10 Burst results for "Justice Gloria"

"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

02:24 min | 5 months ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Gloria? It has been a pleasure I. Appreciate your time your vision, your effort, your volunteerism, your education. I can't say it enough. Are there any final words that you want to add. We need to reform. The prosecutorial system will need to on hold. Police officers accountable. We need to read more about how we got in the situation. The first place and we need to go beyond the emotion of this moment to maintain our alliances. I've been here before. And I've seen things. Dwindle and go away and people make excuses that we have to have these drastic murders of people of African descent in order for white people and other non black people to believe in the oppression in the system, while we're in a country where people are here, because either their generation or generations before them came here because of oppression filled in other countries that look just like this. And yet they get here and get him Nesia about what oppression looks like. And this is troubling, so we need to understand that people know what oppression is. If they don't, they should read more and don't fall away when it becomes uncomfortable because I'm GONNA still be black than to? There were still. People. To really why people? I'm tired I. DON'T WANNA part you any anymore. I don't know what he really was guilty, but he had a gun. You know I'll be black even when you get tired so and we need to get the black middle class to stop hovering around the edges and jump into the fight, too many educated black people, too many people who have skin in this game. Who are pretending like they don't. Because of the privilege of Skate. So. So, that's why I just want people to. Look at this moment. Remember it, but this too shall pass, and then where will we be? Gloria Browne Marshall. Thank you for joining US Brooke mcilvaine. Thank you for your input and we really really appreciate it. have a wonderful night. Thank you. Thank, you thank you, thank you for all you do. You're listening to works of justice a podcast by pen America..

Gloria Browne Marshall US Brooke mcilvaine pen America Nesia
"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

06:23 min | 5 months ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Watching television. and seeing this little skinny black man with big is talking on a talk show. And I was a precocious child myself so I used to watch. The Talk Shows Dick Cabinet. Risk those talk shows and I heard him talking about race. And he was so clear and so eloquent and I said in my mind. I WANNA be like him. When I grow up and I tell you right now. It's still gives me chills when I remember it. In. That was James Baldwin. In the more I thought of what he did and I thought about the platforms that he used to do it as a playwright as an essayist as a teacher. Of course as a novelist in and then as a civil rights, activists are those things. It then opened the floodgates from me. You didn't happen all at once, but it gave me permission. To say yes, I can do all these things, too because James Baldwin did it in every time. I think about people telling me no or they're uncomfortable with my advocacy when I'M A. Civil Rights Attorney and they want me as being a playwright and they don't understand. Why do this and I have to choose I don't have to do anything except stay. Black in dies sometimes. Pay My taxes when you think. You know. We want to put like limits on other people and you know like. Do these things. If you can't handle it I'll see I'll keep the I'll tap it down, so you don't have to deal with that when I'm in particular arena. But. I'M GONNA. Do what I'm GonNa. Do this is Stephen. Biko's said I write. Would I liked? I write what I want, and still that's what I do. as far as social change goes. There what would were missing in this aspect of social change two things it may be third with two one. We're not causing any consequences until now. This is what happened Martin Luther King Gay, people consequences. When he had Bus Boycott that was economic consequences. When he had sit in that, he led walls for consequences to those stores also consequences to those. The woolworth in those other like eating establishments, and what was happening up to this point, we didn't wanNA hurt somebody economically socially politically shamefully. And now you can see when you give people consequences. It doesn't have to be violent consequences, but there has to be consequences. And I think that was the difference in social change and other leaders understood this nervous reason, it wasn't understood in this arena until now so I'm hoping that people will grasp this and also the second one I said there needs to be vision and I go to proverbs, it says without vision the people perish, and if there's no vision that leads us working together, litigation lettuce legislation protests with a vision of how we want to be treated a vision of what the country should be doing how the law should be acted or change I mean the prosecutor Cross prosecutor's power is corrupted because there's no consequence to what they're doing. The police have been corrupted because there's no consequence. Consequence so I'm looking for the Vision on looking for the consequence and the last one on looking for the alliances that will allow us to have a vision of a country that has everyone working together because by the year twenty fifty, this nation is going to be majority of people of Color, and I'm afraid that we're either going to go into an apartheid state are going to be living as a community Martin Luther King's book title says it Best Where do we go from here? Chaos, unity, chaos or community, so we need to understand. We're at across road where we're going to go from here. That's the question I. think that's up near right now. That everyone fears. Yeah. I have another question that actually. Segues well with what you were just saying. and I really appreciate about answer. According to the new report, the attack on security has most impacted the black votes and of course. That's not something that like anyone can really control right now. But how would you advise to combat that? And how do you see impacting the Blofeld and the twenty twenty election? I'm so glad that people are still talking about those I wrote a book voting rights war and I wrote the book voting rights for at the end of Obama's second term because I said people are going to want some type of spiritual experience when they go vote and it was never meant to be that you know this anomaly of voting for a black president that get everybody's so excited. You can't get that with their reelection. Don't vote for the school board for a spiritual experience and so a this. Year is one hundred fiftieth anniversary of the black man gaining the right to vote in eighteen seventy. Is One hundredth anniversary of women gaining the right to vote with the nineteenth amendment in one, thousand, nine, hundred twenty. What is also the hundredth anniversary of the end of the Spanish flu? As well as a census year. And the after the nineteen nineteen red summer. Was the hundredth anniversary of the year after they sell. I want to understand what we're dealing with now. Zeman dealt with before a hundred years ago. What did we do then? We kept our eyes on the prize. So as Russians in cyberspace, cyber attacks, and all these things are undermining our vote. We have now a hundred years ago. We had to Ku. Klux Klan the John Birch Society. We had oppression. We had sheriffs in poll tax. We literacy tests. We've always had people attacking at the American vote because it's a powerful tool, and so we need to understand that attacks will continue to happen with our I should be on the prize, and we should be using our cohesiveness and our alliances to make sure that we don't forget. This is a national election.

James Baldwin prosecutor Martin Luther King Dick Cabinet woolworth Martin Luther Klux Klan John Birch Society Stephen Ku Biko Attorney Zeman Obama president
"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

07:44 min | 5 months ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Arrested him and he stood trial in was convicted of capital crime. In sentenced to death, he was not shutdown. They could have gone in and just blown up the little boat. They could've shot full of holes. They go to any of those things and they did not. In the shootings that horrible shootings, and the Dr in the theater in Aurora Colorado. That man went in just shut everyone they could find the dead and the dying and living. He was arrested and tried before a court. And and when we look at Eric Frayne, and this is what really gets me. Eric Frayne who executed a state trooper shot another one execute him intentionally walked up to kill because he wanted to start a revolution. That's what he said later do this. He's part of a whole group to kill off their the police officers white killed by white people who WanNa start a revolution or anti-cop anti-government. They're the true anarchists if you think about it. And he led the police in New York. State and Pennsylvania state on a man hunt for weeks. There were like were wanted posters out for him. He was finally caught. He was not shot even now. He was known to have done this. He was brought in, and they roughed him up a little bit. He had one bruce by. And they questioned the police officers. Did you beat him up? He stood trial and was found guilty of a capital offense. And went through the whole process in those were horrific. Crimes committed intentionally in those people live to stand trial. On the other hand, we have George Floyd who was suspected of passing counterfeit twenty dollar bill, which is a federal crime. It's not even for local police officers to do anything with this federal. We have a Michael Brown in Ferguson, who was thought of to have stolen a box of cigars once again. What is supposed to be the reasonable comportment of police officers? And when when you think about this, you just go from one to the other with Eric Garner. He was thought based. Based on the word of someone in a store to be selling loose cigarettes on the street, and we have arrest. Not of those cases should have involved an arrest because there was no evidence outside of the word of one non white, one nine black person I'm assuming wipers person, but one non black person who says this person committed this act. He's not capital offenses. These are not even enough evidence to foreign arrest. You can't go arrest. Somebody based on the word of one person. And yet this is what we have. People who not only arrested but attempted, and then did take the life of that person based on that arrest. This this is what we're talking about. When it comes to actions of reasonableness when there's a black person when there is a wipers. When you say that it fills me with just all the feelings I think about how. Deeply Black kids growing up in the hood internalize these messages and. Cultural as communities. You know that's the thing when you think about Jordan. In Florida who was shot in his car because a white man said his music was up too loud. When you think about all of these things that would give rise to a white man, putting his knee for almost nine minutes in broad daylight. With three other men on top of him. With somebody, taping it and not care and put his hand in his pocket and not care. That's where we are. It doesn't matter what neighborhood it doesn't matter. What social economic status doesn't matter what education doesn't matter. What title? This is the deeply embedded racism in the criminal justice system in this country. I'm so glad you frame it. With such clarity. It's been a really. Tough. Bunch of days and I think about Just the value of having clear thought on all of these things. And, it brings me kind of tonight next question like as A. Playwright and as an educator at John, Jay, I, wonder what you. The role of writing is in creating the opportunity for change. I think writing is essential to change. when it comes to Social Justice I've always said litigation legislation in protest are required to make change in this country. But one thing that's unstated in that is the need for the artist. And there's always been a need in social change for the artist for the rider, the playwright for the sculptor for the poet. The dancer. All those creative outlets are necessary in. I'm concerned because I really don't see the artists. In this the way it should be. In I, hope is rising up I. Remember playing music by by Wynton Marsalis, and after his father died, and you can feel the emotion in the music. We need to have the musicians we need to have those people who can speak to the soul and spirit in hard of what we're going through and I'm hoping that we have a national or international memorial. That, that gives us a chance to grieve to cry to have our our motions expressed, and that's what the artists brings to the table as we go through social change, we've got to have the artists there, and that's every realm of art in I. Look Forward to seeing how this plays out. Brooklyn I'm wondering. If you there and you also have anything any questions to ask. Him. Yeah in here out of into the Gloria conversation. Talk but I just meet them out loud if if that works to. Whatever feels more, Ganic, Gloria. Thank you again for taking the time to talk with us. It feels like healing for. A Very Long Day. You kind of touched on this. Gloria but one of the things. I admire most about you is how you wear all these different hats and contribute to the conversation. Movement in so many different powerful ways. I was curious if you felt that one of these roles suited you more than the others, and why whether about changed on as corporal context, changed Over, time. I used the platform less present it to me. If I could sing, I would, but you don't WanNa. You're missing. Do Do Guitar here. It's happening. It's happening. It's so funny because I used to say if I could sing, I'd be dangerous, but. But I think I remember as.

Eric Frayne Gloria Aurora Colorado George Floyd Eric Garner Wynton Marsalis WanNa Florida bruce Pennsylvania New York A. Playwright Michael Brown Brooklyn Ferguson Ganic John Jay
"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

09:50 min | 5 months ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Hear, the central cry of. Sort of Looking back to the original sin, the founding of the country and the principles that it's founded on and it. Reminds me of the Sixteen Nineteen Project So praised and critiqued in the New, York, times, I was. It just made me think also about. The of education and history How has? The separation of From your experience, have you seen in black and Brown students or people of Color, a separation from education about their own history and the history of the country? Well when you have states. That for example Arizona and a fight against actually. In K through twelve education would happen after the Mexican American war and the movement of the the line of the border between Mexico and the United States that left so many people who were earlier Mexican with property as Americans without property. When you start to realize that education that deprives people in this country from knowing the true history, and the instead they're fed propaganda. And so that propaganda is not just in their educational systems propaganda in their informal education. A what I call when people have called others have called you know this. The power of of white. Privilege! And unfortunately, the power white privilege is based in murder. And I actually wrote a poem entitled White Privilege I'm in is pretty. DASTARDLY POEM I go there I go deep. They say. With that poem, because White Privilege is based in murder. We didn't you know? Give away our our land in our labor. It was taken by murder. white privilege is based in. Don't do what I say. Give me what I want. I'll kill you as we see with George Floyd. This is what white privilege is so even when I hear why why people throw that phrase around Oh, I'm sorry I'm using my white privilege. They don't even understand the phrase because the education is not even gotten to the point where they realize how much blood is on the hands of each generation, a white people in this is what I like about the protests. The diversity of the protests were seen in this George case because these white people especially young was with some of the older ones are saying not in my name. I don't want was blood on my hands, and this is what we must do. We must say because if you don't stand up. The blood is on your hands. And we can't escape it just because I didn't learn about that in school. You can watch it on television. You can see it in the news. Don't act like that. Didn't that wasn't a Eric Garner? You saw getting killed time and time again on the news and you sit there and I've heard so many people. Will you see if only he would have and I? I said well. If only we would have been white. It never would have happened so I. Think Education when people say I read about that in school. Nobody taught me. This country has so many books in so much access to information. If People WanNa know they can know what is easy through the privilege of escape to just say I can't deal with that so i. I think education has role K. twelve. The governments have to stop denying the history of this country and living in this vacuum bubble that makes them feel content in their oppression and their benefit of their oppression. People have inherited wealth based on oppression all of that. If you want the wealth fine, you know, we can't go back and change the past, but take the guilt. Guilt that comes with it, don't don't take your wealth and don't take your benefits from you know segregation and from oppression, and then believe that you're supposed guilt free. You can't have it that way. And so I think education caves at twelve education is. I have with my students in my race and Law classes by constitutional law classes. Gender Justice I. Try to remind people. Why this country became wealthy how you came wealthy and so that they began the education there, but continued education for lifetime. That's. Such a powerful answer I agree wholeheartedly our prison writing program as you know has. A mentorship component, which is sort of like education I think a lot of people think of it as into education, although we look at it as much more connective so. The prisoner learns from the Mentor, but the mentor also learned from the prisoner through the exchange on end. I, that also brings me around to this concept of ally ship None of these questions are planned, so just forgive me I'm like literally just kind of going off the cuff, but. W-, I'm wondering what you see is the the main challenges to ally ship, wide ally ship with people of Color as struggle for justice. Well African Americans powerful. We are creative. We've gone through what I say. Four hundred years of perseverance. We're resilient. And we are worthy allies in search a worthy allies. Were not a project. Were not an empty vessel for someone else pour into. We come fully formed. And so because so much. Of what other people who are Non African American non black know about is from a position of pity and sympathy, sometimes empathy, but usually is not a level. Playing field is though we come with nothing. And that concerns me because we don't have to be married, but we do have to have common ground that lasts during an alliance that alliance asked me based on on mutual respect, and in some sense of the empathy that we have for one another I feel sorry for some white people because they are so disconnected that when you do, tell them the truth when it are educated about it, it really messes them up. I've had police officers. Tell me they. Decided to leave the police force when they read my book Race Law in American. Society because they had no idea. That the police department began as slave catchers. And militia to put down native American uprisings, they had no idea they history in the blood on the hands of police officers generation to generation. What White Irish police officers did in order to become American there there are books on this, and so in order for us to understand what an alliance means need to know that we're coming into this both of both sides with something to offer and that our history. Binds US in a lot of different ways, and we're all growing. America's not perfect far from it. But. We need to understand that we're being bound together. In this country based on a mutual history that has given and taken on both sides, the emotional and psychological damage done to white people in this quest to maintain a superiority. They never had in the first place that was all an allusion has created. Levels of mental illness. And I remember talking to Andrew Young, the former ambassador and he told me personally we like he said you know when he worked in civil rights on firsthand on the forefront with Martin. Luther King I said. How did he do that? He said because he looked at them as mentally ill. Why would you believe that somebody could be less than you based on just the pigment of their skin? He said he's he. That's how he was able to do it and you just saw them as mentally ill. So I I think the alliances will be formed. They don't have to be permanent, but they have to be there based on mutual respect and common goal in vision for the country. Thanks Gloria. I'm reminded by your comment about the foundations of police forces in this country to your comment on Anderson Cooper three sixty. where he talked about Three examples specifically of how. I! Think you referred to it as a reasonable standard for the way, the police approach a suspect. Is completely different for black people and for white people. I was wondering if you could talk some more about that because I. Remember feeling flabbergasted as he laid it out so clearly. Yeah when police officers encounter. A suspect, there is a reasonable standard. That's the legal standard on how they are supposed to comport themselves. And so when we think about the reasonable standard as applied to the Boston bomber, who killed and maimed terrorized Boston in vicinity, and was tracked down in found, and they had the the infrared showing that he was hiding in this little boat and.

United States murder George Floyd Boston Arizona York Mexico Anderson Cooper Eric Garner Luther King murder. Gloria Andrew Young America Martin
"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

07:18 min | 5 months ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Pen America's prison injustice Writing Program Director and I am honored to turn this conversation over to such critical leadership in forwarding both a continued. And long overdue Gloria Browne Marshall. Thank you for being with US Today I. I feel like a weird sort of reverence for you know just for you in your presence in the world. Look at I saw you on CNN and. There, you are standing there, proud and beautiful and black. With the, African cloth behind you, and how was just like you go Gloria? I just have to say that I. Obviously I feel I felt really just. I Dunno stunned by your beauty and your awesomeness and. Yes I think. You've also signed on to be in addition to all your amazing work. In the world, you have contributed heavily as a member of the pen prison writing awards committee which. we feature a lot of work from on this podcast and on our website in our temperature. Check and. I would just WanNa? Know we're grateful for that. Welcome, thank you I. Thank you first for doing this. I mean I. I appreciate the opportunity to use different platforms to get the word out to put ideas into the marketplace of ideas, so I really appreciate this opportunity. Thanks again. So. It's really interesting for me. lately are. A lot of the work that we're putting in the world through our blog and podcast is focused on covid nineteen in prison. And its impact on both the writers we know, but also. Everyone in prison across the country. and Part of what we're seeing. Is this intersection of? Cova and the larger conversations about race in class disparities in this country. So one of one of the things I really wanted to ask you I've heard a phrase being floated around. Sort of characterizing our country is being in the middle of two pandemics both. covid nineteen and the pandemic of systemic racism in like I'd love to hear your thoughts in response to that statement. Will I believe we're into diseased state? One disease, being covid nineteen, the other chronic disease being racism. and. Racism has plagued this country from the root of its beginning in. The colony of Virginia. And we know last year was the four hundredth commemoration of the arrival of Twenty Africans into that colony in sixteen nineteen. And those laws put in place by the House of Burgess says that was also established in sixteen, Nineteen, coincidentally were. Put in place in order to The greed. Of those Englishman who wanted to have perpetual labor without paying for it. And, so those Africans with subjugated and oppressed by law and one of those laws was a law of sixteen sixty nine. which gave. The Englishman the right to kill an African without it being a felony. So we start thinking about how long this has been going on with the murder of people, African descent with impunity. It's been going on since the Virginia Colony. And so there's been progress made in every area of every American life, and that's why don't want people to sail. We've made no progress we have. We've made progress in politics in education. We made policy. We made progress in in. Corporate America in the Arts and Sciences. We've made progress in every area. Except criminal justice, and we're still dealing with the segregationist laws in the oppression that was put in place in the Jamestown settlement of the. Colony were still dealing with slavery type mentality within the criminal justice system in mass incarceration were still dealing with Jim Crow Segregation is justice from the nineteen hundreds were still dealing with murder with impunity. We're still dealing with this in, so it's so deeply embedded in this country that it takes something like this to shock the conscience of not just Americans, but around the world I have friends in Paris and London I had a Brazilian radio station and Television stations asking me about this people. In Canada, this is shocked the world. Because it's happening on two fronts. One is happening from the standpoint of. Just a horrific thing that take place there've been murders in other countries of people of color, but this country self up to be a shining light on the hill of democracy, so you don't set yourself out to be exceptional may talk about American exceptionalism, and then at the same time subjugate people press people murdered them in plain sight, and with such ease in arrogance is officer displayed. And this is something that didn't happen with just George Floyd and it didn't happen with Trayvon Martin. It didn't happen going all the way back to the nineteen sixties and the riots that took place in in Newark. New Jersey because of a black man being shot by police. It doesn't go to. Emmett till it goes all the way back deep into the root of colonial Virginia and so we have a lot of work to do. If we're going to be what we consider, quote, unquote, a civilized nation. but I'm concerned because even in the midst of a pandemic. Even in the midst of a pandemic, we couldn't even just be. Americans joined together in our misery. Against that common full Kovic now we couldn't even be a part of that. Even within the pandemic we are, you know subjugated to such oppressive horrific means this and so it's such a sad time. The disease is so rampant is chronic is ongoing and I. Don't think you know since this is America's original sin that in the subjugation of native Americans for the Land I. Don't think it will ever go away, but we can do better than this..

murder Gloria Browne Marshall Virginia Arts and Sciences America Pen America CNN Virginia Colony Program Director Cova Jamestown George Floyd Newark Emmett New Jersey Jim Crow Canada Burgess Trayvon Martin
"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

02:36 min | 5 months ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"You get tired. This works of Justice. podcast is embedded within our rapid response series temperature. Check covid nineteen behind bars. At the data recording on June third twenty twenty the united. States is boiling at the intersection of. As our guest, Gloria j Brown Marshall so clearly names. To insidious in terror, rising diseases the pandemic. And white supremacy. We cannot talk about the impact of the krona virus on incarcerated people without explicitly naming and centralizing the rampant racial injustice that has created our country shameful problem of mass incarceration. What you here today is our prison Justice Writing Program Manager Robbie pollock with support from our intern burkey mcilvaine in powerful conversation with Gloria, Brown Marshall, a valuable member of our prison, Writing Committee who holds an extensive biography that includes being an award-winning civil rights attorney, highly regarded author of numerous books, articles, and plays a sought-after legal commentator and professor of constitutional law at John Jay. College, of criminal justice. In this episode, Gloria, contextualising the long history of systematic murder of black Americans at the hands of the law puts into perspective history of policing in our country, and offers a holistic and inciting call to action, a run, reconciling white privilege and being in right ally ship with black Americans in this critical moment and beyond. Litigation legislation and protests are the ingredients for change that Gloria extends to include the role of the artist. As colleagues, friends and family grapple towards contribution and understanding in this global call to action to witness and dismantle the pervasive anti blackness that riddles every aspect of our lives in America and has invaded our psyches I invite you to listen with a close ear, glorious wisdom and message, and to share it widely. You'll find another of glorious many contributions to our work. In next week's a stronger desire to live a highly emotional and affecting podcast performance, featuring incarcerated writers work that she both helped to curate and voice on air. Join US on June eleventh at five PM es. To listen in partnership with haymarket books..

"justice gloria" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on The Big Story

"Involved in Andrew kinsman disappearance. That's how it was initially. And then he becomes a suspect in the murder, and also there are these men who disappeared from the village and their disappearances have never been solved. In this causes us. Concern. So it's being the c conduct strongly. They're being put together. Right. I think what has upset many people in the community from what I'm hearing from my sources, is that there was some kind of element of gas lighting that was going on, because there had been you know, this year's long concern that men had been going missing and people were saying the word serial killer that to have the chief of police say that there wasn't there wasn't the evidence to back that up and then only a few weeks later. Sure enough. That's what they had on their hands. That has been destabilizing I think to, to too many people, you can see though. How how quickly it evolved from having Bruce, MacArthur be a suspect in intricate. Kinsman skilling to suddenly being a serial killer. We know that, that actually happened in the course of a day. Tell me about the rest of that day. Then once they find the photos. What happens? So the decision is made to arrest MacArthur, but to preserve the integrity of a major case like this, they have to do everything possible to make sure that Abbott's is not lost. It's important to remember that at this time they didn't know if Bruce MacArthur was acting alone. So there were people that they thought might be helping him. They had no evidence I should stress it no evidence of that. But they, they didn't have evidence to the contrary, either. So they had to make sure that police were in place, and that, that warrants were in the in the process, you know before the courts to be able to search certain addresses that included the Mallory crescent address where we know sadly know that Bruce, had had kept some of his victim's bodies, all of us victim's bodies. So they knew that they needed some time to get that in place, two or three days. So that. Vision is made we're going to arrest him. I believe it was on a Saturday. And I think it was a Wednesday and, you know, give or take a few days in there, and so they decided we're going to watch him, you know, round the clock and get everything in place. But there's a caveat and caveat is from the images, they've found they know that, that it's very likely that Bruce, MacArthur killed one person or more in his bedroom or in his apartment and prior to that the theory had been that Andrew kinsman had been killed in his van. And so police have ways to intervene and, and have far more control when the scene of a crime per se is of the Ecole they don't have that control when it's an apartment when someone's own residence. So the rule the caveat was under no circumstances can Bruce MacArthur, be alone in his home with another man. And sure enough. What does he do lesson? Twenty four hours later. He takes a man back to his apartment alone. And then what happens well, everything the way that I understand. It was it was sort of controlled chaos. The decision is made to arrest. Macarthur immediately. There are already some officers at MacArthur apartment building. Dave Dickenson the primary investigator goes to the scene very quickly and they go up his apartment, and they arrest him and what's really quite tragic, and remarkable is that the individual who he had in his apartment. The core core documents had identified him by a student, John and John had been handcuffed and was naked and black bay had been put over his head. And that's when police went into the apartment they found him handcuffed and Justice McMahon, who was the judge on this case said in, in basically no uncertain terms that he was sure that John was going to be the next victim. So. So it was it was really good that they intervened. What did some of the police officers that you talked to in the course of this investigation? Tell you it was like to work on something like that. That was stale for so long. And then finished so quickly and furiously what I know is that they are really pleased at that they could bring some finality to the families who had been wondering for so long, you know, in that point can't be overstated. These people didn't know what happened to their loved ones. That's different from having your relative be the victim of violent crime. And so to have number one, the uncertainty of what happened. And then, number two finally finding out what happened in having it be so horrific. Those are two different kinds of grief as I understand it. And so, at least to bring an end to the suffering of not knowing I think that has been really big for, for the police that I have heard from. I think it's important to know that there is an ongoing review right now done by former Ontario court of appeal Justice Gloria up Stein. How do the police feel about that? They talk to you about that at all. This was this was officially endorsed by the Toronto. Police chief Saunders has supported this and it's trying to police services board who unanimously passed, basically the for this altogether to be perfectly honest with you. I think that they actually support it because it's going to come out with some recommendations about how did you things better? And everyone can can get behind that. I think. Thanks, wendy.

Bruce MacArthur MacArthur apartment Andrew kinsman murder Toronto Dave Dickenson John Justice McMahon wendy Abbott investigator Saunders Ontario Justice Gloria Stein Twenty four hours three days
"justice gloria" Discussed on WWL

WWL

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on WWL

"Is back today. One week after he was hospitalized. When a speeding motorcycle slammed into him as he crossed canal street at bourbon WWL Steve Cohen, talk to the talk show host about what happened shoot says while he's in a lot of pain, he's counting his blessings after a speeding motorcyclists hit him knocking him some forty feet through the air. I feel so fortunate and and even if I even if I didn't I feel lucky to be alive, so many other things could have gone wrong. I mean, the abrasions on my face were superficial. I have two stitches I mean, I could have hit my head in a way I could have so many things could have happened. I could have had internal injuries. I have fractures in my ankle. And I have a bone that shift in in my knee. He wants the hit and run driver caught and to face Justice. You can hear more from scoot this afternoon from one until four PM here on WWL. And then Dave's full interviews also posted wwLcom other news stories TV star goes to jail. CBS news update Jesse smell light has surrendered the actor is now under arrest weeks after reporting a hate attack. Correspondent dean Reynolds police in Chicago say smollet lied to them last month when he claimed to mask Trump's supporters shouting racist and homophobic slurs beat him up in the middle of the night near his apartment building small lead. Last spoke on national TV before suspicion turned to him. Everything that's happened. There's something called Justice. Gloria Schmidt is the attorney for two brothers who testified before a grand jury after telling police smollet paid them to stage the assault. There was a point where this story needed to be told CBS news update, I'm Deborah Rodriguez. Back at home the controversial New Orleans east. Power station will be discussed at the New Orleans city council meeting today, the council is set to find energy five million dollars for its astroturf in scandal. When people were paid to appear as grassroots supporters of natural gas powered power plant in New Orleans east. The plant has had no shortage of criticism at public hearings has made a mockery of this process. And they should not be rewarded with millions of our dollars. But the council seems unlikely to straight up reverse it's six one vote in favor of the plant and mayor latoya Cantrell who voted for the plant when she was on the council still supports it. We cannot get off of the fact that power generation in the city does matter. Chris Miller WWL first news. A first of a kind summit on sex abuse by clergy is underway at the Vatican. This is Seth tone in Rome outside at the Vatican were a landmark first of its kind sex-abuse summit on the protection of minors is now underway. This summit will take place over the next four days, including today this morning. Pope Francis spoke about the terrible wounds caused by the scandals of pedophilia and the need for the church to transform those evils into an opportunity to cleanse itself..

New Orleans Steve Cohen Trump Chris Miller WWL CBS dean Reynolds Power station latoya Cantrell Gloria Schmidt Pope Francis Seth Dave Deborah Rodriguez Chicago Jesse assault Rome attorney
"justice gloria" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The temperature right now in boston good afternoon i'm mike macklin top stories we're following now the brookline restaurant owned recused putting a camera in the bathroom of his restaurant was charged last month with child ripe and possession of child porn police say the camera in the restroom of the restaurant may have been there for years president trump has begun is meetings in quebec with the leaders of the g seven nations they began with a working lunch that featured local delicacies special counsel robert bonner bringing additional charges against ball at a longtime associate now accusing them of obstructing justice wbz news time two fifty a woman involved in the kidnapping of a newborn baby from a hospital in florida two decades ago finally facing justice gloria williams was found guilty of kidnapping newborn mobely from jacksonville florida hospital in july nineteen ninety eight then raising her as her own child they were found in south carolina last year and now she will serve eighteen years in the florida state prison she is worded credit for time syrup which is five hundred and eleven days mobile you never learned the truth until she was turned down for a driver's license because she didn't have a birth certificate or social security number she since been reunited with her biological father who says there are no real winters in the case now he says he's concentrating on mending his family peter king cbs news orlando in rhode island providence police detective charged with assaulting his girlfriend has brought criminal charges against the woman john black today taking advantage of a little known and rarely used law that allows house him to file three simple assault charges against the woman she's telling police they'd been arguing in a that black assaulted her when she refused to let him into her apartment he allegedly took her phone when she tried to call nine one one.

peter king john black rhode island special counsel president brookline mike macklin orlando boston south carolina jacksonville florida hospital gloria williams florida kidnapping robert bonner quebec trump eighteen years
"justice gloria" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"justice gloria" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"His restaurant had previously been charged with child rape and possession of child pornography anthony bourdain host of cnn's parts unknown was found dead in a hotel in strasbourg france the network says he took his own life dane whose sixty one he wants called donald trump conman but mitt romney's now changing to the former massachusetts governor forecasting the trump will solidly win the republican nomination and a second term as president a park in the miami area close today is police continue to search for women who may have been dragged into the water by an alligator the call reported seeing it happened just before ten this morning at the silver lakes rotary nature park a spokesman for the florida fish and wildlife conservation commission says the report of the attack is still unconfirmed but law enforcement officers with the agency are headed to the scene the commission says the likelihood of a florida resident being seriously injured during an unprovoked alligator incident is roughly one in three point two million a woman convicted of kidnapping newborn baby from a hospital in florida two decades ago finally faces justice gloria williams was found guilty of kidnapping newborn camogli from jacksonville florida hospital in july nineteen ninety eight that raising her as her own child they were found in south carolina last year and now she will serve eighteen years in the florida state prison she is worded credit for time served which is five hundred and eleven days camogli never learned the truth until she was turned down for a driver's license because she didn't have a birth certificate or social security number she since been reunited with her biological father who says there are no real winters in the case now he says he's concentrating on mending his family peter king cbs news orlando kentucky fried veggies this word the kfc is developing a vegetarian fried chicken substitute reports say the chain will test at sometime next year in england kfc says it's also working on a.

kfc england kfc orlando kidnapping miami massachusetts donald trump strasbourg anthony bourdain rape peter king south carolina jacksonville florida hospital gloria williams florida president mitt romney