21 Burst results for "Justice Npr"

"justice npr" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:07 min | 2 months ago

"justice npr" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Political sensitivity around this right now Well but maybe to put a finer point on it if President Biden says the U.S. and its allies will defend every inch of Ukraine against Russia can it say it's doing that if it doesn't impose a no fly zone There are other ways to do it besides that There are surfaces surface systems There's other things that you could do to bring capabilities to because ultimately you're defending the land not the air If you look at how Russia or a modern military operates they have not used combined arms and they have not used a lot of the tools that they would normally use based on military assessments It's a very very limited air campaign Why is Russia holding back That is a great question I could hypothesize that there is a potential phase two overwhelming force because they've maybe underestimated the will of the Ukrainian people It could be that they're withholding forces in case there is an escalation and now Nader gets involved They have forces to blunt that attack Maybe if you Belarus or in Poland the easiest speculate it's hard to know why they're actually not fighting the weight we thought they would fight All right we're going to leave it there for military officer Mike founder of the newsletter of the merge Thank you very much All right thank you Now to turkey which has faced an influx of refugees long before the war in Ukraine Some are Somalis headed to the EU but that route has seen tragedy Recently 5 Somalis and 14 other migrants died trying to cross from turkey to Greece allegedly pushed back by border patrols Now Somalis in Istanbul want justice NPR's dury buscaron reports To 25 year old Aisha Ahmed a somalian henna artist living in Istanbul It's painful to think about the 19 migrants who died on the border because it could have been her She wanted to talk about that Her customer Kinsey Farah interprets as Ahmed draws thin lines of henna under her.

Russia President Biden U.S. Nader Belarus turkey Poland dury buscaron Aisha Ahmed Istanbul Mike EU Greece NPR Kinsey Farah Ahmed
"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Laxmi saying against the backdrop of a still disputed presidential election. The fate of Obama care rest with the conservative leaning U S Supreme Court today. President Trump nominated three of the justices. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports. This case is the latest in a series of Republican attempts to dismantle the affordable care act. Back in 2012. The Supreme Court took a look at a part of the law called the Individual Mandate. That's the requirement that people pay a financial penalty. If they don't have insurance, and back then the justices have divided court. Set. The mandate was valid because it was a tax under Congress's taxing power. Well, since that time, Congress zeroed out the financial penalty. People don't have to pay it anymore, And that prompted states led by Republican attorneys general to bring this new case. Carrie Johnson reporting. President elect Joe Biden leads a supporters in arguing that up to 20 million Americans aren't risk. Of losing health insurance in the middle of a pandemic. Recognizing Biden's election victory, the Taliban are now urging him to stick to an agreement that will see the withdrawal of most foreign forces from Afghanistan. There's NPR's DEA Hadeed. The agreement was signed in February under President Trump, and it will see the drawdown of American and NATO forces from Afghanistan by next April. In their statement, the Taliban worn bite and need to be vigilant of warmongers, presumably in his own administration that would seek to perpetuate the war, most likely by slowing down with droll DEA headed reporting. This is NPR news from K C. R W I'm Cherry Glaser. With this local news update Tensions between the L. A County Board of Supervisors and Sheriff Alex Avian away, they could kick up another notch or two today. His case here. W's Lori Parole reports. The supervisors are scheduled to vote on whether to look further adoptions for ousting via Nueva before his term ends in 2022 2 weeks ago. Emotion from supervisors Mark Ridley Thomas and Sheila Kyul past that instructed staff to lookinto ways to legally get rid of the sheriff before his term was up or scale back his responsibilities. Board members have said the sheriff does not know how to balance his budget and have characterized his behavior has unacceptable. That previous motion followed the civilian oversight Commission calling for the sheriff to resign. Recent comments to the Times, the president of the Association of Deputy Sheriffs slammed the board's motion. Ron Hernandez heads the union representing the rank and file in the department. He said any elected body focused on finding a way to override the voters has lost touch with the constituents they serve. For K C. R. W I'm leery. Peral rank and file. LAPD officers are highly critical of how police chief Michael Moore handled protests over racial injustice and police brutality this spring and summer. That's according to a new survey conducted by the officers Union, as reported by the Times. The Police Protective League says almost nine out of 10 officers do not feel supported by Maur during the protests and did not believe that Maura, another department brass provided strong leadership. Many said the LAPD was not prepared to respond to civil unrest. The Orange County Registrar of Voters says his department will conduct a voluntary audit of this year's presidential election ballots to ensure the integrity of results. The auto is not required, but registrar Neal Kelly says it provides strong statistical evidence that the outcome of the election is correct. According to the current tally, almost 54% of OSI ballots were cast for Joe Biden 44% for Donald Trump. L A Times columnists and Casey are w contributor, Gustavo Ariano says. The idea of OSI is Republican stronghold is out of date. That's going to be two presidential elections in a row where the Democratic candidate has won in Orange County. Remember in 2016, there was national headlines made because Orange County the place where Reagan said all the good Republicans go to die. Had elected had picked AH, Democrat as president for the first time since the FDR administration Now it ain't no thing is just how Orange County's going blue..

president President Trump Joe Biden Supreme Court NPR Orange County Carrie Johnson LAPD Individual Mandate Orange County Registrar of Vot L. A County Board of Superviso Congress the Times OSI DEA Obama Afghanistan Ron Hernandez Laxmi
Pope: Market capitalism has failed in pandemic, needs reform

NPR News Now

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Pope: Market capitalism has failed in pandemic, needs reform

"Pope Francis has presented his blueprint for opposed cove world, which covers fraternity income, inequality immigration, and social justice. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports. The Pope has the dad says a pandemic has shown that market capitalism has failed. The pope's post pandemic vision is contained in his latest encyclical `Fratelli cty in Italian `Fratelli. Refers to both brothers and sisters. It's release came on the birthday of his namesake Saint Francis of Assisi, it's escaping description of laissez faire capitalism Francis Denounces. This dogma of Neil Liberal faith that resorts to the magic theories of spillover and trickle down economics. A good economic policy he adds creates jobs doesn't cut them. The encyclical is a critique of nationalism and populism and the divisiveness caused by social media on racism. The pope said it is a virus that quickly mutates and instead of disappearing goes into hiding and lurks in waiting. So People Jolie NPR news Rome

Pope Francis Saint Francis Of Assisi Pope NPR Jolie Npr Sylvia Poggioli Neil Liberal Rome
"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With even cleaner planes. Jeff Brady. NPR NEWS This is NPR. The U. S House is preparing to vote on a plan to remove statues from the capital of historical figures linked to slavery and the Confederacy. NPR's Joe Snyder reports on the vote scheduled for this afternoon. The bill the house is set to vote on would remove nearly a dozen statues of people who voluntarily served the Confederacy. It would also remove a bust of Roger B. Taani from the old Supreme Court chamber. Taani was the chief justice who wrote the majority opinion in the 18 57 Dread Scout decision. Bill calls for his bus to be replaced with a bust of Thurgood Marshall, the first African American to serve as a Supreme Court justice. NPR's journal Snyder reporting. The State Department's internal watchdog, has been asked to review and alleged request made by President Trump to his top diplomat in London. U. S. Ambassador Woody Johnson reportedly told colleagues of President Trump asked him to check with the UK to see if they could help move the lucrative British Open tournament to Trump's Turnberry Golf resort in Scotland. NPR's Frank Langfitt has the latest from London. When Johnson told colleagues about Trump's request, they advised against it because of the ethical problems of advancing the president's business interests. But Johnson went ahead and raised Turnberry hosting the open with David Mandel, then the secretary of state for Scotland, according to a source with knowledge of the meeting. Mandel declined to discuss the meeting and referred The New York Times, which broke the story to a statement from the British government. The Johnson quote made no request of Mr Mandel regarding the British Open or any other sporting event. Claims have been forwarded to the State Department's inspector general. The State Department said it stands by Johnson and that he has led the embassy honorably. Frank Langfitt. NPR NEWS, London This is NPR. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Subaru, with the 2020 Subaru Forester featuring standard symmetrical all wheel drive and safety technology. Love. It's what makes Subaru Subaru learn more.

NPR U. S. Ambassador Woody Johnson President Trump State Department David Mandel Subaru Joe Snyder Subaru Forester Bill Frank Langfitt London U. S House Jeff Brady Scotland Supreme Court Supreme Court chamber Roger B. Taani 18 57 Dread Scout
"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. John Lewis has died, a hero, a civil rights champion, the Voice of conscience. The 80 year old Georgia congressman had pancreatic cancer. A young man in the Deep South. John Lewis was hit, kicked and beaten by white mobs and police and stood up for justice. NPR's Kelsey Snell has this remembrance. In Congress. It's common for lawmakers to deliver a floor speech to a room full of empty chairs and distracted colleagues. But Congressman John Lewis knew how to capture a moment. The time for files and patient is long gone. We'll call it on the leadership of the House to bring common sense gun control legislation to the House floor for a vote. That was Lewis in 2016 following the mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida. He was surrounded by more than a dozen Democrats as they launched a sit in on the House floor to try to force a vote on gun control. They failed, but members stayed for two days, causing what Louis called Good trouble, Rico Where is the heart of this body? Where is our soul? Where is Aymara leadership where youse are courage. Lewis brought that kind of passion, toe every issue he touched from gun control to healthcare and voting rights. His political style came from a foundation of faith. In a 2000 for interview with the nonprofit Academy of Achievement. Lewis recalled how preaching to chickens on his family farm in Troy, Alabama, prepared him for a life in Washington Messina, but I look back on it suddenly chicken with by their hairs. Somebody's chicken with shake their hair's did never quite say Amen but intended to listen to me much better than some of my colleagues Listen to me today in the Congress that some of those chickens with a little more productive, at least they produce a that was well before Dr Martin Luther King Jr helped change his trajectory. I was so inspired by Dr King In 1956 with some of my brothers and sisters and first cousins. I was only 16 years old. We went down to the public library trying to check out some books. And we were told by the librarian at the library was four flights on Lee and not for colors. Lewis told Fresh Air's Terry Gross in 2009 that he didn't set foot in that library again until 40 years later. To sign copies of his own memoir, he said The 1956 experience set him on the course towards the civil rights movement. While attending the American Baptist College in Nashville. Louis studied the techniques of nonviolent protest in the summer of 1961 He and other students protested a segregated lunch counters and later joined the famous freedom rides. By his early twenties, Lewis was the head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and in 1963 he joined King as a speaker at the March on Washington said, Be patient and wait. We must say that we cannot be patient. We do not want our freedom Gradually. Well, We want to be free now. Louis took action again two years later in 1965 in a March from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. In his interview with fresh Air, Lewis remembered leading peaceful marchers onto the Edmund Pettus Bridge to protest for voter registration. There. They met the Alabama state police lest in a minute and I have The major said troopers advance You saw these men putting on the gas mass. He came toward us. Beating us the bullwhips. Nightsticks. Driven us with horses. And releasing the tear gas. It came to be known as bloody Sunday and news images from that day were fresh in the minds of lawmakers as the seminal Voting Rights Act became law that same year. Later, Lewis would make an annual pilgrimage to the bridge to honor that day. The event became a rite of passage for Democrats running for office, particularly in 2007 when then Senator Barack Obama was running to become the nation's first African American president. The pair repeated that walk several times. And in 2011 President Obama presented Lewis with the presidential medal of Freedom. In his speech, Obama said Lewis had been asking himself to questions his entire life. If not us, then who? If not now, then when Lewis told NPR The honor brought tears to his eyes. It's hard to believe But in a short time It will come so far the nation and as a people. You look back. The youth of Iraq. Obama was born 50 years ago. Like people and white people in America himself concert together. On a bus ona train. In the waiting room. We changed that Louis remains strong in his convictions. As politics changed in recent years, he repeatedly clashed with President Trump as the house prepared to vote to impeach Trump. Lewis compared the moment tow other times when he chose to follow his sense of moral obligation. When you see something that is not right My just my fair. You have a moral obligation to set something to do something. Our Children and our Children will ask. What did you do? What do you fare? For Sun. Just vote may be hard. We have a mission. And a mandate. To be on the right side of history. Less than two weeks later, he announced his diagnosis of stage four pancreatic cancer. When it came to that final battle, Louis returned to a mantra. He repeated on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in 1963 to never stop fighting. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington Hospitals around the country are scrambling to figure out a new data reporting requirement from the Trump Administration. They were told this week to send critical information about covert 19 directly to the Department of Health and Human Services. Bypassing the Centers for Disease Control and.

Congressman John Lewis Louis Senator Barack Obama NPR News Alabama Kelsey Snell Dr Martin Luther King Jr NPR Congress Scott Simon Fresh Air Department of Health and Human pancreatic cancer congressman Centers for Disease Control Academy of Achievement Georgia
"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"J f dot org's And from listeners of cake dfm, San Francisco and FM NORTH Highland Sacramento. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Mary Louise Kelly. The school choice movement scored a major victory Today, The U. S. Supreme Court effectively killed constitutional provision in 38 states that bar taxpayer aid to parochial schools. The vote was 5 to 4, with Chief Justice John Roberts writing the decision for the court's conservative justices, NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports. The court's decision is the latest in a Siri's of recent rulings that have lowered the traditional wall separating church and state and requiring government entities to treat religious and non religious institutions. Maury equally At issue in Today's case was a decision by the Montana Supreme Court that struck down a tax subsidy for both religious and nonreligious private schools. The Montana court said the subsidy violated a state constitutional provision banning any state aid to religious schools, whether direct or indirect, But writing for the U. S Supreme Court majority today, chief Justice Roberts said the state court had it backwards. A state need not subsidised private education, but once it decides to do so it cannot disqualify. Some private schools because they're religious, he said. Thus, the subsidy enacted by the state Legislature for all private school students must stand. Experts on both sides of the issue, agreed that the practical effect of today's decision is to neuter state constitutional provision in most states that until now have to one degree or another barred state aid to religious schools. Francisco, no grown counsel for the National School Boards Association, characterized the status of these state constitutional provision. Now this way, I think near death would be a good way of describing them. Dick Comer is senior attorney for the Institute for Justice, which brought today's case on behalf of several parents with Children in religious schools.

U. S. Supreme Court Montana Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts U. S Supreme Court NPR San Francisco Ari Shapiro Maury Institute for Justice National School Boards Associa Sacramento Mary Louise Kelly Nina Totenberg Dick Comer Siri Francisco senior attorney Legislature
"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Morning edition continues on this Thursday at seven thirty five it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning an unprecedented trial resume to this week in Germany two men are on trial there former Syrian officials who are part of president Bashar al-assad's regime they got to Germany with a wave of refugees and claimed asylum there and then last year it's already started looking into who these men were and arrested them on charges of committing crimes against humanity during Syria's civil war NPR's Deborah Amos is cover that were for years and she's been following this trial very closely good morning to good morning what's happened in the trial so far so there's a big idea here and that's an international war crimes trial in a national court and those on trial are German citizens their Syrians so for the first time former Syrian officials are confronted by Syrian torture victims in person in court one is a former colonel the other is a check point guard when the indictment was read in court the victim's heard a summary of their testimony one horrible crime after the other says German attorney Patrick Roker who represents some of them there were very emotional reactions I was sitting in front of our clients I checked every once in a while I saw that they were yeah finding it difficult but in the end they were really happy that they were there it made us all aware again off what is actually at stake here now the main defendant and more research long he's in his late fifties was in charge of an interrogation unit out of prison on his branch to fifty one out Revlon gave his first statement to the court this week it was read by his lawyer he denies all the charges he said it there were criminals the took over his prison they ignored his complaints about brutal treatment essentially it wasn't me and the defense strategy is you're going to have to prove it and this trial is expected to take more than a year more than a year what is the evidence against this man rests on there's quite a lot there's the torture survivors more than a dozen testimony from German immigration officials who said arriving refugees told them about wrestling on at this notorious branch two fifty one there are official documents smuggled out of Syria that show that he signed his name to official reports that went up the chain of command now those documents do not explicitly mentioned torture according to sources who've seen that evidence the outside regime has always long denied charges of torture in Syria these two Syrian men are foreigners in Germany but of course there are lots of Syrian refugees there around eight hundred thousand people who fled the civil war how is that community in exile responding to the trial of these two men so Syrian activists in Germany are trying to get the details out to their community a German trial they are trying to get it out in Arabic one of them is wa from Stafa an activist she was speaking at a zoom conference call in Brooklyn this week her father is still detained she hoped the trial would speed his release so she knows it's a painful process of now managing expectations we've been demanding justice for years but now we are being introduced to just change the fate the trial gave us hope it gave me hope and it gave them an idea of patience I also told myself that definitely it's needed to have hope but it also needed to have patience I myself might not be the day that justice will be achieved and carry on it is finding enough that I know that someone will and also satisfying she said it's the first time the victims have a voice in seeking justice NPR's Deborah Amos thank you thank you downtown.

Steve Inskeep NPR
"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of all the uses a drone to film luxury properties Montenegro in Spain which he says are owned by the prosecutors family slightly longer skeptical prickle bonding with Ross refer to any social media posts made by the family with local property records his investigation raises serious questions about our Moscow prosecutor could afford so much foreign real estate when he makes twelve thousand dollars a year what makes the story even more provocative is that Putin personally appointed the prosecutor which is probably why the Kremlin was quick to defend him sing pop off as a clean record touch Aniston a via a political analyst says the Kremlin has no choice but to stick with its man you get the most for their non violently film that needs he says the government from the volume allies will only increase despite success on social media not only is still struggling to become a household name across Russia in a large part because state television rules the airwaves a poll conducted last month found only nine percent of respondents have a positive view of him well twenty five percent are negative thirty one percent in different and another thirty one percent don't even know what love on the dots what can I say yes he did not stop viruses authorities have not been involved in jail for good because that would turn him into a hero and help raise his popularity in Malaya Nielsen's tonight in lieu of us but not with the Kremlin really wants is to life so miserable for finally goes into exile but not only us and before that he plans to stay in Russia and keep fighting the regime is already followed up his video with a letter to Putin asking to fire the Moscow prosecutor and Evan brought to justice NPR news Moscow it's morning edition on WNYC in New York good morning I'm Richard hake stay tuned coming up sport hunting is drop in popularity in the U. S. in recent years an attempt to lure people back of mostly failed out Kansas is working on a new plan to attract young people we'll have that story coming up later this hour and then later on this morning we have special coverage as you've been hearing the first public hearings of the house impeachment inquiry into president trump will begin this morning with testimony from the acting ambassador to Ukraine and a Deputy Assistant secretary of state stay with us for live coverage and analysis from NPR and WNYC that starts this morning at ten o'clock on ninety three point nine FM a may twenty and W. NYC dot org and then tonight at eight you can join Brian Lehrer to discuss what happened in the impeachment hearings by and we'll have highlights guests.

Moscow NYC president Richard hake Brian Lehrer NPR Deputy Assistant secretary Ukraine trump Kansas New York WNYC Montenegro Evan Kremlin Malaya Nielsen Russia political analyst
"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR news in Culver city California nine to Wayne brown the trump administration is moving ahead with plans to tighten regulations on migrants seeking asylum in an effort to curb the number of central American seeking protections here in the US NPR Joe Joe rose tells us the ACLU is suing the administration over the new restrictions the trump administration's new rule denies asylum to nearly all migrants to arrive at the southern border without first applying for protection in one of the country's they passed through on the way marking a major shift in US asylum law the ACLU and two other groups say the new rule is illegal and filed suit to block that change in US District Court in San Francisco NPR's Joel rose the restrictions reverse decades of US policy on asylum seekers the new rule would cover countless would be refugees many of them fleeing violence and poverty in Central America in Chicago embattled R. and B. singer R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to thirteen federal charges the indictment alleges child **** and obstruction of justice NPR's on the Stasi SCO because reports federal prosecutors in the Northern District of Illinois say that Kelly made substantial hush money payments to silence the alleged victims five girls and members of their families this indictment was one of two federal cases against the singer unsealed last week the other was in New York and includes charges of racketeering and sexual trafficking involving five alleged victims including three girls all together the alleged incidents spanned two decades from nineteen ninety eight to two thousand eighteen eighteen federal charges include child **** kidnapping obstruction of justice and trafficking miners and women for sexual purposes the federal judge has ordered Kelly to remain in custody while he awaits trial on this does it still because I'm hearing news New York stocks finished lower on Wall Street today you're listening to NPR news and this is WNYC in New York on John Carlson the US department of justice will not bring civil or criminal charges against an NYPD officer in the twenty fourteen death of Eric garner after meeting with federal prosecutors in Brooklyn the Reverend al Sharpton said their decision not to pursue legal action against officer Daniel Pantaleo is a moral disgrace.

officer NYPD US department of justice kidnapping NPR Joel rose San Francisco Wayne brown Culver city California Daniel Pantaleo al Sharpton Brooklyn Eric garner John Carlson racketeering New York Illinois
"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:49 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Money? On the next greater L A. Welcome to the future where machines continue to replace people at work. But those folks have mouths to feed and mortgages to pay and they say they won't be pushed out of the workforce quietly. I'm a born and raised Sam Pedro Forty-six years here. I love this. There's nothing like it. And that's why I will fight to the end for my community, and Steve is fears of automation taking hold in the port of L A on greater LA today at one on Casey are w. Thomas four seven. This is KCRW. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Noel king. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. It will take time for Americans to feel any difference. But US tariffs on Chinese goods rose overnight taxes that Americans pay on some though not all Chinese goods rose from ten to twenty five percent. The Trump administration took that step even as Chinese negotiators are in the US for trade talks. How does this look from the United States and from China or we're going to go to both places to Scott Horsely was NPR chief economics correspondent, and is in Washington also to NPR Beijing correspondent rather NPR? Correspondent rob Schmitz who was in Shanghai, gentlemen. Good morning. Good morning. Good morning, or I should say good evening to rob. Since your twelve hours different, Scott. Let's start with you. How big is the tariff move. This is a significant ratcheting up of the pressure by the president at a minute past midnight tariffs on some two hundred billion dollars in Chinese goods went from ten to twenty five percents. That's more than doubling the president is hoping this will. Put pressure on the Chinese negotiators to cut a deal. The president tweeted this morning that the talks with China are continuing in what he called a very congenial manner. But he also doesn't see any great urgency to dial back these tariffs. He he thinks their source of income for the treasury, even though most of the Bill is paid by consumers and businesses here in the United States in which we're gonna talk about more in a moment. But first let me hear how this looks from the Chinese side. Rob we've heard that there was a sticking point in recent days, essentially, the China backed off some commitments. But then we were told they still want to do things the US wants, but they're reluctant to put their commitments in writing where they could be seeing how sensitive are the public relations for China, very sensitive perception is reality for China's communist party, Steve. And it's interesting also that China's still wants to look like it's trying to compromise and be nice about these negotiations with the Trump administration on a. Trade deal. And from what we know Xi Jinping himself is likely behind the China's unwillingness to give up much more at this point. And she is very well aware that he's in a showdown with President Trump on a global stage, and it's important to him that his audience both at home and throughout the world sees a tough China. That's willing to fight back how sensitive or the politics for the Trump administration. Scott Horsely, the president also wants to be seen as a tough negotiator. And he I think feels like he has room to run here. The US economy grew at a better than expected pace in the first quarter three point two percent. We had a real strong jobs report that came out the end of last week. I think he feels like the US economy is in good shape. The Chinese economy may be more vulnerable. So this is a good time for him to push his case. Although let's circle back to that question of who pays here, Scott because you said that US consumers pay most of the price. We heard an example of that elsewhere in today's program. From Robert Daley who was a China specialist at the Woodrow Wilson center for scholars here in Washington DC. And if these tariffs continue to get higher and higher and higher. He talked about one possible consequence for American consumers. Let's listen it's been estimated that costs of apparel and clothing for a family of four could go up by five hundred dollars. If we put twenty five percent tariffs on all remaining Chinese imports as has been threatened. Okay. We're not quite to that point yet, Scott Horsely, but aren't there Americans already feeling some effect here? They are although up until now the administration has taken pains to try to sort of corden off consumer goods. So the cost of these tariffs has mostly been kind of hidden in wholesale supply chains, and and, you know, at the producer level if in fact, the president follows through on his threat to expand the tariffs to the remaining three hundred billion plus of of Chinese imports. Then you really start to see it hitting everything. On the shelves at WalMart and target that consumers buy, and it would be perhaps more obvious to American consumers how this affects their pocketbooks. And then rob Schmitz. I'm trying to figure out why China cares. If it's American consumers who end up paying the tariffs. But maybe we're getting at it here. Even if Americans are the ones paying the tariffs may be at some point when the price of clothing goes up, they ended up buying less Chinese stuff. That's exactly right. And I think that the short term impact will hit the US in the longer term if these tariffs stick, those supply chains will be forced to move out of China. And when that happens the damage to China's economy may start to feel a little more real you're going to have Chinese assembly workers and truck drivers looking for work. You'll have smaller suppliers that sold the raw materials to these US companies losing some of their clients. It's would damage and already sluggish Chinese manufacturing sector that employs tens of millions of people when you say a sluggish economy are sluggish manufacturing center in China. What does it feel like does it feel like economic trouble where you are? Yes. In places like the Yangtze river delta in the Pearl River, delta near Hong Kong and Shenzhen in those places for years. You've seen a slowdown and a lot of this has to do with labor prices and just a natural evolution of China's economy. But a lot of this is also because of the manufacturing is the manufacturing sector is losing a lot of ground. Okay. Whole lot of context for trade talks that continue today in Washington, rob Schmitz and Shanghai. Thank you very much. Thank you. And we also heard from NPR chief economics correspondent, Scott Horsely here in Washington, Scott. Thanks to you. You welcome. And now a story that takes the long view, the very long view in two thousand and ten at the age of ninety supreme court Justice, John Paul Stevens retired after thirty five years on the nation's highest court since then he's been busy writing lots of articles. And now he's written a third book, titled the making of Justice NPR's, Legal Affairs. Correspondent Nina totenberg reached him at his condo in Florida in the past. When I've interviewed Justice Stevens. He was in chambers often without a jacket, but always wearing his signature bow tie. I'm much more casual just ping pong em in my outfit to be precise. A red short sleeved shirt blue plaid, Bermuda shorts athletic, socks and running shoes. John Paul Stevens may be ninety nine. But he's no slacker a couple times a week another day of the week. I play nine holes ago. But they don't get the ball very far. But at least they can hit he still swims in the ocean with the aid of neighbors who helped him in and out of the waves. And he plays bridge two or three times a week. His memoir starts at age five when those small of stature he passed the kindergarten physical test with flying colors, but flunked the mental test the book winds through his years growing up including the arrest and eventual exoneration of his father on criminal charges his years as a navy code breaker in the Pacific theater during World War Two and his law career from attending northwestern on the GI Bill to life as a litigator and lower court judge. But the bulk of the book is about Steven's life on the supreme court. What happened each term and what he thought about it. So this book is your last hurrah as an author. What do you want to say? Well, it's hard to summarize everything in just a few words, but part of what I would say is. The world is changing much faster than I anticipated is changing for the better or worse for the worst. Why is it worse though? He's no longer a sitting Justice Stevens answers as if he still were on the court will I in my job, a little commentary, but I am offended by much to the leaders of our country or caged in now in his last years on the supreme court Stevens was publicly worried about the courts rightward tilt. But now off the court. He's even more worried he sees a newly constituted and more aggressive conservative court majority acting in a quote, less neutral fashion, for example, he descended fiercely in two thousand eight when the court ruled for the first time that the second amendment guarantees are right to own a gun is the history and the reasons for the amendment was dead Rhone still as Stevens discloses in his book Justice. Anthony Kennedy who provided the fifth and decisive vote in the case insisted that the decision include language, protecting reasonable gun regulations. Kennedy, however, retired last June to be replaced by brick Cavanaugh who has a lower court judge viewed as unconstitutional every major gun regulation that came before him. So what hope if any do you have for the court upholding serious gun regulation? We're at to pass, and I suppose the as for favorable now Stevens is equally critical of the court's recent decisions striking down all manner of campaign finance regulations and the gutting of voting rights legislation judicial doctrine does change over time. But do you think the current court is taking a radical turn to the right? Yes. It really do. I think some of the decisions really quite wrong in quite a country to the public interest. Every. Member of the court. Not just the chief Justice goes around saying, we are not politicians we're judges, but it gets harder and harder for some people to believe that. Well, it's to leave. But there's still some hope they won't be totally weight. But it is true that it seemed to be more ideological than it's been since nineteen thirties. Stevens has appointed to the court by president Ford in nineteen seventy five he was considered a moderate conservative then. But by the time, he retired in twenty ten he was considered the courts most liberal Justice. He has consistently maintained that for the most part. He didn't change the change was in the composition of the court. Indeed. In the years that followed his appointment. Increasingly conservative Republican presidents appointed increasingly conservative justices, and the Republican appointments outnumbered. The democratic appointments by more than two to one over the last two decades. Republican presidents have prided themselves on appointing judges who call themselves originalists. So I asked Justice Stevens. What does he call himself if not an originalist? What is he his answer? Returns to the beginning of our interview. I'm a person who plays being foam wants to. So is he the condo champion? I'm better than anybody. My age if you in find anybody maze plays. I'll challenge the competitive spirit lives on in John Paul.

China United States Scott Horsely John Paul Stevens rob Schmitz president NPR Washington DC Steve Inskeep supreme court Shanghai Noel king President Trump Anthony Kennedy Sam Pedro KCRW LA Thomas Justice NPR
"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:55 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The difference between heaven democratic president democratic House Republican Senate and having a democratic president democratic house and Senate difference in the world. Don't get yourself. Is there a path for Democrats to win control the Senate in twenty twenty next time on the takeaways politics with Amy Walter Fridays at three on ninety three point nine FM? It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Noel king. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. It will take time for Americans to feel any difference. But US tariffs on Chinese goods rose overnight taxes Americans pay on some though not all Chinese goods rose from ten to twenty five percent. The Trump administration took that step even as Chinese negotiators are in the US for trade talks. How does this look from the United States and from China or we're going to go to both places to Scott Horsely was NPR chief economics correspondent, and is in Washington also to NPR Beijing correspondent rather NPR? Correspondent rob Schmitz who was in Shanghai, gentlemen. Good morning. Good morning. Good morning, or I should say good evening to rob. The since you're twelve hours different Scott. Let's start with you. How big is the tariff move. This is a significant ratcheting up of the pressure by the president at a minute past midnight tariffs on some two hundred billion dollars in Chinese goods went from ten to twenty five percents. That's more than doubling the president is hoping this will. Put pressure on the Chinese negotiators to cut a deal. The president tweeted this morning that the talks with China are continuing in what he called a very congenial manner. But he also doesn't see any great urgency to dial back these tariffs. He he thinks their source of income for the treasury, even though most of the Bill is paid by consumers and businesses here in the United States in which we're gonna talk about more in a moment. But first let me hear how this looks from the Chinese side. Rob we've heard that there was a sticking point in recent days, essentially, China backed off some commitments. But then we were told they still want to do things the US wants, but they're reluctant to put their commitments in writing where they could be seen how sensitive are the public relations for China, very sensitive perception is reality for China's communist party, Steve. And it's interesting also that China's still wants to look like it's trying to compromise and be nice about these negotiations with the Trump administration. A trade deal. And from what we know Xi Jinping himself is likely behind the China's unwillingness to give up much more at this point. And she is very well aware that he's in a showdown with President Trump on a global stage, and it's important to him that his audience both at home and throughout the world sees a tough China. That's willing to fight back how sensitive the politics for the Trump administration. Scott Horsely, the president also wants to be seen as a tough negotiator. And he I think feels like he has room to run here. The US economy grew at a better-than-expected pace in the first quarter. Three point two percent. We had a real strong jobs report that came out the end of last week. I think he feels like the US economy is in good shape. The Chinese economy may be more vulnerable. So this is a good time for him to push his case. Although let's circle back to that question of who pays here, Scott because you said that US consumers pay most of the price. We heard an example of that. Elsewhere in today's pro. Graham from Robert Daly was China specialist at the Woodrow Wilson center for scholars here in Washington DC. And if these tariffs continue to get higher and higher and higher. He talked about one possible consequence for American consumers. Let's listen it's been estimated that cost of apparel and clothing for a family of four could go up by five hundred dollars. If we put twenty five percent tariffs on all remaining Chinese imports as has been threatened. Okay. We're not quite to that point yet, Scott Horsely, but aren't there Americans already feeling some effect here? They are although up until now the administration has taken pains to try to sort of according off consumer goods. So the cost of these tariffs has mostly been kind of hidden in wholesale supply chains, and and, you know, at the producer level if in fact, the president follows through on his threat to expand the tariffs to the remaining three hundred billion plus of Chinese imports. Then you really start to see it hitting everything. On the shelves at WalMart and target that consumers buy, and it would be perhaps more obvious to American consumers how this is affecting their pocketbooks. And then rob Schmitz. I'm trying to figure out why China cares. If it's American consumers who end up paying the tariffs. But maybe we're getting at it here. Even if Americans are the ones paying the tariffs may be at some point when the price of clothing goes up they end up buying less Chinese stuff. That's exactly right. And I think that the short term impact will hit the US in the longer term if these tariffs stick, those supply chains will be forced to move out of China. And when that happens the damage to China's economy may start to feel a little more real you're going to have Chinese assembly workers truck drivers looking for work. You'll have smaller suppliers that all the raw materials to these US companies losing some of their clients. It's would damage and already sluggish Chinese manufacturing sector that employs tens of millions of people when you say a sluggish economy are sluggish manufacturing center in China. What does it feel like does it feel like economic trouble where you are? Yes. In places like the Yangtze river delta in the Pearl River, delta near Hong Kong and Shenzhen in those places for years. You've seen a slowdown and a lot of this has to do with labor prices and just a natural evolution of China's economy. But a lot of this is also because of the manufacturing is the manufacturing sector is losing a lot of ground. Okay. Whole lot of context for trade talks that continue today in Washington, rob Schmitz and Shanghai. Thank you very much. Thank you. And we also heard from NPR chief economics correspondent, Scott Horsely here in Washington, Scott. Thanks to you. You welcome. And now a story that takes the long view, the very long view in two thousand and ten at the age of ninety supreme court Justice, John Paul Stevens retired after thirty five years on the nation's highest court since then he's been busy writing lots of articles. And now he's written a third book, titled the making of Justice NPR's, Legal Affairs. Correspondent Nina totenberg reached him at his condo in Florida in the past. When I've interviewed Justice Stevens. He was in chambers often without a jacket, but always wearing his signature vote. Tie a much more. Casual I just think phones. M in my people outfit to be precise. A red. Short sleeved shirt, blue plaid, Bermuda shorts athletic, socks and running shoes. John Paul Stevens may be ninety nine. But he's no slacker. Couple of teams week another day of the week. I play nine holes ago. They don't hit the ball very far. But as he can hit he still swims in the ocean with the aid of neighbors who helped him in and out of the waves. And he plays bridge two or three times a week. His memoir starts at age five when those small of stature he passed the kindergarten physical test with flying colors, but flunked the mental test the book winds through his years growing up including the arrest and eventual exoneration of his father on criminal charges his years as a navy code breaker in the Pacific theater during World War Two and his locker ear from attending northwestern on the GI Bill to life as a litigator and lower court judge. But the bulk of the book is about Steven's life on the supreme court. What happened each term and what he thought about it. So this book is your last hurrah as an author. What do you want to say? Well, it's hard. To summarize everything in just a few words, but what I would say is the world is changing much faster than I anticipated is changing for the better or worse for the worse. Why is it worse though? He's no longer a sitting Justice Stevens answers as if he still were on the court will I my job political commentary, but I am offended by much to the leaders of our country gauged in in his last years on the supreme court Stevens was publicly worried about the courts rightward tilt. But now off the court. He's even more worry. He sees a newly constituted and more aggressive conservative court majority acting in a quote, less neutral fashion, for example, he descended fiercely in two thousand eight when the court ruled for the first time that the second amendment guarantees a right to own a gun is is the history and the reasons. The amendment was dead Rhone still as Stevens discloses in his book. Justice Anthony Kennedy who provided the fifth and decisive vote in the case insisted that the decision include language, protecting reasonable gun regulations. Kennedy, however, retired last June to be replaced by brick Cavanaugh who has a lower court judge viewed as unconstitutional every major gun regulation that came before him. So what hope if any do you have for the court upholding serious gun regulation? We're at to pass a Susie as a favorable now. Stevens is equally critical of the court's recent decisions striking down all manner of campaign finance regulations and the gutting of voting rights legislation judicial doctrine does change over time. But do you think the current court is taking a radical turn to the right? Yes. It really do. I think some of the decision. It's really quite wrong in quite a country to the public interest. Every member of the court, not just the chief Justice goes around saying we are not politicians where judges, but it gets harder and harder for some people to believe that. Well, it's inherited to leave. But there's still some hope they won't be totally that late. But it is true that it seemed to be more ideological that. It's been since nineteen thirties. Stevens has appointed at the court by president Ford in nineteen seventy five he was considered a moderate conservative then. But by the time, he retired in twenty ten he was considered the courts most liberal Justice. He has consistently maintained that for the most part. He didn't change the change was in the composition of the court. Indeed. In the years that followed his appointment. Increasingly conservative Republican presidents appointed increasingly conservative justices, and the Republican appointments out. Numb. Numbered the democratic appointments by more than two to one over the last two decades. Republican presidents have prided themselves on appointing judges who call themselves originalists. So I asked Justice Stevens. What does he call himself if not an originalist? What is he his answer? Returns to the beginning of our interview. I'm a person who plays wants to know. So is the the condo champion. I'm bittered anybody. My. It inflated anybody. My plays of challenging the competitive spirit lives on in John Paul Stevens. Nina, totenberg, NPR news, Washington. This.

China John Paul Stevens Scott Horsely United States president rob Schmitz NPR Washington DC supreme court Steve Inskeep Shanghai Senate Nina totenberg Noel king President Trump Justice NPR Beijing treasury
"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Thirty news headlines are next live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly, the Senate Judiciary committee. Here's from attorney general William Barr this morning, he'll be questioned about special counsel Robert Muller's findings Democrats want to press bar about his conclusion of insufficient. Evidence to charge President Trump with obstructing Justice NPR's Ryan Lucas says after bar released his four-page summary of Muller's report Muller wrote a letter to the attorney gen. Expressing his frustration with how bar characterized his findings. The Justice department says bar called Muller after he got this letter. The two disgusted. The department says that Muller said that nothing embar summary was inaccurate or misleading. But that mother was frustrated about the lack of context and the media coverage related to the question of obstruction of Justice. That's the Justice Department's take spokesman for other declined to comment a former police officer in Minneapolis will be sentenced next month after a jury convicted him of murder for fatally shooting a woman who called nine one. One Matt's epic with Minnesota public radio reports Muhammed nor shot and killed forty year old Justin Rose check in an alley near her home after she reported a possible sexual assault. There nor is it turns argued he was protecting his partner after they were startled by annoys. Nor is the first Minnesota police officer convicted in a line of duty killing restricts father says he satisfied with the verdict. Wall Street futures are higher this morning. This is N. NPR news from Washington. The founder of WikiLeaks has been sentenced to almost a year in a British jail for skipping bail seven years ago. Julian Assange was sentenced today nearly three weeks after he was arrested at Ecuador's embassy in London that's where he'd been holed up for nearly seven years before Ecuador revoked his political asylum in two thousand twelve Assange was wanted for questioning and Sweden where he was accused of rape and sexual assault. Tomorrow. There's a hearing on a request by the US to extradite Assange on charges of conspiring to break into a Pentagon, computer system. There are concerns about violence erupting at today's mayday marches in the French capital NPR's Eleanor Beardsley in Paris says anti-government demonstrators have been making themselves heard in recent months. Today's worker holiday with its traditional marches comes barely a week after leaders of the anti-government yellow vest movement dismissed package of tax cuts by president Emmanuel Macron last year on May Day hooligans. Using black bloc tactics. Joined onto the tail end of the workers marches this year, those hooligans could be back joined by angry yellow vest. Protesters may two thousand nineteen is expected to be a test for the French government's news zero tolerance approach to protest violence, thousands of identity and bag checks are being carried out along the protest route and cars without of Paris license plates are also being stopped and checked Eleanor Beardsley NPR news Paris. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR news in Washington. Growing up in Portland, Oregon, Mitchell Jackson was raised by hustlers pimps. He sold drugs you meant to prison, but he.

Robert Muller NPR Justice department Julian Assange Washington Dave Mattingly Minnesota President officer Eleanor Beardsley Matt Senate Judiciary committee assault Mitchell Jackson Paris Ecuador William Barr attorney Ryan Lucas
"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To host the first time was terrifying. Like the feeling I had when I'd have to play basketball in front of my family. It was like these people know me, and it's not that people. Who know you don't love you. But they know you and so like they can't possibly think that I should be here. Mullany says when he was growing up it was like being in a family in the nineteen fifties except it was the nineties. He was raised Catholic and went to Catholic school, but his wife Anna who he married five years ago is Jewish. That's not a big deal or getting married. If you're Jewish and Catholic only a couple of people asked about it. And they were my parents Molina's comedy special kid gorgeous is on net flicks. First news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. In a surprise move the charges against empire actor Jesse small. Let are dropped Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel and the city superintendent of police are fuming over the Cook County prosecutor's decision with mayor Emanuel calling it a quote whitewash of Justice NPR shero corley reports on the fallout of the case in which small let was accused of staging a hate crime against himself actor Jesse small act was accused of lying to police about being the target of a racist and anti gay attack in downtown Chicago. He faces sixteen counts of felony misconduct, but not anymore. Prosecutor said after reviewing all the facts and circumstances, including small, let's volunteer community service dropping the charges was appropriate. Chicago police superintendent Eddie Johnson doesn't think so do I think Justice who serve and a little bit mayor Rahm Emanuel says it was not just a whitewash. But unbelievable is a person who's.

mayor Emanuel Rahm Emanuel Jesse small Chicago Mullany Justice NPR prosecutor superintendent NPR basketball Lakshmi Singh Catholic school Molina shero corley Eddie Johnson Anna Cook County Washington five years
"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. President Donald Trump is rejecting the idea proposed by some Democrats running for president of increasing. The number of supreme court justices NPR's Brian Naylor says Trump spoke during a joint news conference with Brazil's president today, a number of democratic twenty twenty hopefuls have proposed increasing the number of supreme court seats as a way to balance the two conservative picks of President Trump and to make up for the GOP led senate's refusal to consider former President Obama's nomination of Merrick garland asked about the idea at his news conference. President Trump says he has no interest in pursuing the issue. I wouldn't entertain that. The only reason is that they're doing that as they want to try and catch up. So if they can't catch up through the ballot box by winning an election. They wanna try doing it in a different way. Trump went on to say, he guarantees it won't happen for six years meaning until after a presumed reelection victory, Brian. Naylor NPR news, Washington. The supreme court ruled today the federal government has broad powers to detain immigrants who've already served prison time for a criminal conviction is NPR's. John Burnett explains the court's conservative majority said non-citizens can be arrested years after they've done their time in jail. The case involved a Cambodian and a Palestinian immigrant who were living legally in the United States and who were convicted of drug charges in separate incidents. They were picked up and held without bond hearing after they had completed their sentences under President Trump's aggressive immigration policies. Federal agents are seeking to round up immigrants convicted of any crimes from murder to driving without a license. The ninth circuit court of appeals had taken the immigrant side ruling that the government could only detain an offender within twenty four hours of the release from custody in the five to four decision. Justice Samuel Alito writing for the majority said that an official duties are better carried out late than never John Burnett. NPR news New Zealand's, Prime minister's you're saying to our. Dern talk to students at a high school affected by last week's shootings at two mosques in the city of Christ Church. The prime minister addressing a crowd at cashmere high school Wishaw two of its students and a former student gunned down our Dern said she refuses to honor the name of the twenty eight year old Australian man believed responsible, and she told students the country's reviewing its gun laws in the wake of the shootings that left fifty people dead. We'll be announcing those decisions very very soon. And so that's an immediate thing that we wanted to do because many of you will have saying we have a lot of holes in outgun Lewis in New Zealand, and we need to fix that. As the prime minister was speaking barrels were being held for some of the victims today. Some of the bodies are still being identified stocks after bouncing around a bit lost ground in the final hours of trading today. Some of the market downturn apparently driven by confusion over conflicting reports about US China. China trade talks the Dow was down twenty six points to twenty five thousand eighty seven the NASDAQ closed up eight points today, you're listening to NPR fan KiKi leading news. I mean, akin the Federal Emergency Management agency is extending an affordable housing program for people affected by the October twenty seventeen fire siege Witty's. Jeremy Siegel reports the direct temporary housing program aims to provide assistance to people who lost their homes to the fires while they were to rebuild their currently more than one hundred fire survivors who rely on the service, which was set to expire in April. But FEMA is now extending the program for former renters for another month and former homeowners for another two months the move comes after north bay. Congressman Jared Huffman and Mike Thompson penned a letter to the federal agency asking them to continue providing assistance in a statement Huffman praised females decision. But said he and his colleagues will continue fighting for services and funding until the community is fully recovered. I'm Jeremy Siegel news and the California Highway Patrol is investigating three separate shootings on East Bay highways in the last three days, including one that was. Bolted in the death of a young woman. Local lawmakers pushed for cameras and other security measures three years ago after shootings along I eighty and highway four reached what they called crisis proportions. Hercules, mayor Dan Romero says the camera system he and his fellow mayors pushed for is now up and running having a tool now that we can fall back on the woman that lost her life as a bigger pack, at least you have hopefully we'll be able to catch a person and identify them. So that's key. At this time CHP says none of the recent shootings appear to be.

President Donald Trump NPR president supreme court Prime minister federal government Brian Naylor Naylor NPR Washington John Burnett United States Jack Speer President Obama Congressman Jared Huffman Jeremy Siegel New Zealand California Highway Patrol Justice Samuel Alito
"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Search for victims of Sunday's tornado that killed at least twenty three people NPR's. Russell Lewis reports that at times the tornado was at least a mile wide. The worst damage was in leak Howdy, Alabama in and around Beauregard the tornado had winds of at least one hundred seventy miles per hour, it demolished scores of homes and flattened trees and anything else in its way, national weather service meteorologist Chris Darden walked through one neighborhood and called the damage overwhelming. Kind kinda get a definitive shot of how wider expanse of the damages appear kind of he'll where you're going to give you kind of going downhill or downstream with a tornado went the long track tornado was on the ground for twenty five miles before crossing into Georgia. Russell Lewis NPR news Beauregard, Alabama. The White House has released a sharp. A statement criticizing Democrats on the House Judiciary committee. Lawmakers have issued demands for information they say could reveal alleged misdeeds by President Trump, including obstructing Justice, NPR's tamra, Keith has more. The White House is striking back at the committee's investigation. The committee had sent out requests for documents to eighty one different people entities and federal agencies as part of its investigation into President Trump. Now press secretary Sarah Sanders is saying quote, the Democrats are not after the truth thereafter, the president NPR's tamra Keith reporting police in Sacramento, California, arrested eighty four people on Monday after they marched through an affluent neighborhood. They were protesting a decision to not bring charges against officers who fatally shot an unarmed black man last year capital public radio's Ezra. David Romero has more among those arrested were prominent Sacramento pastor and students who shut down. Amol Sunday police say they intervened because of a report that cars were keyed community activists berry access we came in. And we shook up privilege. We did not do anything wrong. We were peacefully protesting. And now, you have a riots as if we broke windows in the community the groups targeted the neighborhood because they say that's where people live that helped make major decisions in the city. The group is planning more protests this week friend PR news. I'm as David Romero in Sacramento. Government officials in Pakistan say they have arrested several dozen people believed to be associated with militant groups one of those militant groups claimed responsibility for a deadly suicide bombing in disputed Kashmir province that killed at least forty Indian soldiers. The bombing has led to escalating fighting between Pakistan and India in Kashmir and both countries have shot down each other's military jets, Pakistan, shot down one Indian air force pilot, but released him back to India. In custody last week. This is NPR. This is WNYC in New York. I'm shumita Basu. US? Senator Chuck Schumer says he'll propose legislation to jump start. The gateway rail project Schumer told a business group yesterday that the Bill would allow New York and New Jersey to advance money to start construction and require the federal government to reimburse them. There is no reason why gateway projects that are shovel ready should wait for the signature of transportation. The signature of the secretary of transportation when we're racing against a doomsday clock. The proposal includes thirteen billion dollars to build a new tunnel and one point seven billion dollars to replace the New Jersey port au bridge. The Trump administration says it wants the states to commit more of their own money. Congresswoman alexandria. Oh, Causey a Cortes opened her district office in queens yesterday. WNYC's Birgit Bergen reports she's balancing her national profile with constituent work with more than three million Twitter followers in proposals. Like, the green new deal shipping, national debates. There's another issue across your Cortez says she finds riveting fixing slow mail delivery for constituents in the Bronx. That is kind of riveting it's great to be able to be in a position where? You know, just a few months ago. I was a normal constituent normal person in the Bronx frustrated that I couldn't get my packages and a year later, I'm able to pick up the phone and actually called the post office and bail say that they're on at her office is on it with thirty three constituent cases. So far most related to immigration mayor de Blasio is defending his decision to call a snow day yesterday for New York City's public schools, even though we didn't get all that much snow. Many working parents were not so pleased that they too have to stay home with their kids. But the Blasios said he's learned the hard way. What happens if you don't prepare for the worst? You gotta soom the worst projection, and then some and you got assume that it will come at the worst possible time. So originally the projection was the hours right before rush hour, we had to assume that could easily drift right into.

NPR Sacramento House Judiciary committee Senator Chuck Schumer tamra Keith President Trump New York Russell Lewis David Romero Alabama White House Beauregard Pakistan Birgit Bergen WNYC Chris Darden Bronx Blasios
"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news in Washington, I'm korva Coleman. President Trump has just arrived in Vietnam where he's to meet with North Korea's Kim Jong UN the two men will share a meal before holding formal talks on denuclearization later this week. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports from Hanoi President Trump and Kim Jong own we'll have dinner on Wednesday night in Vietnam. Trump will be joined by secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, Amos chief-of-staff, Mick Mulvaney for the meal. Trump and Kim are meeting for a second time as the US continues to push for North Korea to agree to give up its nuclear program. Chum often talks about his positive personal relationship with Kim as a sign of progress between the two nations, he's expressed optimism about the Vietnam. Summit saying North Korea will become an economic powerhouse. If it denuclearize is. But Trump's American intelligence agencies have assessed that the regime will seek to keep its weapons. Isha Roscoe NPR news Hanoi, the leaders of seven pharmaceutical giants face a grilling today in a Senate committee NPR's Alison kodjak reports lawmakers want to know why drug prices are so high and keep rising the drug companies CEOs will be forced to defend their pricing, practices and answer questions about the way, they extend patents to prevent competition. Drugmakers often say their list prices are irrelevant because insurers and middlemen negotiate discounts and few people pay the full price. But committee chairman Chuck Grassley warned the company's on Twitter that he will be unhappy. If they refuse to take any responsibility for the high cost of their products, the Iowa Republican says he wants to see more transparency in the pharmaceutical industry committee Democrats also planned to pin the blame on manufacturers, a committee staffer says government spending on brand name drugs has risen more than sixty percents. Twenty eleven Alison kodjak NPR news, Washington. A court in Australia has convicted a senior, Roman Catholic. A cleric of child sexual abuse. The Vatican is now banned cardinal George Pell from saying mass in public NPR's Silvio. Pohjola has more. Pell was convicted in December of five sexual offenses against two thirteen year old boys in nineteen Ninety-six trial. Details are now known because a gag order imposed by the judge has been lifted. One victim whose name was not released described. How Pell had exposed himself to the two boys fondled them and forced one boy to perform a sex act on him. Pell denied the charges and says he'll appeal about against statement said the news is painful, but voiced full respect for Australian Justice NPR Soviet Pohjola. President Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen is scheduled to testify today before the Senate intelligence committee. He's facing a three year prison term for several federal convictions, including lying to congress about the Trump real estate deal in Moscow. He also arranged hush money payments, just before the presidential election two women who alleged affairs with Trump. This is NPR. And this is KCRW news. I'm rosacea Rivera filling in for cherry Glaser this morning. Good morning. Here's what's happening on Tuesday. February twenty six. A judge in LA has approved a one hundred twenty million dollars settlement related to the largest natural gas leak in the nation's history. But it's KCRW Benjamin Gottlieb reports the agreement is being criticized by environmental groups, they say it's too favorable for southern California gas. This deal involves the city and the county of Los Angeles and it calls on utility to mitigate the pollution caused by the two thousand fifteen Aliso canyon leak you may recall. That's when more than one hundred thousand metric tons of methane spewed from gas storage yard owned by socal gas forcing residents from their homes and making thousands of people sick. Now one part of this deal. However has environmental groups irate the agreement allows for so Cal gas to offset that pollution by participating in other programs, including plans to capture methane from a dozen dairy farms in the state's farm belt. Environmentalists say the utilities should not get full credit for participating. But state officials defend the deal. That's fair and say it is not a subsidy. To soak y'all gas socal gas still faces more than three hundred fifty lawsuits filings with the US securities and Exchange Commission show that the utility has also spent more than a billion dollars related to the blowout with the majority of that going to temporarily relocate thousands of family. Los Angeles school board. President Monica Garcia has announced that she's running for a seat on L. A city council. KCRW Gonzala has more. Announce her candidacy in a speech before supporters that she also posted on YouTube. She talked about her ties to the fourteenth city council district. She hopes represent..

President Trump NPR George Pell North Korea President Monica Garcia Vietnam Kim Jong UN Alison kodjak Michael Cohen US Trump Kim Kim Jong KCRW Hanoi KCRW Gonzala Aisha Roscoe Washington
"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I think part of his motivation was that he wanted to do something that is world's first and that could give him more name recognition in the hope that will bring in more investments and also more future. Business opportunities for his company's. China's government promoted the same goals it wanted Chinese companies and scientists to be the world's first and best in a range of technologies, and it encouraged them to acquire foreign technology to do that. CCTV's segment featuring her talking about his gene sequencing machine the technology hook claimed as his own in which CCTV tattered as China's own was actually from a machine created by a company founded by his American advisor at Stanford when the company went bankrupt hose advisor allowed him the licenses technologies is Chung, but regardless this is still being seen as a Chinese company, a Chinese technology. And there is a lot of state sponsored and government pushed propaganda efforts behind it. And while Beijing's push for global dominance in technology, pushed login Kway, the government's lax regulatory environment may have contributed to Hood's, reckless gene editing experiments on live humans so says Shanghai-based medical ethics lawyer Louis Guan Neva Shamir warming. There's only a few low level laws that cover gene editing on human embryos, and none of these laws detail the consequences of violating them. This is a big flaw. Lu hopes. This case will push the government to introduce more laws. Otherwise, he says, China may see even more dangerous outcomes. Dangerous to is the culture that shaped login says, Tony university, professor dot com. The Chinese way is to only think success. We don't think of that path to success is legal or ethical, and you can use as many tricks as you want as long as you succeed every ten east person grows up with this notion, and there's another cultural aspect of China that scientists young young Chung says plays a big part in the case of the role of gender chunk says Lulu and Nana apart from being twin baby girls whose DNA was altered by a male. Scientists were created this way by her for an expressed reason the mock thought he lost the hope for the life at the Hong Kong conference said Mark the name he uses for the father of the twins had lost hope for life because he was HIV positive but says her when he altered the DNA of Mark's twin daughters to make them resistant to the virus marks hope in life was restored. It's this justification that bothers scientists young Chung the most clergy and quay exploited. The shame of the father that desire. Fatherhood. This societal expectations of how men are expected to twenty to carry on the family line remains under house arrest awaiting punishment. China's government says it will tighten regulations on gene editing, and Chung's hope is that Chinese scientists. And politicians look inward to reflect on how this happened and to take measures to ensure it doesn't happen again. Rob Schmitz, NPR news, Shanghai four days before Nigeria's rescheduled presidential vote. The gloves are off the president is seeking reelection. And he says security forces will crack down on anyone who tries to tamper with Saturday's vote. The main opposition says this is direct call for quote jungle, Justice NPR's, ofeibea Quist arcton reports from a Buddha addressing his party leadership president Mahmoud Wadi, a former military leader said Nigeria's police and military have orders to deal ruthlessly with anyone found meddling in the. Voting process. Eleven. Cokie. There was an immediate backlash. Harry's main challenger former Vice President Atiku Abubakar described the president's comments as a painful reminder of the era of dictatorship and military rule..

China Chung Lu president Louis Guan Neva Shamir advisor Rob Schmitz Mark Beijing Vice President Atiku Abubakar Stanford Nigeria Hong Kong HIV Tony university NPR Lulu
"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"justice npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Unity and working together and moving forward, unless of course, at a time when organizers have been criticized one particular organizer to make a Mallory has faced accusations of antisemitism for her association with Louis Farrakhan, she spoke a moment ago, she said to my Jewish sisters ICU, and I see your pain, and there have been multiple religious leaders from from many faiths, Christianity Islam, Judaism, speaking at the rally today emphasizing the importance of the movements working together for a whole host of issues from women's rights to immigration. To social Justice NPR Serra mccamman, President Trump says he appreciates the statement from special counsel Robert Muller's office that disputes report from BuzzFeed news NPR's Ryan, Lucas reports. The statement from the special counsel's office comes in response to buzzfeed's report that alleges President Trump directed Michael Cohen to lie to congress about efforts to build a Trump Tower in Moscow, BuzzFeed also alleges that Muller has other evidence such as texts and emails to corroborate it and the publication so far is standing by its reporting despite public pushback from the special counsel a spokesman for Muller's office. Peter Kerr took the rare step of issuing a statement to dispute the story he says buzzfeed's quote description of specific statements to the special counsel's office and characterization of documents and testimony obtained by this office regarding Michael Collins, congressional testimony are not accurate Ryan. Lucas NPR news, Washington. Mexican authorities say the death toll from. Fuel pipeline explosion yesterday has climbed to at least sixty six. Dozens are still missing as NPR's. Carrie Kahn reports the blast was caused by people tapping into the pipeline to steal gas fuel filthy tapped into the pipeline around five pm local time Friday, sending a torrent of gas gushing into the air. Dozens of people gathered for more than two hours collecting free gas in buckets in huge plastic containers video from the scene showed police and soldiers there. Mexico's public security minister says the troops did not want a confrontation with the crowd. And we're retreating from the area when the pipeline blue fuel theft has been on the rise with losses. Topping three billion dollars last year. Mexico's president shut off gas to six key pipelines in an effort to crack down on the practice that led to widespread fuel shortages and long lines. He's vowed to quote, tell the whole truth about what occurred in Friday's deadly explosion Carrie Kahn, NPR news, Mexico City. This is NPR from. Acuity news. I'm Jeremy Siegel women's marches are taking place across the bay area today, Katie REEs, Caroline, champlin is outside of city hall in San Francisco where demonstrators are gathering before marching later this hour and Caroline we've seen a number of these events canceled over claims of semitism by the national organizers, a lack of diversity at the local marches, clearly San Francisco's isn't cancelled. But I'm wondering are people talking about those concerns out there today? Yeah. Definitely actually the first people that I talked to you where three women who came up from LA. And and they were saying that this is a really a white March. And that they felt like they needed to come today because they are people of color. Another woman. I spoke to she was sitting little bit away from the crowd because she felt kind of emotional distance. She said from the March because of these claims that are coming out about antisemitism at diversity. And you know, today's March also comes during. In a government shutdown national politics, the stalemate in Washington are these things on people's minds today. It definitely seems like I've seen several signs that say damn wall along those lines one woman that I spoke to she said that she definitely on her mind that she's sorry for the people that are out of work for for over almost a month. Now. All right. That was Caroline champlin. Joining us from the San Francisco women's March. And I'm.

NPR special counsel Lucas NPR Caroline champlin buzzfeed President Trump San Francisco Robert Muller Carrie Kahn Mexico Ryan Louis Farrakhan Washington Trump Tower Peter Kerr Mexico City Serra mccamman Michael Collins champlin
Iraqi protesters set fire to Iran consulate in southern city

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 4 years ago

Iraqi protesters set fire to Iran consulate in southern city

"Good morning. They're six more days until New York's primary election last night, the four democratic candidates for state attorney general took the debate stage to make their case for the I'm Richard Hake. New Jersey's Hudson county is dropping a federal contract hold the tain immigrants and its local jail. Also, look back at the highlights of yesterday's questioning of supreme court nominee. Brad Kavanagh people were asked to raise their hand. Give a hand how many people believe a sitting as a matter of law that a sitting president cannot be indicted during the term of office. We saw the videotape. You raise your hand. And it seems like falls on its way Sunday and only be in the sixties, but one of the great joys of summer still available. We'll talk about ripe

New York New Jersey Wnyc President Trump NPR Richard Hake Jim Zarroli Interbred Cavanaugh Brad Kavanagh Attorney Iraq City Council Committee Senate United States Senate Judiciary Committee Justice Npr Hudson County Montana
Roxanne Scott, Louisville and Npr discussed on The Moth Radio Hour

The Moth Radio Hour

02:32 min | 4 years ago

Roxanne Scott, Louisville and Npr discussed on The Moth Radio Hour

"World needs energy solutions that combine pollution eliminate poverty and promote social justice npr sylvia poggioli reports on the vatican's take on the closed door conference addressing the heads of some of the world's major oil and gas companies pope francis said combating climate change with a transition to less polluting energy sources is a challenge of epochal proportions the two day conference brought together oil executives investors and vatican experts who believe they climate change is caused by human activity francis the first pope from a developing nation has made protection of the environment up pillar of his papacy we know the challenges facing us are interconnected the pope said if we are to eliminate poverty and hunger the more than one billion people without electricity today need to gain access to it but he added that energy must be clean sylvia poggioli npr news rome you're listening to npr news in washington and quickly as it became a powerful category four storm in the open pacific hurricane a lettuce win slowed saturday from one hundred forty miles an hour to sixty miles an hour it remains fire from the mexican coast and does not pose any threat to land the biggest threat is from ocean swells that are likely to cause rip current conditions the hurricane is forecast to move roughly parallel to the mexican coast for several days and then had further out into the pacific justify the favorite has won the one hundred fiftieth belmont stakes roxanne scott of member station w f p l has more on the kentucky bred thoroughbred justify a chestnut colt won the kentucky derby and preakness earlier this year making the horse the thirteenth in history to win the triple crown at one and a half miles the belmont is the longest of the three races american pharaoh was the last horse to win the triple crown in two thousand fifteen both american farrow and justify we're trained by bob baffert he's the second trainer to win the triple crown twice at fifty two years old justifies jockey mike smith is the oldest jockey to ever win the triple crown prior to american pharaoh the last horse to win the triple crown was affirmed who won in nineteen seventy eight sir barton was the first horse to win the triple crown in nineteen nineteen for npr news i'm roxanne scott in louisville top rank simona hell has won the french open by defeating sloan stevens three six six four six one it is how ups first grand slam title after she lost twice in the french open final and was runnerup at.

Roxanne Scott Louisville NPR Kentucky Pope Francis Sylvia Poggioli Sloan Stevens Simona Hell Sir Barton Mike Smith Bob Baffert Farrow Kentucky Derby Washington Fifty Two Years
Giuliani adamant Trump would fight Mueller subpoena to testify in Russia probe

Snap Judgement

02:22 min | 4 years ago

Giuliani adamant Trump would fight Mueller subpoena to testify in Russia probe

"Live from npr news in washington i'm windsor johnston attorneys for president trump say they'll contest any effort to force him to testify in front of a grand jury in the russia investigation special counsel robert muller is looking into whether the trump campaign colluded with russia and whether the president obstructed justice npr's camilla domino ski reports if trump continues to refuse to sit down for an interview muller might issue a subpoena to force the president before a grand jury rudy giuliani one of trump's lawyers told abc's this week how his team would answer such a subpoena we'll say hey you got everything you need you got one point four million documents you have twenty witnesses president is given every explanation and correct and sean that we're missing persons you've got everything in it what it is for he noted that prosecutors often do not interview central subjects and must make a decision anyway man up and make your decision giuliani's comments come after the new york times published a confidential memo written by different trump lawyers in january that memo said trump can't be forced to testify and also can't obstruct justice because he is the country's chief law enforcement officer camilo domino sqi npr news a massive wildfire is continuing to spread in new mexico deborah martinez reports the youth park fire has grown to thirty two thousand acres and officials feared lightning strikes could ignite additional blazes almost one thousand residents of two communities in northeast new mexico had to be evacuated as the utah park fire doubled in size to forty two square miles officials haven't determined the cause of the blaze but most of new mexico is under severe drought severe thunderstorms are looming and that rain could cause flooding in the burned areas of the sangha the crystal mountains shelters are offering cots warm meals to displaced residents as they wait were word that they can return home three hundred homes are threatened and a dozen empty buildings have been destroyed at a boy scout ranch near cimarron more than five hundred firefighters are battling the blaze in rugged terrain using air tankers and helicopters equipped with giant water buckets for npr news i'm deborah martinez in amman jordan demonstrators turned out for another day of protests against the.

NPR Amman Jordan Utah Park Mexico Sean ABC Rudy Giuliani Camilla Domino Special Counsel Windsor Johnston Washington Cimarron New Mexico Deborah Martinez New York Times Donald Trump President Trump Russia Robert Muller Thirty Two Thousand Acres