40 Burst results for "Justice"

Fresh update on "justice" discussed on Balance of Power

Balance of Power

00:31 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "justice" discussed on Balance of Power

"Mental health services available to people by making sure that people are getting treatment. And so it is an overall reform effort, but I'm glad to say that it's on I am still disappointing that we don't have a George Floyd justice and policing act passed. I do support that legislation. And I hope that the Congress will support it as well one day. Okay, mister Chandra, a really great to have you with us. Thank you for your time. That's Keith Ellison. He is attorney general of the state of Minnesota. Coming up, the MTA in New York is facing an unsustainable revenue

George Floyd Mister Chandra Congress Keith Ellison Minnesota MTA New York
Your Wednesday Briefing: The F.B.I. Searches Donald Trump’s Home

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 8 hrs ago

Your Wednesday Briefing: The F.B.I. Searches Donald Trump’s Home

"Online threats against the FBI and Justice Department following the search of former president Donald Trump's estate in Florida draw a sharp response from the head of the FBI FBI director Christopher wray during a visit to Omaha Nebraska calls the threats of violence against the Justice Department and FBI agents because of Monday search of Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago deplorable and dangerous He adds the threats come at a time when law enforcement across the country is being hit by a wave of violence not seen in more than 20 years Last year

FBI Justice Department Christopher Wray Donald Trump Omaha Florida Nebraska
Fresh update on "justice" discussed on Balance of Power

Balance of Power

01:34 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "justice" discussed on Balance of Power

"Former president Trump's residents. What about the national security potential implications? We don't know what that warrant was for. We don't know what was there, but some of the reporting is potentially that the former president took with him some very highly classified documents. If that's true, what does that mean for national security issues? It means that that information might be available to adversaries or others who made us form. President former president Trump is exactly a former president. He's a citizen. He's not a president who has the ability or the law abiding notion that he can hold on to classify documents. He has to turn all of that over to the American people. It has to be archived to have to be protected and the notion that somehow he might still have that information. That in itself would constitute a crime of my judgment. So to the extent we don't know what the request was, by the way, president Trump former president Trump could clear things up. He could release the search warrant and say, here's what they were after. I don't think he wants to do that. And we certainly don't want to do that. If the Justice Department were to release that, it would look like we are really just discriminating against president Trump should he ever come to trial. So there's a way to clear it up, but I think we need patients and have some reliance upon our attorney general as a meticulous, very prudent, thoughtful former jurist, would not easily sign up with something with something there. Excellent point. Thank you so much. Secretary William Cohen for joining us today. I really appreciate it. Still to come, we're going to talk with Minnesota attorney

Donald Trump President Trump Justice Department Secretary William Cohen Minnesota
Kash Patel's Initial Reaction the Mar-a-Lago Raid

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:36 sec | 17 hrs ago

Kash Patel's Initial Reaction the Mar-a-Lago Raid

"Patel is here. Cash, welcome to the program. Thanks. Initial thoughts on the raid of Trump's home. A two tier system of justice on full display in 2022 America. I prosecuted terrorists in foreign countries in Africa and the Middle East that now have a superior justice system than the United States of America. That's my initial reaction. It is the department of politics. It is no longer the Department of Justice. And this boomerang may come back, you're the political expert, but they come back to just smash them in the face in short order.

Patel Donald Trump America Department Of Politics Middle East Africa Department Of Justice
Fresh update on "justice" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:20 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "justice" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Department. Again, violence against law enforcement is not the answer no matter what anybody is upset about. The Florida judge you signed off on the FBI warrant has been facing a wave of violent threats on right-wing social media where users have published his personal information and threatened his family. The chatter publicly in the Republican Party is that they're all rallying around the former president's side. They're excited in the sense that they can have political warfare against the FBI and the Justice Department. But privately based on my reporting, it's a different picture. This is a Republican Party that knows the former president in many ways is damaged because of these investigations because of what happened on January 6th. And a lot of them privately feel like Mitch McConnell, the Senate Republican leader, wait and see. We don't know the full scope of evidence here and where this is exactly going to lead. At CBS News, chief election, and campaign correspondent Robert Costa. 1144? Hi, Jonathan cotton. And do you know what people buy when they come to the good feet store? Art supports, of course, you might say. Yet what we have found is that customers are really buying hope. Hope that they can address foot knee or back pain without surgery or prescriptions. Hope that they can work a long shift without thinking about their feet or hope that they can run that ten K, take that trip to Italy or enjoy the visit to the zoo without their feet

FBI Republican Party Robert Costa Justice Department Jonathan Cotton Florida Mitch Mcconnell Cbs News Senate Italy
Stephanie Ruhle Wants to to Redefine the Word 'Raid'

Mark Levin

01:34 min | 17 hrs ago

Stephanie Ruhle Wants to to Redefine the Word 'Raid'

"Keep hearing a lot of people call with the FBI did at Mar-a-Lago a raid But for fact's sake here's the deal Law enforcement doesn't even use the term raid So what actually happened The Justice Department applied for and got a court authorized search warrant that gave them lawful authority to enter Trump's home When they raided his home And they grabbed everything they could And they went into the former First Lady's closet and went through a wardrobe Care if they got a warrant under the Fourth Amendment under an outrageous judge Who cares This was intended to try and humiliate Trump and the First Lady This is intended to find information Yes related to the presidential records act but even more so anything else they could find January 6th tax returns They get one shot They wanted to make sure Trump wasn't there And he wasn't This was in planning for weeks It involved two at least offices of the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Washington and South Florida They want you to believe the attorney general knew nothing about it That's just not believable We don't have to believe anything these people say because they lie like a rug

FBI Lago Donald Trump Justice Department South Florida Washington
Fresh update on "justice" discussed on Stephanie Miller

Stephanie Miller

00:48 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "justice" discussed on Stephanie Miller

"Who gave you up to the feds? Who squealed? I'm told them what you kept in safe at Mar-a-Lago. No, not that stuff. Disgusting. The classified documents. 15 boxes of top secret files. That's naughty Donald. And illegal. You broke the law no wonder the Department of Justice in the FBI came knocking coming for you. But who leaked? Who sold you out? Was it Jared? I'm grateful. Ivanka, backing away from you. Don't junior. Your own son. Eric, you even care. Melania? She wants to escape. Mark Meadows? Who did all your old Washington Friends are talking to the one 6 committee and a grand jury? Good morning, your Friends. Maybe it was someone closer. Okay. Someone you trusted me. Now you're the first president to have his home rated by the FBI. This is your legacy

Melania Mark Meadows Department Of Justice Ivanka Donald Trump FBI Jared Eric Washington
'Self-professed' white supremacist gets jail for Jan. 6 riot

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 19 hrs ago

'Self-professed' white supremacist gets jail for Jan. 6 riot

"A man described by the FBI as a self professed white supremacist has been sentenced to four months of incarceration for his role in the capitol riot Prosecutors say Brian bettinger was on probation for a 2019 burglary conviction when he traveled from a Washington suburb and joined the mob that attacked the capitol on January 6th of last year a GPS enabled monitoring device Betancourt was wearing under the terms of his probation showed he spent roughly three hours in and around the capitol prosecutors say he climbed scaffolding before helping other rioters remove furniture from a conference room using pieces of the furniture as weapons and projectiles the Justice Department says Betancourt emphatically claimed the 2020 election was stolen and flashed a far right extremist okay hand sign as he left his interview with an FBI agent last month Ed Donahue Washington

Capitol Riot Brian Bettinger Washington Suburb Betancourt FBI Justice Department Ed Donahue Washington
Fresh update on "justice" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "justice" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Time in 5 months. I saw the gas like cheap bored out. I feel good about it. It's nice right now. As long as I keep getting it for this price, I can care less how I get it at this price. The three 99 a gallon average is 15 cents lower than last week and 68 cents less than a month ago. Republicans are pressing the Justice Department for answers in the FBI's search of former president Trump's Mar-a-Lago compound. CBS Robert Costa. Publicly in the Republican Party, they're all rallying around the former president's side. They're excited in the sense that they can have political warfare against the FBI and the Justice Department. For privately based on my reporting, it's a different picture. This is a Republican Party that knows the former president in many ways is damaged. An investigation is underway and Evansville, Indiana, where at least three people were killed when a house blew up. Fire chief Mike Connolly says most of the neighborhood is a mess. 39 homes were damaged

President Trump Robert Costa Justice Department FBI Republican Party CBS Evansville Mike Connolly Indiana
Iranian man charged in John Bolton assassination plot

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 20 hrs ago

Iranian man charged in John Bolton assassination plot

"In Iranian operative has been charged in a plot to murder John Bolton I'm Lisa dwyer with the latest the Justice Department says that an Iranian operative was offering $300,000 to eliminate former U.S. national security adviser John Bolton assistant attorney general for the FBI's national security division Matt Olson says This assassination plot was undertaken and apparent retaliation for the January 2020 killing of Qasem Soleimani Identified by U.S. officials as a member of the Iran's revolutionary guard is currently wanted by the FBI on charges related to the murder for hire plot Olsen says This was not an idle threat And this is not the first time we uncovered brazen acts by

John Bolton Lisa Dwyer National Security Division Matt Olson Justice Department Qasem Soleimani FBI U.S. Iran Olsen
Why Do We Need to Continue to Have an FBI?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:20 min | 21 hrs ago

Why Do We Need to Continue to Have an FBI?

"Do we need to continue to have an FBI? That is very serious and simple question. We could have state run agencies. Now the answer was the FBI came into being because of interstate crimes primarily because of bank robberies. Now, of course, there's some good things the FBI does. That's not what I'm saying. Even Ron Paul would say that, going after child sex trafficking, going after interstate, gang activity, cartel activity, but even that seems to have diminished in recent years to be more focused on moms and dads that show up at school board meetings. And this, the front page of the Justice Department website, while all this is happening, the first thing on their website is this. Justice Department files lawsuit and proposed consent decrees to end long running conspiracy to suppress worker pay at poultry processing plants and address deceptive abuses against poultry growers. Look, this might be a major issue for some of you in the audience. The suppressed pay at poultry plants, why is that exactly the focus of the Department of Justice? How about the next one? Just this department establishes reproductive rights task force. And this one, attorney general, Merrick B Garland statement on Supreme Court ruling in Dobbs V Jackson. Now isn't that interesting? By the way, if we're looking into poultry plants, why don't we investigate why they're all burning down?

FBI Justice Department Ron Paul Merrick B Garland Department Of Justice Dobbs V Jackson Supreme Court
Where Is Merrick Garland?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | 21 hrs ago

Where Is Merrick Garland?

"Where is Merrick Garland? You would think that after you raid a former president's home that you would at least get a press release, you'd think that the DoJ would mention this in passing silence, nothing. You go to justice dot gov, they have this Justice Department establishes reproductive rights task force. Justice dot gov, they have clicks of links of COVID-19 relief fraud scheme. Massachusetts construction company owner indicted for tax crimes. Okay. Nothing about the raid of a president, to give an idea of how extraordinary this raid was, it was a 9 and a half hour occupation, including over 30 agents, equivalent equivalent of a 180 man hours where Trump's staff were literally kicked out of Mar-a-Lago and now we're just waiting waiting and anticipation, where is Merrick Garland? And sun tzu's art of war, there's a great quote that says 1 may know the condition of a whole army from the behavior of a single man. Now, the silence is something I didn't anticipate. The raid surprised me to some extent. The timing of it. But generally, when I thought about it, we predicted here on this program. But Merrick Garland being the attorney general of the United States owes the country, hey, how did this happen exactly? What was the reason for it? Why could you have not issued a subpoena? Why a raid? Just everyone understands a raid is only necessary if you believe a crime is currently being committed or property is about to be destructive. Donald Trump was not even at Mar-a-Lago.

Merrick Garland DOJ Lago Sun Tzu Massachusetts Donald Trump United States
Mark Robinson: The FBI Is Being Weaponized Against Political Opponents

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:18 min | 22 hrs ago

Mark Robinson: The FBI Is Being Weaponized Against Political Opponents

"Going back to the situation now with president Trump, the FBI, the Justice Department, it looks, it looks to me like the FBI has been weaponized and they're targeting conservatives and specifically Trump supporters. Am I off base here? Absolutely not. This started back with the Obama administration. They weaponized the RF, the RS is again being weaponized 87,000 new agents that are going to start coming out to folks who don't who don't the party line look and communist in Russia. When the communists took over to communist forms something called the NKVD, it was a secret police of Russia. It was supposed to be there for the state. It was not there for the state. It was there for the Communist Party. That is the exact same thing that the Democratic Party is trying to do with the FBI and the DoJ. They are trying to turn them into their own private secret police that they can use to destroy their political enemies. This is the United States of America. We can not stand for it. We have got to put people in office. We're going to smash up this cabal and get those offices back to doing what they're supposed to do, which is protect the people of this country, not protect and fight for the Democratic Party. Got to

President Trump FBI Obama Administration DOJ Russia Donald Trump Nkvd Communist Party Democratic Party United States Of America
Ron Paul Warned About the FBI Years Ago

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:43 min | 22 hrs ago

Ron Paul Warned About the FBI Years Ago

"Ron Paul, the father of Rand Paul. A great political mind. Ron Paul years ago, this was back in the 1980s. Actually, sounded the warning bells on the FBI, cut number one, please. You know, most of our history, we didn't have those institutions. The FBI came in during the First World War. And interestingly enough, the one thing that Woodrow Wilson did, he used the FBI to spy on American citizens and actually arrest them if they disagreed with his foreign policy about going to war in Europe. It is an interesting how recent they used it in the Vietnam era. Democrats used there and Republicans used the FBI to spy on a hundred different groups in this country, including the churches, who disagree with the policy in Central America, almost looks like the FBI was designed to spy on Americans who might be disagreeing with policy, especially the foreign policy. So the FBI, although I don't think I could condemn everything they've ever done because I'm sure some of the investigations and investigation of crime has been beneficial, but that could be accomplished through Justice Department within our states. We wouldn't reject that portion of it. I think the FBI has kept and continues to keep a lot of records on a lot of individuals, the CIA has only been here since 1947. Their record is lousy. You just think of the CIA used by the democratic administration to so there you go. And it goes on and on and on. That was Ron Paul, Ron Paul, sounding the warning bells. That something's not right with the FBI.

FBI Ron Paul Rand Paul Woodrow Wilson Central America Vietnam Europe Justice Department CIA Democratic Administration
Michael Knowles: A Two-Tier System Attacking Biden's Biggest Opponent

The Dan Bongino Show

01:06 min | 22 hrs ago

Michael Knowles: A Two-Tier System Attacking Biden's Biggest Opponent

"Got Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State with digital copies of classified material 30,000 emails easily hackable by any hostile foreign government You even compare the two types of document there You've got the outdated documents by a definition they would have to be outdated even if Trump had them physical documents unless some Chinese spy is sneaking into Mar-a-Lago and going into his bedroom They're not going to get those materials or you got Hillary who's leaking classified material all over the planet possibly got people killed as a result of that And yet what happened The FBI doesn't raid the Clinton home The FBI doesn't go down there No never mind She wipes the server it's all gone Meanwhile they go after Trump to try to prevent him from running again And so it's just so clear if you do not understand right now that this is a two tiered justice system that this is all about targeting not only by these predecessor but his most popular most powerful political opponent right now then I don't know man I think you're not going to make it at that point If you need to wait withhold judgment then you just don't have judgment

Donald Trump Hillary Clinton FBI Lago Hillary Clinton
Judge Jeanine Rages on 'The Five' Following FBI Trump Raid

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:53 min | 1 d ago

Judge Jeanine Rages on 'The Five' Following FBI Trump Raid

"There was a funny headline about judge jeanine losing it on the set of the 5 yesterday. The headline of things said she lost it over this and then she lost it over that. But we're all kind of losing it. We're all enraged that this is happening in America. Here was judge jeanine on the 5 on the Fox News channel. I've read all the reporting. I saw some reporting last week that said that there was this awful story, this ten year old little girl that was raped and was an incest case and you had attorney generals across the country and including in those two states and we don't know what this case is about. We think that Democrats have made it all up. Only to have to come back and recant. To find out when the facts came out. But we should wait for the facts to come out here. The president is presumed innocent. Until proven otherwise. And I agree with that. But your speculation, I just think I don't think it's speculation at all. You do not. You do not break into a house of a guy that you've been working with for 9 months that you have to admit has been cooperating with you for a presidential records. No. Can I ask you a question? No. I'm going to answer your question. Yes, ma'am. And you do not do that and have guys who are they are 15 and women I might add at the front of Mar-a-Lago in a situation like this where the man's about to announce for president if he's going to run for president. But if I were the lawyer, the first thing I'd say is, as a citizen of the United States, I want to know from the Department of Justice, why you're doing this. I want to know from the FBI, whether or not this is legitimate, because everything that you've done regarding Donald Trump has been illegal, illegitimate, and immoral in the country knows it, and you have destroyed our faith in the justice system. Just one question, George. And it's not Donald Trump. It's their fault. His lawyers have that search more. They could release it. And that government can answer the question.

Judge Jeanine Jeanine Fox News Channel America Lago Donald Trump Department Of Justice FBI George
Sen. Lindsey Graham: Trump Is Much More Likely to Be Re-Elected Now

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:34 min | 1 d ago

Sen. Lindsey Graham: Trump Is Much More Likely to Be Re-Elected Now

"Lindsey Graham talked about the pathway for Trump getting wider to be reelected in 2024. Here we go again. I lived through crossfire hurricane. I lived through the Mueller investigation. The fisa court rebuked the Department of Justice for providing false information to the court to obtain a warrant against Carter page. Is it plausible the same people would be going after Trump again? 90 days before the midterms. So the pathway for president Trump to become the nominee is much wider now than it was yesterday. The likelihood of him being relegated is greater than it was yesterday because if you got something that is really so compelling, you had to go into the man's home with guns, drawn to get the information, tell the American people to ever Republican listening to me. We should be clamoring and demanding answers to the questions of why they had to raid president Trump's home 90 days before an election. Yeah you know, of every crazy aspect of the raid. You know the one that I can't get out of my head, guns drawn. Mar-a-Lago is swarming with Secret Service agents. Mar-a-Lago has a Secret Service presence. With some of the most trained and sophisticated, you know, law enforcement personnel in the country. Why would the FBI need to have a guy with a machine gun at the gates of Mar-a-Lago?

President Trump Lindsey Graham Mueller Donald Trump Department Of Justice Hurricane Carter Secret Service FBI
Two-Tier Justice: The FBI Raid on Mar-a-Lago

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:28 min | 1 d ago

Two-Tier Justice: The FBI Raid on Mar-a-Lago

"Last question for you? The PR perception. You talk about their 30 people on the hill. I've talked to many of them just like you, you know, they sell the FBI and the sale of the DoJ. Is there anybody there that could give a look and say, hey, here's the mirror. The people are looking at you and seeing complete hypocrisy. You've got to get this straight because we need the FBI to be the FBI. Yeah, I mean, obviously it's got to be and it's got to start from the top, so it's got to be Chris wray, and he's got to inculcate that into the organization. And he's from outside looking in. He doesn't seem like he's accomplished that at all. I want to go back, Doug, and one other thing that we all should know is, you know, Bill Clinton took $300,000 worth of furniture out of The White House and moved it. You know, when he left The White House and who knows what documents there was a negotiation, obviously for that, that ended up being returned to plus years later. George Bush obviously, when he left The White House, there was an ongoing negotiation about his papers and documents and what was and what it wasn't a presidential record under the act. And I just, I see, you know, again, you talk about the two tiered system of justice. I see that there is an inconsistency here with how Donald Trump's being treated versus other presidents and it's quite frankly it's disgusting.

FBI Chris Wray DOJ White House Bill Clinton Doug George Bush Donald Trump
Is It Time for a Refresh at the FBI? Matt Whitaker Weighs In

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:04 min | 1 d ago

Is It Time for a Refresh at the FBI? Matt Whitaker Weighs In

"This as well as the vast majority of FBI DoJ is 99%. I mean, they're tired of this. I think, you know, I've talked to them, and I know you have, well, they're just tired of this. You're right. Do we go back? Because you were sitting at the top of the ladder there. You saw some of this play out, you've known some of these players, is it time just for, I mean, down to some deputy level, it's time for a refresh at the FBI, probably at DoJ as well. And how do we make how can we encourage that to happen? Because this has gotten singing grain. Yeah. It is. I think it's also time for Congress quite frankly to exert its really one lever that it has. And that is funding. There needs to, you know, the FBI has, I think, maybe 30 agents dedicated to lobbying Congress. They are very effective at building these relationships, explaining their mission, explaining how important their mission is and how they do their mission. But when you're priorities are taking people off of violent crime, international terrorism, you know, listen, we've had 50 people in terrorist watch list try to enter our country in the last year on the southern border. You know, all of these issues, Doug. I think it's time to start having a conversation legitimate conversation about funding for the FBI and their priorities because they always come and then they ask for more money. I supported, for example, them plussing up their cyber capabilities seemed important seems sort of forward leaning. But you know, what I think they're using those resources for instead of doing the issues I just described and so many other important issues, you know, child sex trafficking and just there's a million issues, as you know, that the FBI investigates. I think they're spending way too much time on these political cases. For example, this one against Donald Trump,

FBI Congress DOJ Doug Donald Trump
Matt Whitaker Unpacks the FBI Politization of the Mar-a-Lago Raid

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:14 min | 1 d ago

Matt Whitaker Unpacks the FBI Politization of the Mar-a-Lago Raid

"Really breaking news episode today. This is a special episode that we're going to be discussing what just happened yesterday at Mar-a-Lago in Florida, the raid or the investigation with the FBI into Donald Trump's classified information that came from The White House a lot going on with this. But could not think of a better person to sit down and talk with than my friend Matt Whit or former acting attorney general U.S. attorney. Going to get a lot of answers today. So Matt, let's just go straight into this. Let's give people what they need. Mascot to have you back on the podcast. Doug, I'm always enjoy the time we spend together. And I look forward to having you on my show, liberty and justice soon. Looking forward to liberty and if you folks, have you not sang liberty and Josh, you gotta get on it. I mean Matt is killing it with guests and in the topics they're discussing. Great stuff is we go, Matt, let's just go ahead and dive into it. There's no way around this. If you look at this, I mean, and we're still fresh into this, and a lot of hot takes going on here, but you know, this timing, the thing about this, when you were attorney general, 'cause number one, there's no way this could have gotten done without Chris wray or Merrick Garland knowing about it. What do you think the internal dynamics were that you could imagine inside DoJ with this? Well, I think the internal dynamics are pretty clear. I mean, there was a letter that was sent from the national archives that there was concern about president Trump's handling of presidential records after he moved out of The White House and there was an attempt to resolve that with the national archives and at some point in time this letter was sent to the FBI asking to open up a criminal investigation and that's exactly what the FBI did. You know, Doug, there's a lot of decisions, as you know, that were made in this situation, but I think the most concerning decision that was made was, and I'm sure it was approved by Chris wray and approved by Merrick Garland as attorney general. And that was the execution of a search warrant instead of sending a subpoena or instead of continuing to negotiate on this issue.

Matt Whit Matt FBI Chris Wray Merrick Garland Donald Trump Doug White House President Trump Florida Josh U.S. DOJ
Eric Discusses the Unprecedented Raid by the FBI on Mar-a-Lago

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:58 min | 1 d ago

Eric Discusses the Unprecedented Raid by the FBI on Mar-a-Lago

"When I got home after taping the George Hamilton, I was on such a high and exhausted, we had dinner with Friends. And a friend of mine, a very dear friend in Florida, texted something that I'm despairing about the country. I feel like I've lost hope for the country. And I read it and I thought, that's uncharacteristic of my friend, Martha. I said, that doesn't sound, what is that? And I didn't really. And it wasn't until I was just about to go to sleep that I looked, and I read that the FBI had raided president Trump's home. Yeah. Now, I want to be clear, ladies and gentlemen, because there are some people that are motivated by anger, there are people that hate him so much that they don't really care about the facts. And that tells you everything you need to know. If you have somebody on the facts I'm on your side. If you have somebody on the facts. If somebody behaves in a way that is lawless and that deserves to be treated this way by the FBI, I'm on your side. I'm on the side of truth and justice and the American way. But when we have weaponized our government, which by the way, we are the government. We pay for every FBI agent that did that. I paid them and you paid them to do that. They work at our pleasure. We, the people, we are free people who govern ourselves. And we hire people to do what needs doing. So when the FBI and the Department of Justice are weaponized in this political way, there's a lot to say. First of all, it is as un American as it gets. Yeah, I mean, this makes George the third look like a nice guy.

President Trump George Hamilton FBI Martha Florida Department Of Justice UN George
Congress can get Trump tax records, appeals court rules

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 d ago

Congress can get Trump tax records, appeals court rules

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting an appeals court rules Congress can get former president Trump's tax records A federal appeals court has agreed with the lower court ruling saying Congress can access former president Donald Trump's tax returns a three judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia circuit agreed with U.S. district judge Trevor mcfadin a Trump appointee who in a December ruling said the chairman of the House ways and means committee has brought authority to request the records The House ways and means panel first requested Trump's tax returns in 2019 Under the Trump administration the Justice Department defended the decision by then treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin to withhold the tax returns from Congress Mnuchin argued the records were being sought by Democrats for partisan reasons Mike Gracia Washington

Mike Gracia U.S. Court Of Appeals Congress Trevor Mcfadin Donald Trump House Ways And Means Committee District Of Columbia Trump Administration Steven Mnuchin U.S. Justice Department Mnuchin House Treasury Mike Gracia Washington
What Happens After the FBI Raid? Joe D. and Victoria T. Weigh In

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:40 min | 1 d ago

What Happens After the FBI Raid? Joe D. and Victoria T. Weigh In

"Now? What do you expect happens now? Let's start with you, Victoria. How is DoJ? How's the national archives? How is the FBI going to play this? The fact that the FBI director is on vacation is rather intriguing and he didn't know this was coming up. The White House didn't know. They're going to search and raid the president who just left less than two years ago. They don't know Victoria. Yeah, well, The White House is a pretty broad term. So who at The White House was told who was included. But this is actually, it's very typical that the Justice Department and the FBI do not comment on a case when something happens. When it's a former president. But this is an exception. And I think they need to give an explanation. The American people. They are hiding because they don't want to give an explanation because it is so obvious that this was a pretextual search warrant based on nonexistent evidence from all that we can tell when there is no way that the home residents or office of a former president of the United States should have ever been subject to a search warrant under these circumstances. I can think of no circumstances where this will be done. This is truly truly Soviet style law enforcement, which is to say it is political law enforcement with no basis in law or in fact. This is a disgraceful moment for the Justice Department and the FBI and the smarmy Ness with which they have refused to comment is a symptom of just how ugly and crude this exercise was yesterday. Yeah, but

FBI Justice Department Victoria White House United States
"justice" Discussed on Introduction to Political Justice - Louis Felicia Numan, BBA, MSM, PhD

Introduction to Political Justice - Louis Felicia Numan, BBA, MSM, PhD

08:46 min | 2 months ago

"justice" Discussed on Introduction to Political Justice - Louis Felicia Numan, BBA, MSM, PhD

"Good afternoon. Welcome to political justice minister Lewis. And Felicia, Dixon, Newman. And we are led to have this opportunity to be able to. Talk to you about. Our opinion of what's going on in the world. From a personal commentator from civil rights activist commentator from augmented stereo come and take it. Political justice was created in 2012 and Selma, Alabama, originally. And her only we are. In Indiana. We're in the process of expanding to as far as Las Vegas, Nevada, and our whole purpose is to serve the public as Jesus Christ, sir. The public. Political gift is a self severity of the universal science church of God. Universal science church of God. Being in it existed for like 20 years. And then mister Lewis and I are the pastors there. And managed to reduce sales and being our introduced monster. Good morning. Good afternoon. It's just a permanent and a great opportunity to be able to speak to someone out there and radio land that I'm understanding what we're trying to do. And the help that we need and going. We appreciate the help of God, which walks with us each and every day. I will give you a quick brief reduction about who I am, my name is Lewis, Nixon, changed it to Newman, trying to get into a new way of living. And it gradually is happening. I've been through a lot, a lot of things. I served in the middle of the graduated from central high school, the last county Alabama. I graduated that began to be there. One of the greatest things I have achieved in my life, I graduated first in the class of 19 60. It was I didn't realize at the time. Oh, how great of time I was having, but opportunity. When you're on top, it's good to try to stay in touch. It made me kind of concert. And I began to, I lost a lot of great things in my life because I started out at the top, but then when you did cocky and stuck on yourself, pretty much ended up being stuck on yourself. But I learned differently. I learned to listen. I learned that me and father, I've been involved in a lot of things. Today I'm currently 7, I was born in 1950. September 11th, 19th. But I have to thank God. I have walked with me like I think that is what comes with me now. But when I tell if I ever got a chance to tell my complete story, it would take my God to walk with me. And while whatever, every day, all the way from even before we were born. But in a way, I served in the military for a couple of years. The only Vietnam era. I was a military police. And that's when I made some decisions about doing police work. I found out in the military that was good for law firms. Cocktails and whites and black African Americans at the time we were negroes, I think, at the time. But I learned early in my life and western with the dictionary that the black man was the devil. I learned it ever earned the aid, but I got over it, you know, as I grew and learned about this battle though, that's why I'm kind of some people. No matter what's the one called you. No matter what it is, you got this. It's up for you to change to grow past how someone labeled you. But the life journey is a great thing. If the person, just try to turn, I came up with what was known as the black family, not my grandmother was like counting black books to my mother died of a young age, so she is the one that really raised me. And I love that. You know, I guess I was a very young person at the age of 7. And that was my first knowledgeable experience about God. Because I missed my mother so much. She came to me and dreamed of being myself. And told me, don't worry about her, and from that point on, I never worried about my mother. I grew up with music as an excuse. You know, for not doing just that love. But everybody, I found out that, you know, a lot of people do. And I was trying to make a best use for a lot of people knew that condition. You know, legitimate a legitimate girl that struggles in life. But everyone has to struggle in this world of money. Everyone has to spend a month. Whether you be a Rockefeller, can you be ritual? Do you want to have struggles in your life? I'm just glad that we got time to have made it be able to talk about some of the things. This is a superior dick bedding binning system. It helps your psychologically right now. I say I'm trying to help others with I am truly trying to help people, but it helps me to be able to just have free speech and be able to talk with this is the year but free speech is jeopardized. Even by our government, but I just want to let you know the things you hear me talk about from now on. This is going to be things that I have, I've been through the things I've been through and able to they want to enable me to speak about what I'm thinking about even now. My biggest problem now is my daughter was taken out of my home. She was 13 years old. I was going to be in middle school. I was like, we have to. We have to laugh in the face of adversity. But this is a difficult kind of a lab. Because it's this day, I'm going to touch with the FBI, I've been in touch with administration of the I don't even know. And I'm trying to figure out why. What? I know that Bella has a plan. When we are all a part of it, she's a pilot. I'm a part of it, and you are to, but I don't want to rest for a moment. And. Well, you must have indeed there's a story to tell. And she said all of us have no.

minister Lewis universal science church of Go Universal science church of Go mister Lewis Newman Alabama Felicia Selma Dixon central high school Nevada Nixon Indiana Jesus Christ Las Vegas Lewis Vietnam FBI Bella
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"Push for the equality act that would expand protections into other spheres. Lgbtq plus people and. i think that often folks come to us with thinking that they have one problem and then we on earth really just all the ways that their identities are compounding that problem. And so i think that it is important not to think about this. Just sex discrimination or race discrimination. It's this intends to be a combination. Yeah there's certainly is a lot of the intersection forms of experiences that an individual has to deal with. When it comes to discrimination within the workplace with a post op decisions certainly kind of provided us as practitioners. A different view on sex discrimination in terms of expanding it. What will your thoughts immediate thoughts when the decision came out why we have in making the argument for some time about agenda expansive identity argument about our sex discrimination laws but really that is not accepted as the law of the land in many parts of this country. And as i look at this wave of really horrible at mean-spirited anti trans kids legislation. that's coming out across. The country minister just introduced a bill. That would criminalise trans youth. That tried to join girls. Sports teams it really. It's very powerful we need. We need guidance in the united states supreme court on this now. I'm not going to say that. I have full faith that the united states supreme court is the place where we want all of our civil rights issues to be decided at this point in time. But i was gratified of that recognition by the court and i think it really validated reality of our workplaces in the reality of the kinds of experience that millions of people have in our community. I was. I was very happy to see it. Absolutely so let's talk a little bit about title nine. Let's talk about the protections that an individual has within institutions universities schools in what does equal rights advocates do for victims of any form of sex based discrimination within these institutions. The reasons why. I'm really honored to do title. Nine work is that i think that kids are what they learn if we allow inequities in schools to. That's what they expect. From their first second third fourth fifth jobs if we allow harassment in violence to happen in schools those students become emboldened in the workplace. And so we really feel like title. Nine which prohibits sex discrimination in schools that receive federal funds which are all mostly is just been one of the most transformational pieces of legislation. That's passed in our space. Passed in nineteen seventy two and it prohibit sex discrimination all educational programs instead of that does include athletics for many of us myself included. Athletics was a key part of my educational experience than pave the way for me to be the first to go to college and to get some money to do that..

first united states supreme court one problem Nine one Nine work title nine millions of people fourth fifth jobs first second third nineteen seventy two earth
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"And then we said. But what about. All the on unionized janitors and so we formed a pasta coalition. Which means enough is enough with women janitor leaders to pass a law taking the relief that maria hocus stood up for into a law. That's now benefiting two hundred thousand janitors in california. The law has been replicated in two other states and is now being considered by other low paid industries like agriculture migrant workers. So from one person who couldn't even name what happened to her to be until for trial she has had a legacy of a decade of help of millions of people that were in her shoes. Not every case shows up like that. But we've you every single case as part of that movement and so i would just encourage you to find a place where you feel safe find a great lawyer and slowly defend yourself as best. We're very proud for every step at selling can make and it can really change the face of our workplace. Let's nominal that's great definitely a great story and certainly a very common story for a lot of those people that are put in those situations in those positions where their circumstances the difficulties of life in general relationships. All the things that they have to do. They put all of that before their experiences and the difficulties that they've had to deal with an experience such a difficult thing so it's certainly a remarkable story in certainly marinez empowered so many others by her legacy of having spoken and tells you a lot about how hard it is in that situation. So yeah that's wonderful wonderful to hear. Now let's talk a little bit about different forms of sex discrimination that somebody experiences obviously sexual harassment. Is the more more publicized form of sexual discrimination. What would you say to our listeners. Today in terms of other forms of sex discrimination that individuals in the workplace experience across the board. We are not just any one thing. We all have intersectional identities. We gender we have sexual orientation we have our race. Ethnicity and many workers experienced harm the workplace. Because of all of those things. So it's really important. When you think about how. I feel that this treatment is different or that you think about all the identities that might come into play age disability ethnicity race marital status your gender identity and i'm grateful that we're finally seeing more cases that really show the compounds of harm based on all of our identities and we do have in our federal law a fairly comprehensive list which has just been expanded by a recent supreme court case to make sure that includes gay and transgender people pasta decision. We have happening in congress right now..

congress california Today two hundred thousand janitors two other states maria hocus one person one every single case millions of people
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"On fox news for him to be finally shown the door with a golden parachute isn't aside but i think that there's a reckoning with me too. I think that there has been a spotlight on the fact that often. Hr departments can be complicit as opposed to helpful in sexual harassment and. I think that it's really a comment upon employers. Look it's a competitive job. Market to retain people to attract people. There are shareholders to be beholden to and so these are factors that are bottom line business decisions but just also in terms of what you get the best thing that you get from your workers is if you make them feel safe you give them their best chance to be successful. You have to be absolutely clear about your policies. You have to put them in action with an action again and again you have to provide very specific examples about what is harassment. Wound is a hostile environment. Doesn't have to be a sexualize one. There's no end to resources to employers to do this right. But often we need to enforce the law for them to be incentivized. Now let me ask you this. Noreen obviously sure that you've heard this question for many people and lot of times those that are questioning people's intense especially when it comes to sexual harassment a lotta times. The victims and survivors of these type of circumstances situations incidents..

fox news
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"And i think that this is something that we recognized a lot more as practitioners about how much of that power dynamic in the relationship between an employer or somebody who is in a position of some power can use that power in a manner in which they exploit or take advantage of someone who has less of it and kind of leveling that playing field with law for protection. What are your thoughts about your work with your a trims of sexual harassment in ways that we can kind of combat this in a much more broader level. And so appreciate that. You're asking this question. Because i think the metoo movement i think exposed one. I think the meeting was important because after so many years our fight was proving. That happens and i feel like the metoo movement shifted to like. That's it happens. How do we make it stop. There was a new conversation that presumed that it happens and sexual harassment is always has been the number one form of complaint receive on our help line and i will know you all know this. It happens in every single industry. We represent janitors and servers and professors and women attack and so it really is across every position every industry and i think that the power dynamic is so critical and it starts from the moment. Someone takes a job when they have to sign agreements at say. They will arbitrate their claims. They will be quiet about their claims. In order to resolve a complaint they have to away their rights. And so it's both sort of this system power and it's also just personal power. It doesn't matter what industry you're in if you have a supervisor that is allowed to continue to harass and no one above him or her them is doing anything about it. There is incredible sense of helplessness. To folks who are experiencing sexual harassment in your state hearing with respect to the governor and time and time again we hear employers. Who really are supposed to be getting. It don't stand their power. Even among very educated and powerful women in their own right at power dynamic is really really. Such a crucial factor. and so what. We aim to do with the law and so glad that we do this community with you is to really level playing field by not having people sign away. Their actual rights by making sure that employers are held accountable when they protect repeat repetitive. That they are able to silence people through settlements and get tax deductions through their settlements which is a component of one of the federal pieces of legislation. And i have been really hardened we are co leads of a network of states to stop harassment and our goals are to push the strongest slates of me to legislation in the entire country across the country. And i'm so happy that we're finally getting traction on ending silencing agreements on making sure that people don't have to arbitrate their claims necessarily in order to have their legal rights we're making sure that they are more nuance trainy..

both single industry one years every
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"I think it would really make employers hard pressed to continue to pay people differently so ask what other people are making ask what factors were considering the in pay and continually no your worth test the market. I'm still excited that we're in. This new era withers class doors. Were there are public sharing of certain jobs and salaries go in there get arms. Get your information there. Isn't this taboo about talking about wages. Like there may venue. When all of us i entered the workplace so look. I think that there's individual things people can do. But we're also trying to change the law to really fill in those gaps through people all and also sometimes people just need great legal counsel and they need representations. I'm so glad that you're exists. I appreciate that. So what are in your opinion. Some of the. I know you mentioned in terms of pay transparency but we do have title seven of the civil rights athey of equal pay. Act the Ledbetter so why are these laws insufficient than what are some of the deficiencies. And why is there a real need for more legislation. You know what happens is as litigators. She all are to you these cases. And you feel like you've got the perfect law and then you see how things similar in the sexual harassment context to which i'd love to talk about. Uc that perfect example and this is a gap that the paycheck fairness would feel. Great keys in california. Where a great example back case where a woman working in san francisco was being paid less than employees that were working in fresno mail that she didn't have any males in her particular business location but she tried to compare it to other business locations and there is a dispute that you can't rely on sean. Comparisons in different business locations the same employer so she didn't have the right temperature for her case discrimination in so the paycheck fairness act would say look. If you've got an employer with a bunch of different locations. You might be the only one in the small little office but if you compare them and show that there isn't market reasons why they're paid differently. You can use that to prove your case so all the stuff sounds like common sense right. It is really being expressed that you can't be retaliated against for talking about pay even in california where this is the law for some time. I still get calls. We have a national helpline and we get a lot of people from california to who say. Oh yeah it's just clear you're not supposed to talk about pay and it's really challenging to find out if you actually are paid inequitably if you can't find out so these are the kinds of gaps that we find are really troubling in cases and so over the years we've just thought about all the gas and we have thought about laws that can fill them and we need really smart attorneys to be helping us to continue to identify those as we push our head in terms of our policy work. Wonderful one thing that you mentioned previously was about the what i recognize. Is that power dynamic. The power dynamic of how institutions that are somewhat embedded with these societal processes as to how things should be viewed how things should be an hour fightback in essence to try to eliminate that right. This is that battle and we're talking about power dynamics from the context of sexual harassment..

san francisco california fresno title seven one one thing paycheck fairness act Ledbetter
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"Workplace to help their children learn. They are suffering from wage penalties. When you're forced out of the workforce because you don't have paid leave. Studies had found that women. Coming back into the workforce meets seven percent less than men. Coming back into the workforce for the same job. And so as i think about you know. What's the root is actress. Plain old intentional discrimination. Or is there some other root causes. That's prompting women to be paid so much. Less studies have found. It's not surprising to all of us. Is that women are coming back. Their laps is held against them whereas men who are coming back from a short job laps. It's not held against excused. And one of the key pieces that we're working on is so many employers rely on what your prior salary was your last job in setting your higher pay. California was with the first states to pass a lot provide that. But it's still not the law of federally and what we are trying to do is say look. Don't rely on that fire sour because it's often embedded with a lot of sex discrimination in devalued work in the women's start their jobs very first hiring pay as being less than men because of that and it only gets wider as they continue their careers. So that's a key policy change that we're trying to push and for folks that are listening likes important that employers have patriots. So you're not beating against yourself or trying to combat a fire salary. That wasn't really what you should have been earning. And i think you mentioned a number of things. Tell us a little bit about like what jeff was saying about. The root causes a little bit about the historical nature of how this gender wage gap exists. I know that's a very very lengthy question that potentially go into a lot of tidal things of that nature. But i guess in terms of specifically now in the last fifty years or so with kind of closing these gaps and kind of closing additional gaps. That have been created as a result of all these other types of institutionalized forms of discrimination against people and on the basis of gender. I guess my question is big here. I'm getting to it. Which is ultimately. What can we do as people to overcome this. We hold employers to do the right thing and kind of eliminate this gap. Well actually. i really love your question about some of the historical origins because we just signed a letter with about two hundred different women's rights organizations across the country to president biden and to awesome of our elected officials when we heard that there's movement to raise the minimum wage but to actually exclude tipped workers from that. Bill there's been some negotiation about that. And what we raised was that the tip minimum wage has its origins in slavery emancipated slaves when they first paid the only repaid via tipped. Which of course. Julia changes the dynamic of their work. And you see this. Really historic roots of how people are paid on equally until the mid sixties..

Julia seven percent jeff Bill first states mid sixties last fifty years about two hundred first president biden one of the key pieces women California rights
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"Amazing and so like you mentioned you do a combination of things you both are involved in catering to a number of campaigns to actually address a lot of these issues both legislatively in terms of the general issues that exists for workers in general and then also you're out to make sure that employers and other institutions are held accountable and so that certainly is very very respectable in terms of the work that you guys do so. Let's talk about the issues that we are experiencing and women are experiencing. Today there are still a number of challenges that exist in women's rights in terms of the united states both in the workplace as well as in various institutions throughout this country including educational institutions. Let's talk a little bit about the gender wage gap. Just recently we had equal pay day obviously organization was running a campaign. You wanna tell us about that. Yeah i mean look. It's insane that over fifty years. After their civil rights laws passed to make sure that women and men are paid equally were still experiencing a gap that's costing women hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of their careers much worse for women of color just this week. We celebrated the kick off of equal pay days. Which is how far into this year. Women have to work across different demographics to make earnings of men on average last year. And just as we celebrated all women's the average but then it takes black women until august to make up those wages native women until september and latino women until october take those wages and so we helped found a national network organizations across the country that are really committed to closing the wage and race. Wage gap is called equal. Pay today and we use those same strategies. We have a national employment. At fair pay litigator network. And we're really strategizing about what are the cases that need to be brought to show the gaps in the law and we're also working to change the law and so before this new administration. We really active in the states to really push state laws to be stronger in california. We passed in twenty fifteen d calif fair pay act which was then the strongest equal. Pay law on the books in the states. And i'm happy to say that forty eight states have since replicated and strengthen that model and now we're gonna see up in the federal space. The paycheck fairness act. But you know. I think that these days throughout the year highway all the contributors to the pay gap which are all kinds of sex discrimination so the over segregation of women in low paid work and are under representation in higher off the fact stat. Our minimum wage is too low. Two thirds of the minimum wage earners in this country are women and that there's a tipped minimum wage as you know but maybe a lot of people don't know that many tipped workers in this country actually have a sub minimum wage of two dollars and thirteen cents and they have to put up with a lot of harassment at or mic tips. That get them up to the minimum wage and so that's a key component of the wage gap that we're talking about and then of course shouldn't people working in similar jobs make the same. Hey in nearly every industry every job there's of pay gap and so we have a lot to battle. But i also just want to mention a part of our platform isn't the obvious but when you think about the fact that women who are now coming out inc ovid bearing the brunt of childcare not always having paid leave being forced from the.

two dollars thirteen cents california last year Today this week forty eight states september twenty fifteen d calif fair pa over fifty years both august today this year paycheck fairness act october latino hundreds of thousands of dolla Two thirds united
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"And welcome to the workplace justice. Podcast my name is myron the sar and in this episode. Today we have a very special guest. Today we'll be discussing workplace bullying experiences that an individual within the workplace goes through the difficulty challenges and how we can overcome it and we're joined today by an individual who has so graciously dedicated her time and fighting for individuals within the workplace a workplace bullying expert linda. Crockett is here with us today. Linda thank you so much for joining us my pleasure. Thank you for having me so. Linda amazed with all the work that you do. You've been in this field for thirty two years. Tell us a little bit about your reasons for getting into the specific area of becoming a workplace bullying expert at the twenty two year mark of my own career in social work in if anybody knows that profession. We got our hands into a lot of different places. I had years of experience working in poverty domestic violence sexual abuse addictions medical social worker. And i had all kinds of training in investigating and assessing all forms of abuse. I even trained investigators on how to assess and address all kinds of abuse so a twenty two year mark. I knew how to get through all the different systems that we have in our world mental health medical systems income systems. You name it. But yet i found myself at an absolute bottom because i was going through workplace bullying i was experiencing it and i didn't know what it was. I had no words and to fi- i you all kinds of abuse. I did not know this one and so it took a very long time for me to figure it out. And by the time i did. I was actually diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder. As a result of the situation. That i was in i was exposed for over two years. My bully happened to be a psychologist. Who knew very well how to believe people have read them in their weak spots or they're sensitive spots. Whatever you wanna call it. But i was also believed by to. Hr a social worker and a pastor. So when you're going through that you cannot believe that a psychologist social worker pasture with do such a thing so you're constantly in self-doubt or isolating your question what you think if you see so when i figured it out i was devastated and i have to admit to you. I was even more shamed because i should have known. That's the words it went through my head. I should have known. How could i trained all these people. But that's the same as dr missing diagnosis on their child or a policeman. Finding out their child is arrested for drugs or whatever. That's the same thing so we ended up in more isolations you know. It's very much like domestic violence and sexual assault in the sense that it is very shaming and it often blames the victim and that silencing in that shih-ming enables the abuse to continue. Because everybody's pulled out. Nobody wants to get involved. You're everybody's afraid. So when i went through it and realized this was it i did some research and i look for some help and there was nobody. There is no one. I tried different therapists to try to process invent and they actually made me worse because they really didn't know what they were doing and they used the wrong treatment. Modality on me. So it made my injury even worse and of course insurance companies and unions. Nobody knew of doing so. I knew how to do. My recovery work my training. It taught me what to do. I decided to get my masters degree specializing in this area. Because it really impacted me that. If i couldn't navigate these systems how someone who is not educated like i am who is not experienced like i am and what about those people. They don't speak english as a first language. I was really concerned if there were going to be many more after me and it was horrible to be alone going through that misunderstood. So that's the passion behind the drive of mine to do research and find out what we needed. And i discovered that there was actually a recovery center in germany and a day treatment program in norway and i thought we'd essential here leah center in canada. And that's why i started the workplace bullying center. She do research do recovery programs to do some teaching and training. But you need usa. You have the workplace bullying institute. Dr gary namias as well. So i went and got his training to and over the last ten years of running this company. I swear i have never been busy. Because it's an academic. Yeah that's amazing obviously. This is a very difficult topic that deals with a lot of individuals because everyone that is an employee works within the workplace. The experiences are difficult to necessarily understand from a perspective of themselves but also so much to communicate and so much misunderstandings exist as a result of trying to figure out what is happening. What's going on celinda in terms of how would you define. I guess there's so many different ways in so many different patterns in which workplace bullying occurs. Can you shed a little bit of light on what types of bullying and what type of patterns you've seen. Well i can touch on the definition. I can give you a little bit about my own experience how i define it as well as i'm going to read for you a very loaded. Herod graph that really defines it well. And if you want i'll send you the paragraph with references and you can post it in that people can be really workplace. Bullying is not at all like childhood. Bullying that's one. We have to try to shift that stigma stereotype. It's not childhood bullying where it's primarily aggressive. It can be psychological obviously at school as well verbal in cyber but workplace malays primarily psychological. Of course it will. Escalate to physical unaggressive is primarily psychological harassment as terminology us years psychological harassment cycle of violence. So it's an abuse of power in power comes in many forms whether it's top down or bottom up or it's peer to peer. It comes in many forms and there are many definitions depending on what researcher what country what province what state. There's a little bit terminology that changes than evil get wrapped up in that definition. So for you this loaded paragraph and then i'll tell you a little bit more about how i see it. The paragraph starts were placed blank signifies emotional abuse and compensating subtle and or obvious negative psychosocial behaviors embodying aggression austerity and intimidation generally characterized by persistence exhibited by workplace insiders and outsiders operating individually and or as a group to an individual or a group employees during the course of the lars work being interpersonal and organizational in level the display of the negative behaviors which most often bears the mark of influences from within and without outside the or place occurs privately or publicly and in real or in cyber forms in the context of an existing or Unequal power relationship between the parties while targets workplace blink notwithstanding the harm they undergo often strive towards wellbeing who agonists like bullies bystanders. Employers experienced varied outcomes. I think that's really good definitions while send it to you but to break it down really. It means a variety of negative tactics in us towards an employee or a group of employees which overtime causes an injury and similar to domestic violence sexual assault or even combat trauma. Over time as the saying goes it becomes death by thousand cuts and it is not just. It's death of career death of her reputation death of bank account death of your home. Because you could lose your home. And i have clients who have lost. Their home is death of self esteem. Self confidence of safety a sense of safety in your workplace. There are time flynn these. Negative behaviors are deliberate conscious. Planned predatory absolutely but there are also times when it's not.

traumatic stress disorder Linda Crockett leah center workplace bullying institute Dr gary namias celinda linda norway germany usa canada flynn
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"A lot of pretexts right in. What the employer will will not allow. I wanted to ask a question. Just kind of general curiosity sense. The two thousand sixteen presidential election has your organization seen in uptick in any particular type of claim that people wish to bring so in other words since the two thousand sixteen presidential election. Have you seen people come to organization in a higher frequency. That wanna bring say hostile. Work environment claims failure to hire failure to accommodate. Always just curious to see how real life things such as a presidential election in controversial candidate. Who won how. They have an impact on the types of claims that you see now that we've had kind of a a large sample size of three and a half years at the casey going. Let me just say this. In two thousand sixteen. The new york chapter registered almost five hundred percent increase and hate and bias incidents in general and i was during the election of donald j trump. I've been here for about nineteen months and the one thing that constantly seen is there's a trend for a hostile workplace. But i would say it's a bit then shocked me but it's a little surprising that there were more hostile workplace claims than there would be a regular what i would call straight up failure to accommodate higher. Yeah are failure at a higher which. We haven't seen very many up in the state of new york when i was in. Dc we had national jurisdiction so we went to a lot of less progressive states. Right like virginia or maryland or kansas where we have to litigate motto failure to hire claims member claim in virginia where individual hired this woman and then the owner action told her that you can start on monday. Just make sure that at home. And when i say that he was pointing jap she was wearing law yet so Into federal lawsuit is. How are we at a mcdonald's franchise that i think was owned by muslim. So most certainly discriminate against one another and wanna make flair. Because that was the defense of the mcdonald's franchise owner was that he was muslim in that his wife was shop but that did not change the fact that he told his employees that she got the job but that match worthwhile to wear the sheep. She was like you start the job but we have a policy that you can't wear that and so it certainly happens for the most part in the state of new york. I think everyone knows very clear that the jab is not something that creates undue burden. It's very well understood in. Has litigated pretty clearly. In federal courts. They don't see that very often. What we see is more harassment in creating workplace environment place or to failure to accommodate prayer because attempts to get into the undue burden a bit more complex and the hostility. Sometimes is very very clear cut. I know earlier this year. In middle co bid refiled a case against cuny and the student was working in the career services and she endured about a year's worth of just bullying demonization. From two of our supervisors. It ranged from religious discrimination to sexual harassment in it. It was extremely bad just to give you an example. My goodness her. The executive university registrar supervisor asked her if osama bin laden was related to barack obama right. We're talking two thousand nine hundred nine. By the way right..

donald j trump new york virginia mcdonald maryland kansas middle co osama bin laden barack obama
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"I am joined with. Casey will now. Sqi and jeffrey rosenberg. Today we're going to be covering a topic which is a very important topic given the criminal justice system specifically criminal record discrimination. How does an employee deal with having a criminal record and experiencing discrimination by their potential employers. A lot of times employers require a background check and sometimes their employer may decide not to hire an employee or perhaps they learn of something down the road and then they unlawfully terminate that employee based upon a criminal record so jeff. Let's talk a little bit about criminal.

Sqi jeffrey rosenberg Casey jeff
"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

Workplace Justice

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"justice" Discussed on Workplace Justice

"Skeet and jeffrey rosenberg. Welcome to the workplace justice podcast. My name is myron saw. An i am joined with. Casey hausky and jeffrey rosenberg. Today we're gonna be talking about negotiating your sovereigns. Your severance agreement is an agreement that an employer offers to you when they're looking to separate you from your employment. There are a lot of things that you need to know about this agreement how it impacts your rights and how it impacts your future employment. So i'm gonna talk a little bit about all these different issues alongside with casey and jeff. Casey tell me a little bit about if an employee receives a separation package a severance agreement. How should they navigate that process. How should they navigate looking at what they've been offered. In terms of a monetary amount the different clauses within the agreement. And what would your recommendations in terms of advising people about their rights under this agreement before signing it. So there's a few things i would say. Number one is anytime. Anybody receives any kind of severance agreement. It's usually part and parcel of somebody. Having lost their job. Which i know is always a very difficult thing and there's always a point of knowing what is going to happen next one's family with one's career where they're gonna get money and i know that a lot of times people are very concerned because now you have job loss you have document which was thrown before you which you have to kind of figure out. Well what do i do. Do i hire an attorney. Do i do this myself. Do i talk to friends. There's a lot of terms and conditions in here. That i have to kind of look over and i know that it's always a very difficult position. So people are in. There's two things. I think that people need to really focus on it. We can get into the details a little bit here. But the number one aspect is going to be the monetary component right. How much is that. They are offering you for what is called a severance agreement or a separation agreement. Sometimes they'll call it a termination agreement or even a settlement agreement. Whatever it's called it's basically the same thing and you're looking at. How much money are they providing you now. A lot of employers will have a structure that is handed down from above that they sometimes will determine based on a mathematical formula terms of x. number of weeks or x. number of months per years of of employment with the company. And you'll look at the amount that they're offering you. That's the monetary aspect and then the second component is the non monetary aspect. What are the non monetary components..

Casey hausky jeffrey rosenberg myron Skeet attorney jeff
"justice" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

15:21 min | 2 years ago

"justice" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Sixty thousand youth under the age of eighteen are incarcerated in both jails in prisons is covert nineteen continues to spread through the criminal. Justice system advocates are calling for the release of more minors in detention to learn more about the particular challenges. Covert nineteen poses for incarcerated youth. My fellow intern at Penn. America's prison injustice rating program. Liz Fury called up one of the strongest leading advocate in juvenile justice field. Vincent Trolley Benson is currently a senior research scientist at Columbia's School of social work in Director of Columbia Justice Lab. History in the field is expansive and impressive. Vincent founded the policy think-tank the Justice Policy Institute and even worked in government is director of juvenile corrections in Washington. Dc then as commissioner of the New York City Department probation where he pioneered effort to community based alternatives to incarceration in New York City in Washington DC. Most recently Schiraldi served as senior adviser to the New York. City mayor's Office of Criminal Justice. All of this history has gained Vincent a national reputation as a fearless reformer. Listen the opportunity to ask him about. America's youth incarceration problem in how this pandemic is further exposing it. They also talked about ways to support incarcerated youth by getting involved in advocacy efforts. My name is Keith Camel. I've been joining us for the last few weeks but I'm happy to turn the conversation over. Liz bringing her brilliant thoughtful in hard work behind the scenes. This past month the forefront. We're glad you're joining us again. For Penn America's New Rock Response Series Temperature Check Covey nineteen behind bars. Thanks so much for joining us. I'm joined by Vincent. I'm so glad we could sit down and talk about justice involve youth Start off with some questions and I could imagine as we talk. Maybe we'll get into some side tangents about things we're really passionate about. I know I'M PASSIONATE ABOUT YOUTH. Just having worked in it just for like a year and it really made me realize how important working with youth is for an overall a holistic view including like in schools and like. I'm sure you know about the school to Prison Pipeline. And all that stuff like that so I'm really interested in youth particularly youth justice. I know you are as well so I think like a good starting question would be I know that you were involved in The do see and working as a director. So then you transitioned into academia Do you WanNa talk a little bit about like how you started off with your career where you are now like what led you to wear. Yeah and I want to. I want to start by dedicating this to a friend and colleague who passed away this week. His name was pulled a mural in in the sixties and Seventies. Paul worked with a mentor of mine. Jerry Miller and they closed every juvenile facility in a state of Massachusetts during a about a two year period Sent allocates home except sixty kids. Total into thirty bed facilities were in small facilities. So it's really the first kind of major institutional has ation of juvenile's in American. Paul was a mentor of Mine and stuck with me all these years and helped me out when I ran youth corrections myself So I just want to dedicate this to him. I actually started working in a group home when I was an undergraduate at Binghamton statement of versity in upstate New York and then her Jerry Miller who just mentioned speak about closing prisons down in Massachusetts and I went to work for Jerry. I sort of chased him out of the classroom. I was enthralled by it. This was nineteen eighty-one probably and So I I You know so. That's early days. Really of mass incarceration and think probably mid to late seventies is when most people say mass incarceration started and grew every year between men in two thousand nine so Heard Jerry talk about how he was able to let all the kids out of these institutions provide them with kind of services and supports and I said okay. This is what I WANNA do until I worked for nonprofits from them from one thousand nine hundred eighty one all the way till two thousand five and I never really thought I was going to go into government But then the juvenile justice agency in Washington. Dc was under a court order was litigation over terrible horrible conditions staff beating the kids up sexually assaulting the kids rats and cockroaches crawling on the kids at night. Awful awful awful hair-raising stuff and surprisingly because I was a big critic of it is my nonprofit organization Justice Policy Institute. The mayor offered me job to run the place that so's one of those. Put your money where your mouth is moments and I decided to do it on. So you briefly. Talked About Your own nonprofit. Do you WanNa talk a little bit about that and why you started and what it does today actually started to nonprofits. One is called the center on juvenile and criminal justice. That's in San Francisco and that provided a combination of direct services in advocacy in research. So We'd put out these kind of high impact studies showing racial discrimination in the system war. How much more money? We're spending on prisons than higher education. You know things like that and we also providing direct services some of which were funded by the government so that became a problem because the government was not very happy about criticizing somebody who was funding and so I split off and created the Justice Policy Institute in Washington. Dc and back then it was not easy to get foundation money to do advocacy around criminal. Justice work nobody is wasn't this groundswell of both had the kids at formerly incarcerated people in philanthropy. There's the pickens. Were very slim if you wanted to be an advocate only and so you know that's fine. That's what we sign up for this in his field But that's what the Justice Policy Institute was and it still local still around but the Justice Policy Institute never provide any services because it wanted to be able to say whatever it wanted to be able to say without worrying. This governor that corrections administrator was going to enact reprisals You also touched on a reason why you got into the dot is because you were so knowledgeable about the harsh living conditions of prisons and jails. And I think that especially with everything going on right now. With covert in the spreading that has led to a lot of reforms in terms of like releases of people How do you think that Cova in particular is affecting youth detention because detention is obviously a little bit different than adult presence? Do you think that there's like a unique factor in youth detention how it's being affected during covert you know? I think it's I think it's a similar nightmare in a lot of ways to the adult system with with a couple of variations. But I think they're they're they share a lot more than they don't share on you know when when the pandemic started to become obvious I got together with a bunch of current and former youth correctional administrators and we issued a statement saying reduced the number of people. You're locking up. Close the front door And you know. Create a covert plan. There were many more elements to it there but that was basically it also provide support to families when their kids come home and we issued that and the reason we should is because every one of us the first thing you do you have a rumblings places you start imagining what's GonNa Happen. And here's the way it's GonNa play out is playing out in several places. The virus enters your system. Somehow someway somehow some way through staff through kid comes in the family member through maiden staff you know however and everybody starts to freak out staff start. Get SICK or call in sick. Because they're afraid of getting sick or because family members is sick. And now you've got an order thin staffing compliment. That gets thinner programs get closed down. Because you don't want people coming into might be sick. School gets closed. Visitation gets closed. Volunteers get closed so now. The kids are already in a stressful situation. Because they're Ori- in a juvenile correctional system in America so let's just every day starts stressful and now you up to stress many fault and you have to make this decision. Do I lock the kids down? Or do I let him out into a congregate setting where there is no frigging way. They're gonNA stay six feet away from each other and there's no way might staff who already didn't keep this place. Hygienic before this are GONNA clean it enough. And so that's the situation that person after person after person finds themselves in so that's kind of issued that statement somewhat early on was what we were trying to say. Is You know the doctor did the head physician at rikers island. Dr McDonald said a storm is coming. We need to get ready for right. That was his that was his sort of clarion call. Today it was a beautiful way of putting it and so I got to thinking about storms when it coming. What do you tell your citizenry? Get out there. Now get the plywood up in the hammer nails in board up the windows. You don't say wait till the wind is blowing one hundred miles an hour and then get the boards at hammer nails out. And that's what we're trying to say to. Juvenile correctional administrators politicians the governors mayors county council. Prepare for this now. Bar a bunch of people from coming into the city and released them anybody on a misdemeanor. Anybody on a probation violation anybody's got thirty. Sixty ninety days left to serve on her sentence. Get them the hell out of there. Nothing's going to happen next. Ninety days in your juvenile correctional facility. That is going to change the life of this young person except navy getting coded so get them out of your facility right now in big numbers. Don't do a bunch of individualized Blah Blah Blah. Which is what everybody always wants to do. And then with whoever's left do the individualized plan because yes we get. Some of the kids will be in your view too dangerous to release but not the misdemeanor. It's not the probation. Violators not the kids to fail the program. Not The kids that are coming out in ninety days anyway all of them pretty much or not too dangerous for you to be worrying about so get them out of your facility and then start to take a very careful look at anybody who's left especially anybody with asthma. Honsik kids in my facility had asthma and we know that having asthma mixed the symptoms of covert worse or any of the medically vulnerable kids very carefully. Start looking at them. Very carefully stuck to release plans with prosecutors judges people But step one is get big numbers out so in terms of the kids. That are released Have you or people you know organizations that you know of? Have there been any like solid aftercare programs because I know in talking to Some people I was connected with at my previous job which is the Youth Justice Center in Staten Island That the kids being released from Like horizons or other detention centers. That normally in after care plan takes quite a bit a while to plan like six months prior to release you. Start thinking about after care. Plans like what's going to go on Do you know anything about either. Your nonprofit or other people that are Helping with this kind of relief. I've heard that there are a bunch of groups actually have gotten together on this and that a lot of youth correctional administrators are starting to sorta amp up their release planning We should all been doing this. The first day to kit arrived the first aid kit rhyme. You should start thinking okay. Six months from now nine months from now we have this Gig go. What's that GONNA look like? What kind of after care plan will ever be so shame on you? If you already haven't been doing that but one of the things I've been thinking is you know we're all wishing life was back to normal. I wish I was sitting in a room with you. Do in this interview. I wish I could go to a bar tonight. I wish I could go to a game right and which kids could go back to school but there are some places where we don't want to go back to normal and mass incarceration is one of them. We don't want to fill these facilities backup. We don't WanNa do Lousy aftercare plans for these kids and so we should really be looking at this moment. Not just as an opportunity to keep young people safe but as an opportunity to improve stuff. We should've been improving anyway. It's a disaster right now and everybody's really concerned about putting a kid into that disaster. We should have always been concerned about putting that kid into that disaster. Not just now because they might get covered nineteen but always because they might get beaten up they might get raped their chances of success upon release go down and because it's dramatically racially ethnically disparate does should have been our concerns every single day. And now we add to that pile the pandemic so this was all fired. Good idea before and we don't want to get back to normal right and I think what you're saying is like a percent accurate really hitting the money on that one where like I hate that. It took a pandemic for people to Kinda be at this level of like a quick reaction for reform. Like mass incarceration like you said was starting to be prominent in the sixties and Seventies. Shame that it took so long to get to this point but at the same time it's kind of like this was kind of like a kick out the door to you know..

Justice Policy Institute Vincent Trolley Benson Dc Jerry Miller Washington America Liz Fury Office of Criminal Justice director Director of Columbia Justice L New York City asthma Youth Justice Center Massachusetts Paul intern Schiraldi Penn America Penn senior adviser
"justice" Discussed on Justice

Justice

07:50 min | 3 years ago

"justice" Discussed on Justice

"Me Excuse me Matvey attention. Please welcome the justice where we have genuinely respect for all people today we want to open the forum of that anyone that wanted to make a statement or comment via twitter facebook <hes> any any <hes> snapchat when it's in pictures that are appropriate <hes> not only for for the eyes of the youth but actually for for for anyone <hes> we want to open you know just let you make your comments via facebook <HES> <HES> <HES> if we're on facebook live please tune in whenever we can do to help each other and whatever channels we can use is so many channels out there in in our respective all the channels that we're able to communicate well. Let's try to keep the wires a clean <hes> we we as we built with each other that there will be judgment there will be people not liking certain things but <hes> in our in our prayer in our in our hope that we can reach the masses assist people with that will agree and understand that <hes> with the comments and the statements they make will not be judged. There's no right or wrong answer <hes> for anything that will make a weekend all agree <hes> upon one thing that we will try to find a solution so let. The opening prayer Father God we thank you Lord for his day everything that you giving his father guide everybody that here let them have let him here. <hes> with the spirit says so as we as we build together today we don't offend anyone in our way and nor guy that you will bless are all families. All mothers and brothers and sisters aunts uncles nephews and nieces grandmother and grandfather's cousin friends in associates in anybody associated to so getting writing. I just wanted to say today you know <hes> as we as we wait we all tend to have have certain <hes> we would say <hes> everyday rituals where we may do <hes> before we get out of bed when we get out of bed is there's a <hes>. Do we turn on the T._V.. Do we go for the the coffee pot right away. Do we get right on her knees and start to pray <hes> <hes> we look at each day <hes> different <hes> than than the next and there's no judgment in that because how a person wants to wake up or what they want to eat if they eat meat or they don't eat meat there vegetarian or Vegan. It doesn't even matter no judgment how a person person is living if he doesn't wanNA take a bath for Berge his teeth then we'll get smelled the aftermath of that if they keep living like that but it's still no judgment we can give a vice and we can we can hold one true to who they are. If we the whole true to who we are be genuine in our approach where we want to be treated like that if not then treat others like we would like to be treated the difference between others in the difference between <hes>. You would say <hes> people <hes> that have. Have respect <hes> in a January respect for all people they tend to be a little bit more subtle <hes> they they don't give <hes> the the straight answer in the beginning not that they're lying but they don't want to offend so they did very choice see with they were as a person isn't that just vicious in psycho. It's all about them. They will say what's on their mind saying I'm upfront person but this type of person can lead somebody into destruction by what they're saying is greater than any weapon. Our words are so we must be careful in what we say what we do when we wait when we going through our day. If we're at work where we school we gotta make sure that we're doing the right thing that we can do even if somebody offend us. Don't let them bring you into their into their cipher into their mode and you give them another source our maybe they didn't get a pop tart this morning. Maybe they didn't get a bowl of cereal going to work. You got cut off in the lane and now you're going and talking about this insane driver but we have to stay in a in a in a mode mode. We're we're we're helping another. We don't WanNA damper the the mode and then you 'cause you damper twice out of the year and now he felt like this is a dampening party now. Your colleague is telling you all the bad things about his day straight in the morning so now your day and your cycle starts on negative news not casting any shade on the news <hes> or any social media content that relates to us in a violent nature. I think that everybody should be able to figure it out I. Yes you know get up in the morning. Don't turn on your phone. Don't turn on Your T._V.. <hes> just just relaxing find out. Who would what you're thinking? I turn to make to make sure that audio odyssey is off for a minute. Make sure that the volume is turned down down on every level wake <hes>. If you have a mate kitchen make kiss your sons and your daughters and call your mother call your brothers and sisters everybody on your heart makes you did you make sure that they okay for before you start your day and if you do do that then you you you move in a way where you you you start to <hes> understand life. You have to care about life. You had to care about people no matter what happens that you be B have genuine respect for all people no matter the judgment no matter if they committed a crime if they if they stepped on your shoe if they didn't say all the things that they would do in maybe they're unreliable and so many things in your so reliable in all things that commitment is still to stay genuine treat people with respect and then they will learn how to respect some some adults are just like children in the in the level of certain aspects of respect could be one of them no bay nobody made we'd never taught him respect and if they didn't teach him. How do you expect somebody to? Not even if they <hes> in a number that you WANNA put on <hes> put on them or whatever ethnic background or social degradation you may want to cast before them they just never learned it and if they didn't learn it then you know how could you expect someone to understand it so if we if we stay genuine and all are approaching respect for others than we'll find out where they're going where we're going on would would would kind of help could they could we offer them <hes> and what kind of how could they offer us in the meanwhile as we're helping them in one area. They may be better in another area but you have to be open to that. Don't think 'cause you helping somebody one area that they're not better than you and the other area so keep an open mind when you get up when you go throughout your a day. How are you presenting yourself to them? How are you presenting yourself to your family when you come home from work so in this in this daily battle was self get self together and then you'll be able to help others if you cannot defeat selves inequalities inequalities then how can you how can you help anybody else in facing equality so the difference of where we're going and what we need to <hes> to see how can we turn around certain issues and in propaganda that we may face as a society as a whole a whole nation whole body of people <hes> we we we can then <hes> intervene with each other without what are casting judgement? Jemaine or casting shade upon <hes> what one has done what one can do and what <hes> what they won't do in having done that we live for for all people a genuine respect for all people so as as you look at your day today look up. Keep your head. I not in arrogancy but keep your head high. Keep Your Chin is your shoulders back. Walk would walk with a a appropriateness as a model may walk down the runway now being to our you have to have a haughty fall because humility but keep it high that you have respect for yourself and you have a genuine respect for everyone else sign-off until we meet again.

facebook twitter Berge arrogancy
"justice" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

10:26 min | 3 years ago

"justice" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Intra community violence right and no evidence that it improves public safety. Thank you in ten floors amazing. Let's pass the MIC. Take down this way to Beth. Tell US beginning Elevator Alabama yes yes. I'm a journalist and I write about prisons in Alabama. You can imagine what that's like and on my elevator or steps head coach of Alabama Crimson Tide Nick Sabin because I'm convinced if he doesn't get involved in this discussion people in Alabama just are not going to care about prisons so that would be my dream to talk to Nick Saban Zaven about what's happening in our prisons Alabama is I think the worst example in the failure of mass incarceration our prisons are completely overcrowded the most overcrowded in the nation the most violent the Department of Justice just call them cruel and unusual in a system wide investigation that I've been studying and writing about what does that mean for people who are locked up and these kinds of places. Aces it means that they live in constant terror in constant trauma. They are re traumatized over and over again. The system is broken. It is criminal genetic. It makes people all who are already traumatized need help worse. So how do we address these conditions of confinement in a way that's meaningful and sweeping and not just piecemeal through litigation which is how it's been addressed since the beginning of prisons in our country. I think Nick Sabin people like you need to care about this issue because it's all of our issue. It's not just an issue for people that have a loved one. That's incarcerated. It's not just an issue for people that work in the criminal justice system. This is all happening on our dime. We are paying for these tax payer run institutions to commit violence to be indifferent to people suffering and and so all of us have a stake in this and I think people have influenced need to speak out and demand that there be changes made in the system until abolition can be a real reality. We have to address address conditions of confinement moment because I think it is the human rights disaster of our generation happening. <hes> I also would like to tell Nick Sabin that there needs to be more of an even playing field across across the board and the criminal justice system between the prosecution side and the criminal defense side Alabama has no statewide public defender that means after you're convicted and you're in prison unless you're one of the one hundred and eighty people on death row. You are on your own trying to appeal your sentence. There are no resources given to the criminal defense side of law in many states but especially in the state that I live in <hes> but the guys that I talked to that are incarcerated rated that tried to appeal their sentences are working and unairconditioned cluttered law libraries that have typewriters and no copy machines. How do they make copies to send their appeals into the courts? They pay the administration a dollar dollar a page which they don't have or they hustle somebody else that's in the prison that can make the copies for them. So things like that lead to disparate outcomes. It's not about justice and there needs to be a more.

Nick Sabin Alabama US Nick Saban Zaven Department of Justice Beth
"justice" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

05:10 min | 3 years ago

"justice" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"People broke <Speech_Male> rocks in the hot sun <Speech_Male> the newer <Speech_Male> workhouse this now <Speech_Male> seventy five years old <Speech_Male> elax <Speech_Male> heating during the cold <Speech_Male> misery winners <Speech_Male> and infamously <Speech_Male> no air conditioners in <Speech_Male> the summer when temperatures <Speech_Music_Male> inside the jail <Speech_Music_Male> can swell to one hundred <Speech_Male> twenty degrees <Speech_Male> and you can hear people <Speech_Male> scream through the windows <Speech_Male> for health from the parking <Speech_Male> lot <Silence> rats roaches <Speech_Male> and steak slip <Speech_Male> through the cells <Speech_Male> as close the workhouse <Speech_Male> members say it's <Speech_Male> not a place fit for <Speech_Male> animals hellish <Speech_Male> brutal <Silence> before the campaign <Speech_Male> started. Nearly a thousand <Speech_Male> people were locked up <Speech_Male> there mostly <Speech_Male> for low level level charges <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Music_Male> serious charges were held <Speech_Male> in a different jail downtown. <Speech_Male> <Silence> Everyone <Speech_Male> here in Saint Louis thinks <Speech_Male> the workhouse is a terrible <Speech_Music_Male> place probably should be <Speech_Music_Male> closed but they <Speech_Music_Male> need to believe. It's possible <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> way out of a church presentation <Speech_Male> elder sodomy. <Speech_Male> <Silence> I keep hearing hearing for years <Speech_Male> about closing. The workhouse. <Speech_Male> Never made sense <Speech_Male> to me. I <Speech_Male> guess if you enclose rikers <Speech_Male> in New York <Speech_Music_Male> closing the workhouse should happen <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> indeed it may actually <Speech_Male> be easier to <Speech_Male> dramatically cut the number <Speech_Male> of people in jail here versus <Speech_Male> New York <Speech_Male> and New York and army <Speech_Male> of nonprofits and service <Speech_Music_Male> providers has been working <Speech_Male> for years to reduce the <Speech_Male> population <Speech_Music_Male> for all their flaws <Speech_Music_Male> near judges actually demand <Speech_Music_Male> cash bill less often <Speech_Music_Male> than many other <Speech_Male> cities including Saint <Speech_Male> Louis. There's <Speech_Male> much quote low <Speech_Male> hanging fruit for Saint Louis <Speech_Male> address before we even <Speech_Male> get to the truth systemic <Speech_Male> reform for all their flaws <Speech_Music_Male> near judges actually demand <Speech_Music_Male> cash bill less often <Speech_Music_Male> than many other <Speech_Male> cities including Saint <Speech_Male> Louis. There's <Speech_Male> much quote low <Speech_Male> hanging fruit for Saint Louis <Speech_Male> address before we even <Speech_Male> get to the truth systemic <Speech_Male> reform we need <Speech_Male> Saint <Speech_Male> Louis which Mark Twain <Speech_Male> described as a <Speech_Male> Midwestern Sharman <Speech_Male> southern efficiency <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is part factory town <Speech_Male> and part Hurricane <Speech_Male> Katrina aftermath <Speech_Male> and needs much <Speech_Music_Male> more than criminal justice <Speech_Music_Male> to thrive <Speech_Male> the divest invest <Speech_Male> message now common <Speech_Music_Male> criminal justice <Speech_Male> reform <Speech_Male> but referring northern St <Speech_Male> Louis as needing investment <Speech_Male> is a severe <Speech_Male> understatement. <Speech_Male> The city is half <Speech_Male> its peak size. <Speech_Male> The mets relied <Speech_Music_Male> intentionally stakes <Speech_Music_Male> well south <Speech_Male> of black neighborhoods <Speech_Male> homes are literally <Speech_Male> crumbling onto the <Speech_Music_Male> street as schools closed <Speech_Music_Male> for lack of kids. <Speech_Music_Male> If the South <Speech_Male> Bronx is is a food desert <Speech_Male> that much of <Speech_Male> Saint Louis the Sahara <Speech_Male> <Silence> yesterday we <Speech_Male> shivered through meeting <Speech_Male> fully layered waiting <Speech_Male> for the heat pipes to kick <Speech_Male> in or startled <Speech_Male> by banging on <Speech_Male> the window <Speech_Male> a man asking take <Speech_Male> the metal scraps from the church <Speech_Male> dumpster <Speech_Male> not ours to give <Speech_Male> away <Speech_Male> to live on the north side. <Speech_Male> You must be tough <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and Saint Louis activists <Speech_Male> are capable of mobilising <Speech_Male> hundreds of people <Speech_Male> into the street on very <Speech_Male> short notice <Speech_Male> after the Stockley verdict <Speech_Male> they did so for days. <Speech_Male> Few <Speech_Male> places in the country <Speech_Male> are capable of mass <Speech_Male> mobilization that has <Speech_Male> been going on on here intermittently <Speech_Male> since Ferguson <Speech_Male> activists <Speech_Male> politically <Speech_Music_Male> savvy and cannot be intimidated <Speech_Music_Male> by

Saint Louis New York mets Bronx Ferguson Stockley Mark Twain seventy five years twenty degrees
"justice" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

10:36 min | 3 years ago

"justice" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"And so they would look at the Paper Cup the Paper Cup as I said was gone and according to people at the innocence project was after reading my reporting about the witness in this case this little boy whose name was Ed Vernon that was when they decided that they really needed to focus on the testimony that the DNA in this was not and it's a really big gamble because courts don't like witnesses who come back back decades later days later and say I lied in court because the judicial standpoint is that will look how you trustworthy I mean you see it was Michael Cohen Today. I mean like you know they're saying you're you said you lied then and now you're saying you're telling the truth. How can we believe you now? In the courts are very very strong on that point that they don't like witness recantations but I felt in my reporting and in the innocence project the Ohio Innocence Project came to see that that was the only area of sunlight in this case. I was the only place where there was any room for trying to get these guys out. I think so rick Jackson's wounded three men who were wrongfully convicted here thirty nine years thirty Rickey Jackson when they were finally exonerated generated he had been incarcerated for thirty nine years continuously that was at the time the longest wrongful conviction in U._S. history. What's what failed here in the system? How did it feel so badly? What happened well? It's impossible to talk about this without talking about race. I mean these were three young black guys in Cleveland in nineteen seventy five. Every police officer who worked on this case was white. The prosecutor's office was white. The judges were all white. The juries were majority white. I mean race was is a huge factor. You're also talking about Cleveland had been embroiled in a lot of racial conflict like many American cities. There'd been a race riot. There had been a very famous shootout which I talk about in the book called the Glenville shootout which a lot the people kind of forgotten about but it was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight a group of black militants opened fire on a bunch of Cleveland Police officers in a neighborhood called Glenville in Cleveland and this was before the Black Panthers were kind of had a national reputation Asian and so if you're a white moderate sitting at home watching T._V.. What you're seeing is opened armed racial warfare breaking out in American city which had never happened before during the civil rights era and so that really raised used a curtain on a new era the civil rights movement particularly in Cleveland heightened the relationship and the animosity between the police department and the African American community and so that was in sixty eight th you're talking about seven years years later? These guys are sucked into the criminal justice system still very much in everybody's mind. It's still very much in play speaking of white people in the role. They played in the story. You're a white person as far as I know <hes> boy you're reading about three black people into story that is very kind of racially fraught. What sort of considerations did you take? <hes> what would that like. How did you kind of make sure you didn't cross any lines anything wrong doing anything problematic? What was that process like for you? And how do you make sure you got it right now. I mean that's a great question and it's important. It's an important question to consider and I'll answer it with the story. So when I first met Ronnie when I first met Cuomo the guy who I met in two thousand eleven and he told me the story with the big box documents excited I did believe him but probably maybe like one percent or maybe five percent of me held back from fully believing him at the time and that was because I felt that the criminal justice I felt that the criminal justice system couldn't really convict innocent people and then have them sit in jail for decades and decades. I felt that there had to be these safety nets or guardrails within the system that if someone was actually wrongfully convicted you know within a certain amount of time the appeals process would flag them and they'd get out and that was so stupid of me to think that and very quickly I realized. How stupid that was as I was reporting the story and very quickly I realized that the only reason I had thought that was because I was white suburban middle class and I had never come into contact with the wrong end of the criminal justice system before so that really kind of shook me in a way about how I approach these stories about telling stories about communities different than mine and I realize that you kind of have to check your perspective at every step of the way so I hoped writing the book that I did that and I was at least mindful and I there's a great book by William Finnegan From The New Yorker? I think it's called Dino's book cold new world or yeah. It's a great book but and again another White New Yorker writer WHO's writing about dot com low income communities of color mostly and he what I love about that book is he interrogates his own perspective at every step of the way within the book and I thought that I had to like interrogate myself and my own perspectives in the same way and I hope nope eventually that that did it in a way that was respectful to the stories what I think one of the most beautiful aspects of this book I think is is not just in a literary sense but kind of in a repertory oriole fence was that you don't just kind of present this as an isolated systemic problem you frame it within this tapestry of institutional failures across the city where does the criminal justice the system and and the things that it did to black resident of Cleveland fit into that wider picture of institutions in Cleveland well I mean I think that we incorrectly look at wrongful. Conviction stories all probably know about you've probably seen keenum on T._v. and like the six o'clock news or C._N._N.. or it's like such and such has gotten out of jail after X. number of years and people say oh what's the first meal you're gonna eat or what you know what's changed the most in the five seconds that you've been free these really shallow way that we approach wrongful conviction and it goes even beyond that I think that most of the narratives we reach for when we talk about wrongful conviction we tend to focus very specifically on individual cases. We say this person because of have you know a pile of bad luck or circumstance was sent away for something they didn't do but we don't look at them systemically and we really don't consider them in the broader kind of in a wonky way of philosophical asaf away as a wrongful conviction representing really the the most biggest perversion of our values as a country for a country that supposedly ruled by law so I really felt that I wanted to expand it. I knew that this story Tori I knew that there are many ways to look at this beyond this and it got very very specific. I mean in terms of like the city of Cleveland but this one for a lot of American cities you're talking about a time in the early nineteen seventies when the federal government in reaction to the riots in the civil disobedience of the sixties around the civil rights movement. The Federal Government has dumping millions of dollars in federal grants on local police departments that just basically escalating you know what we now call the war on crime and that was all fed by the the federal government and in particular in Cleveland after I talked about the Glenville shootout I mean now they're sitting on a pile of federal money that they can use and of course that really rolls right into the drug war really rolls into what we now call at the age of incarceration which these are still the things that we're trying to untangle today. There are three main characters this book obviously <hes> as a writer I just kept thinking how challenging would have been to sit down and be like three main characters who all went through the exact same thing. What how did you figure out how to balance them as characters without being repetitive while still giving all of them there do? How did you kind of go through that now? That's a great. That's a great great question yeah so I decided that especially early on I would give each guy his own chapter so the first chapter after the prologue is very much sunk into kwami genre or slash Wiley Bridgeman at the time his perspective perspective a later chapter gives you Ricky Jackson's perspective later chapter gives you Wiley Bridgeman perspective and I really tried to sink each chapter into a particular perspective of someone who I was talking about. It didn't like obviously when you conceptualize stuff in the head you think at all you'll pull it off seamlessly and it wasn't so don't think every chapter has specific perspective because sometimes they get mixed up but you know I knew that there was a chapter yeah I wanted to do about at Vernon and from Ed Vernon's perspective I knew like I hate writing in the first person but I knew that I had to write my own way in the story and so I knew that there would be chapters or two from my perspective so I just tried to find that kind of anchor point for every chapter and hope that it kind of lead things along but like I mentioned the football analogy that kind of guiding thing in my head is that everybody in a way move the story forward narrative LII A and it was just who is who was I gonna WHO's GonNa be my person in each chapter to move it forward. This is a book about wrongful conviction though right on the front <hes> so as soon as you open the book. You know what's going to happen at the end. How how did you maintain the narrative dramatic tension? What was your kind of method going into that your mindset going into that knowing that as soon as you cracked a book open and you know what's going to happen at the end? How did you write it to keep the reader going? Why just knew that there were so many dramatic of you know if if the central narrative guys didn't do it guys get out of jail if that was essential narrative love I knew that there were so many like byways that I could go off they were super interesting historically and from from a real big picture perspective for an example do one chapter about Ed Vernon? Who is the witness in this case the guy who testified and all the trials and sent these guys these innocent men to jail so in the chapter about him? I talk about how after he had done this as you got older you know he became a really bad crack cocaine addict and lived on the streets Cleveland..

Cleveland Ed Vernon Federal Government rick Jackson Ohio Innocence Project Rickey Jackson Cleveland Police writer White New Yorker Michael Cohen Black Panthers William Finnegan prosecutor crack cocaine Wiley Bridgeman officer Dino Ricky Jackson Ronnie