17 Burst results for "Justin Sherman"

"justin sherman" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

05:56 min | 2 months ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"To understand why this moment feels precarious. Not just for Russians, but for the global Internet, we need to go back in time. Back to the start of the century, when Putin first came to power. So we can see how he's thinking about the Internet has evolved. I called up Justin Sherman, a fellow with the Atlantic council's cyber statecraft initiative to walk me through it. Vladimir Putin sees the Internet both as a threat to regime's security. And a weapon to be used against Russia's enemies. But this view was not always there. There was concern among some members of the Russian security apparatus around 2000 that the information spread on the Internet could threaten the regime, but it really took the next decade decade and a half for Putin and really the top decision makers to start paying attention to this Internet phenomenon. I'm thinking a little bit about the early 2000s. The early 2000s are marked by these color revolutions in former Soviet countries, including Ukraine. We're talking 2003, 2004, 2005. Did technology start to play a role at all there? Technology did not have a huge role in those early color revolutions, but this threat is really, really important for understanding how we got and how Putin got to where we are today, which is that did send fear rippling through the Kremlin about Russia losing influence over former Soviet republics. And also about foreign governments toppling regimes that are close to the Kremlin. For a variety of reasons, including the fact that he's a very conspiratorial and paranoid person, Vladimir Putin doesn't see opposition movements as legitimate. He doesn't see people protesting on the street, whether that's in St. Petersburg or in Kyiv and think, oh, these are people who have their own thoughts and their own desires and are mobilizing out of frustration or what have you. He looks and instead says there must be some foreign plot here where a government is orchestrating this behind the scenes. And so the Internet role in those early ones was minimal, but that really did explode that fear and the Kremlin's head that other states, other mysterious forces.

Putin Justin Sherman Vladimir Putin Atlantic council Russia Ukraine Kremlin Kyiv St. Petersburg
"justin sherman" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

The Secret History of the Future

05:56 min | 2 months ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

"To understand why this moment feels precarious. Not just for Russians, but for the global Internet, we need to go back in time. Back to the start of the century, when Putin first came to power. So we can see how he's thinking about the Internet has evolved. I called up Justin Sherman, a fellow with the Atlantic council's cyber statecraft initiative to walk me through it. Vladimir Putin sees the Internet both as a threat to regime's security. And a weapon to be used against Russia's enemies. But this view was not always there. There was concern among some members of the Russian security apparatus around 2000 that the information spread on the Internet could threaten the regime, but it really took the next decade decade and a half for Putin and really the top decision makers to start paying attention to this Internet phenomenon. I'm thinking a little bit about the early 2000s. The early 2000s are marked by these color revolutions in former Soviet countries, including Ukraine. We're talking 2003, 2004, 2005. Did technology start to play a role at all there? Technology did not have a huge role in those early color revolutions, but this threat is really, really important for understanding how we got and how Putin got to where we are today, which is that did send fear rippling through the Kremlin about Russia losing influence over former Soviet republics. And also about foreign governments toppling regimes that are close to the Kremlin. For a variety of reasons, including the fact that he's a very conspiratorial and paranoid person, Vladimir Putin doesn't see opposition movements as legitimate. He doesn't see people protesting on the street, whether that's in St. Petersburg or in Kyiv and think, oh, these are people who have their own thoughts and their own desires and are mobilizing out of frustration or what have you. He looks and instead says there must be some foreign plot here where a government is orchestrating this behind the scenes. And so the Internet role in those early ones was minimal, but that really did explode that fear and the Kremlin's head that other states, other mysterious forces.

Putin Justin Sherman Vladimir Putin Atlantic council Russia Ukraine Kremlin Kyiv St. Petersburg
"justin sherman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"With the reconciliation process in order to pass President Biden's nearly $2 trillion covert relief package. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says the Senate will vote today on emotion to move forward with their budget resolution that will lay the groundwork to pass President Biden's proposed $1.9 trillion covert relief package through the reconciliation process. That process would allow the stimulus proposal to pass the Senate with a simple majority, not requiring any Republican votes. The needs of the American people are so demanding We need to think big. We need to act quickly. Officials the ABC News Washington once he was a presidential candidate, now a candidate running for mayor in New York. He received backlash, believing the city during the pandemic and now has coronavirus. Andrew Yang has tested positive for covert. 19, the Democratic candidate trying to take over the role of mayor of New York City, was criticized in the past for turning his back and fleeing the city during the pandemic with his family. In a statement, Yang said he is experiencing mild symptoms and will continue to attend virtual events two weeks ago. He said he was quarantining after possibly being exposed to the virus from a member of his campaign staff. Lisa Matteo CBS News he had been in the spotlight and much beloved for many reasons being a World war to vet it all and for raising millions for British health services. Captain Tom has died at the age of 100. Buckingham Palace is the Queen is sending a private message to the family of Captain Sir Tom or the World War, two veteran and inspirational fundraisers. She knighted last summer. A nation is grieving. This quiet, understated gentlemen who set out to raise $1300 for the health service this past spring, ended up raising tens of millions and won a special place in people's hearts here. Vicki Barker, CBS NEWS London at the intersection of Opportunity and Preparedness, WBC's Obama has the story of a venture new One Delicious one, too, for a pair of new business owners on the South Shore chef and co owner of Thank You. Popcorn in Rockland. Justin Sherman fondly refers to himself as chief Snacker and his wife and business partner, Amy sent to the chief Smacker. So when Justin's brother called him up a few years ago and said, I know how we're gonna send Casey to college. We're gonna sell snacks. That's when thank you. Popcorn was born, transforming the lives of these classically trained chefs and new parents. I never I thought we'd be making popcorn. Next thing I know. I started playing around with it and experimenting and drizzling chocolate and I don't know. Now I make popcorn, a vocation fit for the nickname and the philosophy. It's just It's fun. What we're all about Refunds, snacking Chris Mama WBZ. Austin's news radio. 4 38 off the Wall Street, Andrew Oh Dae is that Bloomberg? It's a two day win streak, and that's nice. We'll take this down game 476 today. NASDAQ Up 209 has to be 500 up 52, in part because of the talk going on in Washington between the White House and Senate Republicans around the pandemic relief efforts..

Popcorn Senate Andrew Yang New York City President Biden Justin Sherman Captain Sir Tom Chuck Schumer Buckingham Palace Andrew Oh Dae Washington Lisa Matteo CBS WBC Vicki Barker Austin Obama
"justin sherman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Forward with the reconciliation process to pass President Biden nearly $2 trillion covert relief package. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says the Senate will vote today on a motion to move forward with their budget resolution that will lay the groundwork to pass President Biden's proposed $1.9 trillion covert relief package through the reconciliation process. That process would allow the stimulus proposal to pass the Senate with a simple majority, not requiring any Republican votes. The needs of the American people are so demanding We need to think big. We need to act quickly. Officials. The ABC News Washington the White House not backing down on that proposal for nearly $2 trillion stimulus package this afternoon, press secretary Jen Psaki Telling reporters at the White House. The package was put together by health experts and economists and covers vital areas. It includes safe re opening of schools in the ongoing extension of unemployment benefits, and there White House is pushing ahead with that number 1.9 Trillion. A massive fire destroyed the town hall in north in New Hampshire last evening, the firing Jefferson, New Hampshire, There were no injuries reported, but the building's a complete loss. Officials are investigating the cause. He was once a presidential candidate, now a candidate running for mayor in New York. It received backlash for leaving the city during the pandemic, and now He has coronavirus. Andrew Yang has tested positive for covert. 19, the Democratic candidate trying to take over the role of mayor of New York City was criticized in the past for turning his back and fleeing the city during the pandemic with his family. In a statement, Yang said he is experiencing mild symptoms and will continue to attend virtual events Two weeks ago. He said he was quarantining after possibly being exposed to the virus from a member of his campaign staff. Lisa Matteo CBS News at the intersection of Opportunity and Preparedness, WBC's Kriss Farm. As the story of a delicious venture for a pair of new business owners on the South Shore chef and co owner of Thank You. Popcorn in Rockland, Justin Sherman fondly refers to himself as chief Snacker and his wife and business partner, Amy sent to the chief Smacker. So when Justin's brother called him up a few years ago and said, I know how we're gonna send Casey to college. We're gonna sell snacks. That's when thank you. Popcorn was born, transforming the lives of these classically trained chefs and new parents. I never thought we'd be making popcorn. Next thing I know, I started playing around with it and experimenting and drizzling chocolate and and I don't know. No make popcorn, a vocation fit for the nickname and the philosophy. It's just It's fun, but we're all about her fun snacking. Chris Mama WBZ. Boston's news radio to 38 time to head off the Wall Street. Andrew Oh Dae is at Bloomberg. You know, if you liked yesterday's numbers she had like this even better. Yeah, it's ground Hog day again, And it's a rally for Wall Street again. Amid strong corporate earnings and new stimulus deal hope from Washington, the Dow is up 587. NASDAQ Up to 39. It should be 500 up 68. Those gains of almost 2% of the pandemic persist. Airstream is steering from wealthy retirees to white collar workers and instagram influencers. Today of a luxury trailer brand owned by R. V. Giant Thor Industries, is unveiling one of its sleek silver Tobel campers geared for the work from home crowd, too, with three beds convert two desks, allowing orders to sleep where they work..

Popcorn New York City Andrew Yang Senate President Biden White House Jefferson New Hampshire Justin Sherman Casey Chuck Schumer Airstream ABC Jen Psaki Chris Mama WBZ Lisa Matteo CBS Andrew Oh Dae R. V. Giant Thor Industries
"justin sherman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"As scientists continue to learn about the origins of the corona virus, they're learning about our relationship with the environment, so factors like deforestation play a key role in the emergence, and also the spread of these kinds of diseases and tensions are rising vessel filled with migrants trying to land in Sicily while we're currently off the coast, the fifthly we can be lands, and we've been waiting on news for disembarkation. Also sex workers in Europe are taking new precautions to get back to work emails from flying. When are you open? Maybe a little bit more difficult, but I think we're GONNA make. People want checks I'm Carol Hills, those stories and more ahead on the world. I'm Carol Hills. This is the world. Thanks for joining us on this Monday people in Hong. Kong are facing a different reality right now. For decades, the territory has been a semi autonomous part of China with a distinct legal system and protections for free speech, but Beijing has imposed a new Security Law on Hong. Kong critics say has brought a quick end to many democratic freedoms. They're in response. Several tech companies including facebook say they will stop turning over information requested by Hong Kong officials at least temporarily. Here's the world's Lydia. Here's a hypothetical scenario. Police somewhere in the world are investigating a crime and to solve the case they need information from the suspect social media accounts. Let's say their facebook page would they can do is go to facebook and request that data and information. This is actually pretty common social media companies process thousands of these requests every year, but now some are saying they're not willing to work. Work with authorities in Hong Kong at least temporarily in a statement first reported by the world, facebook said it's pausing these requests to further assess the National Security Law Beijing imposed on Hong Kong last week. That will apply to request for data from INSTAGRAM and WHATSAPP which facebook owns Justin. Sherman is a fellow with the Atlantic Council where he studies Internet governance in Cybersecurity for companies to. Come out now and say okay. We're going to reassess what's going on here. We're going to look at whether we should be handing over user. Data is in some ways a recognition of the fact that the way that private companies operate online in Hong Kong is very likely about to change and quickly about to change because of the new and sweeping National Security Law Beijing. Beijing imposed on the city. It gives authorities on the mainland broad new powers to police what people can say do online and offline. If China thinks people in Hong Kong are committing acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, or collusion, they can be punished harshly. Things that people could save freely before are now criminalised in Hong Kong. Were you previously had a free and open internet? Is Likely that a lot of that. Criminalization of those broad categories of activities is going to mean that people can't speak in Organiz nearly as freely online as the could previously. Janice Wong is already starting to see that happening. She's from Hong Kong and lives there now. She's also working on a PhD focused on data. Protection and privacy at the University of Saint Andrews in Scotland people have been starting to scrub their for media presence. And are starting to self, censor and limit what they say online for fear, because I think of of the question mark that the national security brings one of those question marks is how the law could be used retroactively to go after people for things they said days months years before the law went into effect. People are extra cautions as a result of that. So are not only kind of policing or kind of self censoring with a doing now, but actually back in time. And changing or deleting the move as their posts, some people are also concerned that Beijing will tap into the law and implement the kind of widespread censorship that happens on the mainland under the so-called great firewall, just in Sherman with the Atlantic Council says the new Security Law could have implications for all sorts of companies operating in Hong. Kong part of the benefit of free and open Internet in Hong. Kong is that it helps the business environment there. It's been a selling point for many companies including for example online storage companies that you can store your data in a geographically central spot in the Asia Pacific. You can store it in places geographically proximal to the mainland. But is not subject to the same kinds of. Arbitrary, authoritarian data collection and surveillance rules that are in place on the mainland. The new law he says could be a huge bust, not just for free speech, but also for business for the world. I'm Lydia mainly do. A sneeze a cough. That's what we've been trying to avoid to prevent the spread of the corona virus, but now more than two hundred scientists from nearly three dozen countries have signed onto a letter published today. That's gaining a lot of buzzed. They want us to think smaller about particles in aerosols. The world's Alan Gordon is following the story Alana. What does it mean that the coronavirus spread through aerosols? So Carol Aerosol particles that are so small. You can't see them. They may contain some virus particles. The tricky issue is how that results in the virus, being transmitted in the air, because yes, Aristotle's can stick around longer compared to larger droplets, but they don't have as much virus in them larger droplets in the air by comparison they come from things like sneezes in coffs, maybe singing the bigger, and they may not stick around in the air as long as wrestles, but they carry a lot more virus, so these big droplets have been seen as the primary mode of transmission for this new corona virus. But now scientists want as you were saying attention to Aristotle's too. So, what's at issue in this letter? I mean more than two hundred scientists have signed it. Why do they want the attention to these aerosols? Now so the issue Carol with this letter is twofold one has to do with the way that the World Health Organization and public health agencies like the CDC communicate risks based on what's known are not an issues guidelines, and then the other issue is on the risk of aerosol transmission itself. This group says there hasn't been proper emphasis on this possibility, and so they want. Want, guidelines updated. Joe Allen signed onto this letter. He's an assistant professor of exposure at Harvard. School of Public Health? He said scientists have been observing evidence of aerosol transmission of this new virus. Since February what w join CDC haven't been talking about. And what has been so frustrating for us is that they have been talking about airborne transmission, which means they haven't been talking about the healthy building control strategies that people need to bring in more fresh, outdoor air, higher, efficiency filters, and still. Yes, where a mask indoors. So? He's talking about better. Ventilation in places like schools, and of course avoiding overcrowding now Paul. Hunter is a professor at Norwich. Medical School at the University of East Anglia in the. He's a member of this w show expert panel that shapes guidelines and he's in disagreement. I'm not going to say that Aerosol spread of Toby nineteen doesn't. Happen I'm sure it does the issue for me very much is whether or not actually happens sufficiently frequently that we have to put effort into controlling that transmission pathway. So to him the balance of evidence that Aerosol spread isn't that important. How worried should people be about going out in the world and breathing air? Yeah, so I mean people like Joe Allen's say it's important to really create healthy buildings that have good ventilation to take into account this aerosol transmission, but I asked also his colleague built Hanish about this over at Harvard, School of Public Health. He's an epidemiologist and basically to him. Nothing is really new here. it's always been known. There's been some level of aerosol transmission, but context is important given that we have such an abundant amount of evidence that the greatest risks for transmission all sustained conversation. Talking to somebody for a.

Hong Kong Hong facebook Kong Beijing Carol Hills School of Public Health Atlantic Council China CDC Europe Joe Allen Sicily National Security Law Beijing Aristotle cough Sherman Janice Wong INSTAGRAM
"justin sherman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The creator but there's also poppy music hip hop even country this isn't the first time the music business has changed the language it uses to refer to music by black artists in nineteen forty two Billboard magazine unveiled a new chart called the Harlem thank then it became race records then bring them in blues and soul the phrase urban contemporary took off in the nineteen seventies using different words from music by black and white artists hi the unequal ways they've been promoted and paid says Jennifer Lynn Stover author of the sonic color line it shapes the way we think and understand how the music industry works and it really high all of these practices over the years the Grammys are going to use the word progressive instead of urban eighty Carson at U. VA says that too could be problematic we just probably have to be careful that you know like the changing of the words don't end up in a just being another like we end up with another euphemism that isn't really that different another euphemism that just ends up meaning music by black artists America Buhari's for market place lake you'll pretty much everybody it seems we do basically all of our meetings around here market place on zoom by its metric the video conference companies quote daily meeting participants that's the phrase they used that's it three hundred million and with success like that obviously comes scrutiny there's a whole encryption thing back when Corentin started if you remember that and today censorship and China an American activist who will the zoom meeting to commemorate the Tiananmen crackdown back in nineteen eighty nine had his account turned off from Washington marketplace Scott Tom has now resumed meeting in question was joined by two hundred and fifty activists discussing the Tiananmen killings from thirty one years ago some logged on from China when the meeting host had zoom account disable days later it was no surprise to Sarah cook she's with the human rights group Freedom House and says tech companies often target Chinese users around the world somebody post something on their account that is deemed to be sensitive in China and Lincoln will then send them a message telling them that their profiles now no longer visible to people in China late yesterday zoom restored the user account but all so said in a statement that it's necessary to comply with local laws around the world to mass customers and data servers in China Graham Webster is with the Stanford cyber policy center it's possible that zoom feels political pressure from China that would lead it to try to stamp out the discourse around the world that the Chinese government wouldn't like this comes at a tough moment for a company that sort in the pandemic it faces stiff competition to hose video meetings and zoom has another issue is technology is not the most secure says Justin Sherman at the Atlantic council think tank which potentially means that zoom or other entities could be turning over access to calls or listening in on conversations many multinational firms now banned soon and today several professors who.

"justin sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But there's also poppy music hip hop even country this isn't the first time the music business has changed the language it uses to refer to music by black artists in nineteen forty two Billboard magazine unveiled a new chart called the Harlem thank then it became race records Denver the little blues and soul the phrase urban contemporary took off in the nineteen seventies using different words from music by black and white artists hi the unequal ways they've been promoted and paid says Jennifer Lynn Stover author of the sonic color line it's the way we think and understand how the music industry works and it really high all of these practices over the years the Grammys are going to use the word progressive instead of urban eighty Carson at U. VA says that too could be problematic we just probably have to be careful that you know like the changing of the words don't end up in a just being another like we end up with another euphemism that isn't really that different another euphemism that just ends up meaning music by black artists America Paris for market place like you'll pretty much everybody it seems we do basically all of our meetings around her market place on zoom by its metric the video conference companies quote daily meeting participants that's the phrase they used that's it three hundred million and with success like that obviously comes scrutiny there's a whole encryption thing back when Corentin started if you remember that and today's censorship and China an American activist who will the zoom meeting to commemorate the Tiananmen crackdown back in nineteen eighty nine had his account turned off from Washington marketplace Scott Tom has now resumed meeting in question was joined by two hundred fifty activists discussing the Tiananmen killings from thirty one years ago some logon from China when the meeting host had ism account disable days later it was no surprise to Sarah cook she's with the human rights group Freedom House and says tech companies often target Chinese users around the world somebody post something on their account that is deemed to be sensitive in China and Lincoln will then send them a message telling them that their profiles now no longer visible to people in China late yesterday zoom restored the user account but also said in a statement that it's necessary to comply with local laws around the world your best customers and data servers in China Graham Webster is with the Stanford cyber policy center it's possible that zoom feels political pressure from China that would lead it to try to stamp out discourse around the world that the Chinese government wouldn't light this comes at a tough moment for a company that sort in the pandemic it faces stiff competition to host video meetings and zoom has another issue is technology is not the most secure says Justin Sherman at the Atlantic council think tank which potentially means that zoom or other entities could be turning over access to calls or listening in on conversations many multinational firms now banned soon and today several professors who teach China studies said.

"justin sherman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The creator but there's also a poppy music hip hop even country this isn't the first time the music business has changed the language it uses to refer to music by black artists in nineteen forty two Billboard magazine unveiled a new chart called the Harlem thank then it became race records Denver them in blues and soul the phrase urban contemporary took off in the nineteen seventies using different words from music by black and white artists hi the unequal ways they've been promoted and paid says Jennifer Lynn Stover author of the sonic color line it's six three we think and understand how the music industry works and it really high all of these practices over the years the Grammys are going to use the word progressive instead of urban eighty Carson at U. VA says that too could be problematic we just probably have to be careful that you know like the changing of the words don't end up in a just being another likely end up with another euphemism that isn't really that different another euphemism that just ends up meaning music by black artists America bears for market place like you'll pretty much everybody it seems we do basically all of our meetings around here market place on zoom by its metric the video conference companies quote daily meeting participants that's the phrase they used that's it three hundred million and with success like that obviously comes scrutiny there's a whole encryption thing back when Corentin started if you remember that and today censorship and China an American activist who will the zoom meeting to commemorate the Tiananmen crackdown back in nineteen eighty nine had his account turned off from Washington marketplace scuttling has now resumed meeting in question was joined by two hundred fifty activists discussing the tenement killings from thirty one years ago some logged on from China when the meeting host had ism account disable days later it was no surprise to Sarah cook she's with the human rights group Freedom House and says tech companies often target Chinese users around the world somebody post something on their account that is deemed to be sensitive in China and Lincoln will then send them a message telling them that their profiles now no longer visible to people in China late yesterday zoom restored the user account but also said in a statement that it's necessary to comply with local laws around the world to miss customers and data servers in China Graham Webster is with the Stanford cyber policy center it's possible that zoom feels political pressure from China that would lead it to try to stamp out discourse around the world that the Chinese government wouldn't like this comes at a tough moment for a company that's stored in the pandemic it faces stiff competition to hose video meetings and zoom has another issue is technology is not the most secure says Justin Sherman at the Atlantic council think tank which potentially means that zoom or other entities could be turning over access to calls or listening in on conversations many multinational firms now banned soon and today several professors who.

"justin sherman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on KCRW

"Country this isn't the first time the music business has changed the language it uses to refer to music by black artists in nineteen forty two Billboard magazine unveiled a new chart called the Harlem thank you then it became race records then bring them in blues and soul the phrase urban contemporary took off in the nineteen seventies using different words from music by black and white artists hi the unequal ways they've been promoted and paid says Jennifer Lynn Stover author of the sonic color line it shapes the way we think and understand how the music industry works and it really high all of these practices over the years the Grammys are going to use the word progressive instead of urban eighty Carson at U. VA says that too could be problematic we just probably have to be careful that you know like the changing of the words don't end up in a just being another like we end up with another euphemism that isn't really that different another euphemism that just ends up meaning music by black artists America Paris for market place lake you'll pretty much everybody it seems we do basically all of our meetings around here market place on zoom by its metric the video conference companies quote daily meeting participants that's the phrase they used that's a three hundred million and with success like that obviously comes scrutiny there's a whole encryption thing back when Corentin started if you remember that and today censorship and China an American activist who will the zoom meeting to commemorate the Tiananmen crackdown back in nineteen eighty nine had his account turned off from Washington marketplace Scott Tom has now resumed meeting in question was joined by two hundred fifty activists discussing the cameraman killings from thirty one years ago some logged on from China when the meeting host had ism account disabled days later it was no surprise to Sarah cook she's with the human rights group Freedom House and says tech companies often target Chinese users around the world somebody post something on their account that is deemed to be sensitive in China and Lincoln will then send them a message telling them that their profiles now no longer visible to people in China late yesterday zoom restored the user account but also said in this it meant that it's necessary to comply with local laws around the world to mass customers and data servers in China Graham Webster is with the Stanford cyber policy center it's possible that zoom feels political pressure from China that would lead it to try to stamp out discourse around the world that the Chinese government wouldn't like this comes at a tough moment for a company that's stored in the pandemic it faces stiff competition to hose video meetings and zoom has another issue is technology is not the most secure says Justin Sherman at the Atlantic council think tank which potentially means that zoom or other entities could be turning over access to calls or listening in on conversations many multinational firms now bands soon and today several professors who teach China.

"justin sherman" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

13:52 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"Here's the best part if your relationship. Asian ship doesn't work out all the stuff and go through this whole process again and keep the thank you notes arrays. The names bats goals. Hello meet again. I've been thinking through all of the stories on the things that we've been there. Nineteen years and things. You've probably even forgotten. Definitely forgot is a terrible memory. This glad you're running into people because they can compile these that we need to reconnect. Also my husband here is a is such a fan and also loves your podcast. tweet reconnecting keep better touch so I can hang out with Justin Sherman. He's pays pretty damn charming. We've known first of all nineteen years. We kind of like you were already in the Biz. I I was already quite a big Dick as I asked you a lot of questions. Yeah that's right but like barely didn't know what to do with my first job besides screaming on law and order episode. That's right you're right Outta be you. Yeah and you were. Everything was so new. You're so excited. And like yes and I was excited. Remember rose colored glasses. Do you remember when you picked me up on the side of the road by the way in the BERKSHIRES. When I do you remember this I was like? I'm so glad I was on this jumping jumping away ahead for but I was just thinking about all the things we've been through together and how you are like also such a testament to you. You are like the show up friend. Oh that's always been the show up front including like crashing that wedding in Mexico that time to remember that but there was also. Do you remember. Okay I was just I mean I was just out of college and you called me. I was crying and I was on the side of the road in the BERKSHIRES. Okuda vaguely like what's wrong. I mean I I must have. I'm sure this was still in the like I was still on Ed Point. Maybe but anyways I was crying because I had been a strange social situation Asian that I needed to get out of and so I didn't know what to do because I was on foot and we did have cell phones. Obviously but we didn't have any other means of like you the Google anything. I was on one line with my mother who was looking up train schedules to help. Get me out of pictures and you happen to call a line and it said mom hold hold on justice on the other line and I'll just come get you and I was like what do you mean you. Can you kill like four hours and I'll just come you're in trouble with Massachusetts countryside. Where you are? We were in Florida town and like I will come Pick WanNa say you knew people at the Williamstown theater festival out. People play there a couple of years. Maybe I just want an excuse. I'm trying to get myself a reason for not to be as selfless as it was. Because that's some I mean I'm like I'm thinking back to that age medium. I'm proud of him. I'm glad you went back clicked over with my mother and I was like just. I'm fine did you do easier to play up. There I did was planted. The corn is green. Yeah two thousand four hundred five sometime. Mm Time everything to me is in terms of how long my hair has been those. Were my long hair days so it was like more than twelve years ago. It was originally on the show. You a very. She had like Pixie Haircut. Short here early. How my guy I was like all frown but it was also exciting to take somebody to be have somebody to take everything had been so new for me that point that I now got to have a little buddy who was kind of let it go? Let me show you. The he did not distance by everything the VIR planning. But you had a very clear idea of what you want it to me. It was like I'll do whatever you know. I'm I'm excited to have to be in any movies and stuff but I think I was in that about you that you had a clear without sounding like Dushi or Shitty. I won't do certain things but you know you just had a good idea of what you wanted. Sir Ed was. We had smaller roles on that. Show Really Watch the people then people did but it was so. Stop me about though I get. It occasionally not always makes me really like nostalgic. And what was your impression when you first got that. Show what what were you thinking right out of college. Were you like. Oh we're off to the races and this is thinking. Thank God I can pay my rent. I was sharing a actual bed head with a college classmate because we couldn't fit more than one bed in the space God in I mean it was somewhere in Queens. I don't even remember where at this point. So the fact that I could pay rent wilmer girls and doing something that I was obsessed with but I do remember thinking that because I was right out of theater school that must have been fresher and more precise and my work was probably less exhausted and I went back and watched my first episode years and years and years and years later and notice that I was looking at the floor the entire time because I was scared I I would like look in the camera. Oh that's probably looking for mark. Oh Yeah I catch myself looking for marks. All the they put down their little pieces of tape on the ground for actress to stop it which I rarely do with an inconsistency overstepping. I've recently saw Ed to contextualize for the majority of you. Who Haven't seen it was a show about? It actually shows all the time. I heard this show any other Canadians likely. which makes me like the Canadian even more than But Ed was a bowl. He was a lawyer. Moves back to a small town of Stuck Ville opens up a bowling alley blah blah. You know that old chestnut and engineering. I played and he has a crush. He had a crush on a woman who's now his teach. It is now a teacher. Teacher played by Julie Bowen of modern modern familiar fame and in Virginia students in her school so the first season I was on and then Jimmy came in the second season. I think to become a regular snyder. Diane Snyder Diane Diane Star started as psycho. What's the dynamic like? Oh it's kind of like some kind of wonderful yes you know what's actually think the reference we think it what you yeah. Yeah that's right your character directly reference that movie but So it was kind of a back enclosed little love triangle with their friends. Michael played by Margaret Dri. Tom Kevin I ran into the Madison. Weirdly runs into Tom and he's in Canada anyway. We'll we'll Thompson Vancouver's yes flash through your husband's on show now what he's on manifest which which is NBC so yes about the plane advantages for five years. Yes so we yeah. We made a deal that I would never or leave home here best. We signed some paperwork when you decide to love her for the rest of your life by the way I was. I didn't WanNa get married which I will tell that story. Okay that But we made a deal which go back to that but we did make a deal that I I feel very strongly. He both very strongly that someone has to be home with children. The children are not. I was when I had kids that they were gonNA come along for the ride and then I had them and I was like Oh fuck years ride interesting like like I am now when service of you and so not a part of my little entourage. I'm on your tire trauma and so I stayed home with the kids because I can't I can't be away And my husband is I mean. He is free as far as I am concerned to do. Whatever he wants? Anywhere in the world he comes back and visits a lot very liberal. Not The worst situation we should like. I feel like more than some other. We've been together for almost a decade and I feel like we still. It's like dating when he comes home in that like we miss each other there and we're not like we don't get annoyed other bottled up in the same environment. Raising children is really traumatized. Said like that's that's cool. Yeah I do that in like six months a year. He comes home and he's full on data. So you plan your work. So then you'll catch jobs around that and I also will not leave for any job for more than an extremely short period of time so to your shooting once upon a time that was in Vancouver yes and we left after the sixth season because of the because because we were just we were wiped and we need to put the kids in school and also like six years. You must have been in terms of like the character to have sets you know. We actually did twenty three episodes most if those years. God were you still into the show by the end. I mean into the work I was attached to. Yeah Yeah I could have done a better job there at the end I mean I had both babies on the show so I went through my pregnancy. I I worked up until I was five. Weeks pre delivery only child God went home for hiatus and then with back acting by five weeks postpartum. And you're playing a snow snow white hair so snow as pregnant every little dwarf again and again anyone never stopped having babies with restore. You were going to tell you what was I gonNa tell about getting married. Oh yes so I had this whole thing about how. Oh my husband. Because he's Prince charming was last was all that he really is. He was passionate national about getting married and I felt strongly that marriage marriage didn't like as legality. Didn't make sense to me like it didn't mean anything to music. Why can't we just be together forever? Promises like it's an outdated you know Formality and in and he said to Fi- proposed you would say no and I was just flips like let's just put till later because I'm not projecting you by saying I don't so anyways it was complicated but all of the sudden so we did plan to have babies and we lived together and I was very very very pregnant and one day it was like a light switch and I was like I want your Our Name. He's like I wish I hadn't brought that really open the floodgates so he proposed super pregnant and then we got married when I was eight months pregnant with our first literally barefoot. I wonder I wonder how much of that had to do with your own family which which was fractured So you probably get playing you know. I wonder I just wonder how much of that was like. I don't want to replicate that. There was not an example except for maybe set by my grandparents but there wasn't there wasn't like a more immediate example for me too. How old were they divorced? I was a teenager teenager so I also felt like I mean I was engaged as you know prior to meeting my now husband husband talking to a friend of mine introduced the leading I actually crashing in Mexico right right. We we found each other at. How did we get to be in Mexico at that time? which is also the best trip? Felt photos like you know because we had to actually take we have actual cameras and actual photos back in those days. I'll find them. You called me. I think I was doing like Mona Lisa. Smile or something. And you got tickets to a premier in. You called me if we were these t shirts with the name of Said Jim on the t shirts colored carpet give free memberships and we went in. I chickened out on the carpet and zipped up my jacket. That's right get the membership or sure. Did I got it got Karaj and was one of those like Baseball Styling Jersey style so in you can keep the shirt pictures out there somewhere and we went to that after party and I met by now best friend Dory at that after which we had nothing to do with the other way you got a gym membership and I'm very happy for you. Cut Too late ten years later I was at a bar with Dory. She was going to reporting in Mexico. We were meeting the groom at the Bar and He looked at me and he said someone just fell out. And everything's prepaid. Do you just want to hop on a plane tomorrow morning and come to the wedding and I said yes and then you you called me and I was in Mexico and I was him a wedding in Mexico. You WanNa come hang up bring Christian and this friend of mine and Y'all showed up that's right that's made it like a Mexican vacation so oh funding and you met your fiancee. The point being when that relationship fell apart I felt like marriage obviously is not like like this is not going to be my right. I didn't know that you guys have broken up when I ran into next. Remember this is fair at the Roosevelt. I thought you were joking. I was like you didn't tell anybody nobody. We kept it really just because things like being leaked to get it but you you had a wedding date and was like I was like Except for the wedding. I remember that data so you were like we're removing the day. There's been a conflict and then that person went on to write a movie that was kind of based about this and I'm actually really proud of them..

Mexico Sir Ed Tom Kevin Justin Sherman Diane Snyder Ed Point Dick Google Massachusetts Florida Julie Bowen wilmer Queens Jim Roosevelt Karaj Thompson Vancouver Dory Baseball Vancouver
"justin sherman" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

13:52 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"Here's the best part if your relationship. Asian ship doesn't work out all the stuff and go through this whole process again and keep the thank you notes arrays. The names bats goals. Hello meet again. I've been thinking through all of the stories on the things that we've been there. Nineteen years and things. You've probably even forgotten. Definitely forgot is a terrible memory. This glad you're running into people because they can compile these that we need to reconnect. Also my husband here is a is such a fan and also loves your podcast. tweet reconnecting keep better touch so I can hang out with Justin Sherman. He's pays pretty damn charming. We've known first of all nineteen years. We kind of like you were already in the Biz. I I was already quite a big Dick as I asked you a lot of questions. Yeah that's right but like barely didn't know what to do with my first job besides screaming on law and order episode. That's right you're right Outta be you. Yeah and you were. Everything was so new. You're so excited. And like yes and I was excited. Remember rose colored glasses. Do you remember when you picked me up on the side of the road by the way in the BERKSHIRES. When I do you remember this I was like? I'm so glad I was on this jumping jumping away ahead for but I was just thinking about all the things we've been through together and how you are like also such a testament to you. You are like the show up friend. Oh that's always been the show up front including like crashing that wedding in Mexico that time to remember that but there was also. Do you remember. Okay I was just I mean I was just out of college and you called me. I was crying and I was on the side of the road in the BERKSHIRES. Okuda vaguely like what's wrong. I mean I I must have. I'm sure this was still in the like I was still on Ed Point. Maybe but anyways I was crying because I had been a strange social situation Asian that I needed to get out of and so I didn't know what to do because I was on foot and we did have cell phones. Obviously but we didn't have any other means of like you the Google anything. I was on one line with my mother who was looking up train schedules to help. Get me out of pictures and you happen to call a line and it said mom hold hold on justice on the other line and I'll just come get you and I was like what do you mean you. Can you kill like four hours and I'll just come you're in trouble with Massachusetts countryside. Where you are? We were in Florida town and like I will come Pick WanNa say you knew people at the Williamstown theater festival out. People play there a couple of years. Maybe I just want an excuse. I'm trying to get myself a reason for not to be as selfless as it was. Because that's some I mean I'm like I'm thinking back to that age medium. I'm proud of him. I'm glad you went back clicked over with my mother and I was like just. I'm fine did you do easier to play up. There I did was planted. The corn is green. Yeah two thousand four hundred five sometime. Mm Time everything to me is in terms of how long my hair has been those. Were my long hair days so it was like more than twelve years ago. It was originally on the show. You a very. She had like Pixie Haircut. Short here early. How my guy I was like all frown but it was also exciting to take somebody to be have somebody to take everything had been so new for me that point that I now got to have a little buddy who was kind of let it go? Let me show you. The he did not distance by everything the VIR planning. But you had a very clear idea of what you want it to me. It was like I'll do whatever you know. I'm I'm excited to have to be in any movies and stuff but I think I was in that about you that you had a clear without sounding like Dushi or Shitty. I won't do certain things but you know you just had a good idea of what you wanted. Sir Ed was. We had smaller roles on that. Show Really Watch the people then people did but it was so. Stop me about though I get. It occasionally not always makes me really like nostalgic. And what was your impression when you first got that. Show what what were you thinking right out of college. Were you like. Oh we're off to the races and this is thinking. Thank God I can pay my rent. I was sharing a actual bed head with a college classmate because we couldn't fit more than one bed in the space God in I mean it was somewhere in Queens. I don't even remember where at this point. So the fact that I could pay rent wilmer girls and doing something that I was obsessed with but I do remember thinking that because I was right out of theater school that must have been fresher and more precise and my work was probably less exhausted and I went back and watched my first episode years and years and years and years later and notice that I was looking at the floor the entire time because I was scared I I would like look in the camera. Oh that's probably looking for mark. Oh Yeah I catch myself looking for marks. All the they put down their little pieces of tape on the ground for actress to stop it which I rarely do with an inconsistency overstepping. I've recently saw Ed to contextualize for the majority of you. Who Haven't seen it was a show about? It actually shows all the time. I heard this show any other Canadians likely. which makes me like the Canadian even more than But Ed was a bowl. He was a lawyer. Moves back to a small town of Stuck Ville opens up a bowling alley blah blah. You know that old chestnut and engineering. I played and he has a crush. He had a crush on a woman who's now his teach. It is now a teacher. Teacher played by Julie Bowen of modern modern familiar fame and in Virginia students in her school so the first season I was on and then Jimmy came in the second season. I think to become a regular snyder. Diane Snyder Diane Diane Star started as psycho. What's the dynamic like? Oh it's kind of like some kind of wonderful yes you know what's actually think the reference we think it what you yeah. Yeah that's right your character directly reference that movie but So it was kind of a back enclosed little love triangle with their friends. Michael played by Margaret Dri. Tom Kevin I ran into the Madison. Weirdly runs into Tom and he's in Canada anyway. We'll we'll Thompson Vancouver's yes flash through your husband's on show now what he's on manifest which which is NBC so yes about the plane advantages for five years. Yes so we yeah. We made a deal that I would never or leave home here best. We signed some paperwork when you decide to love her for the rest of your life by the way I was. I didn't WanNa get married which I will tell that story. Okay that But we made a deal which go back to that but we did make a deal that I I feel very strongly. He both very strongly that someone has to be home with children. The children are not. I was when I had kids that they were gonNA come along for the ride and then I had them and I was like Oh fuck years ride interesting like like I am now when service of you and so not a part of my little entourage. I'm on your tire trauma and so I stayed home with the kids because I can't I can't be away And my husband is I mean. He is free as far as I am concerned to do. Whatever he wants? Anywhere in the world he comes back and visits a lot very liberal. Not The worst situation we should like. I feel like more than some other. We've been together for almost a decade and I feel like we still. It's like dating when he comes home in that like we miss each other there and we're not like we don't get annoyed other bottled up in the same environment. Raising children is really traumatized. Said like that's that's cool. Yeah I do that in like six months a year. He comes home and he's full on data. So you plan your work. So then you'll catch jobs around that and I also will not leave for any job for more than an extremely short period of time so to your shooting once upon a time that was in Vancouver yes and we left after the sixth season because of the because because we were just we were wiped and we need to put the kids in school and also like six years. You must have been in terms of like the character to have sets you know. We actually did twenty three episodes most if those years. God were you still into the show by the end. I mean into the work I was attached to. Yeah Yeah I could have done a better job there at the end I mean I had both babies on the show so I went through my pregnancy. I I worked up until I was five. Weeks pre delivery only child God went home for hiatus and then with back acting by five weeks postpartum. And you're playing a snow snow white hair so snow as pregnant every little dwarf again and again anyone never stopped having babies with restore. You were going to tell you what was I gonNa tell about getting married. Oh yes so I had this whole thing about how. Oh my husband. Because he's Prince charming was last was all that he really is. He was passionate national about getting married and I felt strongly that marriage marriage didn't like as legality. Didn't make sense to me like it didn't mean anything to music. Why can't we just be together forever? Promises like it's an outdated you know Formality and in and he said to Fi- proposed you would say no and I was just flips like let's just put till later because I'm not projecting you by saying I don't so anyways it was complicated but all of the sudden so we did plan to have babies and we lived together and I was very very very pregnant and one day it was like a light switch and I was like I want your Our Name. He's like I wish I hadn't brought that really open the floodgates so he proposed super pregnant and then we got married when I was eight months pregnant with our first literally barefoot. I wonder I wonder how much of that had to do with your own family which which was fractured So you probably get playing you know. I wonder I just wonder how much of that was like. I don't want to replicate that. There was not an example except for maybe set by my grandparents but there wasn't there wasn't like a more immediate example for me too. How old were they divorced? I was a teenager teenager so I also felt like I mean I was engaged as you know prior to meeting my now husband husband talking to a friend of mine introduced the leading I actually crashing in Mexico right right. We we found each other at. How did we get to be in Mexico at that time? which is also the best trip? Felt photos like you know because we had to actually take we have actual cameras and actual photos back in those days. I'll find them. You called me. I think I was doing like Mona Lisa. Smile or something. And you got tickets to a premier in. You called me if we were these t shirts with the name of Said Jim on the t shirts colored carpet give free memberships and we went in. I chickened out on the carpet and zipped up my jacket. That's right get the membership or sure. Did I got it got Karaj and was one of those like Baseball Styling Jersey style so in you can keep the shirt pictures out there somewhere and we went to that after party and I met by now best friend Dory at that after which we had nothing to do with the other way you got a gym membership and I'm very happy for you. Cut Too late ten years later I was at a bar with Dory. She was going to reporting in Mexico. We were meeting the groom at the Bar and He looked at me and he said someone just fell out. And everything's prepaid. Do you just want to hop on a plane tomorrow morning and come to the wedding and I said yes and then you you called me and I was in Mexico and I was him a wedding in Mexico. You WanNa come hang up bring Christian and this friend of mine and Y'all showed up that's right that's made it like a Mexican vacation so oh funding and you met your fiancee. The point being when that relationship fell apart I felt like marriage obviously is not like like this is not going to be my right. I didn't know that you guys have broken up when I ran into next. Remember this is fair at the Roosevelt. I thought you were joking. I was like you didn't tell anybody nobody. We kept it really just because things like being leaked to get it but you you had a wedding date and was like I was like Except for the wedding. I remember that data so you were like we're removing the day. There's been a conflict and then that person went on to write a movie that was kind of based about this and I'm actually really proud of them..

Mexico Sir Ed Tom Kevin Justin Sherman Diane Snyder Ed Point Dick Google Massachusetts Florida Julie Bowen wilmer Queens Jim Roosevelt Karaj Thompson Vancouver Dory Baseball Vancouver
"justin sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:02 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot org I'm from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station this is one a I'm Todd's Willich were talking about how governments control the internet we just in Sherman of new America and cyber security researcher nema Fatemi Justin Sherman what are some of the ways that governments can control the internet aside from just blocking it out there are a variety of ways governments can control the internet night actually thinking for thinking about these techniques and these policies as a sort of tool box internet blackouts are more like a hammer they're pretty blunt they don't require in some cases a lot of technical sophistication in order to do them but there are tools that are more like a scalpel a great example would be the great firewall in China which uses the blacklisting of I. P. addresses machine learning to look for a particular kinds of content posts and a variety of techniques that essentially aimed to block things based on where they're headed where they're coming from and the contents so there's really a range of of ways that governments can control the weapon the slain so if you're an authority and Thor tarian are inspiring authoritarian when would you get out the hammer when there's a blackout appropriate or is it just the tool of the technically non sophisticated every now and then we see eight very technically sophisticated country block out the internet China in its Xinjiang region which is currently the site of a techno fueled a crackdown on the weaker Muslims was had the internet shut down for about a year from two thousand nine to two thousand ten and that's a case where the government used a blackout because they wanted them the least visibility possible into the region and the least amount of internet communication possible within the region that's not because they don't have the capability to to censor which they certainly do but in many cases countries that engage in internet shut down to do so because they lack the scale and sophistication that the Chinese have for filtering content I'm I mentioned India earlier and that's a great example because with the misinformation that had been viral on what sap the Indian government had actually gone to what sap several times and requested that they give them some sort of way to monitor posts in real time so they could stop the spread of misinformation and what sap rightfully in my view said no and so the Indian government's response in many of these cases is to turn to that hammer ask technique of just blocking out communications entirely because they don't have more sophisticated mechanisms to catch this misinformation you mentioned the great firewall in China the selective and sophisticated blocking of I. P. addresses machine learning take me inside a little bit more about what technically savvy sophisticated censorship looks like today I think it's important to put this in historical context for a couple of decades liberal democracies have largely thought about the internet as this inherently open and free and democratic space and so the way to accrue its benefits the logic has gone is to remain relatively hands off as a government authoritarian regimes on the other hand at least those and China Russia Iran initially saw the internet very differently they saw the free flow of information as a security risk as a threat to regime's stability and so very early on there were a coalition of countries that started to build out the censorship and surveillance mechanisms in order to clamp down on the web from from the very start from the very start exactly and there is a now infamous speech that Bill Clinton gave in two thousand which said that for China to control the web would be like nailing Jello to a wall and as it turns out they've nailed a ton of Jello to the wall because they've been spending the past two decades working on blocking foreign news websites like The New York Times on scanning all traffic within the country to make sure nobody is posting things the government doesn't like for example if you compare president she's in pain to Winnie the Pooh that'll be taken down and so there's a variety of techniques that they've been building but because they've been doing it for so many years because they've been investing so much money in it because China has a large technical talent base on which to draw to do these things they've become in many ways the the sort of global leader in online censorship and control here's a little bit of internet censorship that sounds in comparison to what we're talking about relatively benign a listener tweeted in Ethiopia recently internet connections were blocked for many days a stencil extensively to prevent students cheating during exams but he created chaos throughout the country Justin what do you know about Ethiopia does that sound plausible to you it sounds plausible that that occurred but I think what this what this person mentioned is right on point in that there are always collateral effects of these internet shut downs because while the government perhaps was well intentioned in some ways and preventing students are treating her we can imagine other cases where the government might have a very particular legitimate motivation there are still many other people who depend on there's communication systems who are going to be hurt by having them taken off line as in the mess said there are also tend to be you know certain demographics that are affected worst but just because one group has perhaps bad uses of the internet that you want to stop doesn't mean that other people whether that's emergency personnel or journalists or just regular citizens aren't going to be also impacted if you shut down the web now I want to talk about the United States because when you talk about internet blackouts immediately many Americans minds go to rumors they've heard or that they read about online about the kill switch the internet kill switch now in twenty twelve president Obama did sign an executive order that gave the U. S. government as so called kill switch for the internet or the power to shut off the internet Justin is this a real thing does the government have the authority to do it or do they actually have the ability to do it there are various in extremist legal authorities were in some sort of catastrophic situation the government could potentially exert control over the American internet in various ways but I think there was a lot of unnecessary panic about what happened with president Obama and I think in large part that's due to branding it as a kill switch the internet in the United States is relatively decentralized compared to other countries in China for example there are only a few major gateways that can back to the global web to the web within China so it's much easier for the government to go in and whether that's force those companies to do something or tap those I SPS on the shoulder and make them do something it's much easier to control the web one it's more centralized that's not the case in the United States it's a lot more decentralized and of course we live in a democracy so that also makes it fundamentally different from many of these other countries where there isn't rule of law and where there aren't checks and balances that would prevent the government from going in and turning off the west so just to be clear if the U. S. government has the in extremists authority to shut down the internet you're saying in the practical world even though they have the authority the ability to do it is not that easy it may not be easy it can't be done it would be quite difficult to compare to any internet shut downs we've seen so far in other countries Nina what's your perspective on an internet kill switch some people had a vision of a look a toggle switch on the resolution on the resolution that originally destined you know in the oval office the president just kill the switch I think what we have to consider is that inter censorship and shut downs are going to look very different in different societies different depending on depending on many many many factors one of the most important parts of what they one of the most important thing that that makes internet so enjoyable for it for all of us is that the aspect of like the people aspect of it the fact that it connects of everybody together and it is true that internet is a lot more decentralized here in the U. S. but we have to be very careful about the path that we are on like for example right now Facebook and Amazon and Google basically these for the three companies control the visit vast majority of everything that you do online and we are seeing like ridiculous censorship on Instagram and nobody can do anything about it because there is little to no regulations on all of these like make a tech companies on how they are handling this information for example like if you're if you're an author and you you you write a book and if Amazon and Barnes and nobles decided to not to publish your work good luck selling that book nobody's gonna know about it sure you can put a put on a website sure you know the government is not like actively going after you to to you know persecute you for for writing that book but note that you're not going to be able to find your audience there is government censorship there is also corporate censorship and we're gonna talk about corporate censorship especially as big American tech companies do more and more business overseas and want access to countries like India and China let me be your group though looks for those workarounds when government censor the internet when they put up the walls you try to get around them and over them and under them in the past when you were able to get around online censorship I'm we're not super technically savvy right now to give me a sense of what that looks like how you go to work to get past the censors so basically what we do is that we generally look at what is allowed as traffic in any network and then by studying what is allowed we try to figure out if we can have like some Dicko traffic some if we can like reshape the traffic of you know like we try to encrypt the traffic between and points like for example if you want to visit Google dot com or any other website we make sure that your traffic in transit is encrypted so nobody can luck which website are you actually visiting when your you know like if you're connecting to for example Tor network which is in that meeting and and I'm in the network it's tore is this free and open source browser that anybody can basically download from the web and it just helps them to protect their privacy online so when when you use technologies like this you basically try to hide your traffic in sight encryption and what we do is that we try to look and see if we can reshape the traffic to look like the traffic that is actually allowed imagine like just you know like you go to USPS and our boxes there they are sending boxes that are loud and they're sent to certain boxes that are not allowed you basically reshape your traffic to look like this the boxes that are loud and then inside that box you put your an encrypted traffic so it looks like normal traffic for things back that sounds completely logical in as you describe it makes me think of Star Wars when Lou can lay and Han dressed up like storm troopers.

Todd America Justin Sherman NPR Willich researcher
"justin sherman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

13:08 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"One day at W. M. U. dot org Justin Sherman what are some of the ways that governments can control the internet aside from just blocking it out there are a variety of ways governments can control the internet night actually thinking for thinking about these techniques and these policies as a sort of tool box internet blackouts are more like a hammer they're pretty blunt they don't require in some cases a lot of technical sophistication in order to do them but there are tools that are more like a scalpel a great example would be the great firewall in China which uses the blacklisting of I. P. addresses machine learning to look for particular kinds of content posts and a variety of techniques that essentially aim to block things based on where they're headed where they're coming from and the contents so there's really a range of of ways that governments can control the weapon the slain so if you're an authority at Thor tarian are inspiring authoritarian when would you get out the hammer when is a blackout appropriate or is it just the tool of the technically non sophisticated every now and then we see eight very technically sophisticated country block out the internet China in its Xinjiang region which is currently the site of a techno fueled by a crackdown on the weaker Muslims was had the internet shut down for about a year from two thousand nine to two thousand ten and that's a case where the government used a blackout because they wanted the man the least visibility possible into the region and the least amount of internet communication possible within the region that's not because they don't have the capability to to censor which they certainly do but in many cases countries that engage in internet shut down to do so because they lack the scale and sophistication that the Chinese have for filtering content I'm I mentioned India earlier and that's a great example because with the misinformation that had been viral on what sap the Indian government had actually gone to what sap several times and requested that they give them some sort of way to monitor posts in real time so they could stop the spread of misinformation and what sap rightfully in my view said no and so the Indian government's response in many of these cases is to turn to that hammer ask technique of just blocking out communications entirely because they don't have more sophisticated mechanisms to catch this misinformation you mentioned the great firewall in China the selective and sophisticated blocking of I. P. addresses machine learning take me inside a little bit more about what technically savvy sophisticated censorship looks like today I think it's important to put this and historical context for a couple of decades liberal democracies have largely thought about the internet as this inherently open and free and democratic space and so the way to accrue its benefits the logic has gone is to remain relatively hands off as a government authoritarian regimes on the other hand at least those and China Russia Iran initially saw the internet very differently they saw the free flow of information as a security risk as a threat to regime stability and so very early on there were a coalition of countries that started to build out the censorship and surveillance mechanisms in order to clamp down on the website from the very start from the very start exactly and there is now infamous speech that Bill Clinton gave in two thousand which said that for China to control the web would be like nailing Jello to a wall and as it turns out days nailed a ton of Jello to the wall because they've been spending the past two decades working on blocking foreign news websites like The New York Times on scanning all traffic within the country to make sure nobody is posting things the government doesn't like for example if you compare president she's in pain to Winnie the Pooh that'll be taken down and so there's a variety of techniques that they've been building but because they've been doing it for so many years because they've been investing so much money in it because China has a large technical talent base on which to draw to do these things they've become in many ways the the sort of global leader in online censorship and control here's a little bit of internet censorship that sounds in comparison to what we're talking about relatively benign a listener tweeted in Ethiopia recently internet connections were blocked for many days a stenciling extensively to prevent students cheating during exams but he created chaos throughout the country Justin what do you know about Ethiopia does that sound plausible to you it sounds plausible that that occurred but I think what this what this person mentioned is right on point and that they're always collateral effects of these internet shut downs because while the government perhaps was well intentioned in some ways and preventing students in treating or we can imagine other cases where the government might have a very particular legitimate motivation there are still many other people who depend on this communication systems who are going to be hurt by having them taken off line as in the most said there are also tend to be you know certain demographics that are affected worst but just because one group has perhaps bad uses of the internet that you want to stop doesn't mean that other people whether that's emergency personnel or journalists or just regular citizens aren't going to be also impacted if you shut down the web now I want to talk about the United States because when you talk about internet blackouts immediately many Americans minds go to rumors they've heard or that they read about online about the kill switch the internet kill switch now in twenty twelve president Obama did sign an executive order that gave the U. S. government as so called kill switch for the internet or the power to shut off the internet Justin is this a real thing does the government have the authority to do it or do they actually have the ability to do it there are various in extremist legal authorities were in some sort of catastrophic situation the government could potentially exert control over the American internet in various ways but I think there was a lot of unnecessary panic about about what happened with president Obama and I think in large part that's due to branding it as a kill switch the internet in the United States is relatively decentralized compared to other countries in China for example there are only a few major gateways that connect to the global web to the web within China so it's much easier for the government to go in and whether that's force those companies to do something or tap those I SPS on the shoulder and make them do something it's much easier to control the web when it's more centralized that's not the case in the United States it's a lot more decentralized and of course we live in a democracy so that also makes it fundamentally different from many of these other countries where there isn't rule of law and where there aren't checks and balances that would prevent the government from going in and turning off the west so just to be clear if the U. S. government has the in extremist authority to shut down the internet you're saying in a practical world even though they have the authority the ability to do it is not that easy it may not be easy but can it be done it it would it would be quite difficult to compare to any internet shut downs we've seen so far in other countries Nina what's your perspective on an internet kill switch some people had a vision of a look a toggle switch on the resolution on the resolution that originally destined you know in the oval office the president just kill the switch I think what we have to consider is that inter censorship and shut downs are going to look very different in different societies different depending on depending on many many many factors one of the most important parts of what they one of the most important thing that that makes internet so enjoyable for it for all of us is that the aspect of like the people aspect of it the fact that it connects of everybody together and it is true that internet is a lot more decentralized here in the U. S. but we have to be very careful about the path that we are on like for example right now Facebook and Amazon and Google basically these for the three companies control the visit vast majority of everything that you do online and we are seeing like ridiculous censorship on Instagram and nobody can do anything about it because there is little to no regulations on all of these like make a tech companies on how they are handling this information for example like if you're if you're an author and you you you write a book and if Amazon and Barnes and nobles decided to not to publish your work good luck selling that book nobody's gonna know about it sure you can put a put on a website sure you know the government is not like actively going after you to to you know persecute you for for writing that book but know that you're not going to be able to find your audience there is government censorship there is also corporate censorship and we're gonna talk about corporate censorship especially as big American tech companies do more and more business overseas and want access to countries like India and China let me be your group so looks for those workarounds when government censor the internet when they put up the walls you try to get around them and over them and under them in the past when you were able to get around online censorship on we're not super technically savvy right now to give me a sense of what that looks like how you go to work to get past the censors so basically what we do is that we generally look at what is allowed as traffic in any network and and by studying what is allowed we try to figure out if we can have like some decode traffic so if we can like reshape the traffic of you know like we tried to encrypt the traffic between and points like for example if you want to visit Google dot com or any other website we make sure that your traffic in transit is encrypted so nobody can luck which website are you actually visiting when your you know like if you're connecting to for example Tor network which is anatomy in anonymity network it's tore is this free and open source browser that anybody can basically download from the web and it just helps them to protect their privacy online so when when you use technologies like this you basically try to hide your traffic inside encryption and what we do is that we try to look and see if we can reshape the traffic to look like the traffic that is actually allowed imagine like just you know like you go to USPS and our boxes there they are setting boxes that are loud and they're sent to certain boxes that are not allowed you basically reshape your traffic to look like this the boxes that are loud and then inside that box you put your and encrypt the traffic so it looks like normal traffic for the inspector sounds completely logical in as you describe it makes me good Star Wars when Lou can lay and Han dressed up like storm troopers and they got into the death star and do their business a similar principle okay I understand that you make the traffic look like traffic that's allowed and then you get the end but if it's just you and your buddies it can do who cares I mean how do you then give the people who want to access let's say around wanna get information and want to get counter information and how do you enable them to piggy back on your ability to hide your traffic forty stars I mean tell you that it is just definitely not just us there is a big community of censorship succumb mentioned developers out there and Braylon researchers working on this and what we have been doing around the issue around the wind was just we were mostly working as a fast litigator to bring in all these researchers and try to find ways because of how severe the situation is and how and because of you know like that that though it the fear that we have that Iran is basically writing a play book that ought to other countries are going to pick up and and deploy but once we basically find a way in and out that's when we can actually start to like look into like what is possible and what is not but in situation like Iran we just.

Justin Sherman W. M. U.
"justin sherman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

26:20 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Restrictions in the United States and in some ways that means we're running the thousand different elections during the Russian intelligence services in the West and you think wow these guys are so sloping they I'm leading on their watch get ready for dinner at two. In the morning I'm Carol only fifty two weeks to go until we head to the polls to vote for president that's a solid year Russian troll posing as somebody from Nebraska might be child's play compared to what else could happen 2016 and let's start inside the Springfield Office of the Illinois Board of Elections Shutdown Matt Dietrich is with the State Board of elections he's talking about there was an intruder this intruder had gotten into the statewide we took the entire system down we notified our Attorney General the FBI Robert Muller indicted twelve Russian military officers for attempting to to see if they were mentioned in the document they weren't but there was a paragraph did you know this obviously is us it was extremely since tried to get into election systems in every single state all fifty of them he says the way we run our elections here in the US makes us vulnerable at the cyber attacks thousand different elections during a big federal election like a presidential election often have no it support no cyber security staff Norden says that makes them Susan's then states have been taking steps to secure their systems in Illinois other states like Florida are taking similar steps ahead of twenty twenty there's a much greater awareness and the federal government Norden says all of this is promising because it could devoted or that their address changed the May Have Difficulty Voting Norton says Levy to hack into Rachel Toe Back who runs a company called social proof security yes and it's extremely easy to admin access on this machine this video actor would be to open up the Sushi by pressing this button right here after a few taps sheen also within minutes and I think that's pretty wild a lot of these attacks polling station in America equipped with a paper ballot backup according to the Brennan Senator Mark Warner he's a Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee and he wants all in the best interest of our democracy he's as bad actress can weaponize election security their votes may not be fully reflected and he fully expects bad actors and other actors who have been watching and learning for the world I'm Lydia mainly the rest of the web here to explain how this would work is Justin Sherman he's a cybersecurity main things the first is give the Russian government greater legal control take technical measures that will allow the government to isolate the Russian internet it'll still function internally people can still communicate but nothing else I can get in nothing inside not really anything it's one thing to pass a law it's quite another thing to actually nearly gotten to where they want to be and so at least for the next few weeks that really coming to the companies that actually control the physical hardware and the Software Art China's Internet firewall China and Russia can be compared generally his but I would argue that that's about where it stops China's Internet strategy so it's sort of a tricky wire they try and walk their Russia's a little bit different laments I mean how effective is likely to be that's the key question here and Russia you're the same level of sophistication and scale they haven't been doing this as long as Fox is this new likely to have any impact on Russia's disinformation only lower their disincentives to do disinformation campaigns and cyber attacks and things of that nature book prize in town for Thrillers and the nominees couldn't be more different one Birnbaum reports the staunch prize is now in its second year and it's the brain child the British Oscars I watch films and I noticed how many featured ripe and bring other exciting thrilling stories but without focusing on about violence against women is to pretend that it's not happening British writer thing is celebrating other kinds of stories making room for them if you like in the thriller Genre I mean just think of poor Janet Lee murdered in the shower the beginning because they're women oversee men are in violent films and volume books but they're not talk what kind of way in in violent fiction the staunch prize will be awarded things ends this weekend don't get thrown off but here's a possible solution abolish timezones hello hi is Steve Speaking Hi it's Carol Hills in Boston actually in a actually with Mrs Hanky and a and a store our time straight and get back to him later you're listening to the world the country they were seen as a threat the Soviets saw them as disloyal but now under president a new book the compatriots my colleague Marco Werman spoke with them about how far back the roots of collect Zell since West and too big surprise understood that most of his you've brought and since van Specialist Stalin he was absolutely obsessed this history lands so what role does Vladimir Putin play shifting the way he wanted to get people who in a way constituted the other Russia the Russian she was completely different he believed very should go into one Russia guided from an ruled and to be honest he was quite successful I mean is Putin using the kind of compatriot he is extremely scared of political emigrants like Russian Oligarch Mikhail Fremont again after Putin signed decree pardoning him on the other side the Russian culture and two Russian history and put in a look at what is his story and why did it become such a central character in your book that's nothing could be done from inside so they decided to do something from outside and in charge of inventions ideal personal sanctions but he himself he was several people shot him Nemtsov fifty five was a prominent opposition survived but he was so adamant to get back just a few or or less normal physically psychologically in many ways I mean after the first time I was poisoned in two thousand loses second time she'd recovered faster and again he came back to she told us but for the Russian politician it's impossible to be out of Russia older times happened and visas and new phenomenon we have now very first diamond Russian history we have underscores the cloak and dagger spying side of this whole compatriots idea scruple and you think wow these guys are so incompetent they're so slope and intentionally stupid exactly and it happened with many cases from screwball curses safety yes extremely worried about his safety but he and the ventricles position and we also understand that the Russian intelligence services and adds a book on immigration and wrote it in English right and you're doing publicity for it in Russia back in nineteen ninety nine thousand and by the falls and then ten we understood that it's the way we operate route book in English when you wait passionately for and that's our way to get back to our in Russia which sounds very crazy about I had two conversations with one of the main protagonist of the book a priest he I tried to intimidate us was back in two thousand and two probably your member background and Bhagat's integrated sumner to prison and I'll offices think of Heaven Lost Hank you that was my colleague Marco Werman speaking with Andrei Soldatov president trump has rolled reliable ally and an irresponsible lita trump says the Paris accord is a disaster where co-production of the BBC World Service W. G. B. H. IN BOSTON PRI NPR step closer to delivering on a major campaign promise getting out of the ground breaking twenty I mean just five months after taking office trump's stood in the Rose Garden to say the US I think Paris accord and the draconian financial and economic or two degrees Celsius president trump sees it as a bad deal for the US it accord was a total disaster based on these speeches you'd Party to the agreement David Wasco from the World Resources Institute says US negotiators saying no country can lead the accord for its first three years so the first date getting out of the pact we'll take a full year meaning the US won't finally and the irony here would be that the withdrawal from the Paris agreement could take effect after entered international organizations that it's left before UNESCO for example the lawyer Subas says technically that would be easy to do the US could the tricky part would be setting a new carbon cutting goal right now the is going to have to be a little bit of a goldilocks target because if it's too stringent I don't think we'll have will be an interesting challenge now president trump wins a second term next November.

"justin sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:35 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Very concerned for upcoming election because machine is eighteen different states and it's extremely this video is from two thousand eighteen to back is at the annual hacking conference def con in Las Vegas she stands in front of a voting machine all they have to do this bad actors would be to open up after a few taps and clicks and now I have full I mean I at this year's conference she was able to get into different voting machine also within minutes and I think that's pretty wild one of these attacks many of them are very complex but many of them at the same time are actually quite simple this is why many election security advocates want to see every polling station in America equipped with a paper ballot back up according to the Brennan center about twelve percent of Americans will vote with out a paper back up in twenty twenty that's an improvement from twenty sixteen but it's still not enough says Virginia senator mark Warner she's a Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee and he wants all polling stations to have a paper ballot back up I can't stress enough that they should not be a partisan issue they should be were Congress acts in the best interest of our democracy he's as bad actors can weaponized election security gaps in the cyberspace and information space in many ways you don't even have to change actual vote totals you just need to make Americans believe their system their votes may not be fully reflected and he fully expects that actors to use social media to stir up doubts about the integrity of the twenty twenty election and he says it's not just Russia he's worried about but also Iran China and other actors who have been watching and learning for the world I'm with Emily do in Russia surfing the web just got a lot harder a new law takes effect there today it allows the Russian government to increase censorship and isolate Russia from the rest of the web here to explain how this would work is just in Sherman he's a cyber security policy fellow at the new America think tank in Washington this is a law that was first proposed in the Russian parliament back in February it essentially does two main things the first is give the Russian government greater legal control of the internet service providers in the internet architecture within Russia and the second main element of the law is encouraging those entities or in some cases forcing those entities to take technical measures that will allow the government to isolate the Russian internet they essentially want to have a switch where if they think the Russian internet needs to be completely cut off they can do that on the technical level and so it'll still function internally people can still communicate but nothing outside can get it nothing inside can get out so how does this actually works say if you're in Moscow today what's going to be different from yesterday right now we're not really anything it's one thing to pass a law it's quite another thing to actually technically execute something as complicated as isolating your countries and are not so well the Russians have started to do some things in this vein they would have not nearly gotten to where they want to be and so it least for the next few weeks that really will not look to different I don't think so this is companies have to do this not individual users this is nothing to do with individual user implementation now this is the government going to the companies that actually control the physical hardware and the software layers of the internet itself so that they can isolate information flowing to and from the users on that network how does what Russia is doing compared to China's internet firewall China and Russia can be compared and generally they both have what we call somber and control approach to the internet they see it as something that needs to be much more managed by the state that we often see in many liberal democracies but I would argue that that's about where it stops China's internet strategy is fundamentally oriented towards balancing the economic benefits of internet openness with the political and security benefits of internet control so it's sort of a tricky why are they trying to walk there rush is a little bit different because Russia's economy is not nearly where China is is particular in the tech sector and so in Russia they lean a lot more towards caring about the political security elements I mean how effective is this likely to be that's the key question here and Russia has struggled particularly compared to China which as you said the sort of the gold standard of internet filtering Russia's really struggled to achieve anything near the same level of sophistication and scale they haven't been doing this as long as the Chinese the tech hold capabilities are not there they don't have the human and financial resources of the Chinese do for that reason it's very likely that they're going to be a lot of stumbling blocks is this new law likely to have any impact on Russia's disinformation campaigns I would argue yes they're already doing a lot of the space add that to the fact that they might feel more insulated from what the rest of the world can do to them I think that would only lower their disincentives to do disinformation campaigns and cyber attacks and things of that nature Justin Sherman is a cyber security policy fellow at the new America think tank in Washington DC thanks for speaking with us thanks for having me there's a new book prize in town for thrillers and the nominees couldn't be more different one is about an intern at an embassy in Turkey another one is about a fifteenth century priest but one thing they all have in common there's no violence against women the world Sir Birnbaum reports the stock price is now in its second year and it's the brain child of British screenwriter Bridget lawless she says the idea came out of the me too movement and her experience as a voter for the BAFTA awards which is like the British Oscars I want to order films and I would notice how many featured right person backstory or the main story and it was quite astonishing actually and was one of what I could do that would be a small scale thing I could handle myself to trying to redress the balance a bit and other exciting thrilling stories but without focusing on women as victims still the price is strong criticism most sleeve from crime writers the Scottish crime writer Val McDermid said that not to write about violence against women is to pretend that it's not happening this writer selfie Hannah after publisher not to submit her books for the award other writers call it censorship while the sense these authors are missing the point what we're doing is celebrating other kinds of stories making room for them if you like in the thriller genre bring them to people's attention lawless says violence against women has been a stand by of the thriller genre forever just think of poor Janet leave murdered in the shower at the beginning of psycho which was based on the novel of the same name by the way Wallace says she's trying to find stories were women aren't attacked just because they're women who say men are in violent films and books but they're not tech because the men there type because of something that doing awesome quest their own under the Christ or something and that's the big difference I think the way that women are centered in that kind of way in environment fiction the staunch prize will be awarded on November twenty fifth the international date for the elimination of violence against women for the world I'm Sarah Burton bam daylight savings ends this weekend don't get thrown off here's a possible solution abolish timezones altogether earlier today we scheduled an interview with a proponent of this idea economist Steve hanky hi is this Steve speaking hi it's Carol hills in Boston at the world yeah hi Carol great it's five year now I thought I thought we were going to come back in one hour from now and I'm I'm actually in America actually was this is thank you and I and the store I'll speak to you about an hour and a half okay thanks so much look for to it yeah okay girl thank you yep that really happens we'll get our time straight.

"justin sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:53 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Five yeah we love safer mules are coming up in the next thirty minutes we'll have the story of an Indian land this hall value says he is one of the fourteen hundred people around the world he's bought seven counts for allegedly attacked I wear on their phones at some schools knees in the next ten minutes and business needs as well as the big story there is a merger plans to create the world's fourth largest car company come a response in Russia where annual has come into force allowing the government to filter and restrict what people see on the internet expense I it's unclear how effective these powers will be and what they might be useful potentially the Kremlin may be able to switch of connections to the insect completely in an emergency is the little put said about the government said uses wouldn't notice any change idea aspects Justin Sherman he's a cyber security policy research fellow at new America as a think tank in Washington I'll stick with this little was expected to the Russians have spoken very vaguely over the last four five years about pushing to be able to isolate the Russian web the web within Russian borders from the rest of the planet we haven't seen much action on this front until February of this year the parliament in Russia introduced a bill essentially aiming to do this domestic internet through technical and legal changes to the internet within Russia so Vladimir Putin sign this into law on may first and now it's taking a fact November first why essentially the reasons the Russians give all our we've seen a lot of cyber security attacks hit the global web over the last few years this includes things like the want to cry ransomware they also cite ironically disinformation as an enormous point of concern and for those reasons they say they need to be able to isolate the web from the rest of the world as you said in an emergency situation of course the underlying driver that's not spoken about being that the Russians want more control over information flows within the country for censorship for surveillance and so this is sort of a top cover way to get there yeah changing those one thing but doing it practically is another it how how big is that gap it's pretty big and its considerable for Russia China in the space of internet filtering with their great firewall is more or less the gold standard Russia and many other countries have tried to emulate what China has done but there have been a lot of challenges if you look at Russia's attempts to ban telegram in particular the encrypted messaging app they actually had a lot of issues many of them technical because they haven't been able to filter to the level of sophistication of the Chinese have so when it comes to something that's much bigger than just walking one app when it comes to actually altering the internet so it's isolated from the rest of the planet that's a pretty big left that is not simply a case of the Chinese have better technology or because the Chinese are working on biggest scales with more people that they're they're more able to do that it's a combination of all of those factors absolutely the Chinese have the scale they have the technological sophistication and the resources the capability it's somewhat financial in that way like you said the amount of manpower and money they can put towards that it's also just the mere fact that China has been working on this sort of censorship and filtering much longer than many other countries have and with Russia in particular was only really since the Arab spring that there's been a more aggressive push to filter the web site Russians and me and they want to obey the law but not that soon necessarily thing that this is the end of the incident is right now yes yes definitely Justin German subs security policy a policy research fellow at a think tank in Washington you seem to knees day now the Democrats in the lower house of Congress in the United States have passed a resolution to formally proceed with an impeachment inquiry against president trump it was the first test of supporting the democratic controlled house of representatives for the impeachment process they accuse the president of trying to get you crying to investigate unsubstantiated corruption claims against his political rival Joe Biden and also Joe Biden's son he works with the Ukrainian gas company the president denies any wrongdoing dot said Larry chases cemeteries in American political scientist at the university of Virginia this is only the fourth time in American history that a president has entered the impeachment process in a serious way it's pretty clear that the Democrats who have a majority in the house of representatives are going to press forward with this and probably in the end impeach him people often mistake what that means impeachment is simply an indictment the indictment then goes to the Senate and in the Senate there are different rules so you have to get two thirds of the one hundred senators so you need sixty seven votes if everyone is voting that means twenty Republicans will have to defect from Donald Trump in all the Democrats forty seven Democrats will have to join with them to get the sixty seven it is exceedingly unlikely it is just as unlikely that he will be ousted in the Senate as it is likely that he will be impeached in the house and yet what we now know is a little of the shape of things to come next in this process we're gonna see more things in public and one criticism from Republican side far of pain and that many of the processes have been behind closed doors well I have to say and I think I've been of critical here of the Democrats let me be critical of the Republicans their objections are balderdash there's nothing to them this is the normal procedure you have interviews behind closed doors so that you don't let future witnesses know what the current witnesses are saying and also so that your witnesses will be completely forthcoming they're not under the television lights and they don't have a hundred million people watching them so the Republicans are simply arguing process because frankly they are weak on the substance what the president did in the call to the Ukrainian president is outrageous the only real question and their only defense is it doesn't rise to the level of impeachment that's what they might say others would argue with does rise to the level of impeachment but these process arguments are are worthless so what sort of people might we expect to see in front of these these hearings you're going to have people who were on the call who can verify what was actually said it's become apparent that the transcript that was released by the White House it was edited and that this is going to come as a great shock they edited out some phrases that would have been very troublesome for Donald Trump that is would have made clear that he was really going after biting hard and was linking it to the US military assistance but that's quid pro quo that's everyone talks about quid pro quo well that is the very definition of quid pro quo I know you have a newsletter website called Sabato's crystal bowl in which you have political analysis of the shape of American politics sounds like in your crystal bowl you don't see at the president being impeached but is it gonna have some affect at least on the election campaign which is already underway for twenty twenty yes although let me clarify he is going to be impeached that's the indictment but he's not going to be convicted in the Senate therefore there will be no practical effect of the impeachment accepted speaks to history and Mady speaks to voters which connects to your question Democrats are hoping that voters will learn more about the corruption they see within the trump administration and the corruption they see especially in this president maybe it will happen maybe it won't my and I away should is it will reinforce the feelings of dislike slash hate that about fifty four percent of Americans after Donald Trump and it will also Stoke the feelings of prop builder's day number between forty and forty three percent of the general electorate they'll be angry that trump is being put through this and it will make them more likely to turn out and vote for him in the election that will be held a year from this Sunday at a stop salary JZ Sabbath seven American political scientist at the university of Virginia gazing into that crystal ball and helping us understand what might be next in the impeachment process yeah a fascinating insight there in front prison try making one of our other stories at the satellites image that he switched his permanence residential address from New York to Florida elsewhere in you little now in force in Russia gives the Kremlin sweeping controls over the insect including the authority to turn off certain service and the Philippines presidents Rodrigo do Tetteh has Chris offered his deputy the role of drugs are often she criticized his war on drugs the ban on smoking is taking effect in restaurants cafes and bars throughout Austria cool to pause the our job postings good morning good morning pull his the sports headlines the captain of the English premier league side arsenal Shaka says he reacted angrily to fans booing him during last Sunday's match against Crystal Palace because of repeated threats to his wife and daughter on social media and recent matches the midfielder says he reached boiling point as he walked off the pitch but didn't mean to be disrespectful the surprise team of the season so far in the Spanish league or not miss the chance to return to the top of the table when they would be three one it's has halfway in the women's European champions league arsenal close go city of Paris asrama book that places in the quarterfinals Tokyo will not obstruct moving next year's Olympic marathon race walking events to north in Japan according to the city's governor but you recall co week he says she remains on happy with the decision made by the IOC to relook relocate the races because of the heat and humidity in the Japanese capital an internist well number one Ashley Barty is true to the Los four of the WTA finals in China Novak Djokovic and Rafael Rafael Nadal through to the quarterfinals of the ATP masters in Paris Jerry thanks very much indeed Jack Parsons with Julia sports on this edition of me steady got some business needs.

"justin sherman" Discussed on Lace Out AFL Podcast

Lace Out AFL Podcast

14:47 min | 2 years ago

"justin sherman" Discussed on Lace Out AFL Podcast

"Policy. That's why lago draftable wholesome just. That's the reason why that's the reason why i never got draft the blowhole phone it was contract that i had to wear long sleeve and i wait no it will break up the the rumor going around as well that g._w. Team had electric blankets on on the bench automatically she with that come on pips. If i was ceiling olinda that's fine but from anything new guy role the other was fantastic. I loved it. I loved it was great great to see all some. We need more of it. I don't know if you've hood the medal football club faisal. The success of the camera game have decided to move the one of the gangs from territory and they're going to be playing a game at second spiritual home casey fields. No no no no no no mapoulo. It's going to be the simon cup eighteen gene. We are going to be playing against the u._s. And hip the snow means cops going to be what's mumford cup. It was known as the cup style sniffles called sniffles. Cup simply showed the stifles shield shield. Yes now's good to say good to say quickly. Move on to something which could to see jerry. I'm sad to say he's worthy. Muddy hundred game plus flexible hold on <hes> but i think the rod is on the wall of the season. I think we all set a new is coming in no he's. He's just awesome like it could not forbid blood play for a club like if you don't get a trump's faulk qua- looking at jared rafi. You've got something wrong with you. Each playable on legitimate use play seven games two hundred ninety two. It's a shame he's not going to get the three hundred five hundred seventy two goals one club only one club playa strides strides doesn't <unk> two thousand fourteen international rules series. He's gonna come middle leading bulky threes rausing stein nominee premise your soul is four hours captain through seventy nine frigging gunman. He ain't you're going to throwing he. He almost at one stage was on his last legs. Gone through the melanoma solder things is it's. It's you forget that at times we marvel volvo immoral pass away and it's very the gauzy football he can have you trolls. You can heavy heavy camelias. You can have a frigging scalise. Euro mirrors not bid pethick here. They run out not hair on their body. Done side would wrong. I'll take a rough at any any day is a gingy. Jerry grows beauty gap between his teeth. He has a loft. He says what he says. In the dog dame could play. I football geography ahead grenell tip it to you because you're frigging superstar and just also remember that horrifying not looking hey made captain of the club after not playing for the twenty fifth day in two thousand sixteen says the author the whole the twenty six. He got mad captain on in his first year back. What's that side legend. That's a guy that says the fellas on one hundred ninety three centimeters naughty kegs of pure football extravaganza grabbed ginza jump back no carry you through the promise lane nets guy you will plainfield club and and he was the last of the twenty two thousand and five trio seats that be heated last one year. He's lost one not buddies but they regularly multiple. You end of the year as well truck bodies lewis to say that he's going to draft tonight. I'm looking at it now. Talk about leuze you got. I just got through the top fifteen. Is that okay do one. That was the three said the person who won that who won that twenty three thousand houses five rookie housing style. The maurits rausing sarasota bay bridge was first rowing griffin david mondays isolate. Let's go through. Let's go through. It will be a few weeks ago a gun or dod listen. You gotta donald them. Britt lydia gun ron griffin john he was he was when he was he was gold realis- nj rhodesia yeah. I'll give you that david mundy gun games brock mclean. If finish fourth anyway i tell you what if you want to brooke mclean's greatest game two thousand six elimination foetal versus the sites. He won that on the back. I'm back number fall. I've gone so i thought jed cook <hes> a fifty fifty. <hes> jordan lewis gun. Adam saw would gun justin sherman kepler bradley <music> spot. He was around one nomination that year land franklin every doc in wilmington again. Not a bad draft was said yes and stuff as ones up stuff up up but now we're gonna miss him because he's a gun. He's just a gun. Sandy's going as well big expand lanes santa's going to save money on <hes> the they're not going to have to kill a kale per foot nail now. Did you stay in the room the tweet from <hes> g. what's his name. Here's a here's here's here's here's here's a look in the jewish state with the with the with the top nazis knight phil davis davis captain about talk of g._w. Is to you could go all i could say was he's talk noughties hair and he's saying he's glasses look blog. <hes> is this the twenty first running with we stand forget it the sandwiches light email it was great slighty met and just on his face as of the end of it all fit like a ride and tell us like that. That's not stuck in the n._f._l. Football so aside knicks facing jeremy from the sponsors and thomson from north retiring and as a host of other players that are currently in discussions with the club's ago remind one more year and also i- bucketload of assistant coaches starting to get the move as well to manley from your call burgess is going to be there. We know about that craig jennings moving on but he wants to take he wants to start cartoon level coaching. Yeah i think career interesting in the next few weeks are now going to be talking about fallen etc. We're gonna have fond extravaganza and a few other bits and pieces. Those are going to be the ones who are gonna be leaving even tolson actually enemy skulls. Do you remember when he decided to <hes> push up at berry hill <hes> with the shooter license six shoelaces nixon that went through his head was almost berries feast. Oh what was he thinking. What was he like a twenty five year old as twelve twenty six year old mom like just a quick one. I'm actually surprised here. <hes> the assistant coaches the first night by the first of august fight end. I haven't heard anything really other than a couple of those from the club living in a couple of assistants yet. I i have heard nothing from j. W. s. all brisbane old gold chris especially we won't happen. The white will normally work is attained things that are out of finals contention. They will be told pretty much first and foremost even heard about yet or not ways specifically the podcast 'cause i mean they've got on speed dial facts. They've got us on spe doll crime stoppers auto no well the much brisbane gone awry. You're not gonna hear anything at of g._w._a.'s vigano rock go coast. Maybe i have my decision yet. Maybe they wanting them. Sitting coaches ready good and other more more from the clubs. Jobs probably mixed with toco a they've probably got. It just hasn't been released. You'll you'll see every club morales. We'll work with them a couple of the big ticket items wake and all these tommy or really do because this is news to see way people going and who they gotta be tagging we have brake brake blight keller. Karla mosley kinda even thought on autumn sagan again fella.

Football jerry lago draftable Karla mosley Cup volvo mumford craig jennings sarasota bay bridge david mundy brooke mclean lewis Britt lydia faulk realis- nj rhodesia knicks brock mclean g._w._a. brisbane