4 Burst results for "Juliana Clark"

"juliana clark" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:50 min | 2 months ago

"juliana clark" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Friends as an adult. And let me tell you, it really touched a nerve with a lot of our listeners. Our guest was psychologist Marissa G Franco. She has a new book coming out, and it's all about this topic. It's called platonic. And we're going to use that as an opportunity to replay our interview with her. These connections are so important. In fact, I'm in awe of my children who can pretty much go up to basically any kid at the playground and they just start playing. And in fact, my youngest daughter will call any child her age, like her best friend. It's amazing. But that isn't how I feel at all. What changes as we get older? Yeah, so sociologists have kind of identified the ingredients that need to be in place for us to make friends organically. And they are continuous, unplanned interaction, and shared vulnerability. But as we've become adults, we have less and less environments where those ingredients are at play. Friendship no longer happens organically. Like you have to try. You have to put yourself out there. You have to be intentional. And that's actually one of the biggest myths that I think people have about friendship is the idea that it should happen organically, even though research has shown us that people that see friendship as something that happens based on luck are more lonely years later and those who see it as something that happens based on effort are less lonely years later. Do you think that the senses that it happens organically just because that's the way it used to happen when we were younger? That's it because it used to happen that way and we're just using our template from childhood in adulthood when it just no longer applies because our situation is so different. We asked our listeners to share their experiences with making Friends as an adult and we got, we got a lot of responses. So we're going to go through some of them. And each of the people you're about to hear will be in different stages of their lives. So let's start with Juliana Clark. She's 25 years old and she lives in LA. Sometimes I have been able to make a couple of friends here and there. I'm really more interested in kind of creating like a sustainable community, especially since at least so many of the friendships that I've made in my life have kind of had these common experiences anchoring them. So what's your advice for younger adults like giuliana who may no longer have the built in social structure of college or any kind of school? Yeah, that's a great question. So what I think about some background for this that I think would be helpful to inform her point is that this concept of the mere exposure effect, which, according to the psychology research, is the idea that as we see people more regularly and they become more familiar to us, we like them more. This happens completely unconsciously. So we need to basically create and structure that continuous unplanned interaction in our lives. And we can do that by just having something that we meet regularly around. Let's say we say, hey, do you want to meet and rotate potlucks? Rotate dinners. I'll researchers also find that when we develop groups, our friendships are more sustainable than they are with individuals because there's multiple touch points now, right? Someone else in the group could reach out to all of us, and then we all keep in touch. I hear that. I do. It makes sense, but some people will be listening to you and it will scare the heck out of them to do something like that. You wrote something that I think could be really helpful for people who feel that way. And that is that we should just assume that people, even strangers that we're talking to, that they like us, that they actually do like us. How important is that? Oh my gosh, it's so important. This one piece of advice that I've come across has just changed my life so much. We all have this tendency to think we're more likely to be rejected than we actually are. Making that you're running dialog, like, oh, it's really scary for me to ask my friend, but I'm going to assume that they might be interested in this. I'm going to assume that this might go well. I'm going to assume that they'd like to hang out. Just like I would. Is a really powerful way to build up your confidence so that you can initiate. I think that's so helpful. Thank you for that. We also heard from a lot of people in their 30s and their 40s who said that having kids or moving to a new city made it tough for them to form connections. Here's Kate Hickok. She's 42, moved to Maine from New York City with her husband in 2018, and she tells us that they still haven't met any friends. We have two small children. One was a baby when we moved here and one was born during the pandemic. So it's hard to make plans. I'm also a city girl. I often feel like an outsider when trying to engage with those in my new local main community who either grew up here and have established connections or those who moved here because of their love of nature and the outdoors. I thought I could force friendship to happen by attending events or participating in local sports or activities. I've definitely been angry at my lack of

Marissa G Franco Juliana Clark giuliana LA Kate Hickok Maine New York City
"juliana clark" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:43 min | 11 months ago

"juliana clark" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Have a hard time making new friends At one point about a year into this pandemic I realized it had been a very long time since I'd met anyone new And even for me someone who feels anxious around new people that absence of connecting with strangers was a real loss I know many of you have experienced something similar even before the virus broke loose Here's Ray Charles in one of our listeners from Oregon He's 65 years old As I get older it just seems like it gets harder and harder to make friends or even want to make friends It gets to be a lot of work Putting myself out there We'll hear from more people like ray in just a moment But first psychologist and professor at the university of Maryland Marissa G Franco She's working on a book about making friends and new connections as an adult Marissa welcome Thank you so much for having me These connections are so important In fact you know I'm in awe of my children who can pretty much go up to basically any kid at the playground and they just start playing In fact my youngest daughter will call any child her age like her best friend It's amazing But that isn't how I feel at all What changes is we get older Yeah so sociologists have kind of identified the ingredients that need to be in place for us to make friends organically And they are continuous unplanned interaction and shared vulnerability But as we've become adults we have less and less environments where those ingredients are at play Friendship no longer happens organically You have to try You have to put yourself out there You have to be intentional And that's actually one of the biggest myths that I think people have about friendship is the idea that it should happen organically even though research has shown us that people that see friendship as something that happens based on luck are more lonely years later and those who see it as something that happens based on effort are less lonely years later Do you think that the sense is that it happens organically just because that's the way it used to happen when we were younger That's it because it used to happen that way and we're just using our template from childhood in adulthood when it just no longer applies because our situation is so different We asked our listeners to share their experiences with making Friends as an adult and we got a lot of responses So we're going to go through some of them Each of the people you're about to hear will be in different stages of their lives So let's start with Juliana Clark She's 25 years old and she lives in LA Sometimes I have been able to make a couple friends here and there I'm really more interested in kind of creating like a sustainable community especially since at least so many of the friendships that I've made in my life have kind of had these common experiences anchoring them So what's your advice for younger adults like giuliana who may no longer have the built in social structure of college or any kind of school Yeah that's a great question So when I think about some background for this that I think would be helpful to inform her point is that this I concept of the mere exposure effect which according to the psychology research is the idea that as we see people more regularly they become more familiar to us We like them more This happens completely unconsciously So we need to basically create and structure that continuous unplanned interaction in our lives And we can do that by just having something that we meet regularly around Let's say we say hey do you want to meet and rotate potlucks rotate dinners Researchers also find that when we develop groups our friendships are more sustainable than they are with individuals because there's multiple touch points now right Someone else in the group could reach out to all of us and then we all keep in touch I hear that I do It makes sense but some people will be listening to you and it will scare the heck out of them to do something like that You wrote something that I think could be really helpful for people who feel that way And that is that we should just assume that people even strangers that we're talking to or want to talk to that they like us that they actually do like us How important is that Oh my gosh it's so important This one piece of advice that I've come across has just changed my life so much We all have this tendency to think we're more likely to be rejected than we actually are Making that you're running dialog like oh it's really scary for me to ask my friend but I'm going to assume that they might be interested in this I'm going to assume that this might go well I'm going to assume that they'd like to hang out just like I would Is it really powerful way to sort of build up your confidence so that you can initiate Also more generally just try your best to check your mean internal dialog that we all have within us And to consider that other people might like you more than you think they do I think that's so helpful Thank you for that We also heard from a lot of people in their 30s and their 40s who said that having kids or moving to a new city made it tough for them to form connections Here's Kate Hickok She's 42 Moved to Maine from New York City with her husband in 2018 and she tells us that they still haven't met any friends We have two small children One was a baby when we moved here and one was born during the pandemic So it's hard to make plans I'm also a city girl I often feel like an outsider when trying to engage with those in my new local main community who either grew up here and have established connections or those who moved here because of their love of nature and the outdoors I thought I could force friendship to happen by attending events or participating in local sports or activities I've definitely been angry at my lack of friendship and at our new hometown So.

Marissa G Franco Juliana Clark Ray Charles Marissa university of Maryland Oregon ray giuliana LA Kate Hickok Maine New York City
"juliana clark" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"juliana clark" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Always share the reasons. Why i'm doing something the way i'm doing it. And if there's feedback of why we should a different way the reasons why we're not i. Also i take feedback a lot. Personally like i try not to have an ego at work and if people say to me like hey if you consider doing it this way and i haven't i have no problem saying whoa. I haven't that's a fantastic idea. Let's try that. That's one of those things that i've learned from like leaders that i respect are the people who do that so i try to be like that. I think it's really easy to get caught up in ego at work. Especially when you're like either. The brand person and somebody who doesn't work in brand is giving me brand advice and it feels like it's like stepping on my toes. It's like no like some people just have really good ideas and it doesn't really matter like what team they were. What their title says like anybody can have a good idea. And i think you're never in the right role if you're not open to listening to those ideas how do you. I'm because i'm sure you have hired a handful of people. How do you know that they're going to be a good marketer. Ooh i got that's a great one I don't and i think where. I probably did like the most true like at hiring was up parachute and the people that i hired. I think we're people who i could tell. Were just like really smart. Like being able to have a conversation and show genuine curiosity knowledge. Even if it's not about what you're interviewing for. I think for me at least goes a long way. I think if you have people who just. I always like hire smart people because they can learn how to do the things that you need them to do. But there could be somebody who is really good at one thing but if they don't really have the ability to think on their feet and to problem solve in general like depending on what the role is like. That might not be what you want. And i find that digital marketing and therefore brand marketing are changing so quickly with just the way the world is changing. So you're never really going to find somebody who is going to be able to execute like brand marketing strategy perfectly. Because it's always going to be changing. But i hire people who have an interest and curiosity about the world around them. Who know things that. I don't and who are problem. Solvers and fast learners. I've never really met like people who excel in marketing. Who were like. I always wanted to do marketing. And i always find that a little weird to like. I didn't major in marketing in college. Like i was a writer and a police major. And i think having other skills and interests are what make you a good marketer because you kind of understand like how to speak to people and different types of people in diff- in a unique way. Yeah okay. this is the final question. I swear to god. I could talk to you forever though i love it. This was very fun for me. So right we are all about redefining success. And i would love to know. How do you define success. How has it changed as you've evolved. Yeah for me. Success is am. I exceedingly the standards actually set for myself that success so i think that seems maybe obvious but i personally like even right out of college like even in some of my last couple jobs like i really define success. As am i impressing people. Do people think i'm smart. Am i getting promotions. And my making more money like these things now. I kind of amount a point where it's like nope because even when that has happened like i haven't always felt like i was succeeded because the standards you have for yourself are oftentimes very different than the standards. You might think that like your company or your boss has for you. But i feel like if i set my own standards of like this is what success means. An eye exceed those like to me. That's successful. it's exceeding the standards. I set for myself be not just at work but in life i think even things as like. I've had a successful day. If i have gone on the run because that's the standard. I set for myself like three days a week. I'm going on a run. And if i hit bat mark on that day like that was a successful day even if everything else in my day like did not go well like i had a successful day. Well it was so good chatting with you. I know you have a very busy day. Oh thank you. This was very fun. i appreciate it. This was like a great conversation for me to have. Let's do it again in palm springs. Okay the best way you can support girl boss. Radio is by hitting that subscribe. Button grow boss. Radio is a production of. I love creative studio. If you're looking for designer production checkout i'll of creatives dot studio lor if you're a created slashing in a stack your skills use the code girl boss for ten percent off at of creatives dot com original music composed by media. And this episode was produced by juliana clark imani leonard christopher nolan and courtney cossack engineering was done by michael castenada and our editorial director is special. Thanks to nor agency and kaley until next week puno is out..

michael castenada juliana clark courtney cossack next week creatives dot com kaley ten percent leonard three days a week christopher nolan puno one of those things nor imani creatives dot studio creative studio code girl one thing Button grow boss agency
"juliana clark" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"juliana clark" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Redefine success for me successes if i wake up in the morning and i feel optimistic about the day. That is a huge success. If i feel optimistic when i sit down in front of my desk. And i'm excited to whether it's how this conversation or jump on a call if i'm genuinely feeling a huge success what a privilege and what an honor to be able to enjoy what you do like feels very rare at all converge where you really believe in what your buildings. You really liked the people you get to work with. You see the impact that in create on a daily basis that's so special mazer When did you realize that that was success for you. I have to keep reminding having conversation. But this hub. Because it's also very easy to be a regular human where you wake up in the morning and you're like a little rigor i don't feel like getting this morning so i think it's a constant reminder looking back now at astoria when she was starting this in two thousand. Eighteen has kind of gone the way that you wanted to go. It's better will can't ask more than that. Yeah so grateful. Every it's harder than i thought it would be in what way every owen covers. Everything is harder than i thought it would be. But that's it's all select even better than what skills did you have to really build in order to do what you've done in the past three years i think getting really comfortable with being uncomfortable Yeah people want black and white. We don't wanna love in the gray. And i think this whole entrepreneurship company. Thing is very much in the gray. All time constant state of gray constant state of slight discomfort or major comfort. I feel like everybody needs to learn that skill. Not just founders. Because what is certain. You know there's nothing that is certain and if the last year has taught us anything anything can come right at you. Oh my goodness yeah. Well man i keep talking to you forever but our podcast is only so long. Thank you so much for your honesty and four getting me on the nuances. I really appreciate that. Because that is how someone can function in uncomfortableness. Yes is recognizing the nuances and everything. I think that's right are had wonderful wonderful time. You thank you so much for having me on. Thank you again so much ash your honesty about funding and for making great olive oil and vinegar if you wanna learn more about bright land checkout we are bright land on instagram and schwab area has generously extended a discount code to be girl bus nation. So if you're salivating to dry bright lanes delicious product land head to bright lynn dot co and use code girl boss for ten percent off the rest of the month of june girl. Boss radio is a production of. I love creative studio. Original music composed by this episode was produced by imani leonard. Christopher nolan courtney. Kodak juliana clark engineering was done by stephanie. Our editorial director is come on and special. Thanks to taylor agency and kaley until next week see ya..

imani leonard kaley instagram next week ten percent stephanie Eighteen Kodak juliana two thousand last year schwab Christopher nolan courtney past three years taylor code girl boss june girl Boss bright land astoria