17 Burst results for "Julie Garcia"

"julie garcia" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on WGN Radio

"State trooper all recovering from their injuries cook county state's attorney Kim fox big double big endorsement the support of a number of Latino politicians in her reelection bid led by congressman Julie Garcia she has demonstrated that public safety and justice for all must go hand in hand it become a reality in the twenty first century others joining Garcia and lending their support to fox state senator Selena Villanueva state representatives dealio remembers an egg and solace good got a commissioner alma Anaya in Chicago alderman Michael Rodriguez and Daniel list spot up Chinese authorities say the Wuhan corona virus deaf toll is now more than fifty they say as many as two thousand people may have been infected now this is happening at a time when hundreds of millions of people would normally be traveling for the lunar new year holiday except for the fifty million or so who live in the city of Wuhan which is the epicenter of the outbreak and sixteen other cities in central China which have been locked down close to two thousand people are being treated ABC's Ian but L. was keeping track of the situation from Hong Kong at the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak the crisis is escalating dozens of workers who hand with heavy machinery racing against time to build a brand new thousand bed hospital in just ten days and now a second thirteen hundred bed facility in the next fifteen the space desperately needed hospitals teaming with patients and staff stretched thin at least ten countries have reports of people who have been diagnosed with the Wuhan corona virus at least twenty two were dead more than a thousand hurt a magnitude six point seven quake hit eastern Turkey Friday night after a grueling seventeen hours trapped in debris an elderly woman finally pulled to safety in front of an anxious crowd she had managed to conduct rescue workers on his cell.

Kim fox L. Wuhan corona Daniel Chicago alma Anaya dealio Selena Villanueva senator congressman Julie Garcia attorney Hong Kong Ian ABC China Wuhan Michael Rodriguez commissioner
"julie garcia" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on WGN Radio

"State trooper all recovering from their injuries cook county state's attorney Kim fox big double big endorsement the support of a number of Latino politicians in her reelection bid led by congressman Julie Garcia she has demonstrated that public safety and justice for all must go hand in hand it become a reality in the twenty first century others joining Garcia and lending their support to fox state senator Selena Villanueva state representatives dealio remembers a negative dollars good got a commissioner alma Anaya in Chicago alderman Michael Rodriguez and Daniel list spot up Chinese authorities say the Wuhan corona virus deaf dole is now more than fifty they say as many as two thousand people may have been infected now this is happening at a time when hundreds of millions of people would normally be traveling for the lunar new year holiday except for the fifty million or so who live in the city of Wuhan which is the epicenter of the outbreak and sixteen others cities in central China which have been locked down close to two thousand people are being treated ABC's Ian bell was keeping track of the situation from Hong Kong at the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak the crisis is escalating dozens of workers who mu ham with heavy machinery racing against time to build a brand new thousand bed hospital in just ten days and now a second thirteen hundred bed facility in the next fifteen the space desperately needed hospitals teaming with patients and staff stretched thin at least ten countries have reports of people who have been diagnosed with the Wuhan corona virus at least twenty two were dead more than a thousand heard about a dude six point seven quake hit eastern Turkey Friday night after a grueling seventeen hours trapped in debris an elderly woman finally pulled to safety in front of an anxious crowds she had managed to conduct rescue workers on his cell.

attorney dole Wuhan corona Daniel Chicago alma Anaya Selena Villanueva senator congressman Kim fox Julie Garcia Hong Kong Ian bell ABC China Wuhan Michael Rodriguez commissioner
"julie garcia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on KCRW

"This was such a different place when I was growing up here and there were kids everywhere go see this as a prosecutor she got pushed back when she first started linking addiction to things like poverty and the lack of health care she was told to leave that stuff to the social workers but she was seen first hand how vulnerable people are when there aren't jobs how hard it is to be opioids once people are hooked you think about it all the time I thought about it when I was a new prosecutor in Suffolk County that I would get the call that more would be dead in then your worst fears are realized when my sister called me and said mom died I I fell to my knees and just wept because it's that moment where everything that you are ever scared of happened her mom sue was fifty eight years old when she died of a heart complication linked to long term opioid addiction less than a year later she got another call this time from the local sheriff we need to come over to your sister's right now and I went over and they said she's got it everyone was screaming in that's the part of addiction I think that there's a horrible part to it like fact chaos on never forget like the people screaming and crying bunny Garcia died after a federal overdose she left three young daughters Julie Garcia drives me to the cemetery above port Henry where her mom and her sister are barely we walked for awhile among the graves it's a beautiful spot with the view of the Adirondack mountains Garcia says she's still tangled up in this epidemic he ran unsuccessfully for a judge's seat this year talking openly about her family struggles in her private law practice a lot of her clients are addicted their lives unraveling because of opioids or alcohol or math some prosecutors have changed tactics diverting people arrested for drug crimes away from prison and to re happened therapy because he thinks that's progress but he says the stigma remains a lot of people still struggle with this illness in secret like her mom and sister I think it's unusual.

prosecutor Suffolk County bunny Garcia Henry fifty eight years
"julie garcia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This was such a different place when I was growing up here and there were kids everywhere yes yes as a prosecutor she got pushed back when she first started linking addiction to things like poverty and the lack of health care she was told to leave that stuff to the social workers but she was seen first hand how vulnerable people are when there aren't jobs how hard it is to be opioids once people are hooked you think about it all the time I thought about it when I was a new prosecutor in Suffolk County that I would get the call that more would be dead in then your worst fears are realized when my sister called me and said mom died I I found to my needs and just because it's that moment where everything that you are ever scared us happened her mom sue was fifty eight years old when she died of a heart complication linked to long term opioid addiction less than a year later she got another call this time from the local sheriff we need to come over to your sister's right now and I went over and they said she's gone everyone was screaming and that's the part of addiction I think that there's a horrible part to it like that chaos on never forget like the people screaming and crying funny Garcia died after a federal overdose she left three young daughters Julie Garcia drives me to the cemetery above port Henry where her mom and her sister are very we walked for awhile among the graves it's a beautiful spot with the view of the Adirondack mountains Garcia says she's still tangled up in this epidemic he ran unsuccessfully for a judge's seat this year talking openly about her family's struggles in her private law practice a lot of her clients are addicted their lives unraveling because of opioids or alcohol or math some prosecutors have changed tactics diverting people arrested for drug crimes away from prison and we happen therapy because he thinks that's progress but he says the stigma remains a lot of people still struggle with his illness in secret like her mom and sister I think it's unusual.

prosecutor Suffolk County Julie Garcia Henry fifty eight years
"julie garcia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reimagining banking offering savings and checking accounts that can be opened from anywhere Capital One what's in your wallet Capital One NA and the listeners of KQED cloudy skies today temperatures mid sixties to mid seventies this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon even those have spent their careers in law enforcement fighting drug crimes order me in from the opioid epidemic while Julie Garcia a former prosecutor in upstate New York which hand they drug cases her own family was being ravaged by addiction to prescription pain killers north country public radio's Brian man has this profile Julie Christie is spent much of her career as a prosecutor working in three county district attorney offices across New York state serving as head the a for a time here in Essex County she says her attitude toward drugs was pretty typical tough on crime until opioids hit her own home town in the early two thousands she got a call one day from her mom and her sister who admitted that they were using opiates getting high together they told me they were scared that was one of the worst moments of my entire life I was just a new prosecutor working out the Suffolk County DA's office and I remember being outside talking to my mom and my sister and like what we do your sister is living what she describes as a double life working days as a prosecutor then driving home to port Henry New York to small mining town where she grew up she found her mom sue and her sister Lani were buying oxycontin and other prescription pain killers from neighbors which was the most disturbing part for me was people getting other people addicted to intentionally and then the raising the price of the pills in people I know and I knew some of the people that were selling to my mom into my sister Garcia says her view of drug crime began to evolve as her mom and sister struggled through relapse after relapse they didn't look to her like criminals neither did the drug dealers import Henry who seems just as desperate and addictive when I was the DA you would always try to figure out a way to stop those people but then again there's another layer to that like why are they doing that what's their backstory Garcia drives me through her old neighborhood in the rocky hills above port Henry she now believes the opioid epidemic has as much to do with economics and poverty as crime the stores are closed here many of the houses boarded up the local iron mine shut down for good in the nineteen seventies this was such a different place when I was growing up here and there were kids everywhere yes yes as a prosecutor she got pushed back when she first started linking addiction to things.

Suffolk County DA port Henry New York NPR KQED port Henry Henry Lani Scott Simon Essex County Julie Christie Brian man New York prosecutor Julie Garcia one day
"julie garcia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on KCRW

"Checking accounts that can be opened from anywhere Capital One what's in your wallet Capital One NA and from the John D. and Catherine T. macarthur foundation at mac found daughter work this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon even those have spent their careers in law enforcement fighting drug crimes aren't immune from the opioid epidemic while Julie Garcia a former prosecutor in upstate New York which handling drug cases her own family has been ravaged by addiction to prescription pain killers north country public radio's Brian man has this profile Julie Christie is spent much of her career as a prosecutor working in three county district attorney offices across New York state serving as head the a for a time here in Essex County she says her attitude toward drugs was pretty typical tough on crime until opioids hit her own home town in the early two thousands she got a call one day from her mom and her sister who admitted that they were using opioids getting high together they told me they were scared that was one of the worst moments of my entire life I was just a new prosecutor working at the Suffolk County DA's office and I remember being outside talking to my mom and my sister and like what we do your sister of living what she describes as a double life working days as a prosecutor then driving home to port Henry New York the small mining town where she grew up she found her mom sue and her sister Lani were buying oxycontin and other prescription pain killers from neighbors which was the most disturbing part for me was people getting other people addicted to intentionally in the end raising the price of the pills in people I know and I knew some of the people that were selling to my mom into my sister Garcia says her view of drug crime began to evolve as her mom and sister struggled through relapse after relapse they didn't look to her like criminals neither did the drug dealers import Henry who seems just as desperate and addictive when I was the DA you would always try to figure out a way to stop those people but then again there's another layer to that like why are they doing that what's their backstory Garcia drives me through her old neighborhood in the rocky hills above port Henry she now believes the opioid epidemic has as much to do with economics and poverty as crime the stores are closed here many of the houses boarded up the local iron mine shut down for good in the nineteen seventies this was such a different place when I was growing up here and there were kids everywhere go see this as a prosecutor she got pushed back when she first started linking addiction to things like.

Julie Christie port Henry New York NPR port Henry Henry Lani Suffolk County DA Essex County John D. Brian man New York prosecutor Julie Garcia Scott Simon mac Catherine T. macarthur foundat one day
"julie garcia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Accounts that can be opened from anywhere Capital One what's in your wallet Capital One NA this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon even those have spent their careers in law enforcement fighting drug crimes aren't immune from the opioid epidemic while Julie Garcia a former prosecutor in upstate New York which hand they drug cases her own family has been ravaged by addiction to prescription pain killers our country public radio's Brian man has this profile Julie Christie is spent much of her career as a prosecutor working in three county district attorney offices across New York state serving as head the a for a time here in Essex County she says her attitude toward drugs was pretty typical tough on crime until opioids hit her own home town in the early two thousands she got a call one day from her mom and her sister who admitted that they were using opioids getting high together they told me they were scared that was one of the worst moments of my entire life I was just a new prosecutor working at the Suffolk County DA's office and I remember being outside talking to my mom and my sister and like what we do your sister is living what she describes as a double life working days as a prosecutor then driving home to port Henry New York the small mining town where she grew up she found her mom sue and her sister Lani were buying oxycontin and other prescription pain killers from neighbors which was the most disturbing part for me was people getting other people addicted to intentionally and then raising the price of the pills in people I know and I knew some of the people that were selling to my mom into my sister Garcia says her view of drug crime began to evolve as her mom and sister struggled through relapse after relapse they didn't look to her like criminals neither did the drug dealers import Henry who seems just as desperate and addictive when I was the DA you would always try to figure out a way to stop those people but then again there's another layer to that like why are they doing that what's their backstory Garcia drives me through her old neighborhood in the rocky hills above port Henry she now believes the opioid epidemic has as much to do with economics and poverty as crime the stores are closed here many of the houses boarded up the local iron mine shut down for good in the nineteen seventies this was such a different place when I was growing up here and there were kids everywhere I see this as a prosecutor she got pushed back when she first started linking addiction to things like.

Scott Simon Julie Garcia prosecutor New York Brian man Julie Christie Essex County Suffolk County DA Lani Henry port Henry NPR port Henry New York one day
"julie garcia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reimagining banking offering savings and checking accounts that can be opened from anywhere Capital One what's in your wallet Capital One NA and the listeners of KQED coming up on weekend edition we're gonna catch up with a musician and activists from Uganda and also coming up a story about the opioid crisis made personal this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon even those have spent their careers in law enforcement fighting drug crimes order me in from the opioid epidemic while Julie Garcia a former prosecutor in upstate New York which hand they drug cases her own family was being ravaged by addiction to prescription pain killers our country public radio's Brian man has this profile Julie Christie is spent much of her career as a prosecutor working in three county district attorney offices across New York state serving as head the a for a time here in Essex County she says her attitude toward drugs was pretty typical tough on crime until opioids hit her own home town in the early two thousands she got a call one day from her mom and her sister who admitted that they were using opioids getting high together they told me they were scared that was one of the worst moments of my entire life I was just a new prosecutor working at the Suffolk County DA's office and I remember being outside talking to my mom and my sister and like what we do your sister of living what she describes as a double life working days as a prosecutor then driving home to port Henry New York the small mining town where she grew up she found her mom sue and her sister Lani were buying oxycontin and other prescription pain killers from neighbors which was the most disturbing part for me was people getting other people addicted to intentionally and then raising the price of the pills in people I know and I knew some of the people that were selling to my mom into my sister Garcia says her view of drug crime began to evolve as her mom and sister struggled through relapse after relapse they didn't look to her like criminals neither did the drug dealers import Henry who seems just as desperate and addictive when I was the DA you would always try to figure out a way to stop those people but then again there's another layer to that like why are they doing that what's their backstory Garcia drives me through her old neighborhood in the rocky hills above port Henry she now believes the opioid epidemic has as much to do with economics and poverty as crime the stores are closed here many of the houses boarded up the local iron mine shut down for good in the nineteen seventies this was such a different place when I was growing up here and there were kids everywhere yes yes as a prosecutor she got pushed back when she first started linking addiction to things like.

one day
"julie garcia" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on WGN Radio

"For political it's a great a great to a newsletter respond to a find out what's going on around the city and state every day in not just news but in politics in particular she'll welcome back to the biz line each thank you so much for having me thanks for reading that the plate thank you for writing it makes my job anchoring the news much I know where everyone is in their life which in New York today thanks to you I did okay let's just start with an S. I want to talk about their campaign reports in the money that they've got on hand that but I've talked to me a little bit first about the political sentiment in the city now that we have a new governor and the new mayor they're both Democrats but it doesn't mean everything's gonna always go smoothly it seems to me like there's a very different mix now when you take them and add in speaker Madigan president color to yeah I mean here you have this set of Democrats running everything but there's still a lot of not a lot they're still friction with the number of people from the business community who might very well be Democrats who are concerned about the increasing the numbers going up in taxes what it means for you know if the fair tax passes what that means for them and I run into people all the time who are supporters of JB prince car but had reservations about some of the policies that keep pushed in the state which is the politicians are the more concerned about when I'm talking about business the the governor or the mayor the mayor is still up in the air because we don't know what it is she is going to push in terms of the solving some of the budget problems everybody presumes taxes will be increased but we don't know what we don't know if it'll be residential will it be more business so I think that's kind of up in the air right now because the legislature just wrapped up there's a lot of focus on what it means that marijuana I will be legal what does it mean that we might have a new kind of tax system in the state I think that's what people are focusing on you know I've been following Illinois politics professionally now for thirty five years or so and I don't remember a legislative session is consequential is the one we just got out of right I mean I just talked to Julie Garcia recently and he called a few of the freshmen eight reps to say do you realize what feels right right people you know they dream of being part of one big building here you've been part of five all in one session yeah it's pretty amazing okay let's look let's go to the books the second quarter financial reports are in mere Lightfoot has what two points no she ended the period of one point eight million dollars which is pretty significant right because that did the quarter includes her campaign in a way right it's very significant she pulled in two point seven million and what I thought was interesting you probably saw him play but was that when mayor Rahm Emanuel one election in two thousand eleven and the second quarter you know after he took office he had I want to say only in quotes one point five million compared to Lori's one point eight million which really shows you and he's the master of fundraising right since we see that Lori Lightfoot is you know edging those numbers is pretty amazing because the you think we think of her as an outsider and in in a way not this but no novice has one point eight million or campaign war chest after winning a campaign right she has really mastered fundraising and you know what she feels emboldened she won fifty wards and and she is she's not afraid to go out and you know ask for money and get get that support Toni Preckwinkle says she's going to run again for County Board president she's only got seven hundred twenty dollars in their war chest which show she's got some work to do it but also indicate that she might be right for a challenge it could be I mean I think it's still too early yet you know it's three years the way too I guess two years before we hear people talking about it she has a lot going on still she's very involved in you know county governments and moving things forward she talked about as you know during the mayoral campaign how she's passed county budgets for what it's eleven years and about doing the same thing again some one of the one I want to ask you about this reason I IT I I'm completely ignored here but it's this this race is shaping up for the Illinois Supreme Court looks like Daniel that scene in peace god novel novels got the job now he was appointed to it but you look at their fundraising what do you make of that well it's funny you should say I'm probably going to write about that later this week that is a very interesting race and one of the most important races in the state because it's the state Supreme Court that really has oversight over a lot of maybe what Mike Madigan does for example it does any other organization in the state have oversight over over the speaker no I would say the state Supreme Court does and that that position mystery novel justice level I was appointed so he has to run again he was appointed because the justice before he retired from that position is open and it says Chicago area seat there are three Supreme Court seats from Chicago the other four damn state it's very competitive there's a Latino in the race they are you know if you're gonna see a lot more people there probably for I think I have to go back to look for five people in the race it's very competitive stay with African American I don't know we'll see what we will read about it in the Illinois playbook from political later this week she a capitalist thanks for joining us today thank you so much you but it's the wind trust business lunch on seven twenty WGN the timer because you're the one trust business minute sharing an examining Chicago business news of the day in the old days a lot of companies used to train their sales force through mentor ship or they just ended up banking on employees previous experience not the best strategy so the market.

seven hundred twenty dollars eight million dollars thirty five years eleven years three years two years
"julie garcia" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of sun seventy seven in fall river seventy two in Acton right now in Boston at eleven OO five occult partly cloudy seventy seven degrees trump administration announcing a brand new rule today that will end asylum protections for most central American migrants as of tomorrow asylum seekers who passed through another country first will no longer be eligible for asylum here in the United States that new rule even applies to children who cross the border alone there are a few exceptions so somebody's been trafficked or if they were denied protection in another country first despite his hardline immigration policies the number of asylum seekers has continued to increase since the president took office leaving port facilities dangerously crowded well beyond capacity meantime the trump administration scheduled ice rates in several cities over the weekend never fully materialized as we hear from ABC's Ryan borough Richmond Julie Garcia of Chicago telling a crowd Sunday we haven't heard of any firm rate larger operations still many immigrant rights groups med giving information on how people can protect themselves from raid so I think I see something here Chicago city alderman Rosana Rodriguez so she did notice fewer people out in her district on Sunday people are not coming out to do their grocery shopping as usual the group's warning the raids could still happen in the coming days possibly at businesses as people show up for work Ribeiro ABC news Chicago and Washington state an armed man was found dead over the weekend after he threw incendiary devices at an immigration jail officers responding to the privately run to Coleman northwest detention center around four o'clock Saturday morning this by the way just hours after the end of a peaceful rally against jailing migrants police say they found the man who would set fire to a vehicle outside the center and then the man apparently attempted to ignite some large propane tanks trying to set the building on fire to members armed with a rifle when they found him a satchel as well filled with flares for officers fired their weapons and later found the man shot dead at the scene police said they are looking into what happened what's left of six and today in a Boston hospital the man from Lawrence accused in a deadly crash over the weekend will be arraigned in his hospital bed WBZ TV Stephanie chan has more on what happened twenty three year old Selvin manual Lima is now facing motor vehicle homicide charges investigators say he was fleeing a traffic stop Saturday evening when he slammed into a car carrying a family of five neighbors rushed to help pulling the eight year old girl out of the wreckage and it was for helicopters going all the way to profit from candles and flowers to teddy bears a makeshift memorial continues to grow at the intersection of Parker in Andover street the very spot that eight year old Peabody girl was killed a neighborhood trying to wrap their minds around how this could have happened soon forego night again Lima facing a list of charges including manslaughter assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and motor vehicle homicide by reckless driving all new fire truck is turning out to be a big problem in Andover fire chief says the brand new truck was delivered over the weekend and immediately noticed it looked a bit taller than the ones they already had when they measured it they found a brand new fire truck measured eleven feet eleven inches which is about five inches too tall to fit under the horn bridge and over town officials now working with the manufacturer trying to see if they can make any sort of adjustments to the truck so can fit under that railroad bridge that goes over central St Helena wait let's take a look at Wall Street now back to Bloomberg business and here's Tracy junkie the call Wall Street has been breaking records and giving us a sense this year you would think trading this market would be lucrative as well but it city group trading revenue fell more than expected the last three months investors figure that doesn't sound good for JP Morgan chase bank americorps or Boston's State Street either stocks are falling all over take to break the records Wall Street set last Friday is to improve on them even a little nasdaq's doing that up half a point does down to S. and P. down one I'm Tracy junkie Bloomberg business on WBZ Boston's news radio all right thanks Tracy will talk sports coming up what would it take for you to get a tattoo you didn't want a million dollars how about a million socks I'm Randy from Bombus when me and my business partner Dave has ago and quit our jobs to start a stock company Bob this we want to make the best socks in the history of feet no more knowing seem no more falling down your leg added our support you get the idea and what's better than creating the best socks.

Acton Boston eight year seventy seven degrees twenty three year million dollars eleven inches three months eleven feet five inches
"julie garcia" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"That that is true of secular museums, too. That's why we're all fighting over who's going to buy for several million dollars. The best specimen of T, Rex and so on, because we all know dinosaurs cell. But at the same time, given the counter narrative being told at these museums about dinosaurs and humans living together. Yes, I did feel some discomfort to why build a museum Garcia argues that there are three significant and interrelated reasons. The first museums are seen as credible. Museums really have a long. History in the US ads places of scientific research and public education in the twentieth, century. They were sometimes referred to as cathedrals of science this idea that they were buildings where we set for, you know, the best of human knowledge, and human endeavor, and everything that, that the collective knowledge of our species was placed in these, these buildings for everyone to see and to learn from so simply by attaching that phrase that word museum it just automatically gives what's inside the building a sheen in Fred ability, that otherwise wouldn't have if it were called a theme park or a bible center or something like that. The second reason also relates to the focus on dinosaurs. Museums are more entertaining than school, bible study, or bible school. It's kind of entertaining that a lot of teachers. Are going to like a lot of parents and teachers, they want an educational experience for kids. And so a lot of parents who might not want to spend the money to take kids to what they feel. It is kind of a frivolous day. The theme park can get behind the idea of taking them to a museum where they're going to be learning about science, and they're going to be learning wholesome things, and kind of bettering themselves now going along with that. The entertainment value is a decent amount of money. At least that's the time that I was writing my thesis. I know that evangelical were the primary audience for a market of about four billion dollars a year in the religious entertainment industry. The final reason going directly to the people number three. I think honestly might even be the most important of them, which is that a museum let's creationist speak directly to the people in. Unfiltered and kind of unchallenged way. And I think this is a large part of a larger movement away from what creationist had been doing, which was bringing these challenges in the court system. They in the sixties. Seventies eighties had suffered a string of kind of stinging defeats the court when things go right? A legal proceeding designed to get to the truth, and part of getting to the truth is subjecting, subjecting assertions to rigorous cross-examination and you have someone sitting up there, the judge who makes rulings about what is a good argument and what's not, and can keep certain evidence out and can rule on who qualifies as an expert. And those were things that weren't going well for. Creationist you know, after they lost a number of these cases, they started moving more toward this museum model. And I think that is because there is no cross examination in a museum in fact, there is no opposite point of view. If you don't want to give it, there's no requirement that you describe, how other people see evidence or that you respond to criticisms of the way that you are presenting your point of view, being able to go directly to your audience without a middleman is one of the main ways the media landscape more broadly has changed. There's now more space for viewpoints that used to be far outside the mainstream to directly attract their own audience, and it doesn't have to be on the level of a single institution. Either Garcia talks about guides to scientifically informed museums zoos and aquariums for sale in the creation, museum's gift shop. Meant to be used at these other institutions for alternative Biblically, correct interpretations of their displays. I know that in addition to those printouts that you can purchase through enters in Genesis in other sources. There are also some organizations that provide these tours such as a group called Biblically correct tours that does tours of natural history, museums. And my understanding of how these were is that essentially, it's an offshoot of this idea of the two model approach, which is the idea that evolution and creationism are two competing philosophies, and that they essentially look at the same evidence, but they just draw different conclusions. And so, by having a sort of Biblically, correct tour of the museum dis organizations, explain how creationism is not opposed to SCI this in their view. You because they know that Americans for the most part like science, nobody wants to be anti science. So if anybody disagrees about things like climate change, or Evelyn, h-, usually, the way that it is phrase is not. Well, I don't like science and I just reject science. It's more. Well, I take a different view of the science and, you know, there are two sides to the story and I follow this interpretation, and so on. It's not just that museum goers, like science Garcia points out that audiences tend to trust information more if it's presented in a high tech style. In her conclusion, there see a rights that it seems probable that in the years to come. We will see the construction of more museums, most likely in the high tech style of the answers in Genesis creation museum, which has proven to be quite lucrative now. It's easier for people through media like Twitter and through buildings like their own. Creation, museums to kind of claim the same sort of authority and have an impact that they otherwise might not have, you know, in the past, where they wouldn't they wouldn't have had that ability to get their message out this has been museum archipelago. You can find show notes and a full transcript of this episode at museum, archipelago dot com. If you liked this episode you can support the show and get some fun benefits like logo stickers and the bonus podcast feed by joining club archipelago on patriarch special, thanks to club, archipelagos, newest member and host of the excellent museums in strange places podcast. Hannah half man. Thanks for listening and next time. Bring a friend.

Garcia Genesis creation museum US Rex Twitter bible school Fred Hannah Evelyn four billion dollars million dollars
"julie garcia" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm UNLV dinner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. There's a new tool in younger with creationist quest for scientific legitimacy, the museum over the past twenty five years, dozens of so called creation, museums have been built most of them in the US, barring the style of natural history, museums, and science centers, these public display spaces use the form and rhetoric of mainstream science to support a belief in the literal truth of the bible, including the creation of the universe in six days, about six thousand years ago on museum. Let's creationist speak directly to the people in unfiltered and unchallenged way, just by being able to put all this inside something that's called museum and use the sort of trappings of science, it really gives creationism that additional feel of legitimacy and credibility that it might not otherwise have this is Julie Garcia and her interest in both evolution and the people who vehemently deny. It led her to explore. Why museums are particularly well suited medium for creationist ideas. My name is Julie Garcia. I was formerly known as Julie Duncan at the time that I wrote my senior thesis which was called faith displayed as science, the role of the creation, museum in the modern American creationist movement Garcia grew up in Kentucky, and as an undergrad at Harvard. She decided to become a history and science, major at other colleges, that's known as history and philosophy of science, which is basically just the study of what science is, and why we trusted and what are different ways of knowing the world for me, part of the reason I had gone into it because I had always had a fascination with evolution. And I had also had a corresponding fascination with wise Sony people so vehemently, didn't like Evelyn. And why so many people? To the point of thirty forty sometimes fifty percent in certain holes believe in creationism. I was prompted to write this thesis when in probably two thousand six or so I heard that in my backyard in Boone county, Kentucky answers in Genesis, a creationist organization was going to be building the largest creation museum in the world known as the answers in Genesis, creation, museum, a twenty seven million dollar facility over many acres about ten minutes from my house to answers in Genesis, creation, museum, also known as just the creation museum opened in two thousand seven in its first year. It reported four hundred thousand visitors I eventually decided coming into the summer of two thousand eight before my senior year that I would spend that summer traveling to back home to Kentucky to visit the creation museum there and three other creation museums around the. S the creation evidence museum in Glen, rose, Texas dinosaur adventure land, and the related creation, museum in Pensacola, Florida and the institute for creation research, which is near San Diego, California. So that's kind of how it all started. And, and I spent the summer two thousand eight visiting those and talking to people and, and learning about the four different idioms Garcia chose these four museums for their stylistic differences, and for their geographical diversity and each one, she viewed the exhibits and talk to the founders and staff, then analyzed highlighted the messages in methods common to all of the museums, there was some trepidation before I went because I was worried that by disclosing that I was not a creationist that they would assume that I was out to write a smear piece on their museums, which, honestly, when I read my thesis, now I think there are certain things that I would now phrase differently that came off snark. Earlier than I think I would write them now but everyone was very kind to me and they were all very eager to show me everything that they had built. And they were very proud of it. I came away from it thinking, you know, these, these are very, nice people with whom I just disagree. But that's the thing that kind of stuck in my mind. The most is that everyone. I talked to was very nice, and obviously very faithful and believe completely in what was being shown in the museum's too. I did feel uncomfortable seeing all the children there. It's one thing I've Asli for adults to decide what they believe and do whatever they want with those beliefs and feel very strongly about them and, and teach them to others. It was just a little troubling to MIR disheartening to see young children. Very impressionable learning things that I personally consider to be contrary to science undoubtedly contrary to. Established mainstream science. But of course, that's kind of the purpose of these museums amphora for museums, heavily featured dinosaurs either in audio neutron ick form or as fossils, this is not just because of the time, compression of geological ages present in young earth creationism, it is also because dinosaurs, attract the public, particularly children to these museums. The founder of the answers in Genesis, creation, museum, Ken ham calls dinosaurs. Missionary lizards for their attention getting power. Yes, I did feel some discomfort seeing kids being kind of explicitly told. Hey, these dinosaurs were alive, six thousand years ago. And people were riding them like an answers in Genesis. They actually have a triceratops toward the end of the Newseum with addle on it, and you can sit on it, and take a picture, and it's, it's not a joke. It is a representation of what the museum says, you know, would've been a typical. Pre-flood diorama, where humans were living together with dinosaurs. All of them basically said in different ways Dr Hoven from guidance sword. Bench Linden, Florida and an ham from answers in Genesis both. Very explicitly said, the, the purpose of using things like dinosaurs is to attract the children to bring them in, you know, then again with distance now I can acknowledge that

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"julie garcia" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on WCPT 820

"More you only need eight hundred and sixty some ever jitney yeah golf eight hundred doesn't work in the city of sixty two hundred and what i was my point like i i could put my first worked first as my political me organization too much from very proud of they could hit the street running and know what they're doing and two hundred and some people circulate you know everyone can do that you know you need that two two and a half threemonth time for him uh to give your signatures but in this case we all thought the cogs and was durant what the but but i have to ask you why why do you want to run i mean why why would you you you know you've got a good good unity organization you say you got a good ward you're in your second term second full term why why i mean i gotta tell you i mean as a longtime political observer first of all chewing garcia has been in the race he's a wellknown individual and especially in the city of chicago i mean he's got a lot of followers he was a spokesman for bernie sanders bernie sanders has endorsed julie garcia which is going to carry a lot away you got some seemingly insurmountable odds why don't the gaining since remodeled there i think the more that people first of all unfortunately in this day and age you gotta varies a lot of money um and i can raise more money than anyone listed on the racist in in the records if you look at the amount of money that i have raised on my own and but more importantly i will put my record up against anybody that's running whether they been in thirty years of the been there three years you know the the federal government in the state government as you know very well are not getting anything done so you.

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"julie garcia" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Former congressman joe wolf thanks for listening follow me on twitter walls freedom i am a i'm excited right now i'm tickled right now because up gets have got i've got another i've got another italian in in the studio with me i've got somebody in the studio with me mike houlahan who has written a book uh w and i want you to describe before me mike up but a that crystalizes chicago politics that i that i asked mike to come in four so we could talk about the book is called nothing's on the square it is eighty two some days in the life of the 2015 may oral campaign right here in chicago rahm emanuel versus a chew we garcia fast same election mike houlahan thanks for show you so much for having me and hide everybody out there it it is my wife aline couldn't put this book downer nothing's on the square i picked it up a little bit ago couldn't put it down what why why did you write this i make a few bucks you know what it's like why they're actually you're approach to work on that roach2 to work on the campaign and they said you want to make some money as it yeah how much could we make in that i brought me down to meet julie garcia seem like a nice guy went to saint rita okay who part of the chicago catholic league i went among communism and they needed help in the nineteenth ward and other while white area the irish vote that's what they really needed help so they called on again in houlahan yeah and i've worked in irish radio and and with the irishamerican news route twenty or so i said i can plugin especially if you went to santa rita and i really do i mean it was a very selfdeprecating whit about him and he's by the way everybody listening right now in chicago in around the country chewy garcia was just almost handpicked a couple of days ago by congressman luiz gutierrez who has decided to retire and it will get into this his handpicked candidate it is the cook county commissioner former alderman chew we garcia a mike houlahan though in the studio with me long time columnist journalist in the city of chicago a broadway actor which i want to ask him about but my mic when when i tell people that this spoke you've written nothing.

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"julie garcia" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on WLAC

"Why did he withdraw today he had a press conference saying quote live to me is like while there's only a certain number of chapters mm oh okay he said that he supported julie garcia for his seat is persia he has no plans to run for mayor and he's not ruling out something in 2020 first of all if he were running and 2020 he would have stayed in congress because you could raise more money in cowers you're you're better candidate in office just like you're a better candidate for the next job if you have a job than if you're out of a job speculation as to why he step down one maybe he just tired of the job immigration is no longer the hotbutton issue at once was put out by that number two is doing a favour to rama bowel i'll because he's eliminating roms the guy that would love to ice i don't know if his body politicians aren't that aren't that unselfish third something big is about to hit and of course we will delight in the thought that that might just be true pinball europe yes sir how are you doing list to bury saw y'all enormous family holidays gone for any yet i say you can't beat oregon shannon next time he hit out here have already absolute little oregon salmon what because it is some of the nation's it you could ever have in your entire life and had come to the right out of the columbia reliable lamb at that i know you've been down uh the clock missus all the way up in the washington all uh on on the columbia river the natives have fish and right subpar in what you are in the racine drive up to decent oregon and by the salmon straight from the natives right off pip trucks really did they catch him what fat whose catching them the natives or in natives sell up in east and oregon around us the dow was that in the hood river they have all of fishing rights out there if net fish and then they go out there and may fish there and they sell it to your what they solid right up right on the beach there right.

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"julie garcia" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"The lakefront for the weather channel i'm meteorologist ray stagich on wlsam 890 with another update in thirty minutes a big game michael chairs happening today in chicago politics longtime congressman louie peres reportedly will announce that he's not going to run for reelection and will endorse cook commissioner hayes whose julie garcia for his congressional seat this is good news for mayor emanuel because if garcia wins the seat in congress it would mean that he would not run against rom for europe in 2019 you remember garcia drew a manual or forced him runoff in the 2015 election 22nd ward alderman rick muneo is reportedly plans to run for garcia is county board c and carlos ramirez rosa a freshman alderman is reportedly going to run for congress as well challenging nesia who needs to replace luis gutierrez in congress gutierrez reportedly will be endorsing garcia today congressman peter roskam of wheaton on with big john in rambling ray this morning talking about tax reform the bill has recently pasqua's house it comes up before the senate this week roskam says one thing is clear nobody the current taxes there's nobody defending the status quo of the tax code really nobody likes it and that's so different than the health care debate that we just went through where you have strong feelings defending the you know defending obamacare and so forth and this thing nobody likes our tax code people like certain elements of its gdp out stipulates that the nobody likes the whole thing however there are problems with this current tax reform.

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"julie garcia" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"julie garcia" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Just say play wgn radio wjr news time is four o'clock get to the newsroom and vic thanks nick tropical storm cindy has claimed its first patel at eight it's cloudy and seventy three at o'hare according to officials in alabama a ten year old boy was killed last night it fort more again a storm surge knocked a large piece of timber onto him baldwin county sheriff haas mack said the boy suffered severe head injuries we do not believe that the child actually drowned but although it for the surf and everything that possibly causing injuries to this child that's why we're looking at it as a weather related answer speaking the local news station w k r g a cindy is threatening areas from the florida panhandle the eastern texas the governor louisiana has declared a state of emergency heavy rainfall is expected fficials keeping an eye on life threatening flooding four people arrested overnight in brussels belgian authorities say they're being detained in connection with a failed bombing at a rail station earlier this week senate republicans in washington are expected to release a draft of their healthcare plan this morning a plan aimed at repealing and replacing the affordable care act many senators will along with the public speech seeing it for the first time and with senator mitch mcconnell eyeing a vote as early as next week there is concerned there won't be enough time for debate republicans can only afford to lose to gop votes it's the passed the bill back locally naked body has been found it is the body of a woman there was found near huron in st louis avenue early this morning the humbled park neighborhood cities westside chicago police say she appears to be in her forties or 50s obviously hasn't been identified yet it's not clear yet yet how she died either go counties african american population is the largest of any county in the us butted shrieking the tribune says twelve thousand black residents moved away last year that's up from nine thousand the year before according to census data forty six thousand black residents have left the greater chicago area since twenty ten betting exit is is larger than in any other metro area in the country had cook county commissioner julie garcia says he wants to county assessor joe berrios to appear before the full county board to.

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