25 Burst results for "Juvenile Justice System"

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 9 months ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To method in places like the District of Columbia Juvenile justice System and innovations like Los Angeles is teen court. Many schools in the United States have turned to use restorative justice methods to resolve conflicts and to prevent them. And to disrupt the school to prison pipeline. Some American high schools have replaced automatic suspensions with opportunities for victims to narrate their experiences and for offenders to take responsibility for their actions. So what does restorative justice look like in schools? Can you Can you give us an example? I'd be glad to its an example. And it's a true story about how restorative justice processes can work. And this involved a young woman, a Mercedes who attended a public high school in California. And there were two other students who called her names and they were almost getting into a fight. And a counselor, took her aside and earned enough trust so that she admitted that she had stolen shoes from one of the other students, and the three of them agreed to have a conference a restorative justice style conference, which Means that they each had a chance to describe their version of what happened. Turns out they had known each other for a long time in childhood and had never found a way to talk without coming to blows. But suddenly Mercedes apologized and she said that indeed she had stolen these shoes. But she did so, she said, because her mother needed money, and she wanted to sell the shoes in order to get enough money so her mother could get a drug test and hopefully show the state that she was clean and then regain custody of two other Children. The other girls were moved and they did not exactly forgive Mercedes. But they said they didn't expect her to pay the money back and they wanted to go forward and they just wanted assurances that they could trust her going forward and later on. Mercedes said that if this process had not taken place, she was sure she would have been on the road to suspension.

Mercedes District of Columbia Juvenile Los Angeles United States California
Houston state rep on the role of cops in schools

Sean Hannity

00:44 sec | 10 months ago

Houston state rep on the role of cops in schools

"As part of a larger debate on police reform there is a growing spotlight on the officers that patrol public schools activists say they shouldn't be allowed to arrest students Houston state Rep Jeanne Lewis an attorney who represents kids in the juvenile justice system says schools need to do their jobs instead of expecting police to address all whole list of emotional issues it was a mark always to break up fights and do other nonsense like that but you don't need to talk to do they shouldn't be doing those things in the first place is gonna send the increase of cops on campus since the Columbine school shooting activists say they serve a small role in need to be replaced with more counselors who can help troubled kids instead of arresting

Jeanne Lewis Attorney Houston State Rep Columbine School
Trauma-Informed Mindfulness With Teens

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

03:15 min | 11 months ago

Trauma-Informed Mindfulness With Teens

"Sandra Stein PhD as a licensed Psychologist Public Speaker and author specializes in working with adolescents and their families via private practice, community organizations and in juvenile justice settings. He travels the world. Offering workshops on related topics lives in Oakland California. A note that Sam's book trauma informed mindfulness with Teens. Is discounted through the publisher through the end of twenty twenty, so please be sure to click on the link provided on the episode page. Our guest today returned to the podcast. Is Sam Himmelstein Sam? Welcome back good to see you again. Thanks so much for having me really excited to be here. So it literally has been for years s since you've been on this podcast so to spend a little time to catch us up on. What's been going on for you during that time? Yeah, for sure it's. It's been a while You know over the past four years. It's been kind of an exciting rides me. I think the thing that's the same as probably. When we last met was that I'm still extremely passionate about and spend a lot of my time working with young people trauma impacted folks, folks in the juvenile justice system, a young people that are impacted by addiction and just other kind of hardships in life and I'm still just extremely passionate and spend a lot of my time doing and thinking about how to bring mindfulness, another self awareness and contemplative practices to do those populations and you know. Probably the biggest change is that I have successfully been able to leave my full time positions I was probably working as a maximum security clinician in the juvenile hall. The last time we met, and what happened from there was I got recruited from a chemical dependency hospital or excuse me. A hospital was chemical dependency program, and that felt really good to get recruited, and did a couple of years there and you know I just kept doing trainings and online trainings, and the demand kept getting more and more to the point where I could leave my full time positions as as. As a clinician, and what I did was I essentially used the center frat lesson studies as a way to launch that and of course I. Still See I have a private practice, I still see people clinically and I still work in a few different juvenile hall systems, actually just on a very kind of contract part time basis, really focusing on teaching, mindfulness and trauma, informed skills and things like that to the youth themselves, which has been really really fun so yeah, I mean. There's been a feels like there's been a lot of growth and I'm very happy and blessed to be where I'm at today, a particularly with a lot of the online growth that I've been able to do. you know in the traveling that I've been able to do to kind of train? Professionals in also work with youth in different systems.

Sam Himmelstein Sam Private Practice Sandra Stein Phd Oakland Twenty Twenty Psychologist Public Speaker California Publisher
Sam Himelstein :: Trauma-Informed Mindfulness With Teens

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

02:25 min | 11 months ago

Sam Himelstein :: Trauma-Informed Mindfulness With Teens

"Our guest today returned to the podcast. Is Sam Himmelstein Sam? Welcome back good to see you again. Thanks so much for having me really excited to be here. So it literally has been for years s since you've been on this podcast so to spend a little time to catch us up on. What's been going on for you during that time? Yeah, for sure it's. It's been a while You know over the past four years. It's been kind of an exciting rides me. I think the thing that's the same as probably. When we last met was that I'm still extremely passionate about and spend a lot of my time working with young people trauma impacted folks, folks in the juvenile justice system, a young people that are impacted by addiction and just other kind of hardships in life and I'm still just extremely passionate and spend a lot of my time doing and thinking about how to bring mindfulness, another self awareness and contemplative practices to do those populations and you know. Probably the biggest change is that I have successfully been able to leave my full time positions I was probably working as a maximum security clinician in the juvenile hall. The last time we met, and what happened from there was I got recruited from a chemical dependency hospital or excuse me. A hospital was chemical dependency program, and that felt really good to get recruited, and did a couple of years there and you know I just kept doing trainings and online trainings, and the demand kept getting more and more to the point where I could leave my full time positions as as. As a clinician, and what I did was I essentially used the center frat lesson studies as a way to launch that and of course I. Still See I have a private practice, I still see people clinically and I still work in a few different juvenile hall systems, actually just on a very kind of contract part time basis, really focusing on teaching, mindfulness and trauma, informed skills and

Sam Himmelstein Sam Private Practice
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"On John Cooley this is a service of my furniture market state lawmakers a lane to the director of the Texas teacher retirement system for trying to move into one of the most expensive buildings in downtown Austin obviously I think somebody's head all roles state senator John Whitmire was sharp words for brand got three the executive director of the teacher retirement system the base annual lease of the deal in Austin's indeed tower would have cost around four million dollars a year three apologize then defended the decision T. R. S.'s since found a better deal in another building Chris fox news radio que LBJ school district is already discussing next year's budget as concerns over a Roman losses loom large and waves the county jailers stop a soon to be inmates last second escape attempt for perpetuity shares a video where a man half go balls and tries to get to a nearby car but he's eventually recaptured and brought back to the jail your kale BJ radar weather watch it's sixty three degrees low thirty nine get Austin news on demand at newsradio kale B. J. dot com why every afternoon two to four this is mark Melinda and ed on newsradio ko B. J. seven five one two eight three six zero five ninety now mark Melinda Melinda how are you I am doing well though whether a wow it's great out there it was great today on hole number ten as I played golf this morning it was great it was actually this morning he would be out there early warmed up with a hot Cup of coffee and went head first into the golf well it's two oh three great to have you with us the news is just full of alarming stories today about what's happening in the public schools here in Austin and across Texas and around the country for that matter Melinda and I talked about some of them ten to eleven others have emerged since then how about this middle school while in for work today where officials say they had to lock it down five staff members were injured the school police officer was hurt between three and five middle school students were arrested and charged that's rough that must that must have been a pier six brawl if all those adults got hurt this is not just a little one this St tells me there is a a gang or more than three four five six seven is that right hawking middle school what is bad ads been awhile grades what five through eight or something like that so you're talking white twelve to fourteen fourteen year old kids in some cases Melinda big kids violent kids while I started in the hallway at Rosemont middle school in fort worth at nine thirty this morning a half a dozen for orders regular police squad cars had to be sent in to help restore order at this school she's flat out restore order restore order that just shows mark I don't know what goes into these kids minds that they think they can get away with it they also use lotion they are allowed to get away with anything there is no responsibility you do not have to take any responsibility for your actions there they send you right back in the classroom because we don't want to in T. all these classes we have to have everybody there so the kids get the message guess who's running this school not administrators say it's what would you do with the middle schoolers who had been arrested taken into police custody what's the proper punishment they say staff teachers police were injured what's the proper punishment mark in a case like this where their their injuries to adults I would kick him out the rest of the year if they were the ring leaders if they were the violent if they injured those adults I would kick them out for the rest of the year and say you've got to find some place else to go good bye and goodnight lenient would that all of whom I hope all the adults press charges and make sure that they are brought to justice on that which to me I II your booties in juvie in the juvenile justice system KGO booties and juvie you can call you can Texas five one two eight three six zero five ninety this is a six year old that you're about to hear this is the audio from a new elementary school girl in Florida she's six years old she has zip ties around her wrist and she's big walk to the police car to be taken in only me she was driven away from the elementary school and charged with assaulting three staff members at the school the officer now has been fired for taking her in and it is a real mass market I usually support law enforcement but it's ridiculous to put the handcuffs retired deals and you heard that's a six year old child you don't run a six year old child in unless the six year old child has a gun or something like that in shooting a gun good gosh I can't hear you heard a six year old child there you probably didn't see a six year old that was attacking three adults I now for they called law enforcement to come in the first place that means the three of them could not handle the six year old quote on quote child they had to call in law enforcement was he supposed to do take a gamble that this girl going to reach for his gun or you're going to try to attack him we don't know here's all three don't say six years old listen what she did wrong I agree with you is wrong and they needed to call someone who can control the child but you don't put a six year old in jail the not same gel but I think you will manage what's right and say Hey come to two islands call mom and dad I'm not saying zero or in behind the bars you know but you don't take it you you can you lever at the school here is the restraining you do that here is the grandmother of Maryland Kirkland she lives with the grandmother the grandmother says yes she she has challenges but this is ridiculous now the little granddaughter is having nightmares I realize Hey it wasn't just my grandmother leaves out of it was that it was really and truly an injustice on an injustice and she wants to see real permanent changes mainly without click to hear is that they can implement some sort of change so the officers been fired somebody to school called him and said will you come down here and help us and now he's out of a job he has been fired mark I would I would have to evaluate the situation who told who told this officer did he get it is this first of all is this part of their normal procedure to put the the hand cuff type devices and run six roles in the jail did someone say you got to go get her and bring her back that's why if if he was going on orders I would fire the guy yeah if its policy something wrong to me with the policy of taking a six year old into the police station well they they have they have protocol set up in this police department for them to arrest kids when they get called in now where they're firing him is he didn't check with the supervisor first okay he had been you know called out so many times to do this that he just knows okay this is what I do yes I don't see this as a fiery necks and offense I believe the school is using the law enforcement officer as a scapegoat for them to tell you to take any responsibility off of them it wasn't us it was the police they came and took her out on hand because we don't have any idea how the police got cold they just magically showed up that's right they're kind of like the wizard of oz credible US there's got to be some type of policy when you're dealing with six year olds in this middle school situation mark where the kids are much stronger much bigger there are growing to be young adults yeah you can you can law enforcement can take care of that we're talking about a six year old girl in Midland I respect your opinion and I see where you're coming from but I just think it's a little too young add to run in a glass room with a six year old who has street as maybe on some of these drugs it has even more strength because it Graham all made she's got problems am I supposed to sit there and take a beat down because no not at all six years not at all Melinda I would I would say to you if you had a classroom of kids I would get all the other kids out of the classroom stat I will first I would call the principal and try to call the officer at the school well that if you worry adults were attacked by rebels were we could all see if that was the case all right give six year old get in here and join us you can call you can Texas five one two eight three six zero five ninety it's two eleven with mark Melinda and ed I.

John Cooley director Austin John Whitmire Texas senator
Helping A Child Whose Parents Are Struggling With Addiction

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

09:10 min | 1 year ago

Helping A Child Whose Parents Are Struggling With Addiction

"Around twenty children's sit around sickle inside the main Camp Lodge. Almost I only have a parent. WHO's addicted to opioids? The lights are dim. It's one of those moments you know is going to be intense and you should brace yourself even before it happens. Happens the eight to twelve year olds. Read the letters to addiction dear diction why do adults like you. When I'm older I will be kill? Kill you make me not like bog. Edad ed it's sad. You make my dairy goat prison. I hate you their addiction. You are immersed my worst enemy. You took my dad for me. My stepdad my aunt and bound to be my uncle so I just have to ask you a question could you please just go to hell. Signed Hyundai very sad kid. I hate you so I wish you wasn't. Will you kids so bad. I hate you go to to help. This is my issue. Mommy the pain. These children feel L.. Is almost too much to bear and millions of families are touched by addiction. But remember that episode of Mister Rogers neighborhood where he tells children to look for the to help us. Well this episode of Life Kit is about how you can be that help because not everyone is lucky enough to go to a camp like this windy. Berkshire Director of campus and Dayton Ohio. Says kids shouldn't bear this pain alone and the most important thing is that you know. Oh that you're gonNA love most important thing to me. Is that your team. And you're no and you're heard after reading. Each child goes outside and throws their letter into a glowing firepit. They watched the letter to Addiction Bourne. Berkshire on other mentors hug them. And say I love you and you're so brave one little ten year old with big Blue Eyes as the last one in line chilly high. Listen IT S my mom. He missed him sweetheart in. I'm sorry mom here. I'm sorry what can you do if you'll see the teacher a neighbor churchgoer coach and you suspect something might be going on. Maybe or thinking yes. I'd love to be that person but I don't know much about addiction. Mary Beth Collins with the National Association for Children of Addiction says it doesn't matter we're not expecting adults to have to go and do a crash course you don't have to go And read a book all about addiction. You don't need to be able to speak clinically about substance use disorder all that you really need to know how to do is to be carrying to be loving and to be able to connect with kids and engage with them. mm-hmm that's as simple as it is. Okay but what if you want even sure there's really addiction family or maybe you don't want to overstep again. Mary Beth Collins says don't worry about it I invite this people to not get bogged down with that level of responsibility. You don't have to Komo for sure it's bad enough before you intervene. I'm covey the Cardoza and before I began reporting on addiction I used to think it mant mant parents strung out on the floor or they've disappeared for days or severe abuse going on but experts like Collins say that's actually not not true. Most of the time addiction takes place in families. That seem like they're functioning pretty well so you'll see them going to work or in Church walking the dog doc. She says the far greater likelihood of neglect or emotional abuse lake constant criticism or unrealistic expectations. Having said that a child safety of courses the most important so if you see signs of physical or sexual abuse definitely call the authorities. All of these children have experienced traumas sometimes abuse and neglect a growing number are in foster care. Many have apparent incarcerated dead or not in their lives. Alone is a national nonprofit that runs these camps in thirteen states many areas hardest hit by the the OPIOID crisis. The children meet at least twelve times a year so I think of it is an opportunity. That's Claudia Black an expert in the field of addiction. She helped start these camps years ago. Yes safe place for very young children to be where they can speak their truth where they can be honest about what it is. That's going on in their family. She says there's a lot of secrets and Cheam. Many kids don't even know what the word addiction means. They just know that parent is different. One eleven year old whose mother has been in Rehab. Several Times says this is how she explained it. If you really want to have a cupcake every single day in constantly constantly. And if you didn't have it you'd feel really schick. Black says that might not be the best analogy because well children love cupcakes. Rather she says she tells young children. It's like an illness or a disease with those who are older. She's a little more graphic. Something literally has their arms their hands wrapped apt around your parents neck. And that there's a choke hold and that your parents hands are tied behind them. They don't have the ability to reach up and pull pull whatever it is this got them around that neck and that so severely choking them in. I think that what we want people to a really grasp is that it isn't willpower. And there isn't a choice at this point without they're getting some kind of help. Okay so now. Let's get down to some practical tips Bryan Moss overseas all camps at Luna. He says these children are at higher risk for so using earlier and for entering the juvenile justice system will never be able to change. What's happened to them but what we can do is boost the protective factors and and lessen the likelihood of long term consequences? What are some of these protective factors that brings us to take away number? One being a caring consistent doubt in a child's life a help. Oh because Claudia Black says often. That's exactly what these children don't have a sense of mastery or feeling of success. At least one area of your life is really helpful to children and so the role that somebody could play play is how can I help develop that with child. Maybe that's with Helping this twelve year old boy work on a car with me and I'm the neighbor and and I teach him some mechanical skills and he develops a sense of mastering sense of pride around that. Or maybe it's win. This little girl comes to my house and plays with my kids. I get she and my kids involved in an art project and really try and further her talent because I see some natural talent in the art things you can do. I really really simple bake a cake. What you game going to hike kick around a ball ask about school collins says it's not about the activity it's about showing you care consistently those loving moments are what will build that trust in these children? And it's through through that trust through that consistent nature that they will start to trust you more when Michael was nine. He got into trouble unlocked for privacy reasons. We're only using his middle name. He was angry because his dad never spent any time with him. He was always dealing with Michael's brother Who is struggling with addiction? He would rarely come because he was with my brother or he was working. It was either one of the two. Michael didn't tell anyone how he felt. I hope but he was angry. I would slam the door as will as sometimes I hit my head on the wall and then walking out of class and and just not being able to control how I felt at that time and then one day miss missy accounts lettuce school started talking to him in the hallway just stuff like how a school today and what do you enjoy doing sometimes complimenting him Michael started going to her office to chat every day for two years she enrolled him in a Lunar Kemp. Michael says he always appreciated that. She didn't ask questions about his family. All pry. It's good to wait because you don't WanNa make a kid feel uncomfortable with answering the question themselves being that the kid. It doesn't even know what's going on in their life they just know it's an addiction and they just wanted to stop

Michael Mary Beth Collins Claudia Black National Association For Child Camp Lodge Hyundai Mister Rogers Ohio Berkshire Several Times Dayton Director Blue Eyes Komo Cardoza Bryan Moss Lunar Kemp
How Young Is Too Young to Face Arrest?

BrainStuff

05:29 min | 1 year ago

How Young Is Too Young to Face Arrest?

"Criminals come in in all shapes and sizes though it may strain definition that we can count a six-year-old throwing a temper tantrum in an elementary school among them yet welcome to America in late. September two thousand nineteen a Florida cop arrested to grade schoolers slapped a pair of handcuffs on at least one of them and sent them off to be booked fingerprinted and have their mugshots taken taken both children again six year olds who misbehaved at school were charged with misdemeanor battery a bad day for Harried police officer well yeah maybe a bad day for schools and the juvenile justice system absolutely we spoke with Marsha Levick the chief legal officer for the Juvenile Law all center which bills itself as the country's first nonprofit public interest law firm for children she said does it get more ridiculous. It's absurd. It's it's a ridiculous abusive law enforcement power authority but it's also really unnecessary but all too common abdication on the part of schools and school districts teachers just defer their management of school misconduct to police the pure legality of charging a juvenile as young as six with crime varies across the United States to be clear a juvenile in forty five states plus the district of Columbia is anyone younger than seventeen in Georgia Michigan Missouri Texas and Wisconsin. It's anyone anyone younger than sixteen juvenile offender normally doesn't move through the criminal courts but through the juvenile justice system which has guided according to the office of Juvenile Justice some delinquency prevention quote by the concept of rehabilitation through individualized justice for more serious offenses though juveniles may be tried in criminal court wear if found guilty the court focuses on punishment not rehab of fifty one jurisdictions. That's the fifty states plus the District of Columbia thirty. The three have no lower level limit on holding a young person criminally accountable that excess that includes Florida in effect that means that an overzealous cop legally Wrigley can arrest even an unruly two year old of those eighteen other jurisdictions most put the lower level that a kid can be charged with a crime at ten years years old in those locations six-year-old like the two in Florida simply could not be arrested or charged with a crime levick said obviously it begs eggs the question how can that be. How can we possibly have created juvenile court system that allows for the possibility that six and seven year olds can be arrested. I think they never envisioned and six or seven year old would be hauled into court. I think that's a fair assumption. That's not who designed the system for so what happened in Florida a police Lisa Officer with Orlando's reserve unit arrested the two six year olds on separate misdemeanor battery charges on September nineteenth of two thousand nineteen one was a girl who lashed out in a Tantrum Trim that was brought on by a sleep disorder. The girl's family told The New York Times on Monday September twenty third the Orlando Police Department fired the officer who made the arrests for not following in protocol that required he'd get approval from his supervisor to arrest any minor younger than age twelve. No charges were filed against the two children. Cops in schools rules of course are not new. Florida is one of many states that has bumped up. Its police presence in schools over the years. The Florida legislature mandated it after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman when Douglas high school in Parkland claimed seventeen lives in February of two thousand eighteen the buildup of police in schools understandable in some ways. It's been more in twenty years since two students killed thirteen people and injured twenty one others at Columbine High School in Littleton Colorado since columbine up until April of this year America it has been through two hundred and thirty eight other school shootings according to a year long investigation by the Washington Post this increased show of force though does come with problems plums for one as the Orlando Sentinel points out citing report by the Education Week Resource Center black students are arrested at school at disproportionately high hi rate at least one of the children arrested in Orlando was black and as the recent news out of Orlando Shows Police School kids even elementary school kids just sometimes sometimes don't mix levick said we know where this is coming from. This fear of what happens when a child acts out in school. There's going to be some catastrophic consequence I am I need from Columbine for twenty years. We've been overreacting. I'm not aiming to trivialize schools being so quick. Call Law enforcement there obviously many situations nations in which that's appropriate but this is one that defies common sense most would agree that slapping cuffs on first graders probably is crossing the line zero-tolerance. Your tolerance certainly has its costs eleven said initially the thought was that there would be some rationality some reasonableness injected into the school environment would curb those extreme and absurd responses but it may be that trusting in waiting for commonsense to kick in isn't going to work it may be that it does require a legislative response. It's some movements across the nation aim to raise the minimum age that a child can be charged with a crime to twelve years old in some of those thirty three jurisdictions actions where no minimum ages set their calls to set something until then though school police officers may have to lean on something much less complicated than legislative action should when faced with a prepubescent troublemaker a deep breath. Maybe a countdown from ten and a little common sense.

Florida Marsha Levick Juvenile Law Orlando Shows Police School Columbine High School Orlando Police Department Orlando Officer America Columbine Douglas High School Chief Legal Officer District Of Columbia Orlando Sentinel United States Lisa Officer Marjory Stoneman Columbia
A Look At The Impact Of Active Shooter Drills

The Takeaway

02:50 min | 2 years ago

A Look At The Impact Of Active Shooter Drills

"There's been a rise in the number of school resource officers across the country, Chris, and I'm wondering why that is what's leading to this increase presence of law enforcement in, in schools. It's really been a long time coming. So simple things that happened back that ideas, no, mention Columbine which one factor that led to the nineteen ninety four federal law. That's required. Expulsion of, of student for weapon possession in it also included for the first time, federal funding source school resource officers, they couple of factors that happened in the nineties, one in the juvenile Justice system in the one that impacted the schools the approach to juvenile Justice in the more heavy handed approach to locking up, young people, quite detrimental, and quite impactful on, on a lot of disadvantaged students, but that also happens schools of zero tolerance policy that coincided with the increased security measures across all schools. And that also has led to unintended consequences that just SO related, but student. Exclusion related also impacting soon disabilities in racial ethnic disparities in punishment and want to get into the sort of disparities that you're mentioning there in a little bit, Chris. Because I think these are really important in terms of the broader conversation going back to the second to officer Peterson here. I'm wondering mo-. There's a lot of criticism. And now even more than criticism about how Peterson handled the shooting with your expertise. What should Peterson have done? Chris, a good phrase minute ago, outlier and Florida is kind of an outlier as far as our association goes because it's, it's a state where we do not train school Bice police officers, they do their own training, in Florida. So part of the answer to that is I don't know how he was trained. That's part of the problem for me and trying to answer any of this. I've seen the footage of talked with several folks who have been involved in investigation corley. There's an issue here when you've got someone standing at a door for the length of time he did. That's not the way we would train anyone again. I'll go back to say this is direct to threat type issue. You've got shots fired in a building. You have to assume you're dealing with an active shooter event you have to pursue that threat and stop it before more lives are lost. I want to I want to drill down a little bit more into that moan because is an SRO is a. School resource. Officer expected to take down shooter expected to essentially bag give their lives in in an effort to remove the threat.

Chris Peterson Officer Corley Florida SRO Bice
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Plus Facebook page, NewsRadio thirty Katri a whole lot more Twitter, Facebook histogram, all of that other stuff that I have no idea how to use. But I hope you do and we'll be there a conversation of looking forward to for quite a long time. And the reason is, as I talked about earlier this morning. It is the not just the topicality but it's the invasiveness of human trafficking that occurs here at home and literally around the world. Poa representatives in our studio, founder and president. Jessica Monja Tammy Batonga in studio as well. And I wanna welcome both of our friends joining us this morning. And both. I wish you very, very good morning my name, you. Good morning. Good morning, just if you don't mind, I'll start with you, would you mind just sharing a bit about yourself, and then we'll do the same with Tammy and then we'll get started on some of our details, please. Thank you so much. So I'm actually nurse practitioner. I moved to Hawaii about thirteen years ago and was only planning to stay for two years. You know, the rest is history about eleven years ago when I was working in the emergency room at one of our local hospitals, I started seeing kids coming into the ER that we weren't necessarily screening identifying recognizing as victims of exploitation. I'd had a lot of training and sexual assault domestic violence, child abuse. I knew about trafficking overseas. But I didn't know that it happened in America to American children. And so, I thought I was the last person to know about this and thought, oh my goodness. And all the years of medical training that I've had no one ever talked to me about this. And so I really started with wanting to raise awareness in the medical community around how prevalent trafficking is of our local children. And so I wish them articles and work. Nationally with a couple of entities to really work to get the word out to our our my fellow colleagues. And yet, then you quickly realize that it's not just healthcare that didn't know but several agencies at large, as well as the intersection between our child welfare juvenile Justice system, our department of education and our community as a whole that this population has existed for years, just unidentified and not necessarily recognized as victims of exploitation on, because oftentimes, they're looked at as true or delinquents, or runaways, and so not necessarily the fact that they've been exploited. And so, my heart was just deeply moved in wanting to help this population of kids. And so that really led to the birth of what we now call Pua, which means new life, our children. And so we have multiple focuses we work. To prevent trafficking by raising awareness in schools, and educating youth. But then we also provide direct service and intervention and we're working to start Hawaii's first residential treatment campus for underage girls who've been exploited are seeing the plans, and it's just remarkable inky originally coming from where that brought you to Hawaii same originally from Lake Tahoe. Moved here from southern California and my husband fell in love with this place. And so, you know, we're now very rooted invested in the community and this is home for us from normal. Yeah. Love of two kids, one of our greatest trips road tripping all the way from Irvine meandering all the way up coast and then ended up in Tahoe for the week and it was during the early early early fall late summer. So I lived in the bay area for years Tahoe was our every weekend you would go, but to bring the kids and look through their is of the puberty and the magnificence of that area. It's one of our favorite trips. Yes said, so my favorite place to go. It's how you know, it's where all my family is and Tammy's had the opportunity to go and see Tahoe. And it's note there over the weekend. It really. Yes. Just got actually just got back from there. Yeah. Two two. Drove past. So we went from Washington down through Oregon, and then we ended up in Nevada, but I could see the Snowcap thinking is that Sierra? Maybe it's the Colorado's really sure something was snowing, was spring Springsteen, the best literally be on the slopes and t shirts because it was just fun. Tevi, let's same with you. Would you mind sharing about yourself, sir? So right now, what I get to do with whole employs. I'm the community advocate outreach coordinator by, you know, and I had a thirty year career as a bookkeeper with different law firms in Honolulu. But life kind of change for me. About I would say about seven years ago, I was out of conference, maybe ten. Two thousand ten about there. I went to a conference and they were talking about sex trafficking. I was like, what the heck is sex trafficking, like, who, like drug trafficking guns. I know what that is. But what is sex shopping, this, I sat through this little thing, little presentation, I was like, well, and then the next year I went back to that conference. It's a women's conference called rise. And they were still talking about it, and I thought to myself a cab on a help them because I was having a women's ministry team. And I said, I'm going to help those.

founder and president Tammy Batonga Tahoe Hawaii Facebook Lake Tahoe Jessica Monja Twitter Katri assault Pua America California juvenile Justice system Irvine Tevi
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene. Rodney Robinson teaches at the verb Binford education center, though yesterday, he was at the White House accepting the national teacher of the year. Award Robinson is not your typical teacher because he doesn't teach at your typical school. Well, I worked in the juvenile jail and must do this range in age from twelve to nineteen from on average sixth grade up to twelve grade and their own varying levels, and it's my job to fit the needs of each and every student no matter what they bring to the table and make them feel loved and appreciated in the spot to do whatever. They want to be Robinson's classroom is inside the Richmond juvenile detention center in Virginia where kids do have all different skill levels. And all different challenges is a very transient population. You know, when we get in the morning, you know, I might have left on my. Monday, and we had forty kids. I might come back on Tuesday. We could have up to fifty kids. And so you just have to be very very flexible, and that's often tell them. Hey, this is the moment to reset no matter. How long you're with us and reexamine your life and the decisions you make. I understand that you have a project that is really focused on helping all of your students navigate the criminal Justice system. Can you explain what that looked like? And why you think it's important. Oh, yes. It was as part of Yale teaches initiative last summer. I had I had opportunity to go and take us. Someone are called race class punishment with James foreman junior. Of course, he just wanted to Pulitzer for locking up our own, but he thought a class and the point was for you to take information that was in the class and create a ten thousand word curriculum unit that was specific to your kids, and what they needed to learn and my unit was based on the history of prison and Pacific ly-, the Virginia juvenile Justice system because my kids aren't survivable twenty four seven so a lot of times when they come into the detention center, they're struggling to understand it all and I hope that my unit about history of prisons the history of juvenile detention in Virginia and how the best advocate for yourself will help them make better decisions. It's. Using their circumstances. As a way to study history as a way to study the law like its coursework in itself. Looking at the at the situation, they're in and learning from it. Yeah. Definitely. That's that's the point always say culturally relevant teaching you have to use. What your kids know what your kids experience to create a positive learning environment and positive learning experience for them? I want to ask you one thing that you brought up. The reality that two percent of public school teachers right now are black males. Yes. What what strikes you about that? And why do you think something needs to be done to change? It always say it's important that students have teachers and people who look like them who think like them who can understand their experiences in life and God them to what they need to be. And right now, we don't have that in America public school children of fifty percent people of color, but teachers I eighty percent white. And so with that comes just a lot of misunderstandings, and quite often that leads to students be unfairly punished and sent to the juvenile Justice system at a alarming rate because black and Brown students and students with disabilities are being pushed out, and I think that a lot of that has to do with not having teachers who are culturally competent in front of them teaches that pretty much look like them and understand their expense. Now's Rodney Robinson. And I finished our conversation. He told me teaching in a juvenile Justice system for all its challenges has a lot of rewards. The best moment we had was we had a student whenever she had a problem in education trying to get her credits and graduate she would violate curfew to come in for one day. So that she could talk to us and get everything in order that she needs to graduate. And so that that to me I mean, I didn't want her violating curfew. But just the fact that she wanted to come back to see us because he knew we had her back, and we could get her issues resolved that must be that was a nice feeling. Yeah. Rodney Robinson is the two thousand nineteen national teacher of the year. Congratulations, and thanks so much. All right. Thank you. Isis is sending an online message. The terrorist. Group has posted a video showing images of a man they say is the group leader Abu Bakar body. It's the first time Baghdadi has appeared on video nearly five years since he declared the formation of the so-called caliphate in most of the rock. Isis has now been forced out of that territory. And now back daddy talks about their next steps and Sherlock reports apple back out daddy sits cross legged on the floor a Kalashnikov weapon beside him. He has a thick graying bid that looks like it's been died red at the edges. He talks about ISIS is global reach. He praises members in Libya, Mali and bikini Fassa confused on ethnic congratulates, the perpetrators of the suicide attacks on hotels and chech- is in the left over two hundred and fifty people dead Hasson Hasson an analyst at the centigrade will. Policy says that if this is confirmed to be back. Daddy, the appearance of the ISIS leader. Okay. Life comes at a strategic time. Do this vigils extremely voting for though Univision to show that the case is still alive and east believes in this project is that there's a continuation of what he started in two thousand fourteen the last time Baghdadi appeared on video in July two thousand fourteen it was to celebrate victory claiming huge parts of Iraq and Syria as an Islamic state or caliphate. But today that territory has been lost. And this broadcast is meant to signal a shift in the group's tactics. Says Hasson ended the physical and says oh. Next chapter which is warfare. Attrition surgency. Even without land involved can Syria. I is still believed to have thousands of fighters in these countries, and it has chapters in Asia and Afghan. The message is intended as rallying cry to supporters to fight back. However, they can reach. I look NPR news favorite too. This is NPR news and this is morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition rubbing mothers report, indicates President Trump sought an attorney general who would protect him following Jeff Sessions departure, he took the job. And then he's I'm going to recuse myself. I said what kind of a man is this attorney general Bill bar testifies before congress about the report on Thursday. That's coming up on morning edition here on KCRW..

Rodney Robinson Isis Virginia juvenile Justice system Baghdadi Rachel Martin verb Binford education center David Greene ISIS Hasson Hasson KCRW James foreman Syria White House NPR Yale Richmond Hasson Asia
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

11:03 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Is talk about reforming Milwaukee's police pursuit policy again after a spate of deaths. Three in the past ten days resulting from police pursuits. But the story of one of the teenager is charged in connection with one of those debts should give you pause that it's not the pursuit policy, but it's the city of Milwaukee's attitude towards criminality in general from the school system to the juvenile Justice system to the adult court system, the story of Marcellus purify is one that should give all of us a little pause. You might recall the story of jasmine pedic's he was at Bayview high school. He was a teacher's aide. And a bout I'm going to say three years ago. He went viral for a video showing him brutally attacking a young student of fourteen year old boy named Marcellus purify pennock said at a number of witnesses backed up his account that purify then fourteen years old in fact wanted to set up panics in a scheme to sue to sue NPS show. He spit on panics kicked him in the shins. Now ultimately was charged and convicted with I believe it was battery. But. The point is that Marcellus purify has been in significant trouble ever since FOX six reporter, Ashley Sears has the story and she actually tracked down jasmine panics. It's a fight that's hard to watch three years ago. A teacher's aide in student when toe to toe in a Bayview high school classroom video went viral. So that class at ten so and I had a run in with Marcellus fiscal jasmine panics lost his job with NPS and was convicted of misdemeanor battery that teacher's aide filed a civil suit in claim the fourteen year old student involve plotted, the whole thing me. A phone. So they kicked room. A shame panics has since moved out of state. But recently, he says the teen he has tried to forget is back in the news those life away expense and versus Marcellus tearful when the former teachers aid Saum ourselves purify had been charged in a deadly police chase. Hey, couldn't believe it failed to court systems. You know, they failed him. Investigators say the seventeen year old took off after a triple shooting left three teens injured as police chased his vehicle crashed into a truck and school bus one passenger in the fleeing car died say back in twenty sixteen FOX six on covered juvenile court records indicating the teen had a criminal past and months before the fight at Bayview high school. He was accused of attacking a man in Milwaukee. With a group of teens is former. Teacher's aide says his life was changed forever. After this fight sat in the same thing didn't happen for the students. St. stop the it's no he shouldn't have from what I hear Marcellus purified does have an extensive juvenile Justice record. But yet he was out now juvenile records are sealed which means it takes some doing Ashley Sierra's got a hold of his juvenile record. I had it described to me by a source. So I can tell you that all of the signs of Marcellus purifies life were building towards a serious crime. This was a kid who very obviously should not have been on the streets who should have still been in the juvenile Justice system, but time and again, he was given a break time. And again, he was taught that there weren't real consequences for his actions. The thing that's most striking as we focus more and more on the police pursuit policy. Is the ages of those involved in the purify incident on April eighteenth just before Easter? A fourteen year old boy has now been criminally charged in a triple shooting Thursday afternoon in which a sixteen year old girl, a fourteen year old boy and a thirteen year old girl were injured now they suffered non-life-threatening injuries. They were initially not cooperative with the investigation. But eventually police were led to this fourteen year old boy after that shooting purify tried to get away from police he dropped off the shooter was subsequently arrested and then led officers on a chase that ended in a crash near fortieth and north a passenger in purifies vehicle. Lorenzo Jones was eighteen years old suffered severe injuries in that crash died a couple of days later, the crash involved a school bus and a truck driver of the truck was hurt. And a child in the school bus. Also suffered undisclosed injuries. Marcellus purify thought he could get away with this by running from the police. Purify had hammered into his head. From the time. He was very young will before he had that encounter with jasmine panics that the rules didn't really apply to him. Or if they did they weren't going to be seriously enforced. The issue isn't the policy that police are allowed to chase suspects. The issue is in the mindset of the suspects who believe that. Well for years, they weren't going to be chaste. And now all of a sudden, they find themselves in a new reality where they are going to have to run from police, but they believe that they can get away with a crime if they simply run faster than the law, if they simply drive faster and more recklessly if the solution is to get rid of the ability for police officers to pursue it reinforces the idea that there's no accountability that there is essentially no one who will even try to arrest. What is that? Do if not embolden criminals if not embolden people like Marcellus purify who at younger and younger ages are turning to more and more severe crimes lost in the shuffle is a fourteen year old boy. Shot three other kids fourteen when that sort of thing happens in a white suburban school district kid brings a gun to school and shoots three classmates. It's a national emergency that happens in inner city Milwaukee. And the rest of the community sort of turns a blind eye to it. Folks. This is a problem with a lack of accountability. Milwaukee public schools, obviously didn't instill in this kid a sense of discipline. But idea that if you misbehave you are going to be punished. Certainly at home. This wasn't instilled in him. But when you've then got the police handcuffed, pardon the pun in their ability to enforce the laws, and when you've got criminals all but laughing in their faces because they know that if they're under the age of eighteen and they're not committing a very serious crime. They're gonna get a slap on the wrist. Maybe they'll go to a juvenile Justice facility, but probably not. This is how you get to criminals at age twenty one at age twenty three. Killing people with a blatant disregard for human life because as their crimes have gotten more and more serious. We time and time again outlined this on this program where I'll go through someone who's been charged in a particularly gruesome murder which for a day or two gets the city gets the state's attention. And a look and say, look, this is where this Specht got leniency. This is where the suspect didn't commit a violent crime. So we're not going to lock them up. We're going to look at alternative dispute resolution, we're going to look at something that furthers the interest of social Justice, but puts a dangerous person back on the streets. This is a major problem not just in Milwaukee, not just in Madison, not just in cities in Wisconsin. But all across the country as there is this attitude shift that if someone doesn't take a gun. And shoot someone either kill them or severely injure them. If it's not a sexual assault. If it's not a brutal beating that those crimes should essentially go unpunished that that that people should walk free because well, we don't wanna lock up too, many people. Why what do you think that tells the people who are out there committing crimes we don't have widespread criminality problem in terms of the percentage or total numbers of people who are committing crimes? It's the same five to ten percent of people in society that are committing roughly fifty to seventy percent of the crimes, it's the recidivism. It's the people for a whole lot of criminals and telling you for a whole lot of petty criminals. You lock them up you do it severe sentence or you scare them sufficiently. They'll turn their lives around. But there is a. Percentage of people out there for whom that doesn't work for whom you can't scare straight. You need to remove them from society for such time until they are no longer a threat to others. It's the only thing that works. We have got a pair of tickets VIP tickets to give away to the Milwaukee food truck and craft beer festival, and we will do so.

Marcellus Milwaukee Bayview high school juvenile Justice system jasmine pedic FOX NPS Ashley Sierra Lorenzo Jones Ashley Sears reporter pennock Wisconsin Specht murder assault Madison fourteen year
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Gas line explosion in San Francisco causes street closures and door to door vacuum. Flames Racine shooting up three stories from the Hong Kong lounge two which was under construction. Five buildings were involved. Officials report all workers receive and the fire is now out PG and E gas is tweeting they are working closely with first responders officials say construction worker started the fire when? In the accidentally cut a natural gas line mass state police arrest two juveniles after a carjacking in high speed chase the two year old car owner says he was punched in the face and his Lexus was stolen by the two on north main street in Brockton around midday the vehicle was then spotted on twenty four southbound and took off at very high rates speed onto four ninety five. They then raced into Norton where the car rolled over the sixteen year olds tried to flee on foot, but recaptured and taken to the hospital for minor injuries suffered in the accident. Both will face criminal charges. The Massachusetts supreme judicial court upholds the manslaughter conviction of plane villes Michelle Carter for encouraging Conrad ROY to commit suicide with text messages Carter's fifteen months sentence has been stayed during her appeal now she's likely to go to jail. Her lawyers say they're disappointed in the decision. And may try to take the case to the US supreme court, Massachusetts, Senator Elizabeth Warren says she now realizes that tribal citizenship is something claimed. But rather granted nothing about my background ever had anything to do with any job. I thought in any place it's been fully documented her statement comes after evidence surfaced that she identified herself as a native American in nineteen. Eighty-six Texas bar application. The Senator has not said if there is other evidence out there of her ancestry claims. Governor Charlie Baker is refiling a Bill aimed at cracking down. On revenge porn images under the Bill miners found to be sending explicit images of peers have to go to an educational diversion program rather than goes to the juvenile Justice system, this legislation also makes it a felony for adults who distribute a sexually explicit image for purposes of revenge or embarrassment. It's now eight three time for traffic.

Senator Elizabeth Warren Michelle Carter Massachusetts US supreme court Governor Charlie Baker Hong Kong San Francisco Racine Senator juvenile Justice system Brockton Texas Conrad ROY fifteen months sixteen year two year
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Another page in a mall setting should immediately be arrested the same if you screw up with a gun. You should also suffer those consequences, but not make everybody else. Give up their rights. Yes. Brian. I agree with you. That's that's a very apt analogy. So. Never is it wise to reward bad behavior. We do that all the time. If if they're misbehaving if they're breaking the law, they're violating your rights when you go to the mall to shop or hang out or lawfully, do what you choose to do their with urine adult or a juvenile or regardless of who you are. Then those people who are behaving improperly should be dealt with the systems in place to deal with them. Let it work let the system work. Get your calls. Let's check in with Robert in Sacramento. Robert good afternoon. Welcome to the conversation. Thank you for holding on. Thank you. Appreciate your show very much. Thank you, sir. And as always, I you know, I agree fully with what you're saying. That just tells us that you're brilliant. I think though that this is stems from a breakdown in the family unit in the school disciplined that they receive I listened to your show of many many times and talk about the the juvenile Justice system and the the break down there and how we treat young children or not just children but teens and young adult. Yeah. I think anybody who breaks the law. The and think about this for a moment, Robert the the solution to this. The knee jerk reaction is to to place the blame someplace else these people are engaging in criminal conduct because because their juveniles and therefore you banjo and also in the ball wrong. I don't buy that. Or these people are engaging in vinyl criminal conduct because they don't have a an appropriate recreational facility to visit. Therefore, we need to open rec centers for kids. No, that's not the you don't transfer the blame or the responsibility. Elsewhere, you focus with laser precision on the people who are creating the problem, and you bring consequences to bear. By the way, not only do you what to the people who want to use the mall for its intended purpose you over to the kids who are stepping outside the bounds of acceptable behavior. I think we all have a kind of a a a natural inherent tendency to to get away with what we can. And at the earliest opportunity for people to to realize you're not gonna get away with much. I think it increases overwhelmingly the likelihood that they will comply with the rules and go on to live a good life. So why don't we go to them to the kids who are misbehaving the kids that are breaking the law and terrorizing people who were there for a legitimate purpose? We owe it to them to feel the consequences of their misconduct, and and redirect them in a more appropriate positive direction and a better lifestyle. So I'm I'm with you hundred percent, Robert, I do appreciate the call, sir. Let's check in with Tom in Roseville. California Tom good afternoon. Welcome to the conversation. Thank you for holding on. Sure. You take my call pleasure agree. You agree with much of you're saying one thing. I don't agree with is. I don't agree with with not allow my child who doesn't do that kind of thing in all because of of what's going on right now. My solution is I think a lot of what's happened is is not just like you said, they're not hold these kids accountable at the end of the day. When it does player, you got a hundred people that are their employment cells in a mall, and you got two people detained or arrested. And now you mentioned earlier we've got enough law enforcement and get him out there. Karalis people zip tie, right. Your reports in dragged appearance into the court system, and this I like to see much what Texas did when they were problem with the public schools. Improve McCain once he got involved in that what do you want to call? It force bonding or whatever, and he started finding the pants and their attention. And I'm not saying we have to take money on. But I tell you what I live in. This community is dirty. We've got a lot of sash needs to be picked up get those standards Alto with the kids on the weekends forty hours. I. I don't disagree with that one. I I will tell you this though, Tom, honestly, I think if you go to the the family unit and the parental presence or participation. We maybe this would be maybe your suggestion would begin to touch some of that maybe it would make an improvement. But yeah, if you're if you if you Sira child that goes to the mall, and and injures people and causes panic and terror. I want you to be held accountable for that. I want you to be held responsible. The reality is these kids who are engaging in this kind of conduct. They don't have. They don't have parents that are involved in their life at all. That's my belief. But maybe this is one of the first steps to to to put that some of that responsibility. Where it belongs. I think ultimately. These the likelihood of kids behaving in this fashion has roots that go back to their their family responsibility and accountability or lack thereof and I liked the idea very very much. I also agree with you make a bold statement get the resources in place when it's an -ticipant at something like this is going to happen, and it can be monitored through social media and an actually bring consequences to bear. And let people see that. But people see the result of this kind of behavior is folks going to juvenile hall or jail as the case may be and and paying the consequences for their for their criminal behavior. Without I think you're going to dissipate is going to continue to address the blame. Elsewhere is as logic. Appreciate the call very much, Tom. We squeeze Karen in from Auburn. Karen, good afternoon. Welcome to the conversation. Got a different point of view. Yeah. I don't disagree with you, very often. But in this case, it was your first statement about. Activities. I think that we're lacking were iphone, and they look at all that horrible things. You can see on that. I think that we need to address activity centers where they can either play basketball or. I I don't I don't say that those are not nice things to have. But you don't go down and start beating people up in a shopping mall because you don't have an activity center and look at I mean, you got to feel someplace where kids can play football. You gotta you gotta any place where they can get together and devise a game. That's what kids used to do. That's what kids still do in some cases. And by the way, it were at virtually zero unemployment.

Tom good Robert Karen juvenile Justice system Brian Sacramento basketball McCain football California Texas Roseville Auburn hundred percent forty hours
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Children. Better. Two thousand nine hundred thousand something done with our juvenile Justice system. Senseless death. They did pass a law. It's a little intricate, but basically which allows better communication between children protective services and law enforcement and may not make a difference in Kenneth case. But it was obviously you want those groups to be able to access information because in that window between the time that she had reported him objected until the time they found him they were trying to get all these different agencies together. Because don't forget he was not living with his mother. She he was living with his aunt. And they they're a CPS issues in their custody issues. And there are all these legal things that prohibited. All these agencies from talking to each other. It wouldn't have made a difference in in Kansas case because unfortunately, he had already died. But in a case where you know, there's an abduction or time is of the essence this would then help that situation improvement for sure quick update on the embattled goes mayor Sean Morris, the the the eighteen. Year old Troy man who says he was grabbed by the throat and choked and thrown off the porch. Couple a few nights back. They released a picture of his throat. Those would suppose would shows the marks that the mayor supposedly inflicted on him. So, you know, I don't know how trustworthy this guy is, you know, according to mayor, he's a bad guy who's into drugs and was his wife's opioid dealer and stuff. But I mean, there is a picture of a neck with Mark som-, you know, and the other thing I heard I heard the bolts filed charges against each other the mayor in the eighteen year old and so no charges filed yet. But I heard the Mira talking yesterday, and I'm gonna I'm gonna I'm gonna start referring to him as the great deflector. Yeah. Because when US Sean Morris about anything, he plays the victim and goes off on these rants where where he he he went who's he's saying how you know. I'm a former firefighter I pull people out of burning buildings high played Santa Claus for twenty eight years so up. What does it have to do with you putting hands on people? Nobody ever said that Sean more Hugh are a bad guy. One hundred percent that you've never done anything. Good in your life. Right. We're talking about the times when you may have done bad things like grab people especially women by the throat. He's thrown out there. I played Santa Claus for twenty. Never mind that that's an abuser. Knowing what one of the things that's a common trait. Among abusers is they they denied any responsibility. But then they deflect attention away from the actual issue. Which is not the fact that you played Santa Claus. Which is not the fact that you were firefighters say people from a burning building. It's the fact that you're grabbing people by the throat. Yeah. That's the part of the problem with I've done a great job for the people of all good. That's great. But what does that have to do with you grabbing people? Right. And so it's just it's so annoying. You and he called himself the victim again a bunch of times yesterday. He's just I don't know if he's delusional or he's just intentionally trying to skew things because he knows he doesn't have much else to defend himself with. But we'll see what happens. I thought you know, again, I I'm not saying this kid is the most credible guy in the world those March look real, I don't know. I mean, maybe could add somebody do it to him. But Mark somehow Chuck and Kelly eight twelve. Eight hundred two three one WTY, traffic and weather every ten minutes. This report is sponsored by untuckit. All's well, so far this morning on the southbound north wages usual tie ups into the twin bridges and then northbound between exits two e and four there's roadwork on the right shoulder..

Hugh Sean Morris Mark som Kenneth Kansas Kelly Chuck One hundred percent twenty eight years eighteen year ten minutes
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

07:02 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"It's anything beyond that to help a young person successfully transition into adulthood will tell me about a few of those programs. The accelerator why does for folks in town? Somebody who finds themselves just in need of a variety of things you guys have one or two programs can do this. Yeah, we can do that. Absolutely. We have a new program called community carrot and this program kind of sprung out of the idea that not all young people want to go and work, maybe a service industry job. They may want to be creating a business of their own and haven't had the education and training on how to do that. So we have an entrepreneur who is leading the workshops from the business standpoint, and and education resource specialist who's working alongside him to make sure the young people feel supported and it's a several week. Long workshop series where they're learning anything from budgeting to pitch decks and really developing their own business idea with the idea at the end being that they end up with a business license. So we're helping them get the tools and resources and education that they need to be successful on their own because we know that not everybody wants to work a nine to five job. And this is a great avenue for that program. Was that is definitely a trend in not just the north west. I think America with young people these days that they don't see the future the same way of people of my generation did where you want the same job for the rest of your life. You notice it, you know. That's that's pretty cool. How's that been fairly new, right? It's fairly new. We are still in the middle of our first cohort. And I think there's about twelve participants. So we're really excited to see how how it goes. But so far the attendance rate has been almost one hundred percent, which is just showing us as something that young adults value their meeting at least once a week as a group and then one on one with the instructor once a week. So it's fairly time intensive, but the ideas that they've come up with have been amazing. There is one young man who wanted to highlight businesses that are minority owned and wanted to create a marketplace for those businesses that's searchable. So he's been working, and he just got his website up and running and they're just starting to work on the pitch deck so that they can get businesses involved. So that's just one of the ideas. I think that there's another idea around clothing and being able to bring it to people's workplaces to help them. Find work close within their own workspace. So they don't have to go out to a store to go buy it, so clever really ideas all over the map, and it's just been exciting and inspiring to see all the creativity and hard work that these young folks are putting in community care like that. And so a place for the consort of put their own ideas into a pot stirrer with guidance of an entrepreneur whose had the research and background to know how to help them succeed. That's pretty cool. That's right. And we we always say and especially about this program. The why is a really safe space to fail. Young people can try things out and like you said kind of stir the pot see what bubbles up and we don't ever turn people away. We never shut somebody off even if they've, you know left the program they can come back as many times as they want. And they need to get the services that that will ultimately lead to them being successful one thing about life. Somebody at my age is found out that you don't just be successful. You have to go through a number of failures. And learn from them before he becomes successful any other great programs accelerator, y you wanna talk about before we run out of time. And I do want to circle back to unheard Seattle again. But one other program that I just really am inspired by these days is are alive and free program. It's a program for youth and young adults who've experienced with gangs violence in the juvenile Justice system. This this program is really unique. In that we have outreach workers who've experienced the Justice system or violence in their own lives, which makes them uniquely equipped to serve young people on kind of help them down a better path. And that program is really really just an amazing program that provides a lot of these same support services, so working with them to graduate and get their GED and find employment. So it's really well connected with the rest of our services, but really focuses on a specific population and serving them in a way, that's culturally competent and make sense. So that we can build rapport with those young folks and get them what they need to be successful alive and free. I liked the title to gush too, many people come out of the juvenile criminal Justice system with nowhere to go supposed to help people. But it really kind of puts them on a path to a lifetime of you're going back into the criminal Justice system. Really glad to see that. There's such a program like that to break that cycle. Right. I mean. That's that's real. I mean, real bad news often definitely and just having folks who've experienced it in their own lives and have been able to turn it around and really pay back the community. We've had several outreach workers in the program. You said I was doing this after I got out to, you know, repair my relationship with my community. And then when I found out this was a job, and I could get paid for it. It was the best news ever. And there's a aspect of the Justice system called drug court. I mean, a lot of people just get addicted to so many for a variety reasons. But but now the judges at least say, you know, what the jail will not be right for you. I'm sending you a rehab, and then does the why hook up with people like that out of drug court? So many young people come out of you know, they have the chance coming out of drug court instead of going into jail. Absolutely. Actually, one of the stories on heard Seattle dot org is Ellen story. And she had experience using drugs and was arrested and ended up we have beds at that downtown YMCA gate facility that are specifically reserved for drug court. So those participants can move right into our housing, and she's been able to get sober and is working toward becoming a nurse and giving back to the community. So the why actually does provide specific services for those young folks and also provide substance use disorder counseling? Yeah. Awesome. So Emily, we are going to run out of time here. Just a couple of minutes. Anything we left out about either accelerator y or unheard Seattle. You wanna make sure maybe say a second time that people really remember about our conversation this morning. I think the most important. Thing is we're getting toward the end of the year. And this is the time to be as generous as you can with donations. They really help programs like these succeed and the private funding that we got fills in the gaps where sometimes our contracts don't cover and really can make a difference in the.

Seattle juvenile Justice system Justice system America instructor disorder Emily Ellen one hundred percent
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"With Nicole cloney. Who is the newly elected Representative in the Arkansas steets district eighty six Heinkel. Hi, thank you for having me. Yeah. Thanks for joining me and congratulations on winning in your district. Thank you so much. So could we start could you just give a little bit backbone done on who you are? And and why decided to run for state Representative? Absolutely. So I grew up Manatt from here. I grew up in Oklahoma and went to law school and practiced law for a little while and as a practice law. I worked for a nonprofit firm that did a lot of work with children's lives us. And so, you know, we were taking on cases one at a time that got with big problems that a kid with having in the education system or the child welfare system or the juvenile Justice system and through that work. I saw that the changes that need to. He made we're so much bigger than these one case at a time things and all that work is critical. And I am so grateful for the people that dedicate their lives to that. I really kinda wanted to be able to start to purchase from a policy perspective. So it took me a while. Because I think wasn't sure that I had the kind of background. I didn't have kind of the cookie cutter politician background. And I was very nervous about it. And that changed when I started our local group of moms demand action forgotten sense up in north west Arkansas, I think joining that group and starting to spend a lot of time in the state capital sort of in the halls of power among the people that were making decisions I really saw that that that kind of work with not out of reach for somebody like me as I thought it previously was, and it was really necessary that we get different types of voices, in my mind, we needed to have for instance, a lot more. Women around those tables in hall as part of those big conversations. So that's really what pushed me over the edge to decide to run and sedan. This district is in northwestern consi-. It is. Yeah. It saves Arkansas, which is where the university of Arkansas, it's housed. So we were something of kind of blue dot in a very red state. Yeah. So I was looking at the numbers and Democrats are definitely a super minority in the Arkansas state house in will continue to be in this next session. So what are some of the ways that you hope to work in the minority to advance some of the kinds of bills that you would like to see, you know, I think it's going to be it's going to be a real session of finding common ground where we can. And the nice thing is that there are we went from having three democratic women to the house in the house to having eight democratic women in the house. So while over all numbers day the. Same as you say, we're still at a super minority. We have almost three times as many women serving as House Democrats, which is really exciting. And I I mentioned that because I think the kind of work that's going to need to be done in order to accomplish much. This session will be the kind of coalition building and incremental progress and just kind of pragmatic thinking that I do think women do so often in so many parts of our lives and the way that I think will really bear fruit this legislative session. I hope that's the kind of work will be able to do and you are also mum of young daughters. What are some of the claims of things that you as a mom see as really important for the state house to be doing? So I had a lot of trepidation about running. With have mentioned, I have two little girls..

Arkansas Nicole cloney state Representative Heinkel Representative university of Arkansas Oklahoma juvenile Justice system Manatt consi
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WTVN

"Don't go to your doctor your primary care physician pediatrician and just simply wait to have some drugs. Doled out. You know, ask important questions talk about how the doctor might have arrived at his or her conclusion do your homework look at the black box warnings on these drugs. Look at the side effects really balance that against what you might experience when you're young kid into your point earlier Brad that developing brain is going to digest sometimes a cocktail of these drugs. I think that's a really important and potentially life changing decision and not enough parents are doing that. And I'm not blaming them or saying that the wrong because it's tough to do that in this world of all you see are these commercials and ads watch TV tonight. You'll say commercials for everything under the sun. I'm telling you to go tell your doctor, you know, to get this, man. They may spend more time picking up granite countertop Mets for their kids. That's awesome. One of the things you have to remember any of these drugs. Even if they do work in the sense that they do what you hope they're doing. You know, there's no drug that you take the goes in and just centers on the annoying behaviors, for example with ADHD you talk about psychostimulants. Well, you know. Yeah. You might get the kid to sit down more often, but you're also thwarting, spontaneity creativity. Some of these other things that we really like and beneath all of that. We're not teaching the life skills needed to move on you just masking symptoms need medicine to get through life needed to get through. That's also messaging, and I kind of look at that. It's kind of your gummy vitamins, it's like we need to take something for a certain desired effect versus kind of dealing with things. Like having a good diet getting a good proper sleep. We talked about again oftentimes if we just do the basics, and I'm a big believer in that getting enough rest eating properly engaging in good conversations and relationships with people daily learning from people using mentors. I mean, all of these things I think it's interesting when doctors prescribe what? I just said oftentimes patients leave the room feeling like they got ripped off. You know, there's nothing there. There's nothing tangible. These are basic things, but I always ask are you doing them? Let me talk about sleep for a second. Because I see a lot of kids that come in. And they're just exhausted. When and maybe they're just maybe they're depressed. Maybe it's a situation situation depression because they've just been arrested charged with a crime, but I've used sleep as being a huge protector of future behavioral issues that can spill into the juvenile Justice system. Here's here's an awesome stat that melatonin is released two hours later and a teenager's brain than an adult brain. And then melatonin stays in the brain longer, which is why they tend to be night house, and it's hard to wake them up in the morning, then so. There's some there was a movement for a while. And I don't know where it went. But to move the start back.

melatonin Brad juvenile Justice system depression two hours
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"Yeah, I, it's always the question for me, and I think for a lot of people when there's any sort of martyr or rally or political demonstration, like what is the point of it? And I think it can have many different points. It can be here all the people who might vote you out of office here are all the people who you know the public opinion is turning against you on this one issue and and don't you wanna be on the right side of public opinion. Also, it could be inspiring for somebody sitting at home and seeing all these people on the news and, oh, perhaps I should look into whatever issue it is that they're demonstrating about, but it does. I feel like now that political demonstrations under Trump have become sort of a given. Now, it's more about like, what are the funnier you signs from this rally? And I know a lot of news outlets, Slade included. We'll do. A slide show or around up all the best signs from a demonstration which speaks to your point, brianna, that it is a sort of our performance art. And yeah, I, I know one of the interviews that I read with boots Riley, he talked about the idea of lowered expectations. So now our expectations when we demonstrate are not that let's change the system, it's let's change the arbiters of the system. And so our expectations now are so low that it's stop putting children in cages, not even all children stop putting this Pacific set of children. In cages. We're not even talking about, like, you know, the juvenile Justice system or anything. It's, oh, let's get someone in office who doesn't put a child in baby jail. And honestly, that's why I didn't love the. I'm not gonna say what it is, but the I guess, days x. mocking at the end of the film where it's not something that I think could happen in real life. And so what the instruction manual you're talking about? Brianna. I was sort of sold out at the end. I don't know about that. I mean, again, if we're trying not to spoil it, I mean the idea that there are, let's say. A violent means that ended up company ING. The labor strike that there is a physical force that ends up getting involved at a certain point is very much a possibility, and it's a possibility that becomes more probable. The more exploitation occurs at the end of the film. We discover that the corporation that's promoted our protagonist in has also kept all the strikers. You know, kind of exploited is doing something that is way worse beyond our imagination. And you know that kind of the kind of violence that they've done to people in the context of the film might very well if if something analogous happening real-life provoke, that kind of insurrection, shall we say. I don't know. That's so improbable, the scifi aspect of it. Is improbable, but the idea that there it might come to a point where there is armed conflict. I think that that's kind of like the history of revolution. It's certainly the history of our nation and our founding fathers didn't actually anticipate that we would have gone so long without some kind of. Likely violent revolution and that's not a call to arms that just saying that, you know. The threat of islands is very real in the movie. You know, as Rachel saying from the police force, who's breaking the strike at cetera, and you know. It is likely that you know violence will be a part of any revolution that general that genuinely tries to attack the roots of capital. I don't mean to sound so. That's just how it is. Yeah. No, I feel that I remember when just to pick on the women's a little bit more when that happened..

brianna Riley juvenile Justice system Slade Rachel
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"You need preschool, you need safe fund schools. It can't be enough that they're just competent they, we have to want our kids to love going to school, and that involves the arts and sports and after school staff and end just making school something that isn't a punishment. It involves housing like you were saying, eviction, so stable, housing, affordable, housing, transportation, public health. You know, we hear a lot about problems of of mental health and our lack of support for them in how that is part of what drives crime in order to change that we need a whole lot more people working on mental health. We need people who are hired to do that in communities. We need more treatment beds. For any number of things that might lead people into these systems. So no matter what. You do in your everyday life. There is something that you're adding to the world. You know, very few people sort of wake up in our like, how am I going to ruin something today? We all sort of want our our lives to contribute to the good of our society in our culture. And I think that for many of us because prison is a secret that's hidden away. Outside of our communities behind a wall very intentionally. We don't think about how how is what I do every day going to impact whether or not the kid who lives next door. Lives part of his life in a cage. And if we can consciously declare that that we want fewer people engages that we don't want the neighbor guy to end up in prison. I think we just naturally start contributing to that problem in very small ways because I love what you guys say about like what your work to do. You know, not everybody's work is to be an attorney or to, you know. Right. Revis laws or to go into prisons teach, but there are a whole lot of schoolteachers in this country. In every single schoolteacher in this country is contributing to whether or not each kid who walks into his or her classroom winds up walking out of that classroom and indoor prison cell. And if there were more principals and administrators in our schools who made that not just. I talking point, but a real objective. In their school building, there will be less kids interfacing with the juvenile Justice system and all of that contributes to human goodness and cultural abundance and helping your neighbor have the same kind of joyous life that you would wish for your own children that I think. That's wonderful. And so you have thought about cultural abundance in his lead you to describe yourself as a prison abolitionist, which I imagine is a term not familiar to lots of people. Can you talk a little bit about what that means? Yeah. So basically prison abolitionists our people who more or less feel like the whole apparatus around mass incarceration from policing to parole needs to be profoundly changed. Most of them say they need, we need to dismantle those whole systems. A lot of times you're hearing this right now in the. News with abolish ice that term, I think is confusing to people because when I hear the term abolish I think it's about tearing things down destroying things. But as I started thinking about cultural abundance in this context, I just moved straight to abolition equals abundance for me. I am motivated by ambitious abundant goals. I am not very personally motivated by destroying things, and so I am more motivated to work on this problem consistently and intentionally when I think I'm adding to something. And so I do consider myself a prison abolitionist, but I think very, very little about destroying anything. I, I really focus on what we can add to our communities in the long term any? No. I think the conservative reaction to some of what you have said, the knee jerk reaction when you. You talk about, we need more preschools. We need more mental health services is gonna be who's gonna pay for it will. I think the answer is we we need to spend our money differently..

Revis juvenile Justice system attorney
Rami Malek is a 'legend' in new trailer for Freddie Mercury biopic 'Bohemian Rhapsody'

Gary and Shannon

04:26 min | 2 years ago

Rami Malek is a 'legend' in new trailer for Freddie Mercury biopic 'Bohemian Rhapsody'

"What better way to prove that then Chewing on the women's knows and swallowing the tissue today's national emoji day everybody get out your phones and start, doing, things with little words that you can't. Express we are self both the classic smiley face with hearts for is and the thumbs up we're tied for, first place from Maryland Oregon up to seven states love on the smiley face with hearts. Fries, and the thumbs up did well in other states like Maine Vermont an emoji simple straight to the. Point but California's top emoji the one most used by people, in the state of California along with Pennsylvania is the they call it, the blessed emoji, which is sort of the hands up and little mistake no not praying hands It's not like that. It's like this the hands up altogether like you're like you're playing football but all your fingers are that's the, most popular one is what it says I've never used that one guest where guess what. Nevada's, favorite emoji is Poop poop emoji with the ice Yup On the, baseball seeing this story. Is trending. Locally the buzz surrounding Orioles infielder Manny Machado is at an all time high because. There are a couple of different places. Bob Nightingale had tweeted out this morning he expects that Machado will be. Traded to your Los Angeles Dodgers tomorrow he's like. The, Manny Ramirez of two thousand eighteen yeah but this guy actually has some future ahead of him and I don't think. Manny Ramirez head. That going for. Him he's he's young he's he's great he's in the middle of, a career year batting three eighty five. Twenty four home runs. Ninety six games the Orioles, are. Horrible horrible or Orioles are horrible horrible and. That's why they're trying to unload. Them he's got a huge contract though so the dodgers are going to try to stay out. Of the salary cap if they can and have you seen? The latest Queen trailer bohemian rhapsody trailer I'm gonna play a little bit of. This Enjoyed the show I also saw Lisa it? Is quick and then you need someone you Remmy Malik there. As as Freddie Mercury and the teeth Oli cow the teeth, in that video are incredible so we're. Gonna throw, the latest trailer for, bohemian bohemian rhapsody this is what they call official trailer. Number one. There will, be, more but he in that just in the trailers looks amazing all right coming back, swamp watch all, of what's going on in Washington DC big announcement from. The president today just some comments but a big comment about his reaction to. The reaction what, happened in Helsinki in his meeting with Vladimir. Putin will play those comments, we come back Amy king has an update on the news President Trump says he misspoke. And that he accepts the conclusions of. US intelligence agencies that Russia, meddled in the election you've just heard. Gary talking about that, but the president also says there was no collusion I have faith in our intelligence agencies also told reporters. At the White House this afternoon the US Russia relationship has gotten substantially better news brought to you by eight hundred no. Cup here's a been proposed. That would say a child cannot be treated as a. Criminal if he or she is under twelve years old instead of putting the child in the juvenile Justice system the kid would be. Veered toward gentler service agencies for help with questionable behavior supporters, the Bill say children under twelve are. Too young, to enter the Justice, system those kids who commit more serious crimes like murder. Would be. Sent through, juvenile, delinquency court a federal appeals court says a former inmates should be allowed to sue, county and the, sheriff's department for alleged mistreatment the woman claims she was. Shackled to a cell door for hours while wearing very little clothing without access. To food water, or a toilet a woman has been arrested. For a hit and run, crash in San Bernardino that killed a woman and her unborn baby the driver was arrested. Yesterday the woman who died last week. Was in a crosswalk she, had almost finished crossing The street when she was hit a climber is fallen to his. Death on a, peak in king kings Canyon National Park in central California the. National park service's officials got an SOS from a satellite device last Thursday one hiker was..

Manny Ramirez Dodgers Orioles Manny Machado California President Trump Amy King Maryland Fries King Kings Canyon National Par Football San Bernardino Los Angeles Bob Nightingale Nevada Maine Oregon Teeth Oli Baseball United States
Police say Virginia girl lied about being attacked over headscarf

Power Trading Radio

02:26 min | 3 years ago

Police say Virginia girl lied about being attacked over headscarf

"Targets it was on this date in one thousand nine hundred fifty one april eleventh president harry truman relieved general douglas macarthur of his command in the far east more at townhall dot com how much these spend on your pest control each year two hundred three hundred or even five hundred dollars or more what if i said you could spend less than twenty five dollars a year even less with promo code save twenty then listen up i'm scott from plugging pest free and yes it is possible to rake your high mole business of unwanted pass for less than twenty five dollars per year the answer is plugging pest free how bestseller the plug pest free pro will cover up to four thousand square feet now that's fair dinkum for just a one time cost of only two hundred forty nine dollars even less with primary save twenty you be pissed free for years to come log onto go piss free dot com today use promo code save twenty and start driving those pests away turns sprain regret plugging and forget go pest free dot com that's go pest free dot com promo micoud save twenty police in northern virginia say girls been charged after she lied to police falsely reporting she'd been held at knife point by a man who ripped off her headscarf police said that further investigation into the girls report revealed no altercation that occurred police initially said the girl reported being confronted by a man who cursed at her displayed a small knife and placed it against her arms as he called her a terrorist the girl also falsely reported that the man removed her head scarf and covered her mouth the muffler screens before fleeing the statement says the thirteen year old is charged with knowingly filing a false police report the case will be handled through the juvenile justice system keith peters reporting maryland governor larry hogan signed the legislation to stabilize health insurance rates in the maryland healthcare exchanges financially troubled individual market the bill signed tuesday taps about three hundred eighty million dollars at health insurance companies no longer have to pay in federal taxes more of these stories at townhall dot com so national guard troops are starting to arrive at the us mexico border the president says illegal immigration and crime or at a crisis point at the border as emigrants stream in we have no.

President Trump Douglas Macarthur Scott Virginia Keith Peters Larry Hogan United States Harry Truman Maryland Mexico Twenty Five Dollars Three Hundred Eighty Million D Two Hundred Forty Nine Dollars Five Hundred Dollars Thirteen Year
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the corporation for public broadcasting this is wnyc good morning i'm sean carlson with a look at it with a forecast rain starting later this morning with highs in the mid forties this afternoon there's a chance we could see more rain tonight with patchy fog and cloudy skies temperature rising overnight tonight to about fifty one degrees and then tomorrow wednesday slight chance of drizzle and thunderstorms through the day areas of fog high near sixty one degrees by thursday it'll be sunny and cooler once again with a high near forty seven on any given night fifty three thousand young americans churn to the country's juvenile justice system and while some get a second chance others get trapped in a police courts and jails join me for the special series caught stories in conversations about juvenile justice in the us we'll hear about kids forever changed by how a system nominally aimed at rehabilitation might only be making things worse kim we'll take your calls tonight at eight on wnyc for this eastern passover week the reverend scholar vogel houses one guatemalan asylumseeker and her two kids at his manhattan church in the name of jesus his big thing love your neighbor and who is who our neighbor both not just people who happened to be from this country we are jesus message human beings matters no matter where you're from reverend skyla vogel on the brian lehrer show next time abram x candy on how to be an antiracist the brian lehrer show at ten am on wnyc this is morning edition from npr news i'm rachel martin and i'm steve inskeep a group of central american migrants whose journey triggered attacks on twitter by president trump is under review now by the mexican government.

sean carlson skyla vogel rachel martin trump mexican government kim manhattan brian lehrer npr steve inskeep president fifty one degrees sixty one degrees
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the country's juvenile justice system and while some get a second chance others get trapped in a police courts and jails i'm kai right let me for the special series caught three nights of stories in conversations we'll hear about kids forever changed by jimmy and how a system nominally angel rehabilitations might only d making things worse and we'll take your calls starting tuesday night at eight on wnyc from wnyc in new york this is on the media bob garfield is away this week i'm brooke latte stone it was fifteen years ago this month that president george w bush announced the beginning of the war in iraq setting off an invasion and occupation with a long grim shadow on my orders coalition forces have begun striking selected targets of military importance to undermine saddam hussein's ability to wage war these are opening stages of what will be abroad and concerted campaign fraud indeed even as the war in iraq feels like a never ending story we can still barely follow those responsible haven't left the spotlight take for instance john bolton the hawkish talking head for fox and the former un ambassador who's back in government is trump's new and third national security advisor or no the embassador very well he was one of the cheerleaders for the iraq invasion in two thousand and three which ended disastrously unlike me who feels very guilty about my support a bad invasion back in those days it made sense well we we like to think so the unapologetic about it he still believes it was a good idea geraldo is correct because as we cling to what we like to think about iraq there's a crucial lesson still unlearn new york times columnist max fisher gently schools us i think if you ask most americans how did this war actually start democrats will typically tell you well george w bush for cynical reasons wanted to go to war in iraq so he made up this live iraqi wmd to justify it and then if you ask republicans the more common answer is he meant well but he was misled by faulty intelligence you wrote.

geraldo max fisher york times un john bolton campaign fraud george w bush president iraq jimmy advisor trump fox saddam hussein bob garfield new york wnyc fifteen years
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"To his kids you you you there is a desire among the the criminal justice system the juvenile justice system to not label kids too early as a criminal because it has it's kind of a self fulfilling prophecy so we understand that there might have been an honorific reason to to to engage in this kind of program apparently its way out of hand and what we need to investigate and be sure of i think in arundel county and this is something that i hope to be working on a long with the the rest of the county council is to make sure that this is not a result that happens in enron no county this is a very you know when when we take i used the phrase when you take the cheese when the mouse takes cheese to get the shock when when you take these government grants you know the shock comes in one form or another and in the case of broward county now it's it's come with the the desa seventeen people that this is a very serious thing we have to be careful not to not to pervert our juvenile justice system by by being over careful about about this program good morning this is frankly were joining the conversation this wires grants are concerned whether they be private or public grants there's always the alternative ulterior motive let's face it they if somebody's going to give money they want usually something in return and so we're talking here about a horrific situation in florida but the same logic can be applied to a number of things like the scientists who want to blame man or mankind for climate change.

arundel county broward county florida
"juvenile justice system" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"juvenile justice system" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Juvenile justice system was developed and what people don't understand i mean they always want to anchor the conversation around people who've committed the most alec russell will people don't understand this is frequently young people who hennick committed the most violent crimes who end up in prison who end up in prison would adults when experienced could drastically change a life for the worst for all kinds of obvious reasons hunger to regional dwayne debts this is something that also of us stands out because other countries don't since juvenile's to these as adults to be incredibly might be prison terms and when they hear about what happens how we treat children would say that's the word children in this country um with life without parole or a tree incredibly long sentences it's something where they just say this country's lost his mind it's actually like is actually amazingly different all right in a so a rational so i had a client that was fifteen years old because he was fifty he has being tried as an adult because he was fifteen he couldn't be unlock up with adults for dorna troud dona call process we go to court is not as if you show up he got a time slot so if you get there on time you get an and you get out you show up at seven thirty in the morning and you remain there in sir like three thirty four o'clock in the afternoon and because this kid was only fifteen he couldn't be lanka we're all adults so where was he basically in a solitary confinement sue and a half with gatting i forgotten just how how how how difficult it is the final way to occupy your mind at fifteen until i went to see him and we wanted to sell me and my an attorney the talked to and we actually had nothing to talk to him about right because it was a foregone conclusion.

alec russell attorney fifteen years