17 Burst results for "Justin Hoe"

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:46 min | 11 months ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Slash hire I'm David brancaccio first data out just now from the government show that inflation is running early 1980s style The consumer price index in February was up 7.9% higher than a year ago from January to February alone prices rose 8 tenths of a percent more than expected This doesn't even include the higher gasoline prices from last week in the wake of Russia's war on Ukraine crude oil is cheaper now than this time yesterday crude is just over a $113 a gallon in New York coming out of Thanksgiving It was $66 for comparison Now you pay retail and the site gas buddy says it's now up to four 32 a gallon on average nationwide your price may vary especially in California Small businesses are feeling the pinch as well on this marketplace is Justin hoe has that Early in the pandemic jenning is go to added a new line of business to her catering company and food market called Al fresco She started delivering charcuterie boards to people's homes That was a huge segment of our business that we've fortunately been able to grow in the last couple of years In the San Diego area we're in as good as business is based gas prices have gone up 70 cents per gallon over the past week So on Tuesday she hiked her delivery fee by 60% from $25 to 40 You know when you're paying almost $6 a gallon I think I saw yesterday And it keeps rising daily We want to make sure that we're kind of preparing for the weeks coming as well because we don't know you know is it going to keep rising at that rate This gotta isn't sure how customers will react And she's wondering whether she wants to deliver if she has to charge that much So maybe at this point it's something where we start to shift more to having our clients can pick them up with the shop Near San Francisco equipment supplier TMB baking is rethinking its vehicle fleet Greg Warwick is the CEO We're donating a pickup truck that we had and we're also eliminating one van of our van fleet that's not as fuel efficient The company does a lot of site visits to inspect equipment Our installation manager was going to bakery this morning to evaluate an oven then we asked him to take the Prius Even businesses that don't own their own vehicles are feeling the pitch Catherine Reynolds handles imports and deliveries for palmetto tile distributors in South Carolina This week she says her shipping companies started adding new fuel surcharges And those are averaging between like a dollar 50 to 50 per shipment per box So it sounds small but it adds up especially when we have to pass those costs onto our clients And Reynolds says she's expecting her delivery fees to rise even more given the continued shortage of drivers congested ports and problems sourcing raw materials I'm Justin how from marketplace For each gallon of gas you buy 18.3 cents goes to your U.S. national treasury wherever you live in the country now given spiking gas prices some lawmakers are pushing to suspend the federal gas tax marketplaces Matt Levin was on with my colleague Kai last evening suggesting this savings of about $3 per fill up may not be a huge help for household budgets but it would take a big bite out of the money for upgrading infrastructure You can listen later for the half hour marketplace on many public radio stations or from marketplace dot org After the strong day for stocks on Wednesday with the NASDAQ going up 3.6% the biggest one day jump in 17 months things are down this morning the key stock index in Germany is down 2.6% here Dow futures down 349 points 1.1% the NASDAQ future is down 1.2%.

David brancaccio Justin hoe jenning TMB baking Greg Warwick Al fresco Catherine Reynolds Ukraine palmetto tile distributors buddy Russia San Diego government
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A union representing Southwest Airlines flight attendants is pushing back against the airlines plan to get back to serving alcohol later this month the union thinks the hard stuff makes air rage worse Last week the CEO of Delta Air Lines called for a national no fly list marketplaces Justin hoe has more The federal aviation administration says last year it investigated over a thousand unruly passenger incidents Compared to that one to 200 in a typical year that's Lindsey rajki travel and hospitality analysts with the research company morning consult The FAA says over two thirds of reported incidents involve disputes over face masks as long as the mandate to wear them exists rasche says We're probably going to continue to see these incidents happen More often than in non pandemic times Some flight attendants are concerned that the return of alcohol on board will make passengers even more unruly Taylor Garland with the association of flight attendants CWA says the union's members are already strained trying to tell people to put their masks on And when you introduce alcohol and people may become tipsy or inebriated that makes the flight attendant's job that much harder to get passengers to comply Garland's union is called for airport bars to restrict the amount of alcohol passengers can drink before boarding It also calls for a no fly list of disruptive passengers So that people who are either fine by the FA or who may face criminal charges from the DoJ are ultimately banned from flying at least for a certain period of time Airlines already maintain their own no fly lists But last week Delta CEO wrote to the attorney general proposing a national industry wide list Henry harvelle is a travel industry analyst at atmosphere research group What delta is saying is if I ban somebody from Delta that person shouldn't become another airlines problem Getting the government involved in banning unruly passengers is likely to raise civil liberties concerns Heart of hell says passengers would need some form of redress But overall aviation analyst Samuel engel at the consulting firm ICF says airlines are looking for ways to strengthen their hand Inside the cabin you want to be able to say that my rules are law Engel says airlines also want to show employees that they have.

Justin hoe Lindsey rajki FAA rasche Taylor Garland association of flight Southwest Airlines Delta Air Lines Garland's union time Airlines CWA Delta CEO Henry harvelle atmosphere research group What delta DoJ FA Samuel engel ICF Engel
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The biggest drop in a week in a single week for stocks since the pandemic with the S&P down 5.7% in just the last 5 days This morning market participants are seeing more reasons to move away from riskier assets like stocks with the news the U.S. is telling families of its diplomats in Ukraine to leave that country in case of Russian hostilities Right now London's 100 share index down 1.9% Germany France and Amsterdam all down in a similar range Add to this a U.S. Federal Reserve policy meeting on interest rates and inflation later this week Here's marketplace's nova sapho David ware money is flowing in and out of tells you a lot right now oil prices are around a 7 year high as Russia is threatening military invasion of Ukraine Russia is of course a major oil and gas supplier the U.S. and Europe have promised a strong response The question is what would it look like if Russia and fates what would that response be And what would it do if anything to global oil supplies We just don't know yet Meanwhile stocks are in a sell off especially tech stocks which reached very high prices during the pandemic so many investors see them as riskier now especially if the fed starts raising interest rates sooner and faster than Wall Street has been expecting The NASDAQ composite index which includes a lot of tech companies is down about 13% for the year That's in just three weeks It's only late January It's been a rough few weeks for tech stocks Yeah and recently when we've seen dips in prices investors look for bargains and there's a jump in buying the next day not so much in recent days Yeah not so much that pattern doesn't appear to be holding this time around at least not on a big scale They've also been some disappointing headlines with regards to recent corporate earnings reports Netflix last week of course as we reported surprised by projecting subscription growth will be slow a lot over the next few months That adds to the uncertainty suggesting the effects of pandemic are a stimulus are waning What might change the narrative is the fed We'll see what comes out of their policy meetings tomorrow on Wednesday All right nova thank you The key stock index on the Moscow exchange is down more than 4% right now that would be as if the Dow Jones Industrial Average were to drop 1400 points The Dow future is down 227 points or 7 tenths of a percent The S&P future is down 1.1% The NASDAQ future is down one and a half percent Not a how bugs a terrible storm in Western Canada last year and pandemic distortions are contributing to sky high lumber prices in the U.S. wood is up by almost a third since September affecting new home prices and the cost of fixing up older ones Here's marketplaces Justin hoe A lot of what's been going on with lumber prices has to do with the supply of Canadian lumber Mark Fleming is chief economist at first American Canadian pine is highly sought after for home building because of its strength And in November a major storm hit British Columbia Washing out the rail lines that lumber mills rely on Brian Leonard is a lumber analyst with RCM alternatives It stopped shipments by a good 20% and a 100% certain places Leonard says that complicated the supply chain problems the lumber industry had already been dealing with Less truckers less rail employees because of COVID showing up things like that So the whole system kind of broke down At almost the same time last year a 40 year ongoing trade dispute with Canada came to a head says Rachel Brewster a professor at duke law school The core of the dispute between the United States and Canada is whether or not Canada subsidizing their lumber industry And in November the commerce department doubled its tariff on Canadian softwood lumber imports to almost 18% Doubling the tariff rates I mean that is going to increase the price of lumber This is also happening while the Canadian lumber industry is dealing with another older problem A beetle infestation that's been devastating pine forests in Canada since the 1990s leaving behind millions of dead trees and the risk of wildfires Since economist Mark Fleming with first American Increased risk of wildfires increased devastation of wildfires in the 2017 and 2018 error has effectively created now a shortage of trees to be cut down in Canada and exported to the United States Fleming says this is different from the supply chain problems that have caused shortages of other home building materials during the pandemic How do you fix a supply shortage driven by a sheer lack of something like a tree which takes a long time to grow And in the meantime Fleming says demand for new homes will continue to.

Russia David ware Ukraine United States fed Mark Fleming Justin hoe first American Canadian pine Amsterdam RCM alternatives Germany France
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In fact the industry is kind of split with big tech giants on one side and smaller tech giants frankly the likes of Yelp for example on the other side And in Washington both of these bills do in fact have bipartisan support and there's also bipartisan support for reigning in big tech not just in the Senate but the house too the antitrust legislation in the Senate that I just mentioned there is a version of it in the house It's already cleared the house judiciary committee But both of these bills the antitrust Bill the app Bill have a long way to go David There's intense lobbying from various interests Indeed nova thank you Procter & Gamble of charmin toilet paper and crest toothpaste fame said yesterday that its sales grew 6% in the most recent quarter that is despite the company raising its prices by an average 3% during that period It's a sign that even in the face of inflation consumers are still paying up for name brands marketplaces Justin hoe has that Procter & Gamble sells things like tide laundry detergent bounty paper towels the types of products people need to clean their homes and take care of their families Senior vice president at moody's And so these categories tend to be able to bear rising prices more than others Plus montag says many consumers have stayed loyal to name brands during the pandemic That's helped the big consumer product companies like PNG Even if people are worried about higher prices at checkout They have multiple price tiers And so consumers can make choices and actually still do business with proctor It also helps that many consumers can still afford to buy name brands Says Brian Yarborough consumer research analysts with Edward Jones But he says that could change Now that federal relief aid has gone away And then that will remain kind of a $1 million question of consumers are willing to pay these higher prices or if they look for substitutes In the meantime Procter & Gamble says it expects to raise prices some more this year to help cover higher costs I'm Justin hoe for marketplace Let's do the.

house judiciary committee Procter & Gamble Senate Justin hoe charmin Plus montag giants Washington David Brian Yarborough moody proctor Edward Jones
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In fact the industry is kind of split with big tech giants on one side and smaller tech giants frankly the likes of yep Yelp for example on the other side And in Washington both of these bills do in fact have bipartisan support and there's also bipartisan support for reigning in big tech not just in the Senate but the house too the antitrust legislation in the Senate that I just mentioned there is a version of it in the house It's already cleared the house judiciary committee But both of these bills the antitrust Bill the app Bill have a long way to go David There's intense lobbying from various interests Indeed thank you Procter & Gamble have tied detergent and crest toothpaste fame said yesterday that its sales grew 6% in the most recent quarter now That's despite the company raising its prices by an average 3% during that period it's a sign that even in the face of inflation consumers are still paying up for name brands Marketplaces Justin hoe has more Procter & Gamble sells things like tide laundry detergent bounty paper towels the types of products people need to clean their homes and take care of their families Senior vice president at moody's And so these categories tend to be able to bear rising prices more than others Plus montag says many consumers have stayed loyal to name brands during the pandemic That's helped the big consumer product companies like P and G even if people are worried about higher prices at checkout They have multiple price tiers And so consumers can make choices and actually still do business with proctor It also helps that many consumers can still afford to buy name brands Says Brian Yarborough consumer research analysts with Edward Jones But he says that could change Now that federal relief aid has gone away And then that will remain kind of the $1 million question of consumers are willing to pay these higher prices or if they look for substitutes In the meantime Procter & Gamble says it expects to raise prices some more this year to help cover higher costs I'm just in hoe for marketplace Also note that while this inflation may be eating into your wallet it's not hurting Procter & Gamble profits with net income up 12% from a year ago Let's do the numbers After the NASDAQ index full of tech stocks fell into what's called correction territory yesterday down 10% from a recent high NASDAQ futures are up 1% this morning Dow futures are up four 10% of 6 10% for the S&P Starbucks says its employees no longer have to get vaccinated or regularly tested We respect the court's ruling and will comply a senior executive wrote to staff that would be the Supreme Court's decision to strike down the federal government vaccine or test requirement for non healthcare businesses Marketplace morning report.

Procter & Gamble house judiciary committee Justin hoe Senate Plus montag Brian Yarborough giants Washington moody David Edward Jones proctor Starbucks S
"justin hoe" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Okay, raise your hand if you know the answer to this one. What the eggs and new cars and suits and oh I don't know furniture have in common, huh? Three guesses the first two don't count from American public media. This is marketless. In Los Angeles, I'm kind of result. It is Wednesday today 12 January good as always to have you along. Everybody, look, if you actually needed three guesses to answer that question, well, clearly I haven't been doing my job 'cause inflation if I needed to say it, prices of all four of those things up and inflation as you've heard already overall hit 7% December this year over December last. But but but let us look month to month. Inflation was half a percent in December, which was better than November, which was better than October, do we dare ask then whether we're finally topping out, oh, we do dare. Marketplaces Ben shore gets us going. There are reasons to thank monthly inflation may have already maxed out. We are seeing some deceleration calendar meisters and economists with UBS. Deceleration is in prices are still rising, just not as fast as they were. Flight and lodging prices might actually come down briefly because of a dragging down demand, car prices, economists say are set to come off their completely insane highs as production starts to come back. Other goods seem to be cooling off too. You know, energy, food prices, futures prices are suggesting that oil has reached its peak. But that Meister says core inflation basically everything else is not slowing down yet. And we are probably going to see another few months of eye popping 7% annual inflation before it does come down, says Larry summers, an economist at Harvard, and former treasury secretary. I don't see anything that changes the basic fact that we have an increasingly entrenched inflation problem. Basically all the transitory drivers of inflation may be falling away, leaving us with bigger problems. The most fundamental factors driving what we're seeing are pervasive labor shortage, pushing up wages, which are the most fundamental labor costs and what's happening in the housing market. But economists disagree on how persistent all these drivers will be. As a fellow at the Peterson institute. The optimistic view is that over crime will tear through the population very quickly. It will be mild. And we'll come out sort of in a better place as far as the pandemic goes by March. And people might actually be more willing to go back and play before. And that might keep labor costs under control. Of course, it would also trim wage growth. In New York, I'm Sabrina shore for marketplace. Oh yeah, wages. We also learned today that average hourly pay was up a tenth percent in December. That is real wages, meaning they were up even when you factor in the higher prices that spree was just talking about. That said, we are also talking average here and not everybody's pay is rising high enough to cover those higher costs. Marketplace is Justin hoe. Explains what's going on there. Whether you've gotten a raise lately, depends a lot on where you fall on the income spectrum. Lower wage workers are seeing larger percentage increases than higher wage workers. That's Liz Ann Saunders, chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab, a current marketplace underwriter. She says it also depends on what you do. Take leisure and hospitality, for instance. Leave your hospitality has in general seeing the biggest increases in wages. And those workers have been making enough to outpace inflation. So Sarah house, senior economist with Wells Fargo. But she says there are plenty of other industries where pay hasn't kept up with prices. Areas like information, mining industry, manufacturing, construction. One way workers have been able to beat inflation, House says, is by quitting their jobs and taking on new higher paid roles elsewhere. And so companies across the pace spectrum are really having to think about their compensation plans in terms of attracting new employees, but also keeping their existing ones. As a result, those higher wages are likely to stick around, says economist Daniel jowl at the job website glassdoor. And most employers would actually even prefer to furlough or lay off workers rather than cut pay because they know it would have a dramatic impact on employee morale. But jiao says it's not enough for pay to stay where it is. He says wages will have to keep rising as prices continue to grow. I'm just in hell for marketplace. On Wall Street today ain't nobody was surprised by.

Ben shore UBS Larry summers Meister Justin hoe Peterson institute Los Angeles Liz Ann Saunders treasury Harvard Sarah house Sabrina Charles Schwab New York Wells Fargo Daniel jowl House jiao
"justin hoe" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"It was mostly a quiet week politics wise here in Washington, but one piece of so called must pass legislation did get done. President Biden signed next year's national defense authorization act into law. It authorizes $770 billion for defense spending. That's a big increase from last year's authorization and 25 billion more than President Biden originally requested. Marketplaces Justin hoe has that story. The spending law authorizes money for new weapons systems. It gives service members a pay increase. It also expands, paid family leap for primary caregivers in the military to 12 weeks, says Ben geddes hit the bipartisan policy center. Before this, they had 6 weeks of paid parental leave. Secondary caregivers which were typically men, failing at three weeks. And so they also brought that up to 12 weeks. It's also the first defense spending authorization bill signed into law since the U.S. withdrew from Afghanistan, says Travis Sharpe at the center for strategic and budgetary assessments. And so there'll be an opportunity for Congress in the year ahead to make decisions about how it wants to move that money around. Sharp says lawmakers often try to throw as much as they can into the defense spending bill. Compromises are often struck at the last minute. Overall, he says the annual defense authorization bill is considered must pass legislation. In fact, this year is the 61st consecutive year that Congress has passed and the president has signed a defense authorization bill. Part of that is because Congress doesn't want to look soft on defense. And because military spending is tied to jobs throughout the country, says William hartung at the Quincy institute for responsible statecraft. There's really kind of a bias towards the military and militarization of our budget versus the other needs that are emerging. Hartung says, that's a big reason why this bill passed.

President Biden Justin hoe Ben geddes Travis Sharpe center for strategic and budge bipartisan policy center Congress Washington Afghanistan bill U.S. Sharp William hartung Quincy institute for responsib Hartung
"justin hoe" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Coming up, an opportunity that I've never been able to have before. Gotta grab those when they come along. But first, let's do the numbers. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 560 points one in 6 10% to finish at 35,492, the NASDAQ gained 360 points to four tenths percent to end at 15,341, and the S&P 500 added 81 points, one and 7 tenths percent to land at 46 49. We heard from Justin hoe about the Biden administration's plans to distribute half a billion at home COVID test, test maker Abbott Laboratories gained two tenths percent, logic, Inc was down one and three 10%, 3M gained a tenth of a percent, bonds fell the yield on the ten year Tina rose to 1.47%. You're listening to marketplace. The new season of now what's next, an original podcast from Morgan Stanley tells the human stories behind the supply chain woes, we've all heard so much about. Hosted by veteran journalists and Ari Clinton. We learn about the fragile network we all rely on every day, a network made up of people. Get now what's next, wherever you get your podcasts. Marketplace is a nonprofit newsroom. So we count on listeners like you to keep our journalism strong. As a thank you for your support, you can pick up a marketplace face mask. It's kind of thank you gift that shows you care about your community, the people around you and the independent news that has you covered. Get yours when you donate today at marketplace dot org slash donate or just follow the link in our show notes. This is marketplace, I'm Amy Scott. We'll get an update on inflation later this week. The feds preferred measure the personal consumption expenditures index comes out Thursday, and it will likely confirm what we're already feeling every time we open our wallets. Inflation, though, isn't just a concern here in the U.S. in turkey, price increases are becoming so severe. Many people can't afford basic necessities, and that's creating some tough choices. The BBC's Victoria Craig has more from that country's largest city, Istanbul. Turkey is in the midst of a currency crisis, which is fanning the red hot flames of inflation. Official data show prices have surged more than 21% in the last year, while the value of the nation's lyrical currency has nearly halved since January. To put that in perspective, it now takes about 13 lira to buy just one U.S. dollar. That devaluation means simple errands like grocery store shopping have become a lot more expensive. And for many, budgeting and saving is now impossible. I can not pay migrants properly. I ran my room to foreigners. That's Montoya, a college student in her 20s. She declined to give her last name, many in turkey right now, don't want to give their last names for fear of attracting government attention. Montoya is trying to make ends meet by working part time at a local bar. She says her employer can't afford to raise her wages, so last month, she resorted to renting out her spare bedroom to tourists. I'm really worried about it because I'm really scared when someone come to me and I don't know him or her and it's staying at home with someone I don't know. It's really scary. Actually, but I don't have anything to Montoya needs the money not just to make sure she can put a roof over her head, but to buy a basic necessities. On the day we met, she told me it now takes twice as much money to fill one basket at the supermarket. That's a common refrain from families and grocery store workers we spoke to across Istanbul, and it's led economists to believe inflation is much higher than the official rate of 21.3%. Dermis yilmaz is a former Turkish Central Bank governor who served between 2006 and 2011. He's now a member of the opposition party. Groups of academicians who has come up with a technical measuring information, the measurement is even close to 60%. Therefore, this creates a huge burden on the society at large. Normally, central banks would raise interest rates to combat this kind of inflation, but the Turkish Central Bank has instead cut rates four times in the past four months. It's all because president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who has a heavy influence on the Central Bank, believes unconventionally, low rates will spur job creation and dampen price rises. On Sunday, two days after the latest interest rate reduction, he told Turkish state TV his Muslim faith, which forbids charging or receiving interest on loans, has guided his views on monetary policy. He said those complaining about it shouldn't expect any other stance from him, and he vowed to continue doing what is required by Islamic teachings. Economists, though, say that policy will only deepen turkey's economic problems. Here's UMass again. In order to have high growth, he has to bring about first conditions which is necessary for price disability and the financial stability and the fair distribution of resources without doing this, I think the president is living in a different cosmos. Without achieving this necessary conditions, hiring a high rate of growth is not possible. We tried to speak to president Erdoğan's finance minister about the economic strategy, but our requests went unanswered. As the government pursues its unorthodox policy, the everyday struggle for many continues, especially for young people in turkey, where the median age is just under 33. Many, like.

Justin hoe Biden administration logic, Inc Tina rose Ari Clinton Montoya Amy Scott turkey Victoria Craig Turkish Central Bank Abbott Laboratories Istanbul Morgan Stanley U.S. Dermis yilmaz
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is what the Biden administration calls build back better dead in the water Over the weekend democratic senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia uttered the word The White House been trying to avoid no Among the issues the costs of making permanent programs that had been temporary marketplaces nova sapho has that The biggest cost would be the expansion of the child tax credit program which sends monthly payments to parents of up to $300 a month for each child The last payment went out this month and Democrats hoped to extend the program for another year through the build back better act Other temporary elements of the bill include helping parents pay for child care and universal preschool as well as health insurance subsidies A congressional budget office analysis found the bill would increase the deficit by $3 trillion over ten years if everything temporary was actually permanent Democrats say that wrongly assumes later extensions of programs would not be paid for But Joe Manchin yesterday said he was unconvinced and today majority leader Chuck Schumer sent a letter to Senate Democrats promising to take up the build back better Bill for a vote anyway Early next year he said so that senators could make their positions known on the Senate floor not just on television I'm no Visa for marketplace Let's do the numbers Amid new restrictions especially overseas in the face of the amaron variant stock prices are down the Dow future is down 408 points 1.2% The S&P future is down 1.3% The NASDAQ future is down 1.5% and before we get to Justin Ho's piece we want to tell you that crude oil is down 4.7% 67 50 a barrel a bet that the new lockdowns hit demand for fossil fuel Now this is the beginning of a shortened business and markets week with the Christmas Eve holiday on Friday Meantime we'll get more information on this economy amid new uncertainties about the variant of coronavirus and jumps in new infections and key parts of the country We'll have consumer spending data and revisions to gross domestic product and some forecasters are looking to alternative measures marketplaces Justin hoe looked at what some of those are Alternative indicators include things like box office figures Subway turnstile numbers Data that can help answer a big question How far are we back to something that would be akin to pre-pandemic norms Liz Ann Saunders his chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab a marketplace underwriter So far this month she says the picture looks mixed For instance the number of seated diners at restaurants dropped earlier this month according to the website open table Not markedly not akin to what we saw in the spring of 2020 But a noticeable decline TSA traveler numbers and gasoline demand can reveal whether people feel comfortable going places Says Gregory daco chief U.S. economist at Oxford economics If those indicators start to fall That is a sign that you're tending to see less service sector activity and therefore less full role activity Taco says people have been spending more on services this year but that could.

Joe Manchin Biden administration Justin Ho Senate West Virginia Chuck Schumer White House Justin hoe Liz Ann Saunders Bill S Charles Schwab Gregory daco Oxford economics
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That the Senate will still vote on build back better early in the new year This is the beginning of a shortened business and markets week with the Christmas Eve holiday on Friday Meantime we'll get more information on this economy amid new uncertainties about the variant of coronavirus And jumps in new infections and key parts of the country will have as the week goes on consumer spending information revisions on gross domestic product and some forecasters are looking to alternative measures marketplaces Justin hoe looked into those Alternative indicators include things like box office figures Subway turnstile numbers data that can help answer a big question How far are we back to something that would be akin to pre-pandemic norms Liz Ann Saunders his chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab a marketplace underwriter So far this month she says the picture looks mixed For instance the number of seeded diners at restaurants dropped earlier this month according to the website open table Not markedly not akin to what we saw in the spring of 2020 But a noticeable decline TSA traveler numbers and gasoline demand can reveal whether people feel comfortable going places Says Gregory daco chief U.S. economist at Oxford economics If those indicators start to fall That is the sign that you're attempting to see less service sector activity and therefore less full role activity Taco says people have been spending more on services this year but that could change if they grow more cautious I'm just in hell for marketplace Let us do the numbers which are down Amid new restrictions we're just talking about especially overseas in the face of the Akron variant The stock prices are.

Justin hoe Liz Ann Saunders Senate Charles Schwab Gregory daco Oxford economics TSA Taco U.S. Akron
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morning's numbers Still up the NASDAQ future is up 1% The Dow future at the moment of 257.7% crude oil is up 1.6% It's right about $72 a barrel Today the Biden administration is set to announce a plan to get more people into truck driving and to make trucking a better career Meanwhile despite a shortage of building materials companies that need the stuff or feeling more optimistic according to a new reading from the national association of home builders and Wells Fargo marketplaces Justin hoe has that Homebuilder confidence is rising because builders know there's a lot of demand for what they do Robert dietz's chief economist with the national association of home builders The existing home inventory is quite low And that is supporting demand for new construction That low inventory of homes gives home builders a lot of leverage Says Mark vitner senior economist at Wells Fargo As a result he says builders are more likely to focus on constructing homes with higher profit margins So we're seeing a lot more interest in building larger and more expensive homes Vintner says a lot of big investors have been interested in buying rental housing entire neighborhoods of homes built to be rented From a home builder perspective that offers some economies of scale because they're building a lot of homes in close proximity to each other They have a better idea of what they need to order Vintner says that's good news for builders but not so much for potential home buyers who may have a harder time competing with investors for new homes I'm just in Ho For.

Biden administration national association of home b Justin hoe Robert dietz Mark vitner Homebuilder national association of home b Wells Fargo Vintner Ho
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Supreme Court upheld New York State's vaccine requirement for healthcare workers following a similar decision in Maine earlier this fall yet the Biden administration's national mandate get vaccinated or get regularly tested has been blocked for now in lower courts that includes but is not limited to healthcare workers Marketplaces Nancy Marshall ganzer is here with more starting with state rules those do have a strong legal basis it seems Right courts have found this is a reasonable use of state's power and states have the right to enact rules to protect public health because the U.S. Constitution says they have policing powers they can use to keep their residents safe and these vaccine mandates for healthcare workers are legal under those powers But a national requirement for vaccination for healthcare workers still not in effect true It was put on hold by a U.S. district court in Louisiana That judge says it's not constitutional those policing powers I mentioned are only for the states I talked to Sarah rosenbaum about this She's a health law professor at George Washington University She says the Biden administration could use a different part of the constitution to justify the national healthcare mandates The part that gives the federal government to power to spend money and to decide how it spent in this case how Medicare and Medicaid money is doled out Congress when it comes to Medicare and Medicaid has directed the secretary of Health and Human Services to set health and safety standards for healthcare providers that participate in these programs And rosenbaum does expect the Supreme Court to eventually rule on the federal health worker vaccine mandate All right Nancy thank you Today we're also following the big grocery chain Kroger which is ending some pandemic benefits for staff who remain unvaccinated if they become infected they'll no longer be eligible for two weeks paid time off and there's an extra $50 a month healthcare charge for managers and non union hourly people who are not vaccinated Kroger's is also Ralph's food for less Fred Meyer and more There's fresh government data just out that show Americans brushed aside inflation and retail sales rose moderate three tenths of a percent in November that said economists were forecasting a much larger jump in buying The headlines came on Thanksgiving Later on we'll get an official reading on inventories What is back ordered What is not Here's marketplaces Justin hoe Retailers expected that supply chain problems would persist through the holidays Says Brian Yarborough consumer research analyst at Edward Jones Some retailers brought plenty of items in early some of the chartered ships or went to other ports to get items in times Thing is he says some of those items might not make it before Christmas That means many retailers could end up with extra inventory next year If you're sitting there in February and you get you know big load of whatever it may be items that were more Christmas oriented maybe it's home decorations maybe it's wrapping paper You're kind of in a tough spot Yarborough says some businesses might mark down those products Others might just store them David narcotic Cantor says many retailers added more warehousing space earlier this year So putting it away packing in a way of your wish is something that they would never have thought of two years ago but now they have the ability to do it So why not To stay ahead of supply chain congestion Marat says many businesses will hold on to any extra inventory if they can For at least another year I'm just in Ho from marketplace In just about 6 hours the Federal Reserve will brief on inflation and interest rates after wrapping up a big meeting right now the ten year interest rate is up at 1.45% The Dow future is down 19 points The S&P future is up by less than two points Marketplace morning.

Biden administration Nancy Marshall U.S. district court Sarah rosenbaum Supreme Court Kroger Medicare George Washington University Maine Justin hoe Retailers Brian Yarborough rosenbaum Louisiana Health and Human Services Fred Meyer New York Medicaid federal government U.S.
"justin hoe" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"In Los Angeles I'm car rizal it is Thursday today the 9th of December 2022 good as always to have you along everybody. We begin this Thursday of next year with a trip to the marketplace time machine. First of all, we're all kind of done with 2021, right? But also we decided we just need a break from the pandemic economy grind. We have all been living through. So indulgence, would you as we take today's news and pay it forward a year? This being Thursday the headline number of the day is jobs and it's a good just a 184,001st time applicants for unemployment benefits last week. The fewest since Richard Nixon was in The White House. And that bodes well for the maintain full employment half of the Federal Reserve's dual mandate. News of the other half stable prices comes tomorrow with the consumer price index, inflation, of course, for November. Now, we know the economy is recovering from the worst of the pandemic and the things have and will continue to change. So we thought maybe the question we ought to be asking is what's this economy going to be like, come December 9th, 2022. Marketplace of Justin hoe and lily Jamal, got a free ride in that marketplace economic time machine today so that they could report back on what things look like a year from now. We start with Justin on the jobs of December future. Okay, so it's December 9th, 2022. Cargo pants are popular. Influencers are posting pictures of themselves, eating Jell-O salads, and Harvard economics professor Jason Furman says, the jobs market is looking pretty solid. The unemployment rate is in the 3% range. There are fewer than 200,000 people a week claiming unemployment insurance benefits. Ferman says that's a reasonable bet since the unemployment rate tends to take down over time. So if I'm wrong, it's probably because we're in a recession either caused by a terrible resurgence of the virus of financial market accident or something else. We can't know about any of that, but we do know that the labor market has withstood COVID variants pretty well in 2021. George perks at bespoke investment group says that's because consumer demand has stayed strong. I think the baseline assumption should be that we're not going to see big hits to consumer demand from a new variant. What's more likely to happen over the course of 2022, he says, is that the blazing hot job market will cool down? So we've seen for months a month roughly 400,000 jobs created every month. We can't create that many new jobs next year. Another question is how many of those are high quality jobs, says Kate Bond, the Washington center for equitable growth. And that includes jobs of attributes like paid leave, paid sick, scheduling stability, and adequate wages. Of course. Bond says workers were able to quit jobs without those attributes in 2021. That, she says, we'll need to continue for the economy to become more equal. Reporting from 2022, I'm just in hell for marketplace. December 9th, 2022, as it happens as a Friday, and that is where we find marketplaces literally jamali on the inflation beat. Nobody will say that predicting inflation a year out is easy. But making a forecast that is reliable, you have to be very, very humble. Southern methodist university business school professor Harvey rosenblum would know. That forecasting was part of his job for some of his 43 years at the Dallas fed. The pandemic and the fiscal policies that have come out of it like federal stimulus checks have made this harder. The willingness to print money, if you will, and lean on central banks to finance government deficits has been a global phenomenon. That is a major factor that has been driving inflation. And we'll do so for the next several years, he says. Dan Desjardins, deputy chief economist at RBC is more optimistic. I think we'll be saying that inflation is lower than it was when we exited 2021. But that it remains higher than what we were experiencing before the pandemic. She expects it'll still be hard to get people back to work, prompting wages to keep rising. And as a result, that will keep price pressures a little hotter than they were prior to the pandemic. This year, inflation has driven up prices on big ticket items like rent vehicles and food, says Ryan Wang, U.S. economist at HSBC. Knowing that is helpful, but he says it doesn't make the crystal ball any clearer. I mean, if there's anything that economists have learned this year is the ability to be surprised repeatedly and significantly. So I think that's probably the most valuable skill that we should have picked up over the course of this year. Which is why Harvey rosenblum's advice to stay humble might be good to remember. Reporting from December 2022, I'm lily jamali for marketplace. On Wall Street today by which I mean today 2021, mostly sideways except tech, which was down hard as traders wait for tomorrow's all important inflation number. I'm just going to straight up quote Joe wise and thaw from Bloomberg here. It's almost like CPI day. He said today on Twitter is the new jobs day. Think about it. You'll get it. We'll have the.

Justin hoe lily Jamal Jason Furman Ferman George perks bespoke investment group Kate Bond Washington center for equitabl Richard Nixon Harvey rosenblum jamali Federal Reserve Southern methodist university Dallas fed White House Los Angeles Justin Dan Desjardins Ryan Wang
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In policy Apple will start allowing customers themselves to fix some broken Macs and iPhones with parts and tools to be sold by the company The new self service repair program will start early next year first for iPhones 12 and 13 marketplaces Caroline champlain has more The new policy is a win for the right to repair movement including environmentalists consumer advocacy groups and Nathan proctor with the U.S. public interest research group Write repairs about telling these companies no you don't get to tell me what to do with my stuff I don't want new stuff The thing I have works just fine give me what I need to fix it Ease repaired his phone before but acknowledges that not everyone will feel comfortable doing that But if you watch a technician change a battery in an iPhone it takes like 6 minutes It's not that difficult And even if most people won't do it they'll at least have more options So why is apple making this change now David smith with Gartner says it's probably related to an executive order issued this summer meant to discourage manufacturers from preventing DIY repairs The timing is probably not coincidental that it has happened a few months after the executive order Personally though Smith says he will not be opening up his iPhone anytime soon I'm Caroline champlin from marketplace Government dated this week show home construction in America fell 7 tenths of a percent last month are shortages of construction materials laborers and there's something else hard to find plots of land marketplaces Justin hoe has that Back in September a survey of home builders found that over three quarters of them said supply of available lots was low In the case of real severe problem finding lots to build on That's Paul M rath with the national association of home builders which did the survey Part of the issue in rath says is getting permits and approval for new lots can take a while And the pandemic has slowed that down even more Emre says that's because a lot of people are involved in developing new lots You know when you grade them and installing infrastructure you may have problems finding labor just like everywhere else The lot shortage is a particular problem for building single-family homes says Susan walker a real estate professor at the Wharton school Single-family is land intensive Walker says single-family homes have been in high demand during the pandemic But the commerce department says single-family home construction fell nearly 4% in October I'm just in hell for marketplace Let's do the numbers S&P futures are up two tenths of a percent about a half hour here or so before the market opens.

Caroline champlain Nathan proctor U.S. public interest research Caroline champlin marketplace Government Justin hoe David smith Paul M rath Gartner Apple Emre apple national association of home b Smith rath Susan walker Wharton school Single America
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Early January some states are pushing back and a federal appeals court temporarily blocked the rule last weekend with full consideration on a legal fast track businesses are preparing anyway marketplaces Justin hoe has more Companies have a lot of work to do to comply with the rule by January 4th There's a lot of processes and paperwork that they have to pull together They have to communicate with their employees about this Karen Kerrigan is a CEO of the small business and entrepreneurship council She says that work can be costly especially for smaller companies with a hundred or 200 employees Still she's advising businesses to prepare early since they could face fines if they don't comply And that's why many of them are moving on it Regardless of what might happen from a legal perspective Many companies want their workers to be vaccinated but haven't wanted to enforce it Says Evan rawley a professor at the university of Connecticut They feel like gee some of our employees might be unhappy If we mandate the said we don't want to have a lot of blowback from the rank and file or there might even be senior executives who are opposed to it Complying he says allows companies to tell employees they're just following the rules I'm Justin how for marketplace The Justice Department is suing the car service Uber for charging extra wait time fees to passengers with disabilities Here's marketplaces nova sappho Uber has charged all passengers of fee if a ride arrives at a pickup spot and waits more than two minutes to get going The Department of Justice says that violates the Americans with disabilities act because the fee does not take into account the needs of the physically disabled who may have to for example break down a walker or a wheelchair for storage in a vehicle The federal government is asking a judge to require Uber to modify its policy train drivers and staff and pay damages and civil penalties Uber disputes the government's claims and says the average weight via charges amounts to less than 60 cents The company also says that as of last week it's automatically waiving fees for disabled writers I'm no Visa for marketplace Let us do.

Justin hoe Karen Kerrigan small business and entrepreneu Evan rawley university of Connecticut Justice Department Justin Department of Justice federal government government
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Compliance done right I'm David brancaccio General Electric which never fully found its way after its financing arm fell apart during the 2008 financial crisis said this morning it is dividing itself up spinning off into here's the list jet engines energy and healthcare Marketplaces Nancy Marshall guns are has more on this developing story GE's healthcare arm makes medical equipment like x-ray in digital mammography machines GE's energy division produces wind turbines and the company's aviation unit makes engines and provides maintenance services for commercial and military aircraft GE has struggled to recover from the Great Recession when its financial arm took a big hit Eric Gordon is a professor at the University of Michigan's Ross school of business He's not sure the breakup will help This is like an accordion in and out You get bigger you add different divisions saying oh the diversification will help us And then 5 years later you sell things off GE stock has fallen steadily for more than a decade Gordon says the company is hoping to lure investors who might want to invest in just certain sectors not one big conglomerate I'm Nancy Marshall gensert for marketplace General Electric stock is up 5.6% pre market now Now does this feel like the later 90s to you in no way you say but the stock market the S&P 500 has had its longest string of new closing highs since 1997 That's when jewels you were meant for me was warbling out of every radio and the first iPod wouldn't happen for about four more years The S&P closed at 47 O one yesterday up less than a tenth of a percent driven by pandemic low interest rates that make bond investments less attractive also company profits and signs the U.S. economy is spinning up The S&P is up 27% year to date this morning The S&P future is steady The Dow future is down a tenth percent the NASDAQ future is up of three 10% NATO a kind of financial self editing a New York fed study finds more people think it'll be harder to borrow money now than it was a year ago Marketplaces Justin hoe explains the economic consequences The findings are a little surprising Other fed data show that banks have been loosening credit standards Economists Shannon Siri at Wells Fargo says people should have an easier time qualifying for loans because many are in relatively good financial shape compared to last year It doesn't necessarily suggest that there should be all of that much difficulty in terms of accessing credit But that doesn't mean people are feeling all that comfortable right now The fed survey found that people expect incomes to rise But they expect prices will rise too If they're expecting higher income but they also have these fears of higher inflation that really speaks to the fact that they're just worried about their financial conditions If people think those conditions are getting worse they might be less likely to apply for a loan Says Matt Schultz chief credit analyst at lending tree It's natural thing People don't want to get rejected for something like alone Schultz says it's a sign that more people are pessimistic about.

General Electric Nancy Marshall David brancaccio marketplace General Electric Ross school of business Eric Gordon University of Michigan Justin hoe Shannon Siri Gordon S NATO Wells Fargo U.S. New York fed Matt Schultz
"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"justin hoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A member of the board of America's Central Bank in a top financial regulator at the fed Marketplace's Nancy Marshall genser has some details As vice chair for supervision Randall quarrels oversaw the fed's supervision and regulation of the country's biggest financial institutions he convinced the fed to roll back some of the regulations in the dod Frank financial reform law such as lowering the amount of assets banks have to have on hand as a financial cushion With corals resignation President Biden will have at least three seats to fill on the 7 member fed board of governors Biden inherited one vacancy that was never filled by former president Trump Another fed governor's term expires next year Plus Jerome Powell's term is fed chair ends next February President Biden hasn't said yet if he'll reappoint pal he told reporters last week that he hadn't made a decision but would announce it quote fairly quickly Leo brainard is the most likely pick to replace pal if he's not reappointed Brainer does a Democrat and voted against the easing of bank regulations that corals proposed I'm Nancy Marshall gensert for marketplace It is this feel like the later 90s to you in no way you say but the stock market The S&P 500 has had its longest string of new closing high since 1997 That's when Jules you were meant for me was warbling out of every radio in the first iPod wouldn't happen for four more years The S&P closed at 47 O one yesterday at less than a tenth of a percent driven by pandemic low interest rates that make bond investments less attractive company profits and signs the U.S. economy is spinning up the S&P is up 27% year to date the S&P future is up slightly this morning Now to a kind of financial self editing a New York fed study finds more people think it'll be harder to borrow money now than it was a year ago marketplaces Justin hoe explains the economic consequences The findings are a little surprising Other fed data show that banks have been loosening credit standards Economists Shannon Siri at Wells Fargo says people should have an easier time qualifying for loans because many are in relatively good financial shape compared to last year It doesn't necessarily suggest that there should be all of that much difficulty in terms of accessing credit But that doesn't mean people are feeling all that comfortable right now The fed survey found that people expect incomes to rise But they expect prices will rise too If they're expecting higher income but they also have these fears of higher inflation that really speaks to the fact that they're just worried about their financial conditions If people think those conditions are getting worse they might be less likely to apply for a loan Says Matt Schultz chief credit analyst at lending tree Natural thing people don't want to get rejected for something like a loan Schultz says it's a sign that more people are pessimistic about their finances in the year ahead I'm just in Ho.

fed board of America Nancy Marshall genser Randall quarrels President Biden fed board of governors Jerome Powell Biden Leo brainard Nancy Marshall Central Bank S Justin hoe Trump Shannon Siri Frank Jules Wells Fargo U.S.