you tell us what kind of stone or you think they would be. The I guess yes. Okay what kind of stone or Wood Scarlett.

McCain Kathleen Kern Phil Vegas Sue SUSHI PHONE WIGS Wood Scarlett Burt Reynolds Second City Utah Bill Cain Alana producer Mike Michael Andy