18 Burst results for "Julin"

"julin" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"julin" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Secretary hulan castro. Thank you very much for coming on the podcast with you before we get to the topic that we are here to talk about what i wanted to talk about. You want to talk about. And that is the latino vote in twenty twenty. We gotta talk about the biden transition and what you're in for. Do you wanna go back into a presidential administration. But that's his decision. Of course it's his decision. Yeah but. I've said that i'm open to that. I haven't taken anything off the table. Have anything on the table. I haven't had any conversations with the transition team with with the president-elect about that. But the thing that i do know and i can tell already from the names that have been put out there for different positions. Is that the team. He's assembling spectacular one. And it's going to be so much more competent effective than what we've seen over the last four years it goes without saying you know for years ago. Donald trump promised everybody that he would surround himself with the best people and then couldn't be that could have been further from the truth. Joe biden is actually surrounding himself with some of this people out there. Whether it's the folks were up for treasury or a g or any number physicians. And so whether i'm part of that or not what. I have confidence in what matters most to people is that these are going to be very competent. Effective folks okay. I'm going to continue to put you on the spot. And in president obama's administration in the second term you were the secretary of housing and urban development. So let's just take that off the table. When i go back to to where you were before dream job dream scenario. Just forget that. Joe biden kamla. Harris are gonna be the next president vice president of the united states. What would be the dream job. In a presidential administration. I was running for president. Of course they make good people. I would do hampshire saw otherwise and rightly so in twenty. But yeah i mean. I'm going to leave all of those conversations to the transition team. That's uniquely decision. And so i feel like i'm going to continue to use my voice in any way that i can on the issues and the vision that i pressed forward in the presidential campaign. A lot of that vision is shared. I think with adults <unk>. Biden and vice president-elect terrorists but was find a way to serve anyway. I can't even if it's only in according break candidates for office up down the ballot which i was happy to do in twenty twenty so transportation there <hes>. Yeah there any of those roles for people that are interested in public service or great role all right and then i was only pressing on labor and transportation. And you didn't give me a chance to keep going down the list. Because i mean let's not forget. Therefore you ran for president. Before secretary of housing and urban development. You were a mayor. Yeah yeah you were the mayor of san antonio. So it's not. It's not out of the realm of the possible that those two agencies would be something of interest may be an ambassadorship. The world food program in rome. I mean there are lots of things but we'll just leave that alone. We'll leave it alone. I feel like that. This is an exciting time for a lot of people that want to surge. And we'll see what happens. I love pressing. You folks who are you know on the precipice of possibly joining the cabinet tried to watch you squirm but let's talk about something that you actually can talk about and want to talk about. And that is the latino. Vote in the twenty twenty election as i said before. I am fascinated by what happened. Talked to me from your perspective about what happened in the twenty twenty election. These the latino vote. Well overall the a latino vote was still a very important and impactful part of the democrat coalition and you could see that most notably in wins in arizona nevada. You did a community like georgia. You know where. There's been a growing latino community over the last decade or so so overall. Very positive the turnout. Rate among latinos was higher than it was in two thousand sixteen like it was for all other hurricanes so that was very positive. Obviously you also had some of these areas of the country where democrats did performed as well as i would have wanted them to or anybody would have wanted to. That was ruining for joe biden and democrats. I think of miami dade county for instance in florida. Yeah so let's go through each area so in miami dade county in florida. What were the dynamics. There that made the turn out on behalf of joe biden. Not what democrats hoped. it would be. Well you probably heard this term monolithic right more in the last two or three weeks two weeks since the election having last year

joe biden president hulan castro secretary vice president Donald trump united states jonathan kaye hulu president-elect obama Harris
Julin Castro, a 2020 presidential contender, on why Joe Biden beat him  and Trump

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Julin Castro, a 2020 presidential contender, on why Joe Biden beat him and Trump

"Secretary hulan castro. Thank you very much for coming on the podcast with you before we get to the topic that we are here to talk about what i wanted to talk about. You want to talk about. And that is the latino vote in twenty twenty. We gotta talk about the biden transition and what you're in for. Do you wanna go back into a presidential administration. But that's his decision. Of course it's his decision. Yeah but. I've said that i'm open to that. I haven't taken anything off the table. Have anything on the table. I haven't had any conversations with the transition team with with the president-elect about that. But the thing that i do know and i can tell already from the names that have been put out there for different positions. Is that the team. He's assembling spectacular one. And it's going to be so much more competent effective than what we've seen over the last four years it goes without saying you know for years ago. Donald trump promised everybody that he would surround himself with the best people and then couldn't be that could have been further from the truth. Joe biden is actually surrounding himself with some of this people out there. Whether it's the folks were up for treasury or a g or any number physicians. And so whether i'm part of that or not what. I have confidence in what matters most to people is that these are going to be very competent. Effective folks okay. I'm going to continue to put you on the spot. And in president obama's administration in the second term you were the secretary of housing and urban development. So let's just take that off the table. When i go back to to where you were before dream job dream scenario. Just forget that. Joe biden kamla. Harris are gonna be the next president vice president of the united states. What would be the dream job. In a presidential administration. I was running for president. Of course they make good people. I would do hampshire saw otherwise and rightly so in twenty. But yeah i mean. I'm going to leave all of those conversations to the transition team. That's uniquely decision. And so i feel like i'm going to continue to use my voice in any way that i can on the issues and the vision that i pressed forward in the presidential campaign. A lot of that vision is shared. I think with adults Biden and vice president-elect terrorists but was find a way to serve anyway. I can't even if it's only in according break candidates for office up down the ballot which i was happy to do in twenty twenty so transportation there Yeah there any of those roles for people that are interested in public service or great role all right and then i was only pressing on labor and transportation. And you didn't give me a chance to keep going down the list. Because i mean let's not forget. Therefore you ran for president. Before secretary of housing and urban development. You were a mayor. Yeah yeah you were the mayor of san antonio. So it's not. It's not out of the realm of the possible that those two agencies would be something of interest may be an ambassadorship. The world food program in rome. I mean there are lots of things but we'll just leave that alone. We'll leave it alone. I feel like that. This is an exciting time for a lot of people that want to surge. And we'll see what happens. I love pressing. You folks who are you know on the precipice of possibly joining the cabinet tried to watch you squirm but let's talk about something that you actually can talk about and want to talk about. And that is the latino. Vote in the twenty twenty election as i said before. I am fascinated by what happened. Talked to me from your perspective about what happened in the twenty twenty election. These the latino vote. Well overall the a latino vote was still a very important and impactful part of the democrat coalition and you could see that most notably in wins in arizona nevada. You did a community like georgia. You know where. There's been a growing latino community over the last decade or so so overall. Very positive the turnout. Rate among latinos was higher than it was in two thousand sixteen like it was for all other hurricanes so that was very positive. Obviously you also had some of these areas of the country where democrats did performed as well as i would have wanted them to or anybody would have wanted to. That was ruining for joe biden and democrats. I think of miami dade county for instance in florida. Yeah so let's go through each area so in miami dade county in florida. What were the dynamics. There that made the turn out on behalf of joe biden. Not what democrats hoped. it would be. Well you probably heard this term monolithic right more in the last two or three weeks two weeks since the election having last year

Hulan Castro Joe Biden Kamla Joe Biden Biden Donald Trump World Food Program Treasury Harris Hampshire Barack Obama Democrat Coalition United States San Antonio Rome Cabinet Dade County Nevada Arizona
"julin" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"julin" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Today. Rubio is such a big You would do that Your buddy just drenched. You know, I always want by those six guys. Those things that would be the time to do it. You have to say the first. Goodbye. That's a love loser 100 million times. Had to get it from to know. Just say my name like I have been decisive, but I hope I'm not the only one. You know? Home, Julin, you said so I know that was the I wonder when you go with play that too. Home. Good. Now don't you go one good break Fresh shows. I want 35 kiss FM Chicago's number one hit Music.

Rubio Julin Chicago
"julin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"julin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi. I'm Ken White. Many of us have been staying at home for more than six months. Now. For some of us, that means it's impossible to get things done. But for others, the drive to work work work is stronger than ever. A recent survey found that Americans are working on average three hours longer than they used to. When is the drive to do more too much? And when we're constantly moving forward what gets left behind as ever, we want to hear from you. Email us at one A. W A. M dot org's comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm shave Stevens. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden arrived in Kenosha, Wisconsin, Thursday after the police shooting that left a black man paralyzed. Biden's visit to the city was a sharp contrast to President Trump's trip. They're just two days earlier. NPR's Julin McCarthy reports from Kenosha. Joe Biden met and prayed with the family of Jacob Blake. President Trump did not see them. Blake's shooting had ignited fiery unrest to protesters were killed. Biden said. Violence in any form is wrong and pressed the message that the president has been fanning it. He said Trump continues to try to divide the country give sucker to the white supremacist. Talks about how there's really good people on both sides talks about talks in ways that are just absolutely I have never uses going to president for not only incorrect immoral, Biden said The answer was to vote he promised. If elected, there will be a national commission on policing out of the White House. Julie McCarthy. NPR NEWS, Kenosha White House officials say they expect Congress will approve a stopgap measure to avert a government shutdown. Current spending bills expire at the end of the month, a Corona virus vaccine maybe closer to reality, but health experts doubt it will be ready to distribute before election Day. NPR's Sidney Lumpkin reports, the government has been spending billions of dollars to speed up that effort. The effort is called Operation Warp Speed, and its chief scientific adviser, is Monster of slouchy. He spoke to NPR about the likelihood of a vaccine being available next month. It's extremely unlikely but not impossible, and therefore it's the right thing to do to be prepared in case The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has.

Joe Biden President Trump NPR Kenosha Jacob Blake Ken White Kenosha White House president White House Julin McCarthy Julie McCarthy Disease Control and Prevention Facebook Sidney Lumpkin Wisconsin Stevens Washington A. W A. M
"julin" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"julin" Discussed on The Takeaway

"If you're returning from a hotspot state, we are advising strongly that you self quarantine and get tested and probably get tested twice, but self quarantine. Stay away from folks, and that's a particular area of testing that I want to underscore. Governor of new. York Andrew Cuomo has in taken a further step in terms of self quarantining by asking anyone who comes in from one of these hotspots states to fill out a form in addition to self quarantining. Are you considering taking a similar step because I know that? New York Connecticut and New Jersey. governors have all evolved sort tried managing covid nineteen together in in varying ways, because of how the virus was spreading. So are you considering something similar to what Governor Cuomo issued this week? Your first general matter within an extraordinary relationship with our neighbors particularly Governor Cuomo. Governor Lamont Governor Wolf in Pennsylvania Governor. Carney and Delaware Y-. We needed. We realized right from the get-go. Decisions both specific to inside the four walls of our respective states in as much coordination with the federal government as possible, but also with our neighbors, and this is a good example of that, so New York Connecticut New Jersey, have thematically said. If you're coming in from a hotspot state, you got a self quarantine. Each one of the state's executes that slightly differently partly, due frankly depending on our constitution and what we're able to do, right now where ramping up, aggressively the plea. Plea for personal responsibility public, a public campaign that reminds folks developing some technology we want to appeal as with head from the beginning of this virus will appealed to personal responsibility with overwhelming success i. stay home essential workers only now where face covering social distancing this is another ask on our our list of collective responsibility, and so far we. We like what we see, but we WANNA make sure we have tightened this up as much as possible it will continue to. As, we learn more about the corona virus governor. We know that certain communities and certain populations are more likely to be affected those with co Morbidity as people who are older and particularly, when it's broken down by race, black and Latino populations are particularly overrepresented in corona virus cases as well as deaths. Has Your Administration or does your administration plan to take any steps to support black and Latino communities as they? Deal with the challenge of this disproportionate impact. Very, much so Of, said this many times that had so true. COVID nineteen didn't create the inequities in our state or in our country, but it has laid them bear and let let us dot whether it's through the Lens of George Floyd's murder in the stain of racism. In that respect, or whether it's through the very rightful points, you just made the amount of cases and fatalities in black and brown communities Let us not continue to have to see the same movie over and over again in new. Jersey is no exception. We're not as stark as some other states, but we're pretty stark in terms of the fatalities. I'll give you another. Healthcare Lens this child inflammatory. Syndrome the good news is we only have fifty something cases I'm GonNa tell you the fifty something cases something like forty something are black or brown kids, and so doing what we need to do. At long last, and by the way as a nation, please God complete access to health. Are you universal access to health care.

Governor Cuomo Governor Lamont Governor Wolf New York Connecticut New Jersey federal government York George Floyd Carney Delaware Pennsylvania Connecticut New Jersey. murder
"julin" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"julin" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I mean this is hard to speculate. But if there had been a black woman behind the Lens Photographing Viola Davis. -Absolutely I think so. I think it definitely makes a difference ojos behind the ends. Because you know, you're bringing your own history, your own background, your own understanding of of another person, and that's not to say that you know if you're not black. You can't do that with other black people, but we just don't see it enough. We don't see enough. Well we we don't get enough. Chances to see different kinds of people behind the lens who can create these images that you know, live on in media forever and that like really do make a difference and they can. Even the images that people create can either perpetuate harm, or they can do something entirely different and open people's eyes to a different way of seeing and so I definitely think it makes a big difference. Difference who's behind the Lens. Who's telling the story and how they're doing that and we've talked? I, think that's a huge point and Brent. We talked a little bit about this earlier. Just in terms of the team. That's necessary. It goes beyond the photographer. There's an entire team of people who are deciding what images are used, and here we're. We're talking about magazines, but you work for my former employer the. The New York Times. and there is an entire team of people there or there are many photographers there, and they're making decisions or the photo. Editors are making decisions about what gets placed in one of the biggest and most widely read newspapers in digital and online sites in the World Brent tell us about that when it comes to image selection particularly now when we're at a moment, such a. A fever pitch in this country for racial justice for social justice and a lot of the images that are coming our images of protesters, images of very difficult images, and in some instances. How is the the edit the photo editing process taking place? Are you sending out black photographers? Does it matter and what happens when those photos finally get into your hands, and then become, and then decisions start to get made. thank you question Oh. It's it it's entire. It isn't very interesting. processes in today so when it comes to many of the when it comes to the reprocess, we'll start there. I didn't do directly with them. the summer around him on the basis desk but what it really comes down to. We did the near Thomson Publications..

Brent Viola Davis. Thomson Publications The New York Times.
"julin" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"julin" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Regulations kill jobs against These are the what they know is that regulation may impact a job in one industry, but not an but creek. Creek, but can allow for the creation of jobs in another So for example we're often told or one of the things that often comes up. Is that you know regulations killed coal? That's not actually factually correct even people within the coal industry while point to natural gas is the reason to why coal jobs are declining in that same conversation we don't look at. At wind and we don't look at renewables, which jobs are increasing rates. Even as we're losing jobs in one sector, we're gaining jobs in another sector, and so do you have zoom out at that full picture, but overall? You know there's a ton of literature on this and regulations. Don't kill jobs Kendra. Let's talk about Biden's new plan. I mean to be clear president. President trump is sitting in office right now, and he's making changes to the law actual changes to the law. Whereas Biden is rolling out a plan that I'm sure he hopes, will entice his base if you will vote for for him and for the plan, but what does Biden's plan actually say? Yes, so I think you're right that like you know. President trump is in office and vitamin. A candidate so I. Think it's really to compare. Bite the candidate. Trump the candidate. I'm pre. His presidency and trump ran pretty strongly on pot for of deregulation. And Biden is actually saying there are a lot of problems in the united. States, you know we have an infrastructure problem in the United States I. Think the American Society. Of. Civil engineers gave the United States Infrastructure D-, plus in two thousand seventeen know our bridges are falling. Our electrical grid is collapsing and what he's saying is we have a lot of physical structural problems, and we can rebuild this country and making rebuild this country in a way that provides for clean energy that provides for clean water, and that helps us mitigate climate change, and so it's a it's a lot of building and investments in building investments in new technology that that he thinks will create jobs. Does Biden's plan. As it stands right now, go far enough in terms of working to curb greenhouse, gas emissions, and working to actually create a sustainable term change, or or is this sort of a more centrist plan that might appease both companies and environmental activists. So I think overall. His plan goes a lot further than sort of were. He was a year ago or so when he first sort of launched his campaign. We won't really know. He's actually sped up some of the timeline, so it's it goes a lot further a lot of whether or not it will go. It goes further. Enough -servative resides on what it looks like when it's actually implemented, but does it have kind of the bones to get that fire possibly, but a lot depends on implementation. Are there any provision in Biden's plan? Because one of the things that we talk about a lot is environmental racism and we've seen that I think some of the clearest examples of that that most of our listeners would know would be tainted water in Flint Michigan for example in Newark New Jersey. Just the the basic plumbing and piping that needs to get water to communities. Communities of Color in this case, largely black and Brown communities has been tainted for decades and and we see this happening in a lot of low income, communities and communities of color. Does Biden's plan actually do anything to address those issues specifically. Yes, it explicitly calls for the replacement of lead service pipes, and the upgrade of treatment plans, and it specifically call it doesn't..

Biden trump president United States Creek Newark New Jersey Flint Michigan American Society
"julin" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"julin" Discussed on The Takeaway

"What does this tell us about the again? This monolith, the Latino community right people seem to, and I should be clear Goyo products aren't just used by Latinos I saw lots of folks who said you know who were not let you know saying I want to get rid of my Goya products, or how do I make my own Adobo, but I think this as as much of A. As much fun as people are having with this on social media I do think it points to something bigger here and I'm curious to know your thoughts on on the boycott itself, but really what it says about our community when it comes to our politics I think there were people who were very surprised that. that. There are Latinos. Who Are Republican? Who are supporters of the President? Well there are you know I mean I'm here? In Texas and so that something that we see every day, Texas Latinos tend to be. A tend to have more conservatives than you would find in California and New York Florida well. You know Florida. You've had the Cuban-american community, but even that has been changing recently. But. We don't have a community that is of just one mind that is monolithic You know it is basically democratic community and you know center laughed I think. But you do have a strong element. Still of people were conservative, and even some that still support trump, although I think that's a diminishing number of people in Twenty Twenty versus twenty sixteen. To me that the when Bob non were. Sad right next to the president in the rose. Garden at a campaign style event. that. We are truly blessed to have donald trump is a leader. because he's a builder. It felt like a betrayal. and. It felt like a betrayal. Because here's a man, a family then over the generations has made. A lot of money gotten rich off of the harder dollars of the Latino community, mostly who have been very loyal consumers, and the thing is, he should understand and CEO's out. There should understand that we live in a different time if corporations. Are GonNA. Go out there and pay millions of dollars. The high price lobbyists to try and affect policy. If folks like Bob Are GonNA contribute to campaign so that he has. And, if they're going to stand in the rose. Garden and And publicly praised a bigoted president that has harmed Latinos in this country. People. Are GonNA. Pay Attention. Consumers are not going to give you a pass anymore because they want to know what your values are. Just like your advertising. Your advertising tries to make people feel a certain way. While your political words and contributions and actions, also people feel a certain way. And, so free speech works both ways. He can stand up there and say what everyone's. He can support whatever candidate he wants. That's the country we live in, but you know I and so many other people can either choose. His products or somebody else's products. Because that's the country.

President Twenty Twenty Bob donald trump Texas Goyo Florida New York Florida CEO California
"julin" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"julin" Discussed on 710 WOR

"This is Lynn Berman and Michael Riedel. In the morning, 7 10 Wooo are just a couple minutes. We're gonna be joined by ABC news correspondent Aaron Carter Ski He's following the arrest of Julin. Elaine, I'm not quite sure how you pronounce the name Maxwell. She was the woman who procured The underage women for Jeffrey Epstein. She was arrested over the weekend up in New Hampshire. She's expected to be arraigned here in New York City today and then well, we'll see if she, you know, commit suicide in the cell or is rubbed out by, you know Hillary Clinton or something like that. Whatever happened to Jeffrey Epstein? But first though, I want to say I love all you guys, I mean, Joe, You're terrific, Blaine. I mean, you are what you are, but I like you. Um but you guys you have no, you have no feel for the arts. You have no feel for beautiful music. We were talking about the great Italian composer Ennio Merrick Oni, who wrote Some beautiful theme song, some unforgettable theme songs to all those spaghetti westerns that Clint Eastwood started and we played some of the songs that you're all ignorant from. Well, they were forgettable to you, Michael. Well, I couldn't remember one of them. It was pretty, but I could remember is from just one, though. But now I want to play. This may be his most famous theme. And Joe, I'm curious. I want to know if you even you Are moved by this beautiful feet from cinema Paradiso. What do you think That reminds me of being in a spot that we can go to in New York City now massage there? I don't think they play that kind of theme music at the sum of those parts that you might I don't know if you know when you have to walk up those creaky old stairs to go sleazy restaurant. They're playing any Americo de there. But okay, is it anyway, It's a beautiful theme song. All right, Aaron Carter Ski ABC News. Get us out of where we're headed here and help us please idea. He do the good, The bad and the ugly to absolutely He did very good. Somebody with some culture on the program Finally, thank you, Erin. All right. The big question we have for you. How do how do you pronounce? Maxwell's first name is a Julin gaily. I've heard of pronounced ways to Sunday. Someone is cultured in the art should be familiar with the French. I would think. Yes. Well, the S is silent. Yeah. Dylan Maxwell is now charged with six counts federal indictment. We expect that she's going to be in court on Friday because prosecutors and defense attorneys agreed. That should be the day for her arraignment in New York and then a bail hearing. The defense, of course, wants her released on bail. Prosecutors say that her access to money her multiple passports and the possibility of a 35 year prison sentence gives her plenty of incentive to flee. Hey, Erin. I want to ask you how come she's been? Why didn't they arrest her around the time they arrested Jeffrey Epstein why she'd been allowed to zip around the world all this time. You know, it's a good question, and many of the victims questioned it at the time and said, you know, well, okay Epstein, but also her and it just took prosecutors a bit. It appears to build a proper case, and they've been looking at her for for the better part of a year since Epstein's arrest, But on Lee decided to move on her late last week when the indictment was returned by a grand jury. And they found her living in New Hampshire. A TTE this kind of a state nickname tucked away, you know, in the woods of New Hampshire, 156 acre property. The Bill Sweeney of the FBI called it a gorgeous home that allowed her to live a life of privilege. 25 years after inflicting trauma on victims. What's their defense going to be? Do we have any sense of that? I think you know the defense is going to be twofold. One. It will undoubtedly try to discredit the women and the recollections of of people who were you know, as young as 14 and who, you know. You may not remember things quite the way she did. She may try to pin it on Jeffrey Epstein and say that she, too, was abused by Jeffrey Epstein and therefore that excuses some of her allegedly criminal behavior here, so I think you'll see both of those strategies put into place first and foremost, so they'll try to get her released on bail. They don't want her sitting at MCC Manhattan, the same jail where you know why. But, Aaron now she must know a lot of stuff. I mean, are you hearing from your reporting that she could, you know, give names up. I mean, Prince Andrew could be in jeopardy. Alan Virtue, It's even Bill Clinton is around this whole thing. I think if anybody knows anything about the inner workings of Jeffrey Epstein's world and who inhabited it, it would be on Maxwell. But we've always been told that Maxwell was the target. I mean, they're not really If Prince Andrew speaks, it's going to be Dylan Maxwell, who should be You know, in trouble that they have who they want. Now, there may be other women that were part of what victims have called Epstein's network of enablers that they'll go after. But in terms of the men who may have partaken and remember the ball, the bold faced names Clinton Trump Prince Andrew have all denied any knowledge of of Epstein's behavior and certainly any wrongdoing themselves. Karen, I watch this gripping documentary on Netflix. Filthy rich. The Jeffrey Epstein story and a lot of those women seem credible to me. But one of them said what this whole thing was. You know it was an extortion scam. That they had, you know, cameras set up on the on the Pedophile island and in his big house there in Manhattan and that he had all the stuff. That's how he was able to get away with what he did for so long hit all the stuff on all these powerful people. Is that also prosecutors found it when they searched the on East 71st Street, the mansion where you can still see the J D that had been etched into the side door. They found this. You know all these all these camera equipment. And prosecutors talked about that in the indictment. They said that part of what Dylan Maxwell did was made women feel indebted to Jeffrey Epstein..

Jeffrey Epstein Dylan Maxwell Aaron Carter New Hampshire New York City Julin Michael Riedel Hillary Clinton Prince Andrew Joe Erin ABC news Manhattan Elaine Lynn Berman Ennio Merrick Oni Clint Eastwood Bill Clinton extortion Pedophile island
"julin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"julin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At the coast. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin in Washington, D C and I'm David Greene in Los Angeles and just a warning to listeners. You might find some of the details in this next story. Disturbing. It is the story of Army specialist Vanessa again. Who was last seen in April at Fort Hood, a military base in Texas. Since she disappeared, her family has been desperate for answers. They have spoken of how she was sexually harassed in the military. Long before she went missing. And this weekend remains found at a river close to the base were confirmed to be hers. Julin Armendariz has been reporting on this story for Texas public radio and joins us this morning. Hi, Julin. Hi, Good morning. Good morning. I wonder if you could just tell us a bit first about finesse again and what we know about the circumstances that led to her death, right? So what we know is that she had been missing for about 10 weeks. Her family wants to know what happened come out publicly that she had been sexually harassed in the weeks leading up to her disappearance. Earlier this week. There's a press conference that was happened in Fort Hood, and during that press conference, the U. S Army said there was no evidence that that happens. They said they interviewed more than 300 people, and there was no proof that sexual harassment had occurred. Her family obviously says That's not true. And when officials released the name of the suspect, Aaron David Robinson, The family came out and said that he was one of the people who Vanessa again. That had been sexually harassing her. The army says. That didn't happen. They say that The legend her to death with a hammer and one of the army rooms and then recruited another person, Tio help him destroy the body Nearby. That person confessed back in June on June 30th. And that's sort of how this whole story starts to snowball over the past week. I mean, we should say it's it's taken more than two months for her remains to be found to be identified. Do we know why it took so long? Yes, The Army says that they've been interviewing Aaron David Robinson since the beginning. Apparently, they're saying that he and this other woman, Cecil E. Agra, Lar, who was his girlfriend, and then exchanged wife of another former forehead, soldier. And essentially, those people had lied about what happens. But really, it's the cell phone records that officials are saying did them in and created inconsistencies in their story. And eventually is definitely arugula are. They're saying that she confessed to everything on June 30th including telling them where Vanessa Gideon's body Wass. Right after that is when Aaron David Robinson they're saying fled the based and eventually they say he killed himself. Before being taken in propensity..

Vanessa Gideon Aaron David Robinson U. S Army Fort Hood Julin Armendariz David Greene Texas NPR News Rachel Martin Los Angeles Washington harassment Tio Cecil E. Agra Lar
"julin" Discussed on RJ Politics

RJ Politics

11:30 min | 3 years ago

"julin" Discussed on RJ Politics

"But even even even on the debate stage gets you know caught up in in this immediate reflex to sail but of course we need a a big wall civil penalty isn't a penalty is belied by our entire legal system because there are so many things that are civil penalty but we would never say are optional to do because they're not criminally right so I mean it's just it is a it's it's a it's such a false assumption that is underlying so much of this conversation and in a weird way Donald Trump overplaying his hand and talking in terms that makes people think he's a cartoon villain I think shows exactly what we're talking about we need a moat with alligators and of course we don't right so I think you know talking points but I think that really when it comes down to the more people actually talking about this and understand what we're saying I actually don't think there's that much of a debate around this because the the F. separating families and their children is is is wildly unpopular peop- nobody wants to be doing that and so as long as is this law in place that allows people to do that and there's another mechanism to do it where we don't have that there's sort of a no brainer right so I think it's one of those conversations that it doesn't lend itself for a debate stage because there are too many people on stage and everybody gets thirty seconds it's a conversation that I mean I think this is one of my favorite things about this campaign back to this every day having supporting demonization for a minute I what we're seeing is the future of the way we're talking about immigration reform and what it took someone being willing to say I we don't have to have it this way and expanding everybody's sort of political and moral imagination and then suddenly we're talking about this completely different allies support and things like that how do you find that path of victory so I think I mean I think that obviously is the challenge but I think he is still out there he is making these debate stages he's doing what he's doing and we're seeing an awful lot of momentum we have continued to grow every quarter and so one of the hard things I think about about this is that there is there's the there's the element of it that is getting there quicker people tend to think it's like well how is it not happened yet you know started he wasn't coming from an existing office so we didn't have an existing campaign committee we didn't have a list we really built from scratch and so I see this I see a lot of opportunity and a lot of I have a lot of optimism looking at the field and seeing what we've been able to do with so little because of the way he ah the enthusiasm that is out there for for what he's doing because he's running as a social justice candidate right and because of that those are not issues that thanks for listening.

thirty seconds
"julin" Discussed on RJ Politics

RJ Politics

14:35 min | 3 years ago

"julin" Discussed on RJ Politics

"That he targeted people what Secretary Casper said is people who look like me and people love this is a different vision it doesn't it doesn't have to be this way and your kids don't have to just see a president talking about criminality and you're right other candidates who who who maybe don't have the same experience can't can't possibly reach absolutely I think you know Nevada has been he's been the candidate who was come here the most to bring together the coalition of people that you need to bring together to be successful in Nevada it's the same coalition of people that you need to be successful in the rest of the country and so we really do see this is sort of a you know it it it it it says something about electability the and about you know kind of a message resonating with the folks that it really needs resonate with and yeah I think the way he's he's received here is somebody who shares a common experience with a lot of the folks that are here and and you know easy going out of his way to make sure that these are the issues that get elevated to that presidential debate stage that they you know that they're important enough that they are valid that they are and that they are universal that that while there are things that he obviously has in common with a number of folks that live in the state those shoes are not sort of specific Jordan or unique to Nevada or to Texas right these are issues that people are dealing with across the country so in in terms of again with respect to the president he obviously resonated with a segment of America that was angry felt like that they didn't like the things that were going on in America and the didn't like the Republican candidates because they weren't standing up and fighting and they weren't they weren't aggressive enough against opponents and all of a sudden here comes donald trump he's strapper us he's he is he is a fighter he is breaks all the rules of the convention of the campaigning down all these more experienced better finance candidates and resonates with people to the to the extent that he he wins in the electoral call coach So what is out there what is that in how can someone like Secretary Castro talk to those voters because Asli you know politics is a game of addition subtraction you WanNa get the biggest coalition that you possibly can get and there are a lot of people who said the president sold the people in his own base ability goods hasn't done anything for them how do you break through that and and and and talk to those people when when you know they're conditioned otherwise support somebody who is speaking the message to Donald Trump speaking yeah I mean I think I think that's tough I think there's I think there are a couple of pieces of Donald trump's supporters that that can be kind of looked at very very differently I think what you described is that there are people who were frustrated with the system and a liked the idea of somebody who came in and broke all the rules I think that that that is just an expression of a lot of people who felt left out by our politics they do not the people are are working for them are fighting for them and so donald trump came in and broke the rules but I think you're right I I also say he came in and he also broke a lot of promises to that right I think they're going to be a lot of people who were sort of swayed by this you know what what we're doing so far hasn't worked for me maybe we try something completely different those people are hurting right now and I think that they are ready for a very very different message I think the unfortunate sad reality is that Donald Trump also tapped into secretary hassle you know he calls it racial priming right what what Donald Trump did was to tap into some deep seated racial resentment and racism in some people and Stoke that and and ride that to support I think that there are people who voted for Donald Trump because they dismissed his racist rhetoric and I think that there are some people who voted for him because that actually appealed to them I don't know that the I don't I don't I don't know that there is a way that a candidate like Secretary Castro reaches those people but I think that there is a significant portion of Donald Trump's support that were frustrated with politics as they were have been lied to by the president and our and our waiting for something different I genuinely believe there are a lot of people who voted for donald trump who are better than donald trump and I don't think that he will win their support again so so with respect to that second group the the the the people who responded to his racial rhetoric you say there's no way for a candidate like secretary has to reach that particular group Are they is there a segment of America that I guess just has to be left behind in that case President Obama was famous by saying you know we're not gonNA leave anybody behind but there are certain people who do not want to come along and I is that you know is is that because that resentment I think exists in that group and and I it will always be spoken to by a candidate is able to master whatever messages Donald Trump has been able to master does act good luck behind I don't think it's I don't I don't know that it's as simple as sort of leaving behind I think that Secretary Castro has one of the things I Meyer about him so much as his along with someone who you know who who sort of has the grace to leave the door open but this is maybe not a group of people that we I mean the chase in people who for whom those messages resonate is is not gonNa work for the future of this country it's not gonNA work for a candidate color I think leaving the door open and saying hey if you're ready to come along where here is a very different message than actually trying to go to them and actively bring them along because I think in order to do that we have to take that back we have to say we are going to we're going to concede the idea that that your economic insperity has to come at the expense of somebody else's we are going to concede the idea that in order for America to be what it needs to be your racial identity needs to be you know sort of protected in some way from someone else's racial identity I don't think there's a way to if that's if those are sentiments of people only h- how Ho- hold I don't know that you can go back and pull them along without hurting a lot of other people in the process but you can leave the door open and say you're wrong and when ready to see that we're GONNA be over here and by the way we're making policy that's going to help you as well and he's not I mean I think that's one of the really tough things about this is that one of one of the the worst things about the president's racist rhetoric is it has been effective by virtue of it's it's sort of a magic trick he's he's saying it and he's and he's telling people something but he's not actually showing it in anything right that it is not the the the folks that he is able to appeal to some of that rhetoric are not helped by any of the policies that he's putting in place and would be helped by the same policies that allow live the you know a lot of these marginalized communities would also be helped by so if we can get past this I you know this sort of idea that you know there are just there's there's something there's something essential about these communities that we have to acknowledge I think I think we actually see that policy-wise there are a lot of people who are hurting the exact same way and we can help a lot more people by doing it in a way that actually helps a lot more people oh great so I wanted to talk about just because we're we're days away from another debate and I have seen some some stories where you're quoted US talking about how how important these debates car for a candidate like the secretary who doesn't have sort of the name recognition doesn't have the sort of traditional financial backing of a lot of the Democratic so to speak you how are you guys planning for it I think he's had some strong moments in the past where he's he's come out like the change that sticks out to me as he shared with Congressman Aurora over the criminalization of migration and how that needs to be where we're going I think he's the only I think he's still the only candidate really you know go that far on on talking border policy so how are you guys preparing for it and how boredom is this for your camping forward so yeah I mean I definitely it's it the debates are such a good opportunity to get him in front of so many people to sheriff's message and and in a moment where it still a so crowded and therefore it said difficult to kind of break through those those debates are are hugely important and I think honestly were preparing in the same way that we have before I mean the tough part is travel so much it's always hard to cobble together actual preparation time but You know the the the goal is to give voters a chance to actually what his vision is and to find those areas where you know I mean this is we have an incredible field right now but they're genuinely are some differences right there are fault lines and so to be able to show where their policy differences and be able to showcase that while people are sort of paying attention I think that has been sort of a goal from the start and we'll be the goal next because well and just people to get a chance to meet him I mean I think I think kind of what we were talking about earlier there sort of pieces of his personality it feels like people still don't I don't know as much and so people getting a chance to just see him to see how he talks about these issues to see how he in a moment genuinely responds you know y you know kind of with those those same core values I think are some of the best ways for people to know what their core values actually are you know you don't he doesn't he I think one of the things that that you see is that he doesn't he doesn't sort of immediately fall back to talking points about the way he talks about ex wires he really you know kind of engaged there's an with a question in a in a way that's unique and I I'm really I'm always really excited for people to see that because I think you actually do get a chance to see how he thinks when he answers questions in terms of in terms of the border I think a lot of the default even among Democrat politicians is to say oh I we have to secure the border you know we have to secure the border and then we'll deal with the issues that come after that in in terms of that it is that to coin a phrase is that a wall that that can't be overcome I mean is anyone who's who says we have to deal with people more compassionately we have to deal with people George W Bush wanted to have a guest worker program and was pilloried for it I mean it was stoking any of this kind of presented to deal with it on purely pragmatic policy level which I think is Secretary Castro's goal when he talks about that all in maybe a moat with snakes navigators which apparently on the table now because that's where that's gun turrets I think also look I honestly in a weird way I think that that president trump's rhetoric around things like that helps to reveal how ridiculous a lot it's conversation is because the fact of the matter is the borders more secure than it has been and Donald Trump started all of this by telling people if were cruel enough to separate children if we're Jacobean enough to put in the you know it's The it's the metering it's remained in Mexico is if we do all of this stuff we're going to stop immigration not only is that just morally wrong it is factually wrong it hasn't stopped right but I mean the border is secure this idea that it's like you know in order to talk about compassion we have to first beach or coney and then that's not how compassionate works it's humanity works you don't have to earn it that's the whole point and so that's what secretary has been talking about is that we can choose passion over cruelty and we can do it without compromising the concept of a border there will still be in existence if we're not criminals people the the idea that a.

Secretary Casper president Nevada
"julin" Discussed on RJ Politics

RJ Politics

13:05 min | 3 years ago

"julin" Discussed on RJ Politics

"This one I feel like we'll come back to haunt me because he's actually really funny from the Las Vegas Review Journal this is RJ politics. I thrilled to be back in Nevada governor for all the data Weekly political podcast I'm politics reporter Rory Appleton and I'm Steve Civilians Politics and government editor for the Review Journal we have a special episode for a year we have who in Castro's campaign manager with US my rupert is here hi hi thanks so much for having me absolutely and so if we just start out real quick just tell us a little bit about yourself sure yeah so my background is actually interesting. This is my first electoral campaign I'd not actually My background is not an electoral politics it's in social justice movements and sort of activism so I worked in LGBT reproductive justice racial justice economic justice that's kind of UH substance wise my background but I met Secretary Castro when I worked for a while he was the secretary of Hud under Obama and we helped a really good relationship I loved his approach to politics which was the first time I really saw a path you know sort of politician who approached their work the same way that the social justice activists I know approach there's which really is just about sort of bringing folks in from the margins and based on that I felt like you know this is something I could follow no matter what he does next so this is so here I am what does that been like for you to jump into a like an national multimillion dollar twenty four hour new cycle campaign a lot you know it's it's been great there are pieces of it that feel very similar very familiar to working of and movement work like I said the way he has wanted to run this campaign he has been so adamant about talking about issues that a lot of people haven't and so it feels very familiar substantively but there are definitely some differences I mean it's just on scale and and the things that people sort of pay attention to in politics versus sort of worker it's it's fascinating so yeah I go back and forth between being between feeling sort of very familiar and comfortable and feeling like you know these are words I have never heard before why did so yeah it's been a learning experience but it's been a lot of fun for for your first electoral campaign on national presidential campaign what surprised you the most when you when you went to work for the secretary you know I I think like I said I think it's that it's it's have these moments where you know he's talking about an issue nobody has talked about before you know like your he came One of his trips to Las Vegas he got a chance to visit the storm drains where a lot of folks that are experiencing homelessness are make their their homes and it was the first time in Canada had done that and there was a lot of talk about the this is bringing an issue up at a level that you know we had just not dreamed and people really excited but then the news cycle can get taken over ver- by a tweet or just kind of sort of off hand comments or Horse Race Analysis and so I think it's the juxtaposition of these moments where eight so you know these these intense moments of leadership where I see this person that I admire so much and and is exactly the reason I want to work in politics and somebody I want to vote for acting so being able to show people who he would be as a president but then the those are are are stacked right next to some of the most you know sort of the silliest most like gamified pieces of politics and that those things happen just stand next to each other and that's really kind of the whole thing because you know candidates campaigns they're packaged you know like someone's rolling out a product or or something and and the public always wonders I think the the person they see on TV the person that's in the debate the person's giving that speech at the rally they attend who what's that person really like the behind the scene so that's why when there's that when when there's these moments are captured hot mic moments are or moments of candor that people's you know they really interested in those because they think oh wow now we're stealing the real purse right right so so so how tell us you know you view obviously you're running this campaign you know Secretary Castro in ways that you know the most the members of the public never will what do you know about him that you most would want to convey to voters to the general public you mean just about sort of like personality stuff that I don't know what he's really like behind the scenes kind of person that they might find relevant when they're deciding who they want to be president sure I would say I'm laughing because this one come back to haunt me because he's actually really funny a lot of that hilarious sometimes directed at me team so I don't like to tell him that absolutely it's funny to do not encourage but no he's he really is he he has a great sense of humor and he will tease a lot and he's he's a lot of fun I think the thing that that people may be don't see our people wouldn't necessarily know that I think really I hope would influence that there's a there's just a fundamental this with him I think that that that gets communicated through the policies that rolls out in the issues that he prioritizes that he really you know W- what people have Ettelaat is that you know he is he is talking about the issues that other people aren't talking about the way he's described it as he's he wants to expand our sort of what we think of our moral circle like who sort of bring in to that but I think what what I find most captivating about that is that that is that is that's a reflection of who he is he's he's a fundamentally very kind person it was one of the things that struck me most about him as I kind of got to know him like he's just behind stores that's just it's it's one of the just sort of animating features of who he is and I I'm so drawn to that in people and in leaders because I mean I think look what we're seeing I think in this political moment is that there is nobody who gets tested more than the President Right and so you think gravitate toward our those kind of just fundamental pieces of who someone is at their core having kindness as the sort of you know that that kind of animating teacher of of how he decides to do the work that he does is very comforting is there something that the public we in the media anyway there's the everybody gets wrong about him that you've seen you he's written about all the time is on TV there's little snippets of what he said is appear in there is there something that you think people get wrong about him or do you feel pretty confident with you know how he's being portrayed publicly as being a good representation of himself you know one thing that that he gets a lot I always think is interesting is that people think he sort of to sort of to squeaky clean it makes people think he's too polished and and you know one of these has talked about that is that you know look when you when you serve grow up the way that I did in the neighborhood that I grew up in you didn't assume you were going to get a second chance so I knew I had to make the most out of the one I have and I think I think that is something I think a lot that actually resonates with a lot of people doesn't sorta get put that way a lot it's that there's the sense that he didn't expect to be able to get to fail up and so he doesn't have you know sort of stories from college where he got it wrong a few times before he figured it out or that he you know he didn't he didn't have that he's he's the what people think though is sort of is is overly cautious or polished it's it's really just and I think honestly it's it's something a lot of us especially folks of color had just growing up knowing that it was like right you're going to get out there and you're GonNa get judged by all the things that you do so you need to be you need to be conscious of that you need to be careful about that kind of stuff and so I think that that it's so much that it's a wrong impression it's that I think people may be take the wrong lesson away from an impression let's let's talk about sort of the unique role that he is in this race if he wins on nation he'll be running it's a president who inaugurated his campaign by saying that immigrants from Mexico were rapists and dealers and and in some I assume are good people the president has made his border wall a central tenant his campaign rhetorically and literally and here you have a someone who is from that community who who the the president denigrates very frequently if not a on a daily basis so how does that play in to the camp pain I I can't imagine that he doesn't hear some of the things that the president says and some of the president's supporters and not get incredibly angry and control how that anger comes across on the campaign trail absolutely I think I mean look right I think we're in a situation right now where we have we have a president who who has reserved some of his most hateful most racist rhetoric for the Latino Community and specific early on immigrants from the southern border and Secretary Castro's identity his background his grandmother story his mother store and so his story are inextricably linked with that and so sort of you know symbolically I think for a lot of people there and not be a more important time for someone with his profile and his his attitude and his vision to be running against and you know posed to the president's profile envision on those sorta same same issues and so yeah I mean he does get really angry sometimes and and it comes out sometimes and you know he he sometimes it's doing press and he he doesn't he isn't able to to sort of hold it in as much it's you know it's painful I think it's painful for a lot of people but it's especially painful for somebody who's community is being targeted and after the shooting he was he was he was very he was angry he was hurt he was he had to have conversations with his kids and he's you know he said you know once like my family there's no way for that not personal but I think the other side of it is he he is getting a chance to do this at a time where there are a lot of Latino community who feel that anger in that hurt and that outrage that they're being targeted they're being targeted by the president and the fact that he is able to play that role they can they can also see somebody who is is showing them that can be me I think he you know he he he appreciates that he can he can kinda stand in opposition to that yeah I mean this is a this is a really it's it's it's a very challenging time I think for a lot of folks in the community to just be you know doing what they're doing here in Nevada sort of the first test for the Democratic candidates in terms of how their policies are going to affect Latina house when people of Color and this is the first diverse state I mean that's we're very proud of saying that do you think that that experience that that first hand experience of just last wants and also growing up the grandmother who worked in domestic service you know things like that do you think that that helps the secretary reach voters here in Nevada in a way that take on this this state is obviously incredibly important to us and it's a big part of our strategy for exactly the reason you're describing it really does sort of represent the coalition and that is one you you need in order to win the Democratic nomination but beyond that it is representation of the coalition that the sort of growing base of the voting electorate in this country right and so being able.

Secretary Castro Las Vegas Review Journal Nevada secretary Rory Appleton reporter Obama rupert Review Journal data Weekly editor Hud twenty four hour
"julin" Discussed on RJ Politics

RJ Politics

10:46 min | 3 years ago

"julin" Discussed on RJ Politics

"Have more energy then pack wolves is enormously hello and welcome to RJ politics the Las Vegas Review Journal's you know that that it was the president's rhetoric that led that shooter to committing that act and.

Las Vegas Review Journal president RJ
"julin" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"julin" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"It reminds me of the Justice reinvestment initiative stuff that was happening at the same time on criminal Justice policy. Right, right. Like, the federal government has the informational resources. We're going to give that data to you and leave it to you to figure out exactly how you're going to tackle these issues that we've set for you like there are interesting, federalism like implications there. But it also, you know, that does not appear to be the attitude that the Trump HUD is taken toward it. So I guess this is not just a a housing question. But when you're talking about, you know, stuff that happened over the two years you were at HUD, getting put on ice fairly immediately. And you know, in a best case scenario we're talking about getting back into office in twenty twenty one. How much of a problem does that kind of four year setback create for fifteen to twenty year cycle. And how can you make sure that things are moving? Forward on policy. If so much of this has to be just like undoing the things that have been done, right? Yeah. No. I'm convinced that the next president is going to have to spend leaves the first two years cleaning up the mess in these admit these agencies that this president has created and trying to you You know. know, trying to get us back on the right track of actually expanding opportunity for everybody instead of narrowing. It the way that this administration is doing, but I sense that I said in the question though, there two things I wanted to comment on that number one. We saw how empowering it can be to give data right with all of the ways that data can be used. Now, I'm thinking the positive ways that data can be used by these local communities to better understand the landscape of opportunity and how they can increase it, especially for people who are low income, right and communities of color that have often faced redlining and discrimination and underinvestment or disinvestment and white flight and everything else that has locked people into certain neighborhoods, especially in bigger areas. That's number one the power of data that Secondly. You know underneath that question. There's also there is a question. I think that's part of that. Okay. We'll. And this relates also to how I think foreign leaders are thinking about the United States. Now what they see how Iraq this present had been. And they're thinking well are things going to change every four years or eight years and the answer to that is that we have to find ways part of the answers that we have to find ways to institutionalize those positive changes much more effectively than we have so far because we've seen how easy it is to pull that back. Whether that was DACA, you know, in a different space, or it's a firmly furthering fair housing, and that's hard because that often requires congressional approval to do it this implicates issues like should we have a filibuster or not in the Senate? I think you have to keep on the table right being able to do away with no. I mean, the question comes down to are we going to have universal health care or am. I gonna have am I gonna stick to sixty votes in the Senate? We're going to have universal healthcare for everybody in this country. You know, so. But but I think that we do need to be smarter and sharper about how we institutionalize these positive gains that we make. So that you can't have somebody like Trump is come in. And you know, in Radic way start pulling all of it back. I love how you successfully divine that that wasn't fact immigration question. Yes. Which I suppose is not the most surprising thing coming for me. I do wanna like I could easily fill our remaining time. Just peppering you with questions about immigration, but I'm going to at least retain the housing nexus. Because something that we've seen that a lot of the construction industry has really gotten very concerned about not just the recission of Dhaka. But also the Trump administration's efforts to NTP s that's something that in the DC area..

Senate HUD president federal government Trump Dhaka United States Radic Iraq two years eight years twenty year four years four year
"julin" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"julin" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"But I believe that we need a better balance, for instance, with the mortgage interest deduction, and what we could do if we took a portion of that. And we dedicated that to more supply out there either in the mold of national housing trust fund or something that created more housing opportunity for people further further down on the income scale. So I do I agree with with a balance there and in backed if I remember correctly. Former congressman Keith Ellison had legislation that he has proposed essentially to portion off some of that and into dedicated to low income affordable housing, I agree with something like that. I think we should do that. I still I do still see though, a benefit to home ownership in terms of wealth creation and being able to hand down a piece of property to the next generation spoke. No, there's a huge. Wealth gap between communities of color, and and the mainstream community, right? And so I do see home ownership is one way one positive way if it's done right of helping to close that gap and give folks something that they can pass onto the next generation. So one of the big things the federal government does in that regard is the is the government sponsored enterprises which. They were created decades ago. Right. These are basically institutions they buy mortgages from banks they package them. They sell them off. It was privatized. I think in the Johnson administration, and then now to presidents ago re-nationalized, and they've been kind of lingering now under government ownership you supervise them, I guess as as head secretary. And what do you think like what what should be done with this is the status quo situation? Good should we should we accept that? Or do we need to move back? Well, you know about that change was borne out of crisis in our housing crisis. And. I do think that at the moment, you know. I don't I haven't seen a compelling plan that has been put forward that would actually pass congress to change that setup right now. Right. And of course, during the Obama administration there were different proposals. That were made that went to Senate hearings. And I think maybe a house hearing, I think at least for the foreseeable future of it that we're probably going to stay in the pattern that we're in right now, I believe though that their ways the can be better on some of these issues that we're talking about about creating more housing opportunity for low income Americans and for communities of color. They have changed some of the al-gharib algorithms are used for instance, to try and try and encourage. Banks to lend. So I'm not saying that I'm against changed won't change. But I think right now, at least that there's probably not to be a major, but that was going to be my follow up is, you know. Nationalized as a crisis measure, not as a sort of deliberate policy. But if they're going to stay in government hands are there more reforms it should be made to how they operate. So that this can maybe you were talking about racial wealth gap, which a lot of that is driven by differential, home ownership and the different price trends in every neighborhoods. I mean, are there things you would like to see GS's do as they're under executive control? No, I believe that they should follow the lead of of organizations like the FHA as they try and ensure that there's expanded homeownership opportunity, particularly for communities of color. Part and parcel of that is is the product that that that is offered any sanctioned essentially by the, but I believe that they can play a larger role there in encouraging lenders to move in that direction of offering more opportunity to low income individuals and have an impact on communities of color, and essentially African American home ownership and a lot Pino Asian American home ownership and with Mel wa I thought that we had and I do think that we've had a partner that was at least willing to work on those issues..

Keith Ellison congressman Obama administration Johnson administration FHA Pino executive Senate secretary Mel partner
"julin" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"julin" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"I'm Matt to and today. I am bringing you another special live episode of the weeds that we were courted last weekend at south by southwest in Austin is a conversation with myself, Darah, Lynn, Jane Costa and Julio. I'm castro. Houlihan was the mayor of San Antonio city that that I happen to know and love pretty well. He was also secretary of housing and urban development the Obama administration. He agreed to really get like into the weeds with us on housing policy staff, some of his ideas, some of his record in the Obama administration as game effort to explain some of the the real nuances of tax policy of regulations like an end to this. It's a it's a subject that's really near and dear to my heart thing. Also, an interesting conversation. He is of course, running for president as well mentioned some of his his bigger bolder ideas on healthcare immigration priorities after the second break, we've got some questions from the audience that we're really interesting. So I think you're gonna like it. Here goes the waves. Everybody. Thank you guys. It's so great to be here. It's great to be outdoors normally the three of us in dark window room. So it's and usually it's very hot in that room. Aches her hot, fresh, air sunshine, and normally it's just three of us kind of thing around. But we've got a great special guest with us here today make a special event for all of you. He was the mayor of San Antonio great city in which I have spent an incredible amount of time as well as secretary of housing and urban development under Barack Obama a candidate for president in this twenty twenty cycle. So, you know, please, welcome Qiliang Castro. So thank you so much. Thank you so much for for joining us, so agreed to try to delve into the weeds as we as we say here on housing policy. I go to San Antonio allot to visit my wife's family, and I I live in Washington DC. And I said, I'm sorta troll myself looking at the real estate listings, San Antonio and see how affordable the houses their inner city that has been growing lot. It's not a depressed city. It's a lot of people are coming in and from your perspective as mayor there and then running national policy. What do you think? Like what's in Antonio doing? Right. That some of the places on the coast could maybe learned from. Well, I thank you very much for having me out here. It's good to be with y'all hope everybody's enjoying south by southwest. So I served as mayor of San Antonio from oh nine to fourteen and obviously very proud of the city. So what is San Antonio doing? Right or what has the city done? Right. When it comes to unaffordable housing supply. I think cities in Texas generally, one of the things that that they have done fairly. Well, but also double edged is for instance, was owning right? Whether it's Houston famously having almost no zoning or cities like Austin or San Antonio, right. The cities have been hospitable over the years to the creation of of a housing supply. That also has stretched the city limits farther and farther out, but a byproduct of that has been that people are able to find housing that is relatively affordable, you know, within fifteen or twenty minutes of downtown area. I think another thing was that the city was good about setting up a housing trust fund in the late nineteen eighty..

San Antonio secretary Obama administration president Barack Obama Austin Matt Qiliang Castro Julio Houston Texas Washington DC Jane Costa Darah Lynn twenty minutes
"julin" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"julin" Discussed on Latino USA

"The Latino USA team includes Marlin Bishop on said, he those Janice Yamaoka and say give it'll with additional editing by Alison macadam. Our engineers are Stephanie abo- and Julia Caruso, our production manager is not that. Even puts our interns are Carolina, EBay and Lucas. Our theme music was composed biting, everyone knows if you like the music, you heard me sure you stop by dot org and check out our weekly Spotify playlist and one more thing dear podcast listener take a moment to rate and review, let know USA because this really helps other listeners to find us. And also, we really really do love all of your comments. So keep them coming. I'm your host and executive producer muddying Hossa. Join us again on our next episode. And in the meantime. Time. Look for us all of your social media. I'll see you there s leprosy Ma Chao let's say no USA is made possible in part by the Ford Foundation working with visionaries on the frontlines of social change worldwide. The John D and Catherine T MacArthur foundation and hiding Simon's foundation unlocking knowledge opportunity and possibilities. More at H S foundation that org. I know can tell the difference. So I'm glad that I've been able to get to that point. Can you tell the difference in our voice audio? That's the terrorist. One day have him get on, you know, and you're gonna have to tell the difference. Wholesome and next time on let know USA we sit down with Venezuelan, father and son one based in Venezuela. The other based in New York City to understand how one family is making sense of the rapidly changing situation in their country. That's next time on that team USA. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast.

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