2 Burst results for "Justice Kwan"

"justice kwan" Discussed on The Book Junkie

The Book Junkie

06:54 min | 5 months ago

"justice kwan" Discussed on The Book Junkie

"Pretty unique to the y. c. e. when you first started writing the book. Did you have justices name? Just stuck in your head, or did you have something that inspired you to name him justice. Yeah, it's always been a very overt play on words. everything about this book is. About Justice. The character in the book is a play on words and Mike and I spell it with a wide did not directly on the nose so I was burying it just a little bit. Because you know people, we kind of created with the way we sell our names and I think that's beautiful day so from the get go. I knew this haircuts name was justice, and I knew that her name justice was going to be writing letters. Dr King, trying to figure out how justice actually work, and so throughout after book. If you see the where this is a good team, you can replace it with the concepts like in the opening chapter you have justice being arrested, and that's what's happening to the concept of justice in that scene, because there is no justice in that scene is being arrested as well because the boy hasn't done anything wrong, the girl has. So yeah I dislike kind of in your face metaphors. That's interesting. I love reading books. You know not not necessarily hidden meanings, but purposeful placement of the words. The absolutely and the sequel. Dear Justice is I. Kid incarcerated writing letters to justice, and it's the same play on words, so that was fun. Yeah, I can't wait to read that one I've really can't in September when that book drops, I will probably be the first person to read it honestly, and that brings me into the title Dear Martin Even Justice was it something that came after the story was written, or did you write the book based on justice writing to Martin or you know the title? Yeah the latter, so like I. When I wrote this book, I knew it was going to be a kid writing letters to Dr King. And Dear Dr King was just too much of a mouthful. So I went with Martin and like the same thing with your Justice Justice Kwan. He's a character India Martin is writing letters to justice. So that made it really easy fun fact, these are the only two books of mine that I have come up with the title for because I'm actually really bad at titling books, so these were easy, obviously like you ever kid writing writers Martin and Kate Writing Letters to justice very simple with my other books. I had a lot of help with those titles. Like how you called him? Martin in the Book Guy, made it more relatable for me, because if just wanted to be running dear Dr, Martin Luther King Junior dear Dr. Martin Luther King Junior now. I like that I liked how it was deere Martin like he was writing a letter to a friend. Thank you, and if you had to add another character into justice life, this is kind of an interesting question. Who would that person be to him? so interestingly enough the draft of Deer Martin that went to prints in the draft. Everyone like it is in the actual book was not the first one the initial. Dear Martin had it was double the length of what everybody's read. It had eight different points of view. It jumped back and forth in time and justice actually died on page three So. The very different book, but at the same time it was the same book it just like I, move stuff around, however in that previous version justice had a little sister, and she says she was a year younger manny like. Thing for her, and I wound up taking her out. In Edit. It's the one regret I have about this book because you know if you I don't know if you noticed, but there are no black girl in the book Melo is Biracial, but there's no straight up black girl, representing the black girl experience in the book because I, wound up taking her out and not realizing it I. didn't I didn't even notice that I had removed. Removed myself from the story, so that is the person that I would honestly put back in like if I could add another character, I would put her back into the book because she really was this kind of sounding board and this voice of reason in the thick of everything going on so personality lake. She was a big reader. She was kind of quiet. She kept to herself. academically driven she injustice were a lot of like She did not get along. Get along with their mother at all. Where justice with the he has the issue with his mom when it comes to s j win the sister within their. She and her mom just didn't get along at all so like it was just added a different layer the story I think. I would've loved to read about her. And I was reading the book in the realization came to me while not really realization because I knew this was going on in the world, but it settled in for me that this really is the harsh reality for so many black teenage boys who are being victimized by law enforcement in this book is actually the truth like some of their stories written down, so do you know anybody in your personal life that face this kind of adversity with law enforcement? I absolutely do unfortunately I know more than one person. I know one person who just turned eighteen, and he's one of my favorite people on Earth and he has had. He's had some run INS with law enforcement that have been completely unfair with every time he gets arrested. He gets out in the charges. Get dropped because he shouldn't have been charged in the first place type thing and then I actually have a female friend recently had an experience with police brutality that. Shook her up pretty shook her up pretty badly and it's it's interesting. Right? Because in both of these situations, it typically ends up being. There's always more than one police officer. Always and you have this group of like. Three four five police officers who are all for some reason intensely afraid of this one. African American person. You know it's it's such an interesting dynamic, and it's an unfortunate one and I'm glad that I got to write about. Police brutality, and I got to write about kind of this humanity of people, really because even police officers are people, and we're all fallible and I grew up with a police officer in my house. My Dad was a cop for the first twenty four years of my life, so having his insight and having him help me kind of walk through. Separating this ideal when it comes to what police officers are supposed to be from the fact that like they're human and they mess up. That really helped me with this book, and it helps me kind of when I'm hearing these stories from friends. It helps me Kinda like knocking as mad as probably would've other. Right, and it's not even the fact that it's all these beliefs offers going for this one person, a lot of the Times that person is a child. They're minor, and they're not even doing anything wrong. That warrants time treatment.

India Martin Dr King Justice Kwan officer deere Martin Deer Martin Martin Mike the Times Melo manny Kate
"justice kwan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"justice kwan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One Bank USA a copyright two thousand eighteen it's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. The New York Times published a stunning op Ed this afternoon. It is anonymous written by senior Trump administration official the headline. I am part of the resistance inside the Trump administration. The writer reveals a series of steps that the president's senior aides are taking to quote, frustrate parts of his agenda and his worst inclinations. The anonymous writer describes the president as a moral, petty, impulsive and more. President Trump reacted to the peace at the White House this afternoon during an event with law enforcement, somebody in what I call the failing New York Times that's talking about. He's part of the resistance within the business. This person. And you know, the dishonest people as well as. But it's really a disgrace. We have reached out to the times editorial board. But its members are not giving interviews at this point for some reaction. We turn to Tom rosenstiel executive director of the American Press Institute. Welcome good to be here. How unprecedented is this sort of admission coming from inside on administration. Well, in one sense, it's unprecedented. And because it's an unsigned op Ed in the New York Times in another sense. It's what we see in the newspaper every day from anonymous sources talking about events inside the White House cantons Trump's by the president the palace intrigue inside not only this White House, but any White House palace. Intrigue inside any White House is a little different from what this op Ed describes which is a discussion of invoking the twenty fifth amendment, and ultimately deciding to just subvert the president's authority in the Atlantic this afternoon, David Frum writes that mass resignation. Impeachment testimony before congress are all constitutional but overt defiance of presidential authority. He says is a constitutional crisis. Do you agree? Well, I'm not a constitutional scholar. But we know that there are always. Pat policy differences inside white houses can't Troms by presidents. What we're seeing in this White House. It is. And it's contextual. I mean this. This essay really contextual is is would Bob Woodward's book. Fear had this op Ed run a month ago. I think it wouldn't have had the reaction that it's had almost instantaneously what ineffective were having in. This op Ed is an explanation for why so many people would talk to authors like Bob Woodward. And why people why we would see the machinations inside the the Oval Office that normally we don't hear about for years afterwards coming out in real time. It's because there are people at work for the president who believe he's incapable of being president knowing President Trump isn't this likely to make him more angry. Make his team work harder to prove their loyalty and undermine the very effort that the writer describes well, it's quite possible. But I also think this writer the writer of this piece is clearly trying to raise a higher level of awareness about just how bad this he or she thinks things have become and you know, to push us as a nation closer to a constitutional crisis. It's clearly what's going on here, and the author whoever this is thinks that the country needs to be more aware than presumably we are from the daily newspaper stories about how bad things really Tom rosenstiel, executive director of the American Press Institute. Thanks, very, much pleasure. First degree murder aggravated battery and official misconduct. Those are the charges facing Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke is trial got underway today with jury selection vandyck who is white is accused of. Killing la- Kwan McDonald a black seventeen year old in twenty fourteen McDonald had been walking down the street holding a knife officer Van Dyke shot McDonald sixteen times the city only released a dash Cam video of the shooting after being ordered to by a judge a year later now outside the courthouse. This morning protesters held signs that read Justice Kwan and sixteen shots and a cover up. Columnist.

president White House President Trump Ed The New York Times writer Trump Bob Woodward Tom rosenstiel Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro Jason Van Dyke official executive director White House palace American Press Institute NPR David Frum Kwan McDonald Bank USA