20 Burst results for "Justin Fox"

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:10 min | Last month

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Mass shooting last month I'm Brad speaker You're listening to Bloomberg opinion I'm Barney Quinn By the way do get in touch comments and opinions always welcome I'm advani Quinn on Twitter or email vin at Bloomberg dot net Now to COVID-19 that other persistent and widespread threat to U.S. and global well-being both human and economic happy to have Lisa Jarvis join So Lisa first are worried about the nearly 1 million 10,000 people that are dead in the United States as a result of COVID it almost seems unbelievable that that many people are dead in the last two years but if COVID hadn't come along very many of those would not be dead Is that true I think that's true to a certain extent very many people would have died no matter what but we also didn't have good vaccine adherence Once those were available So if people had gotten vaccinated when they were eligible we probably would have seen several 100,000 lives would have been saved I would have to take a look at the estimates but we know that many of the serious cases of COVID were preventable once the vaccines were available What are we going to learn over the course of the next year or two X years maybe 5 years maybe ten maybe more about COVID and various viruses like COVID from the amount of people that have died are there studies ongoing I hope that what we're going to learn is actually from the people who have lived And in that instance what we want to know is long COVID I think that's the biggest opportunity here to better understand viruses One in 5 Americans suffer from some form of long COVID which is a big umbrella term It can mean a lot of different things That's part of the issue is that there's no good definition for it But for a small percentage of that one in 5 people that can mean that their symptoms transform into something that is potentially lifelong and looks a lot like chronic fatigue syndrome We know that those people stopped working And so Justin Fox actually has a column out about that at the moment it's actually showing up in the employment data It is showing us an unemployment data So we know that this is a huge issue now and it's going to be a huge issue going forward because even people who had mild COVID could end up with long COVID and omicron and its siblings are just sweeping the country many more people have been exposed sometimes multiple times to the virus The NIH has been given $1.2 billion to run a long COVID study to really try to understand and get to the bottom of who's at risk what are some of the possible treatments to better define it Unfortunately that study is moving very slowly It makes me very worried about how quickly we're going to get the answers to help the people who currently have long COVID and those who will in the future But we still have a lot of questions we need to answer Also how long does it last the can it go away I mean just anecdotally it seems that sometimes long COVID does go away other times it hasn't gone away yet Yeah that's right I mean part of that is again you know there's this big umbrella of symptoms that encompass long COVID And one of the things that I think we need to do is get better at defining that So you could think about it in two ways to start with the people who had very serious COVID and have long COVID because they have organ damage from being in the hospital And then there's the people who had mild COVID and went on to have this lawn killer symptoms Those are the ones that are the real mystery And within that there's other buckets you know people who have heart symptoms and there are some treatments for that and I think that's a message more cardiologists would like to get out there that if you're experiencing her palpitations or high heart rate after having COVID there are treatments for you There's people who have lung effects and then there are these people who progress to these chronic fatigue like symptoms So yeah we'd like to understand what puts you at risk for that and how can we prevent it and how can we treat it We're now at 85.7 million cases in the United States and another 100,000 per day If one in 5 of those turns into long COVID we have a very serious health issue on our hands over the coming decades I mean it's terrifying to really think about And when you talk to people who are working on this I think they really are calling it kind of a parallel pandemic that not enough people are talking about I mean there are going to be people as you pointed out whose symptoms do resolve and it might be kind of like the same long viral effect when you have the flu You might be tired or have a cough that persists for a few weeks and some people are calling that long COVID It may also be that some portion of those people go on to have longer term damage that still hidden We just don't know that we need to be putting more time and attention towards studying it Lisa how is the virus evolved from Delta through omicron to the sub variants that we're seeing now It seems like we're in I don't know the 6th 7th wave of sub variant Yeah we keep seeing more part of that has to do with the lack of vaccinations around the world giving the virus plenty of opportunity to spread These variants form because the virus has lots of hosts Another way that the variants form is when they hit just the right host So someone who's immunocompromised and the virus persists in their system for a really long time that allows at time to evolve is that something that emerges Right now we've got three that are circulating We've got VA 2.121 We've got BA four and BA 5 I was looking at the recent data out of CDC and I think VA four and 5 are starting to really creep up in the U.S. something like 21% of cases this week are those two variants which I should note that if you're someone who had omicron VA one the original overcrowd in the winter and even in the spring if you had VA one or BA two your susceptible to VA four and 5 you might not get really sick but chances are good that you'll get reinfected if you're not being careful And that brings up the question about those who qualify for a second booster Is it of any use against the new sub variants I think the second booster is always going to help protect you against serious infection if you're someone that is at risk of serious infection you should get that second booster There's so much virus circulating right now Tony Fauci has COVID You know I think everyone at some point is being exposed to this virus And so if you're someone that's high risk we know that the vaccine protection wanes over time Yeah Another thing that happened this week was that the U.S. started letting people in from other countries without a negative test How does it impact the rest of the world and the United States domestically that people who have taken vaccines other than those that were available say in the U.S. and Europe will start to mix with each other Now the travel is becoming more prevalent I'm not sure if the fact that they're vaccinated differently will matter I mean I honestly think that it made sense to lift that testing and requirement and no small part because people were flying within the U.S. They're applying domestically without having to test and we know that the opportunity for spread is great there But I think one thing that has been a little confusing has been trying to parse data coming out of different countries that are better tracking infections where people have different kinds of.

COVID Barney Quinn advani Quinn Lisa Jarvis Bloomberg U.S. Justin Fox Lisa chronic fatigue syndrome Brad NIH Twitter cough flu Tony Fauci CDC Europe
Watch: Tyler Bozak saves Blues’ season with Game 5 overtime goal vs. Avalanche

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Watch: Tyler Bozak saves Blues’ season with Game 5 overtime goal vs. Avalanche

"The blues are still alive in their second round series after defeating the avalanche 5 to four on Tyler bozak's goal three 38 into overtime Bose capped a frantic rally in which Robert Thomas tied the game with 54 seconds left in regulation The app scored the first three goals and were ahead three to one in the third period until Thomas and Justin Fox scored four 17 apart Nathan McKinnon's third goal of the night put the avalanche ahead late in the third but the blues sent the series back to St. Louis for game 6 on Friday Vladimir tarasenko also scored for the blues

Tyler Bozak Avalanche Robert Thomas Justin Fox Bose Nathan Mckinnon Thomas Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:42 min | 9 months ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Going on around the world Michael Aaron thank you very much A Christmas beret turned into horror when the driver of an SUV plowed into people and walk a show of Wisconsin at least 5 people are dead and more than 40 others are injured a person of interest is in police custody Jurors in Georgia will hear closing arguments today and the trial of three white men charged with killing 25 year old Ahmad Aubrey Gregory and Travis mcmichael along with fellow neighbor William Bryant are on trial for Aubrey's death Aubrey was black In the NFL the jets lost Washington and the forty-niners won the Giants play the bucks tonight In the NBA the next loss the warriors won in the NHL the rangers won the islanders bruins and capitals lost Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quick tank powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts more than a 120 countries Michael Barr this is Bloomberg The following commentary is from Bloomberg opinion The great resignation is great for low paid workers I'm Justin Fox The columnist for Bloomberg opinion an estimated 3% of American workers quit their jobs in September The highest quit rate since the government started keeping track two decades ago This has been described as the great resignation A rethinking by Americans of their careers and priorities But the rise and quits is being driven mostly by low wage workers switching to better paying jobs The quits rate hasn't risen in the financial sector It's actually down in the information sector which includes publishing broadcasting software and most Internet companies Quits are way up Meanwhile in leisure and hospitality non durable goods manufacturing and healthcare hires are also up in those industries Wages too Overall low wage workers are seeing their strongest pay gains in two decades That's not a great resignation but it is pretty great I'm Justin Fox For more opinion please go to Bloomberg dot com slash opinion or OPI and go on the Bloomberg terminal These has been Bloomberg opinion And Bloomberg opinion commentaries can be heard every weekday at this time and terminal customers can read more at op N go At a 6 50 on Wall Street we turn to news and science and technology now with a Bloomberg MJ IT stem report brought to you by New Jersey institute of technology Industry ready engineers and more than 20 fields If its engineering is at angi IT more at dot EDU Now here's what's making news and science technology engineering and math Austria went into a nationwide lockdown earlier today in a desperate effort to contain spiraling coronavirus infections The lockdown will last at least ten days but could extend to 20 people will be able to leave.

Bloomberg Michael Aaron Justin Fox Ahmad Aubrey Gregory Travis mcmichael William Bryant Aubrey islanders bruins Michael Barr niners Wisconsin jets NHL warriors rangers Giants Georgia bucks NBA
"justin fox" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"justin fox" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Boris johnson. Lose this battle with and umbrella. That happens here watching morning. Joe so frustrating. We'll be right back. Our world is facing some big challenges. Chuck todd breaks them down a deep dive into a topic. Instead of covering all the big stories. We're gonna cover one. Single subject impacting american politics exploring and explaining the critical issues that affect our future. Meet the press. Reports all episodes of season two are now available on demand on peacock. Hey it's chris hayes. This week on my podcast. Wise is happening. I'll be talking with business and economics writer. Justin fox about the weirdness of the housing market after cova. What's happening is that as more people who can work anywhere moved to places that puts the squeeze on people in those places who can't work anywhere some of that can't be avoided and a lot of these places that are still growing and will be able to accommodate that over time so much in this country. It's all focused on the most affluent twenty-five percent or so of americans because they're the ones who are subscribing to the various media properties that report about it and they make more noise and they just have all this market power. That's this week on. Why is this happening. Search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right. Now and subscribe vaccine was developed an authorized under a republican administration and it's been distributed administered under a democratic administration. Vaccines are safe highly effective. There's nothing political about. Look at all the people who took a shot at they later. We learned a lot of them are already been vaccinated from the start. I have to compliment. Republican senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. He had made a political. He's encourage people to get vaccinated and continue to do so in the states in pretty good shape. Alabama republican governor. Kay ivey recently spoke out to encourage vaccination and even the commentators on facts who've been belittling this for a long time. Some haven't but many have are arguing get vaccinated. Look this is not about reputation. Blue states about life and death president biden praising some republicans recent push to get more americans vaccinated these however are the republicans biden will not be praising a number of house republicans yesterday marching over to the senate to protest reimposing mask mandates in the house speaking out against speaker nancy. Pelosi's push to mask up. That is not a speaker for america. that's a speaker. Only concerned about her own wealth her own direction and her own control. This is the people's house. Do we really wanna listen to this day. We really seriously like the dumbest man. It's not really that. I don't know if he is or not. I don't think just plays on tv or if he's actually tom but the question is how many of those house. Republicans are vaccinated. How many members of the house vaccinated. Because they know most of the democrats are we we've been hearing that they're republicans are still not vaccinate. How many of those house republicans are you so right. There are flying back to districts that are still hot with infections. That are still dangerous with infections because the infections are growing in their parts of the country chances are pretty good. If they're the press conference like that chances are really good. Just looking at that map that they're all from red hot districts are most of them. Were from red hot districts and finally i you just gotta ask it just got to ask. Why aren't they following. The example of governor kay ivey. Why aren't they following the example of mitch. Mcconnell who's actually spending campaign money to get the message out in his desk mcconnell. Where's the mass and mitch. Mcconnell has been wearing a mask ahead of all the other republicans taking this seriously. So this is joe biden said..

Justin fox republican administration Chuck todd chris hayes kay ivey Boris johnson cova president biden senate mitch mcconnell Joe Alabama biden Pelosi nancy america tom Mcconnell mitch
"justin fox" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Beyond just the fact that some people will not have to go on ridiculous commutes As many then. Yeah i mean. Those two aspects of of our economic geographic housing life seemed just so core to you know people. There's jobs people tend to leave places where there are not. A lot of jobs tend to go to places where there are jobs and you look at like inflows and outflows and then you know you have to have housing. Keep up with that. And there's obviously commuting is a huge part of people's lives. there's all kinds of interesting time use surveys. About housing gets more expensive. People spend more time commuting and the more time commute they are the less happy they are controlling everything else. Like communities with long commutes is one of the things like most guaranteed to make people miserable. So now you've got this idea of like. Yeah you can really unlock and people talking about this for twenty years. Since the dawn the internet could really unlock where you live from where you work. It could transform everything i guess. The question is how enduring do we think those changes are going to be. I mean you know not as enduring as they look right now but probably pretty in tearing. And i just think it's just shifted and then sort of having it coincide with labor market situation where the prime age population just isn't going to grow much over the next twenty years barring unforeseen events. You've just got the situation where employers it seems like a lot of employees like it and some employers have embraced it ones that haven't are probably going to encounter some difficulties. I mean one thing on a sort of getting beyond the lives of those people which in many acer improved once again. This is maybe twenty percent of the workforce. We're talking about a thirty percent for able to do this. Whole remote work thing is something for people with white collar jobs in college educates. There aren't many opportunities for everybody else. And when you sort of look at what's been going on with real estate markets. Is you have all these people who probably felt pretty poor in silicon valley or new york but are now among the richer people out in some distant suburb or smaller city. Where they've moved and they're buying in is making it harder for people in those places who are just making local incomes and can't work remotely to afford housing. That's a great point right so yeah so there could be affects both directions right because the degree that again we get we should do. The people were talking about that you know is is very small sliver. It's twenty two thousand twenty. Five percent of the american workforce maybe but it's also a part of the force that has a lot of weight in terms of like the market power and what it does to both development and politics. The good thing i could see happening is it to the extent that those people are further from the city like that taking some of the price pressure away from these actual metro urban areas but then to the extent that does that like the squeezing the balloon. It's put more pressure on those smaller localities. It might be going to where they're coming in with all cash offers and.

acer silicon valley new york
"justin fox" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"That. There's this huge generation of people who are several years behind previous generations in things like Buying a house. And you know our slots written early on about the unique preferences of the millennials. I think it's become clearer and clearer. It's just that they were poor. I mean they came into the workforce at the absolute worst possible time at the end of this awful recession or during it so on one hand. There's this huge seeming pent-up demand on the other hand. Lending standards have not gotten any looser as a reaction maybe over reaction to what happened during the housing bubble of the two thousands. And so it's it's not everybody who can participate in this thing. It's you need a pretty big down payment and a lot of these people moving to various lovely places around the country it's the it's the all cash buyers who were winning right so like in a place like bozeman right where you mentioned before i mean that that seems like that's an interesting situation because it seems like people with a fair amount of money quite a lot of probably freedom. We're talking about a small group of fairly affluent people but it doesn't take that many bows just not a big real estate market. So you like you could pretty much overwhelm that that real estate marketing cause all sorts of crazy bidding wars with not that many people just deciding. Hey why don't i live in bozeman. Yeah and i think that is a lot of it. And i think to some extent it's caused a gotta think some of these places are gonna have a hangover from that in the coming years but as with all these things you just don't know win so well there's also the bigger question here that has to do about with a set of really interesting nested questions about sort of office life. In america we started doing the show completely remotely the first week of lockdown and a week before that. If you said we're gonna produce and broadcast alive our of cable news with no one except maybe one or two people in thirty rock. The host isn't going to be there. The line producer isn't going to be there..

bozeman america
How does education affect employment rates?

Bloomberg Law

01:16 min | 1 year ago

How does education affect employment rates?

"Jobs data concerning men who have graduate and professional credentials. Joining me is Bloomberg opinion columnist Justin Fox. Justin People usually think the more education you have the better Your job is what do the stats show? They show that that's generally true. I mean, pretty much across the board. If you have more education, you're both more likely to be employed. And your wages are higher. But I was looking at the February jobs data for various things, especially comparing men and women in different categories and how they fared over the past year. And I noticed. I mean, it's been happening for a few years. It turns out that men who just have a bachelor's degree, have a higher employment rate. The higher percentage of all of them have job. And men who have an advanced degree and there's nothing like that that I know of anywhere else and statistics, where more education results in last employment. They've only been releasing those statistics in 2015. And it's been true almost every month since then, just to clarify it's not true with women. Correct women who have advanced degrees or more likely to have jobs than women with just about fourth degree. What's the percentage of

Justin Fox Bloomberg Justin
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"C number 99 1 to Boston number 1061 to San Francisco Bloomberg 9 62, the country, Serious exam General 1 19 and around the goal. The Bloomberg business and Bloomberg radio dot com Thiss is Bloomberg markets. Coming up. We're gonna take a look at a story That's just fascinating to me. Are people leaving New York with Bloomberg Opinion columnist Justin Fox is out with a great column, saying the Great New York City exodus isn't really that big will dig deep into that story. But first, let's go to great, Jarod. Bloomberg News for a Bloomberg Business went well, thankyou. Palmore intraday records as stocks extend the rally Equities traded higher even after private companies in the U. S added fewer jobs in August than had been expected more on that in a moment, But right now Checking the markets as we have a tendency to do. The S and P is up 8/10 percent of 26, the Dow's up 9/10 of a percent of 266 and the NASDAQ's up 3/10 of a percent of 39. The 10 year. Let's take a close. Look at that. It's up to 30 seconds down with a 300.66% lead. Uh, let's see here. West Texas Intermediate crude oil's down 2/10 of a percent of 42 68 a barrel Comex gold is down 1.4%. At 1950 90 announced. The dollar yen is at 106 14. The euro dollar 18 45 in the British found a dollar 33 12 back to the jobs report. US. Companies added fewer jobs and expected in August, suggesting the labor market rebound remains gradual, with employment well below pre pandemic levels. According to 80 FIE research business, Faeroes increased by 428,000 after an upwardly revised 212,000 in July. Median projection in a Bloomberg survey of economists call for a one million game for the latest month. That's a Bloomberg business Flash. I'm Greg Jared Thiss is Bloomberg Markets with Paul Sweeney and Funny Quinn on Bloomberg Radio. It is time to take a look at the election just a couple months away at this point, although results wise, who knows, and we're starting to get.

Bloomberg Markets Bloomberg Bloomberg Business Bloomberg Opinion Bloomberg Radio Greg Jared Thiss US New York Justin Fox Jarod San Francisco Boston Faeroes West Texas Intermediate U. S
"justin fox" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on WGN Radio

"It was clean and good. But the new building doesn't sound like there are any issues. Here's knee lander with a pocket in the right circle in the blue Zone. The bowl quest right point runs into a checking is out of position. Here come the blues the other way. For our internal hotline on the right wing drops it off the barbecue chef near the right point. Pain reaching with a stick worked it free, but Brauer took it back behind the net. The barbers have along the right boards. Out to the line. Deep slots. Candela, long shot looked like Suman went down on all fours to block that, in the other way Come the Hawks led by any lander to cane over the blues line, right point stopping their king closing in faking a shot. Moving to the high slot and fires that it parayko in the foot and operate will take the puck and carry to center ice. Parayko slides in and over the hot line along the left wing to McKay. I'll put it down to the left wing corner for parayko wrinkled and jabs it to the boards on the side to Schwartz, who tried to fight off a couple of hawks could not get it away from Duncan Keith. You slapped it away, And then Schwartz takes it back off a centering pass left it at the line on a long shot. From there off of Justin Fox Stick reflects back down ice into the blue zone. The Hawks will take advantage and get a line change. Walked back the other way, was traded in September to the Blues. Or Joel Edmundson moves ahead. And break. Actually, this is Cara sink on the right wing corner runs into Calvin Mahan on works the puck. Frito himself on fighting off a couple of blues eventually had it taken away than to break it took it back across the rink. Here's Could Ula Crossing the blue line of the right wing falls down, but along came doctor get the puck and tried to center. Or Tuesday, laid down to block the centering pass the blues get the puck back cleared off the near glass by Petra Angelo and down into the Hawk's own Calvin gone back to get it. He'll put the puck behind the Hawk Net David camp, leaving it there for the brink it coming by. Judah Han in the far corner waves it out the center ice Now the doc, he takes the puck loops back into the hawk zone for a moment passing and it could jeweler Blues line. He deflects the puck down beside the net. Robert Thomas will carry it around the far boards and stop Back in behind the blues net to parayko. Ahead to Nicola.

Blues Hawks Schwartz Calvin Mahan Judah Han Justin Fox Joel Edmundson Brauer Suman Duncan Keith McKay Cara Nicola Frito Robert Thomas Petra Angelo
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And traffic cameras work and reducing accidents and changing reckless driver behavior there use has not been widely embraced in the United States. However, there may be a new reason to favor them. And Bloomberg opinion editor Justin Fox is here to tell us why I didn't realize that speed cameras had such a history. So tell us about why some places have embraced speed cameras, while others have not. Yeah, the 1st 1 to go back to the 19 sixties. But they seem to have first begun to be what pretty widely used in the late eighties early nineties and this was done both in parts of the U. S. And in Europe, But in Europe, it sort of totally caught on and also in Australia and speed camera. There now, the main way that the police check whether people are going to fast or not, And they seem to be Pretty successful in keeping people from violating speed limits in the US, It's really been back and forth many places that had them have given him a very first places, then add them. We're in Galveston County, Texas, and now in Texas, the state Legislature is actually outlawed feed camera. You can't have them at all in there. 12 other states that don't allow speed cameras now. That surprised me. Why ban them well, and it's two things really one is there's a vocal constituency that really doesn't like them, mainly because they like to speed and then the other is I think more legitimate is that because we leave so much of this in the hands of local communities Some of them do use speed cameras, but also highway off a police and sitting by the side of the road to sort of trapped people from outside who are driving through and make money. So I do think there's a legitimate complaint in some cases, and that's less an issue in Europe, with its usually administered on a national level. Or in Australia. It's on a state level province level. But, yeah, it's kind of ridiculous in the US how little used they are. Dark city uses them. To some extent, several other big cities like Houston in L. A. That used to have them have given him up. In the U, and the U. K. The roads are safer is part of that attributed to the speed cameras. I think it's gotta be because basically, if you go back to 1990 the US had about the same traffic fatality rate per miles driven as Australia and Germany and much lower than France. It was already higher than the UK then. But Germany, France and Australia all have significantly lower traffic fatality rates now than the U. S. And UK is even lower than that. And what's more, they've been a kind of studies done now, over the past 15 or 20 years in Europe in the U. S. And pretty much every single one finds that speed cameras reduced speeds in their vicinity. Even when people even when they're not like clearly labeled people figure out that they're there before long, and they dramatically reduced Serious crashes there now being seen as a way to fight racism. Explain that Yeah. I mean, this wasn't original to me. Aaron Gordon, a writer for vice suggested I'm sure other people have as well. It's just when you automate the process of catching speeders. You take a lot of the discretion out of it, and one of the complaints since first started getting attention more widely in the nineties. Problem where people are basically pulled over for driving. While black. There's just seems to be a lot of evidence. There's one or two studies that find it. Not there. Well, almost every study that's been done find the black drivers are pulled over at an inordinate great and they're definitely then what? Absolutely true. They're searched more often after they're pulled over. So it becomes this way, whether intentionally or not, where Police behavior unfairly impact for the population. And if you took some of that, William Police will still be needed to pull people over for drunk driving things like that. But if you take the speed enforcement away that reduces those encounters and the possibility for bio A lot of times on TV shows, you'll see someone say, Let's check the traffic cams to find out where someone wass or is So is there a problem with this idea of greater state surveillance? Yeah, and I, especially now that they're the ones of 20 years ago took actual pictures on film that then had to be looked at later. Now it's all digital. And yes, it could be part of a broader surveillance system and definitely the UK as lots of speed cameras and then just have lots of cameras of all kinds, watching the streets at all times. So it's clearly something where governance is an issue, and if and if you don't govern this well, it could be really could be abused, But I think that's pretty cool. Hear of any kind of police think if it's not managed well in government. Well, it can be abusive. Is there any movement underway to increase the number of speed cameras anywhere? In New York City area, But I mean, it's a little easier in New York City because a minority of New York residents have cars on DH. That's just not true. In most places. One interesting thing is whenever Poles were taken, they seem to show a majority of people saying, Yeah, these speed cameras and red light cameras are probably a good idea. But when it actually comes to voting for local officials, or occasionally when they're been referendum, like there wasn't Houston, Nala, I go. You know, it's the people who hate the speed cameras who are really motivated and most of the people who are in favor of them. It's far from their number one issue and so you know, in low turnout elections, the motivated people who win Thanks, Justin..

Europe Australia United States UK Justin Fox Houston Germany New York City France Bloomberg Texas William Police editor Galveston County New York Legislature Aaron Gordon writer
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

11:03 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Early as April first I'm Evan handing opinion on Bloomberg radio I'm June Grasso nation states and counties were a large share of the population is older than sixty five face big challenges as the corona virus disease spreads could you tell us where the biggest risks are is Justin fox a columnist for Bloomberg opinion start by telling us about the stats that come from China regarding population age and corona virus what yeah from what we know so far coronavirus the new coronavirus is much more dangerous for older people than younger ones and it's a few weeks old now but I think it's holding up pretty well a study from the Chinese center for disease control founded the mood with an overall case fatality rate around two percent it was almost fifteen percent for those eighty and older and eight percent for the seventy to seventy nine yes I don't know which countries around the world have the most elderly and their population sorted by the percentage of the population that sixty five and older Japan is the world champion at twenty seven point six percent of the population in two thousand eight according to the World Bank another country that's being really hard hit by a car virus is number two in Italy at at twenty around twenty three percent and basically all of western Europe is pretty old well over twenty percent so how is Japan done it's hard to tell I don't think they've managed it super well but I don't think they've had quite the journey having quite the problems that Italy is so I added that in the end they struggled with getting testing going like the U. S. house but I guess they've made even better at social distancing and and the like so who knows if this point that number and I'm sure a lot of these sort of hard to say but it is clear that in Italy one of the reasons this has been so overwhelming for the health care system and there is just that the elderly population is so high and most people are really struggling with it if the country has a younger population does that tend to mean that the incidence of corona virus deadly coronavirus goes down I mean you'd think it would make it least the severity and the pressure on the health care system a bit last in line which is probably mismanaged the pandemic worse than any other country is still being totally overwhelmed even though it's over sixty five shares only about six percent but it does make you think that thanks alf Beijing subsaharan Africa which are usually seen as a super high and it's super high risk for a pandemic like this might struggle a little less than people are thinking just because in those places over sixty five population as often as low as two or three percent so as far as the U. S. is concerned how does the over sixty S. overall is sort of on the low end for a rich country did it sixteen point eight percent of the population is sixty five or older but that's that's still higher than most of the world which is the rich countries tend to be the old countries and they're definitely a lot of variants depending on where you are like Maine and Florida have sort of European level over sixty five ratios and then if you go down to the county level there are places like I mean the one that really stands out is Sumter county in Florida is around fifty seven percent sixty five and older there's this fast growing retirement community they're called the villages that gets a lot of attention that their there are so there is something like seventy five thousand people sixty five and older in that county and it has two hundred and seventy seven acute care hospital beds so man if if this hits their heart is going to be terrible so what I need is that retirement community is there a lot of internal bleeding not many people been moving there the place is that Florida it's more because people older people are moving their place like Maine West Virginia mon it's really more because there haven't been a lot a lot of younger people have been leaving for jobs in bigger cities and there haven't been a huge amount of young people coming and I mean it may end up Portland and it's rock in its greatness but most of the state is pretty rural and exurban losing them so you have these maps in your column that of how variations of light blue to dark blue so I was surprised that you light blue which which means there are less people sixty five and over I'm so Texas is one of those and Georgia well they were both fast growing states that lots of younger people and moving tale and I would imagine I mean Utah which is the youngest state of all has the highest birth rate of all the states I wouldn't be surprised if Texas and Georgia pretty high on the hill but yeah there there are places that young families are moving to land and having more kids so they they skew young according to the study that you did most of the old skewing counties are in rural areas he added to all over the the Great Plains to somebody on the Appalachian in the even in the north west and and put them in the desert areas and it's just that again it's more about young people leaving that all people moving in and those are a lot of those counties have very little in the way of healthcare resources on the positive side it'll take the crown longer to get there but you know those those are places that it's going to be tough I think because the population sold Justin thanks so much that's Justin fox a columnist for Bloomberg opinion during World War two Detroit automakers rose to the occasion and became aircraft tank and gun manufacturers for America and its time of need today industrial companies can repurpose their factories for the tools needed to fight the current enemy the corona virus but Sutherland Bloomberg opinion industrials columnist is here to tell us so remind us of what happened in Detroit to factories in World War two well you had the RFP or the president of the time issue cool for the great arsenal of democracy distorted bring to life and health you know the country and its allies six seed in World War two into three target Detroit automakers repurpose thing everybody's maybe the old and new factories and they became weapons manufactured aircraft manufacturer Hey Glen Dr instrumental to the U. S. wanting more to it you know I think when I look at the corona virus crisis their opportunity here for manufacturers to step up and do you think the Miller now it might not be on the same scale put look at China which of course is dealing with that first you didn't see many factors from a variety of walks of life reporter thing factory lines because they couldn't run them anyway because the police couldn't get to work and instead said no what rather than making semiconductors or cars or you know real products going to instead make and we're going to serve our country so S. what did the president of mass general suggest he's the country the whole world up more of a warlike mentality he thought that the federal government called for a sort of Manhattan Project you know effort where companies across the US in a pool their resources to give the U. S. what it means in terms of ventilators that mask so explain the shortage that we have in this country for ventilators and face masks how bad is it I mean I think that's really what we're worried about and that's why you're seeing you know rather draconian shut down across the area code is that you know for most people who get the flu they probably will be able to survive it but you know there's a percentage that you need to be hospitalized you need the equipment to care for them and for a lot of people that going to mean ventilators and we just don't currently have an offense leaders in our health care system to the port you know the kind of numbers that we would see if this thing is allowed to spread really and I think that is really where the concern is and if defense lawyers also masks we do have you know sort of a national stockpile of medical equipment that the country can drive the the moments of crisis but is that in okay some experts say no that wasn't properly replenished after going through a break in two thousand nine and that were you know somewhat behind because of that certainly we need to ramp up production to make sure that we have all of the equipment that we need to properly beat this thing what surprised me in your column why weren't the masks you know why didn't they make more masks since two thousand nine well I don't think that the only left it sitting idle but you know I think there's the question of how much funding given to that how much priority was given to that it you know now we we need to fill the void in terms of how many maps but we have the coming world pointed meet this war of the factories are they able to just changeover to making these kinds of things I mean it's certainly not as easy as tapping your fingers and I think some factors are going to be more adaptable than others but we expect you know we see companies doing that in China where companies who you know traditionally make cars weren't they make me conductors were inspecting the ticket with the portion of our factory instead make masters so it's going to be probably different for every company another example is over in France what LVMH is resurfacing you know some of its perfume and cosmetic factories to inspect make hand sanitizer so obviously you can draw some parallels between hand sanitizer and perfume and cosmetics in terms of the process that would be involved there the look that everybody is going to be able to make everything and maybe not every company would be able to even do that but I think it's worth thinking about you know find ourselves in this situation what can companies do I mean we're facing a situation where industrial companies are likely to see a significant drop off in demand for many of the goods that they traditionally produced and given that given that there's not going to be any need for somebody exactly the jet engine coming off the factory line can be possibly be repurposed into something that would help us by the.

Evan Justin fox Bloomberg June Grasso
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg business week with Carol Massar and Jason Kelly from Bloomberg radio so we keep hearing about many ways to fend off the corona virus got really simple piece of advice stay home that's exactly what Justin fox Bloomberg opinion columnist is doing what he's coming to us from home from his computer thanks to next E. which is our internal conferencing system Justin it sounds like simple advice yeah I mean it's really simple for me I'm an opinion columnist all I need to do my job is a phone and a laptop and an internet connection what's interesting is where at this time we were all trying to figure out you know how can we can't contain it at this point but all that mitigation how do you prevent it from spreading and we talk about you know fist bump being an elbow bumping and all these different ways there's no more handshakes are all keeping kind of social distance but as you point out it's very simple because it's kind of an equation I think there's a word that I think we should teach to everybody are not because it's all about lowering the are not explain that we are not is basically the infectious mess of a disease it's how many people each person with the disease can be expected to in fact so if it's above one the disease spreads if it's below one it doesn't spread and every disease sort of ads they estimate what the are not is if nobody changes their behavior and for the corona virus it's pretty hot it seems to be between two and three were as for influenza most estimates are usually down in the ones and and so the issue is it's different for different kinds of diseases but have the basic elements of what make up the are not R. how long does the infection last how infectious is the disease when you have contact with the person and how many people do you have contact with and we can affect that how infectious when we have contact with a lot of the things like washing our hands and not touching our faces and things like that but then a lot of it is just if you reduce the number of people having contact with each other if your society has social distancing then they are not goes down and you know in China than they used people's contact with each other to almost nothing and the are not of the disease went below one you may go back up again now that there are people out and about in it and the other thing I would say is it it was still on there that it's completely uncontrollable and South Korea show that you can get a lot of cases and if you have enough testing and peoples are in the public health authorities are very aggressive you can sort of bring it back in and check but that that goes hand in hand with measures to keep are not well it's interesting I do think about this you know this is our version of the Chinese quarantine you know if you stayed on the kind of self quarantining yourself and keeping yourself out of the public it's not just about protecting yourself but if you're not I think about this when I the subways I feel like the traffic is way down but you're protecting others he might come into contact with specially when you're dealing with something yeah if if people are to squeeze squeeze this close together in the subway or in the office or in the like the superliner Bloomberg headquarters then there's a little bit less risk I mean it's not like I'm doing some aerobic thing here right but it does use everybody's risk a tiny bit right I do think about our business week audience and there's a lot of folks the probably read the magazine are in that position where they can work from home the other thing I and I don't know if you thought about this I mean increasingly we're seeing companies are realizing that their systems their technology systems are being taxed as a result of this yeah I mean everybody in every single interview were you were doing was this way and everybody was remote and you guys were remote too we might be struggling a lot more it's sort of easier and it's like an early adopter here to to do it in my get harder later if more of us have to do that you write about a lot of things that I do wonder if you think about one of the things I think we're trying to assess whether it's a plot global supply chains or other factors have something like the corona virus might impact the workplace going forward and I do wonder if you think that in the future we'll see more folks doing things online staying home so we we talked about this in the past when we got there other crises but I wonder if you think something might be different this time around I think you know there's a steady trend in the direction of more people working remotely and then there are occasional things like when Melissa Meyer took over at Yahoo ordering everybody to come back to the office so there's a back and forth but it's pretty clear the trend over the past twenty years for obvious reasons because it's more more possible to do and more and more companies are starting up that basically structure themselves that way from the beginning and so you know it's harder for big established companies to to change to that in autumn one want to because you get a lot out of the in person interaction so I mean this will cause a lot more people to try it and will cause companies to figure out better ways to do it so maybe it'll accelerated a little but I don't think it's going to be some huge tipping point and that's it Justin fox Bloomberg opinion columnist speaking appropriately from home this has been the story of this entire virus in many ways and when you think about it hitting close to home here in New York City and here in the United.

Carol Massar Jason Kelly Bloomberg Justin fox Bloomberg
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg business week with Carol Massar and Jason Kelly from Bloomberg radio so we keep hearing about many ways to fend off the corona virus got a really simple piece of advice stay home that's exactly what Justin fox Bloomberg opinion columnist is doing what he's coming to us from home from his computer thanks to next E. which is our internal conferencing system Justin it sounds like simple advice yeah I mean it's really simple for me I'm an opinion columnist all I need to do my job is a phone and a laptop and an internet connection what's interesting is where at this time we were all trying to figure out you know how can we can't contain it at this point but all that mitigation how do you prevent it from spreading and we talk about you know fist bump being an elbow bumping and all these different ways there's no more handshakes are all keeping kind of social distance but as you point out it's very simple because it's kind of an equation I think there's a word I think we should teach to everybody or not because it's all about lowering the are not explain that I mean are not is basically the infectious mess of a disease it's how many people each person with that disease can be expected to in fact so if it's above one the disease spreads if it's below one it doesn't spread and every disease sort of ads they estimate what the are not is if nobody changes their behavior and for the crowd a virus it's pretty hot it seems to be between two and three were as for influenza most estimates are usually down in the ones and and so the issue is if it's different for different kinds of diseases but have the basic elements of what make up the are not R. how large is the infection last how infectious is the disease when you have contact with the person and how many people do you have contact with and we can affect that how infectious when we have contact with a lot of the things like washing our hands and not touching our faces and things like that then a lot of it is just if you reduce the number of people having contact with each other if your society has social distancing then they are not goes down and you know in China yeah they used people's contact with each other to almost nothing and the are not of the disease went below one you may go back up again now that there are people out and about in it and the other thing I would say is it it was still on there that it's completely uncontrollable and South Korea Asia the you can get a lot of cases and if you have enough testing and people sort and the public health authorities are very aggressive you can sort of bring it back in and check but that that goes hand in hand with measures to keep are not dead well it's interesting I do think about this you know this is our version of the Chinese quarantine you know if you stayed on the kind of self quarantining yourself and keeping yourself out of the public it's not just about protecting yourself but if you're not I think about this when I look at the subways I feel like the traffic is way down but you're protecting others he might come into contact with specially when you're dealing with something yeah if if people are to squeeze squeeze this close together in the subway or in the office or in the like the superliner Bloomberg headquarters then there's a little bit less risk I mean it's not like I'm doing some aerobic thing here right but it does use everybody's risk a tiny bit right I do think about our business week audience and there's a lot of folks I probably read the magazine are in that position where they can work from home the other thing and I don't know if you thought about this I mean increasingly we're seeing companies are realizing that their systems of technology systems are being taxed as a result of this yeah I mean everybody in every single interview were you were doing was this way and everybody was remote and you guys were remote two we might be struggling a lot more it's sort of easier and it's like an early adopter here to to do it in my get harder later if more of us have to do this you write about a lot of things that I do wonder if you think about one of the things I think we're trying to assess whether it's the plot global supply chains or other factors have something like the corona virus might impact the workplace going forward and I do wonder if you think that in the future we'll see more folks doing things online staying home so we we talked about this in the past when we've got two other crises but I wonder if you think something might be different this time around I think you know there's a steady trend in the direction of more people working remotely and then there are occasional things like when Melissa Meyer took over at Yahoo ordering everybody to come back to the office so there's a back and forth but it's pretty clear the trend over the past twenty years for obvious reasons because it's more more possible to do and more and more companies are starting up that is the structure themselves that way from the beginning and so you know it's harder for big established companies to to change to that in autumn one want to because you get a lot out of the in person interaction so I mean this will cause a lot more people to try it and will cause companies to figure out better ways to do it so maybe it'll accelerated a little but I don't think it's going to be some huge tipping point and that's just in fact Bloomberg opinion columnist speaking appropriately from home this has been the story of this entire virus in many ways and when you think about it hitting close to home here in New York City and.

Carol Massar Jason Kelly Bloomberg Justin fox Bloomberg
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg business week with Carol Massar and Jason Kelly from Bloomberg radio so we keep hearing about many ways to fend off the corona virus got really simple piece of advice stay home that's exactly what Justin fox Bloomberg opinion columnist is doing what he's coming to us from home from his computer thanks to next E. which is our internal conferencing system Justin it sounds like simple advice yeah I mean it's really simple for me I'm an opinion columnist all I need to do my job is a phone and a laptop and an internet connection what's interesting is where at this time we were all trying to figure out you know how can we can't contain it at this point but all that mitigation how do you prevent it from spreading and we talk about you know fist bump being an elbow bumping and all these different ways there's no more handshakes are all keeping kind of social distance but as you point out it's very simple because it's kind of an equation I think there's a word I think we should teach to everybody or not because it's all about lowering the are not explain that we are not is basically the infectious mess of a disease it's how many people each person with that disease can be expected to in fact so if it's above one the disease spreads if it's below one it doesn't spread and every disease sort of ads they estimate what the are not is if nobody changes their behavior and for the corona virus it's pretty hot it seems to be between two and three were as for influenza most estimates are usually down in the ones and and so the issue is it's different for different kinds of diseases but the basic elements of what make up the are not R. how long does the infection last how infectious is the disease when you have contact with the person and how many people do you have contact with and we can affect that how infectious when we have contact with a lot of the things like washing our hands and not touching our faces and things like that then a lot of it is just if you reduce the number of people having contact with each other if your society has social distancing then they are not goes down and you know in China yeah they used people's contact with each other to almost nothing and the are not of the disease went below one and it may go back up again now that there are people out and about in it and the other thing I would say is if it were still there that it's completely uncontrollable and south Korean is shot the you can get a lot of cases and if you have enough testing and peoples are in the public health authorities are very aggressive you can sort of bring it back in and check but that that goes hand in hand with measures to keep or not well it's interesting I do think about this you know this is our version of the Chinese quarantine you know if you stayed on the kind of self quarantining yourself and keeping yourself out of the public it's not just about protecting yourself but if you're not I think about this when I look at the subways I feel like the traffic is way down but you're protecting others he might come into contact with specially when you're dealing with something yeah if if people are to squeeze squeeze this close together in the subway or in the office or in the like the superliner Bloomberg headquarters then there's a little bit less risk I mean it's not like I'm doing some aerobic thing here right but it does use everybody's risk a tiny bit right I do think about our business week audience and there's a lot of folks the probably read the magazine are in that position where they can work from home the other thing I and I don't know if you thought about this I mean increasingly we're seeing companies are realizing that their systems of technology systems are being taxed as a result of this yeah I mean everybody in every single interview were you were doing was this way and everybody was remote and you guys were remote two we might be struggling a lot more it's sort of easier and it's like an early adopter here to to do it in my get harder later if more of us have to do this you write about a lot of things that I do wonder if you think about one of the things I think we're trying to assess whether it's a plot global supply chains or other factors have something like the corona virus might impact the workplace going forward and I do wonder if you think that in the future we'll see more folks doing things online staying home so we we talked about this in the past when we got there other crises but I wonder if you think something might be different this time around I you know there's a steady trend in the direction of more people working remotely and then there are occasional things like when Melissa Meyer took over at Yahoo ordering everybody to come back to the office so there's a back and forth but it's pretty clear the trend over the past twenty years for obvious reasons because it's more more possible to do and more and more companies are starting up that is the structure themselves that way from the beginning and so you know it's harder for big established companies to to change to that in autumn one one too because you get a lot out of the in person interaction so I mean this will cause a lot more people to try it and will cause companies to figure out better ways to do it so maybe it'll accelerated a little but I don't think it's going to be some huge tipping point and that's just in fact Bloomberg opinion columnist speaking appropriately from home this has been the story of this entire virus in many ways and when you think about it hitting close to home here in New York City and here in the United States this is what we're seeing company by company our.

Carol Massar Jason Kelly Bloomberg Justin fox Bloomberg
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In with Bloomberg opinion we're joined by opinion conoce Justin fox from Bloomberg he joins us from our ninety nine one studio in Washington DC Jessa thanks much for joining us you ever really really interesting column out today taking a look at the media business the news business and how it's evolved maybe over the last three or four decades kind of frame out for us kind of how you look at this business well basically I just started looking at an old book that I had a myself by a guy who'd been a professor of mine in college William Greider and I did this a couple weeks ago Greider died last week at the age of eighty three but I was actually looking this up before then because I've been struggling with the wild for awhile with the idea that something about our media environment is a big cause of why there's so much political polarization in the U. S. right now if you there's a lot of underlying survey data and data about how people live their lives that sort of show that there's not some great new polarization in how Americans think but there definitely is in our politics gets expressed in part of it is how the media is involved and no one ways to think about that is it's all so awful that there's just you two been talk radio and all these things other than us wonderful people in the mainstream media but Kreider's argument back in nineteen ninety two is that the mainstream media was sort of losing its grip in part because it had become this increasingly sort of establishment oriented entity full of people with degrees from fancy colleges which ironically young Greider went to Princeton and I took a class from there so he was one of those early gender fires who later gets mad at it happening but at the same time I think he was right to some extent that there the national media especially but also a lot of regional papers became from this sort of feisty array of different voices became this sort of centrist establishment voice okay Justin so do you think that the more disparate spray of the way people get news is sort of more polarized way for the the way people get news in terms of being able to carry their feeds on Facebook or I am just follow people who agree with them on Twitter do you think that this is a preferable situation because at least is democratized as opposed to just the establishment of of sort of state reporters who all went to Ivy League schools I mean if you'd asked me in the like late nineties I was at all yeah it's going to be great and I I do feel like in economics journalism it has been great there's a lot more voices that are able to weigh and a lot more expert Boyce's for the most part conoce when people talk about this they're not talking about you know is that you're absolutely right talking about political Twitter yeah and and there it it really is a struggle because for all the problems with the mainstream media at least it's mostly based on a culture of correcting errors when they're found and not making stuff up out of whole cloth and that's definitely much less true in a lot of these newer media forms that have sprung up so just what do you make of or it just from the perspective of the media business and United States kind of how it's really even involved I guess that he is society's view of media and it's probably been answered by this current president and how this present in terms of the media industry are we gonna go ever go back to kind of the way it was do you think perhaps a word me gives me to look at more trusted a little bit more considered to be less bias well one of the biggest problems is it used to be the economics of the media worked so that a lot of it had to be created close to where people work and newspapers in the U. S. there were that's that's that's where most of the news media was was working at newspapers in cities all over the country and that has just collapsed especially over the past decade plus and not necessary people were turning away readers were turning away from that slowly already but it was really that the advertising model fell apart starting in the early two thousands yeah and I don't mean that in a makes me horribly sad and I'm a former I was a reporter in Tulare California and then in Birmingham Alabama and those places are just shells of what what they once were those newspapers and it makes me awfully sad I don't see how that comes back it has to be some reorganization and it's definitely been nationalized and worried this awful moment now where it seems like it it's mostly generating distrust yeah rather than trust and I don't I don't know where it goes from there but I I I also know that we have definitely had in the past of the United States yeah very diverse media with lots of name calling and making stuff up about each other and we seem to survive that Justin fox thank you so much for being with us and I will say I could talk about this for the rest of the day and I know that you've got work to do and we're moving on to other topics we just a fox a columnist for Bloomberg opinion thank you so much for being with us you can read all his columns and others OPI and go on the Bloomberg our outlook dot com slash opinion and full disclosure as a newspaper reporter yes upon a time in Fargo North Dakota and a host of other places you know in in places where local journalism was important you know it is interesting to see the shift I think that Justin highlights a really important point which is don't get soonest all check things were were changing before our eyes social media and and everything transformed it entirely I think the question now is what is the new model right I mean what is it and who who regulates it is it going to be done by some sort of regulatory pressure to classify Facebook as a as a media company or is it is it going to be a more organic kind of effort coming internally yeah it's interesting the one thing that the internet one party come to the internet has not solved is local local media local advertising haven't really saw fort and therefore that local journalism hasn't county economic model driven off the internet I could talk about this little out to a local has changed in reading too because people kind of are creating their own communities that are virtual and aren't necessarily location driven I'm I'm not gonna get into this we got a head over two nine nine one studios in Washington DC would.

Justin fox Bloomberg Washington Jessa
"justin fox" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"That we lost and now we're gonna see we can't overturn the election no matter which side of the aisle you're on we should resist that temptation hello this Justin fox is reporting that the former house of freedom caucus chairman mark meadows plans to leave Congress in the coming days he is going to retire seven percent down her in films get a second six thirteen it is time for traffic and weather on the three that we have here is the king of all traffic sharks nobody would occur one enjoyable motors are brought to use this service to jiffy lube in Iraq and around the county on the beltway the interlude coming up between six forty eight and the ramp we can't meet road to add one seventy at least several lanes are blocked I was just looking at the camera at the V. W. parkway I'm seeing some traffic coming up through that area now they may be getting on at one seventy but nevertheless here's a backup now already on the beltway back to I ninety seven I ninety seven is going to be slow coming up from six forty eight the beltway is going to back up very quickly towards Richie highway and road ten so will keep you posted if they get some lanes open they may start to alleviate that but in the meantime if you're back there on nine ninety seven you might want to plan accordingly and had across route one hundred to the parkway and then work your way back to the beltway from there the other records on the ramp from the outer loop of the beltway onto I ninety five in our cutest clean up still on that there is room to get five but it's a little bit of a tight squeeze their major reckon Washington County and the state highway says eastbound on I. seventy he's closed after the major interchange add interstate eighty one jiffy lube introduces jiffy lube multi care you'll get the same fast convenient service what items like breaks battery spark plugs and more now you can do more in a jiffy I'm sure could occur with traffic and weather on the trees I'll talk radio six eighty WCBS thanks are plenty of sunshine but cold today we're gonna get all the way up to thirty four degrees during the day today right now right she's town has nineteen degrees Ellicott city.

Justin fox Congress Iraq Washington County WCBS chairman mark meadows Richie Ellicott
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Now is Bloomberg opinion columnist Justin fox Justin is a bluebird opinion columnist covering business he was the editorial director of the Harvard Business Review he's also had pieces published in time fortune and American banker and the author of the book the myth of the rational market Justin thanks so much for being here wow what an introduction you don't even need an interjection just you've got a self that I love because I'm on the Acela a lot more than I would like to admit that's headline no Amtrak is not about to turn a profit and you say that they have tracked but now it's the smallest ever adjuster after I did it out to the smallest ever adjusted operating loss of twenty nine point eight million and a twenty nineteen fiscal year which ended in September and said that it was on the path to achieve operational breakeven in fiscal year twenty twenty you are looking to you you're not really by and what they're selling are you just I mean they've been under a lot of pressure from Congress to breakeven operationally whatever that means there's an acknowledgement that they need some help on the capital spending side but so those numbers aren't fake but if you they actually very quietly this week released their accounting numbers and they have a loss of eight hundred and seventy four point eight million which is actually bigger than the previous years managing it's like cable companies back in the day they don't manage to maximize earnings aim and manage to maximize even die and that's sort of what Amtrak is doing now you know I was struck by this is speaking sticking with the Northeast Corridor this is as an operating profit of three hundred and thirty four million dollars on six hundred DSLR the overall northeast corner is even more than that five hundred sixty eight so that's why they're making most of the money from yeah in the is there are a lot of train buffs out there who think those numbers are a little bit dodgy and I think there definitely are some questions of the way they assigned costs and and and such but in general yes them the northeast corner brings in a lot of operating cash and the other the other lines down and you know I I need the conversation that everybody always has at least here in Washington and New York City about the Acela is well why can it go even faster you look at Europe you look it up other countries where high speed rail and it is a lot faster the that Amtrak what is the excuse for that any why do you think that that they need even more supporter credit infrastructure package through Congress a how does it get into the how does it compete internationally the here in the U. S. it with Amtrak always likes to say is that it's the fastest train in the western hemisphere because it is compared Japan China most of Europe I mean a lot of it is just that they're these it it it this infrastructure was built in the late eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundred and I was already being neglected long before Amtrak came along because the east coast railroads were sort of struggling the most before Amtrak was created in nineteen seventy to basically take the load of passenger traffic off the railroad the private railroads and there's things I mean most listeners will know about that the Hudson River Connell which Amtrak in the states of New York and the state of the art I can't really say the states of New York in New Jersey because the state of New Jersey and then governor Chris Christie actually yeah put the kibosh on it back in two thousand ten and it's alive again now but the trump administration won't release any money for it even though at this point I think the states are willing to pay for most of it there's this tunnel in Baltimore the ones south station in Baltimore was built in eighteen seventy three well here at the end of the civil war and it's actually not falling apart apparently but it's it's very curvy and has a great in the trains have to go really slow through it there's tons of track in Connecticut that it's now so blinding track along the Connecticut sure that Amtrak would love to straighten out and has all of these plans to do it and probably eventually well but is this being United States especially Connecticut they're having a battle locals who don't want the trains closer to them at every turn so I I mean I think they're the effectively as plans that would make the trains go somewhat faster they wouldn't go as fast as the station can send in Japan but they you know up in the high hundreds but it's going to take tens of millions of dollars of capital spending to make that I'm gonna be honest I love taking the train I think it's because I was a kid I had the Lionel toy train set and every Christmas my dad and I would set it up so I mean I I you know I said to me on the train got I would take a train over the plane any day of the week just of boxes with us he is a Bloomberg opinion columnist just a let's switch gears he's yet another piece the that that I found really interesting because you crunch the numbers on young men who still aren't working mid career men are returning to the American work force but younger men are lagging behind why I mean I wish I knew the answer to that I think there's lots of questions at their new there's this famous infamous paper from a couple years ago by an economist at the university of Chicago who proposed that it was because video games have gotten so much better oh wow that basically people put on hold for my generation now yeah young men are playing more video games but other people have crunch the numbers and basically that increase in video game time is pretty much canceled out by decreasing TV time but there's a high percentage of men in their early twenties who are not going to school they don't have a job they are looking for a job and it's just in the for women that number is back down near its lowest levels ever given that the economy so good for men it is simply down since the recession but it's higher than it was ten years ago or twenty years one hi then was twelve years ago I was twenty years ago etcetera and I sold it has to be the kind.

Justin fox editorial director Harvard Business Review Bloomberg twenty years thirty four million dollars twelve years ten years
"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries I'm Charlie palette this is Bloomberg this is Bloomberg opinion on Bloomberg radio bringing you news comments and insights from Bloomberg opinions worldwide team of editors and columnists I Janet will win for June Grasso still to come on the show how president trump economic plans may pose a problem for Democrats the first four decades Americans have been cutting back on red meat butter and eggs well actually consuming more calories what we're paying income is Justin fox joins us now with his recent headline what decades of dodgy dietary advice made us do Justin you write that a backlash is happening against decades of dietary research yeah I mean people may have heard about the new news at the very end of September that some big study said it was okay to eat as much meat as you wanted basically again and that study was not it wasn't based on any new medical findings it was based on a bunch of dietary researchers and statisticians looking through the research that was out there in concluding that the evidence just wasn't strong enough to really say anything and so there's that back glass is been more specific backlash against low fat diets and the idea that fat is bad and some of that is based on actual research but part of the a lot of the argument is just that the way dietary findings are reported the way recommendations are made for the past few decades has actually basically messed with people's diets more than it's made them healthier indeed Justin when that meet announcement came out I noticed backlash against the backlash and now consumers are more confused than ever yeah and so what I thought would be interesting given all this is look back and see what if any of fact all these recommendations have had on consumption of various foods because the department of agriculture is nice enough to publish these annual spread sheets of per capita food availability which is based not on like specifically looking at what people eat but it looking what's produced what's brought into stores and.

Bloomberg Janet June Grasso president Justin fox department of agriculture four decades
"justin fox" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"justin fox" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"And here's Bloomberg business news. Americans are consuming less beer, but craft breweries are booming people are drinking less of it, but other people, keep opening more and more brewery, Justin FOX wrote the story for Bloomberg BusinessWeek decade ago, two thousand eight already been a lot of growth in the craft beer industry, but they were one thousand five hundred seventy four breweries in the US in two thousand eight a decade later, they're seven thousand four hundred fifty so it's pretty amazing growth, but with overall beer consumption, declining. Where does that leave the mega producers they've been buying craft breweries but even with their purchases there the market share for Anheuser Busch in bells and Molson cores in the US, and those are by far the two biggest brewers domestic brewers has kept falling Faulk says as beer consumption tapers off, it is inevitable that craft brewers will start to feel the effects on. I'm Charlie Pellett, Bloomberg business on WBZ. Boston's NewsRadio President Trump is speaking out about tomorrow's expected immigration raids targeting ten cities in a sweeping effort to deport migrants who are in the country illegally. The president was asked about it this morning before heading to Camp David came into the country illegally going to be removed from the country. Everybody knows that it starts, you know, during the course of this next week, maybe even a little bit earlier than that the ice rates on the ten cities including San Francisco in Los Angeles are set to begin tomorrow. Organizations that work with undocumented immigrants are now warning their clients to have a plan and know their rights Libby Schaaf, the mayor of Oakland, California says her officers will not help federal authorities and before you very confident in my rights to be a sanctuary city, mayor to direct the limited resources of this. Local community into the things that my residents, prioritize and to not spend those resources for what is a civil federal matter. Many experts say that these kinds of raids typically target criminals, and not families be sure to stay up on this right here on WBZ NewsRadio..

Bloomberg US brewers Justin FOX Libby Schaaf Anheuser Busch President Trump president Molson Charlie Pellett Boston Faulk San Francisco Oakland Los Angeles California David
Sen. John McCain to stop medical treatment, family says

Bloomberg Markets

00:21 sec | 4 years ago

Sen. John McCain to stop medical treatment, family says

"Senator John McCain's. Family is saying that the Senator will discontinue medical treatment, this comes more than a year after he was diagnosed. With brain cancer the Arizona Senator has been battling the onus. For months and now just according to the McCain family. The Senator will discontinue

New York City Senator John Mccain Bloomberg Justin Fox Senator Wilson Bloomberg Russell Brain Cancer Dave Wilson Bloomberg York United States Editor Washington Greg Jarrett Lisa Abramowicz SNP John Senate Jaren