18 Episode results for "Julian"

A Look Inside The Emotions Of Cancelling Events During COVID-19 #834

Trent365

04:02 min | 1 year ago

A Look Inside The Emotions Of Cancelling Events During COVID-19 #834

"Today I want to give you a quick look inside the emotions of cancelling an event during this covert nineteen crisis. Yesterday I made the decision to cancel our annual Bali anniversary event. Now in light of what's happening around the world you might think that that's a pretty easy decision to make but the reality was there was still a lot of questions. I had to ask myself firstly. We'd never canceled this event. Before we've been through bombings we've been through bird-flu we'd been through an armies and in the history of the company we've never had to cancel this event and this is a gathering of all of Bali team and whoever else we can gather from around the world to celebrate the anniversary. It's one hundred and fifty two hundred people and so you've also got to ask yourself how disappointed people going to be. I'm now disappointing. A whole bunch of that same. Who really really look forward to this event. Every year. The other thing I asked myself is what sort of message ammo sending my sending the right message of the wrong message. Am I just fanning the paranoia around this event and my sending the wrong message to our hotel partners who start to panic or am I sending the right message? By cancelling at saying we take this thing very seriously then of course there's also a bit of money involved. These deposits are being paid. There's a whole bunch of financial implications to consider. Now the reality is all of those decisions are predominantly internal stakeholders that were affecting for us. It ultimately came down to a conversation in my head about two things. What's the worst that can happen if we cancel the worst? That could really happen is that we disappoint a bunch of people now. What's the worst could happen if we go ahead with somebody dies and that's actually really what? Boil down to because if somebody was to come to this event get seek. Bring it home. Because don't forget most about people young and healthy and have good immune system so they're probably going to be impacted severely even if they get the vars but the grandparents so imagine if someone came to win home got the virus their grandparents from them and then they died. That's kind of on my shoulders. That's on my head that this person has died because I didn't cancel something that I could have canceled. And so when you really break it down to that simple question. It's actually really easy decision to make but again. I'm just saying that that. This is a situation involving predominantly internal stakeholders not a lot of money involved and okay fair of People. Hundred fifty people thereabouts. But for those people have got external stakeholders involved in hundreds of external stakeholders and for those people have got lots and lots of money. Tens and hundreds of thousands of dollars on the line canceling events at this time is actually a really big decision to make so. I've got a lot of empathy for those people around me and now a lot of you have done this already. Who CANCELED THEIR EVENTS? I know that we've canceled the provisional beauty event or at least delighted the fifth summits being delayed Julian's massage competition championships being delayed or deferred so all of these people have made these decisions to cancel these events. Hats off to you. It's not an easy decision to make. Even though for many people it is but when you really boil it down to the worst that can happen if you cancel versus the worst. That can happen if you go ahead and realized the worst that can happen. If you go ahead is somebody dies. That actually makes it a pretty easy decision anyway. I just thought I'd share the inside. Look I guess of people canceling events because for a lot of people externally thinking about the impact on them and how it's upset their their plans and upset finances but for those people making those decisions hats off to you. It's not an easy thing to do but all things considered it kind of is the right thing to do right now already. That is today. Do thank you for your time and we'll be back again tomorrow.

Julian
6pm Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

02:20 min | 6 months ago

6pm Newscast

"I can't believe it. The elevators totally stopped. All these buttons are dark. None of them are working. There's a little panel down there. I think it's got a phone in it. It's nearly one o'clock in the morning. We're the last people in the building. There's going to be anybody. I don't even have dial tone one's pick it up. Nothing can you hear that music. Let's just we need to get killed before we do anything that's gonna that's gonna make me crazy for stuck in here. I think the speaker cables are probably that should do it. I it feels like we've just been cursed every single year. Retry one of the things that never works. I mean think back to that. I won the cabin in the woods so many years ago it was so beautiful and then like one by one. Everyone called and cancelled. It was just a disaster but we did have that one. remember julian. Koster call from neutrals clientele playedas that song that saved the night. That's right. I i remember like it was yesterday. Oh my gosh. Julian koster mr music tapes neutral milk hotel got. I can't wait for him to bring you saw musical saw. Yeah he should be here any minute because you know it's we're getting close to the to the big party time they ju- lead you close you here. We are you. Oh well i. i'm afraid. I don't think i can make it is. It's not you don't sound concerned. One of my shows is a cold. One of your singing saws is do name. Yeah i know it's noise. He's sorry what's this. What's the symptom of a of a saw with the.

Julian koster Koster julian
Episode 143: Knock and Announce

Criminal

35:11 min | 1 year ago

Episode 143: Knock and Announce

"This episode contains descriptions of violence. Please use discretion. In two thousand fourteen, a woman was pulled over by Myrtle beach police in Myrtle beach South Carolina. The woman was black and the police said they pulled over because of a tail light. They found a small amount of marijuana in her car and she was given the option to avoid charges if she told them where she got marijuana. As one officer later put it, she was asked quote who she knows. She, says she did know someone, but she didn't know his full name. She only knew him as Jules. My name is Julian bitten and right now. I'm in a Conway South Carolina. The police drove the woman to Julian Buttons apartment. They wired her with a hidden video camera and audio recorder, and then they gave her a hundred dollars and told her ass. Julian button to sell her marijuana. Julian is black and in two thousand fifteen. He was thirty years old. It was a friend of Mario de time girlfriend it was. She had some problems after father who died, so she had a medical discharge from the military. And she had asked me for some and I gave her some in first, and they told her to come back and buy from me, so that's what she did. The woman came out with what police recorded as approximately seven grams of marijuana. She'd done what the officers asked her to do, but something had gone wrong with the video recording. So they waited a few weeks, gave her hundred more dollars and drove her back to Julian Ben's house. What I didn't expect her to come back and buy. That was kind of strange that she came back and wanted to buy was like okay. We'll hear what that's not naming. are this ain't something is going become a habit? She would for her because I knew her situation I don't know I think I think she was pretty much more scared than anything when police stopped. If, they if she didn't give some if she didn't give a person gave. It's award that she was going to go to jail and Louis, her military benefits. On the second visit. The woman bought approximately eight grams. And there a video recording. This gave officers from the Fifteenth Circuit Drug Enforcement Unit probable cause to get a search warrant for Julian Ben's apartment. The Fifteenth Circuit Drug, enforcement. Unit pulls together. Officers for multiple police departments across Ori- and Georgetown counties in South Carolina. It stated intention is to create a multi jurisdictional multi-agency task force to address major drug enterprises. When you look at the operational plan, the Drug Enforcement Unit created for their search of Julian Buttons apartment. The first thing you see is their insignia. Large drawing of a skull and crossbones in front of a marijuana leaf. There's also a sword and a lightning bolt. Underneath that her a sort of motto. Serving Our community. One dealer at a time. I'm phoebe judge. This is criminal. Julian vet lived in a building with four apartments in Myrtle beach. On April sixteenth two thousand fifteen. Just before three o'clock in the afternoon, his next door neighbor Santos Garcia was outside working on his moped. Julie Ben was inside playing video games. Julian pause the game to go to the bathroom. And upon coming out of my bathroom, I hear, allow bone and I'm thinking my name upstairs. Neighborhood dropped something. That's all heard. Was it would okay? What are you doing? Upstairs was kind of a thought, but as I'm looking up getting ready to say that my aparicio's se objects coming at me in my living room. So, I'm trying to process de step back and reach for my gun because it was terrifying with the hell. Is this and I mean it was just a reflex. Be Reaching for my first first thing defense. Did you hear a knock debate. Announce themselves. No no, not at all. No. The next door neighbor cintos Garcia said that he'd been standing there and all of a sudden several cars appeared. He, said quote. A white car pulled up into my front yard. Right in front of me. One of the men who got out of it pointed a rifle directly at me. I was told to get down and I immediately did. I was five feet from Julian's front porch and door. Without stopping several of the men who had just arrived immediately went up into Julian's front porch and bastion his door. None of the men announced that they were police. no-one knocked on his door. No one waited any period of time for him to come to the door. And then Santos. Garcia said within two seconds of the men bashing Julian's door. I heard multiple gunshots that sounded like automatic weapons. I remember I remember getting hit. The first shot hit me because I didn't hear the shot I felt it, and it was right up under my right arm like maybe. Enter to away from my. Chest my nipple my. Out of my chest. And that's. It felt like more of A. Like somebody had just punched me real hard. And I thought it was like it was. It happened so fast. It was just like okay, and I knew. Intuitively. I was like okay. You're dead. That's just my my, but that was the last had there was like you did. And, I woke up in the calmest six weeks later. According to the drug, enforcement, units operate plans. Ten officers were assigned to go to Julian. Buttons apartment decks acute the search warrant. An officer named Chad guess is listed as the case agent. Three of the officers of the apartment that day shot Julian baton. Frank Quavo Chris Dennis and David Blue. They fired an estimated twenty nine times and nine bullets hit Julian. Julian says he never fired his gun. Here's how officer David Blue. described. What happened he speaking to a lieutenant with the office of professional standards at the Myrtle Beach Police Department, so I grabbed the screen door pulled it open for the not for the person to knock and announce, and you'll have the ram. Seinfeld, the screen door, and out of habit, announced police search warrant of. Gaza other guys started to stack up on the porch in a kind of like formation, preparing to inner. Chad guests he. He had the RAM actually in his hands he was going to be the person to ram the door by force with knowing those no insurance He comes up to the top of the porch. goes up to the front door and he knocks announces police search war. There's no answer. He hits the door with the RAM. The door comes open. It swings in. to agents went in front of me into the House. in those agents were frank, Waddell and Chris Dennis, and then the third person through the door, and so we were. We ended up one two three in a row all side by side. In a soon as I planted my feet inside the door, know I remember when Kristen is being I in. He announced at least once not twice police search warrant police search warrant of and about that time I stepped my feet into the door soon as I planted my fee. I saw a black male who I could identify from the pictures we saw earlier. Julian Mr Ben Turned a corner from a bedroom probably about eight feet in front of US eight ten feet in front of us. With a gun handgun, he was black and color appear to be like large-calibre. Semiautomatic weapon. was fully extended. I. Remember WHO's wearing white t shirt. Bluejeans. His handgun was full extended. His arm was fully extended out and he fired around. In our direction into the center of the three of us to. One round or more I don't know I distinctly. Remember one round, but. I couldn't tell you if hard more not. Okay, so you saw him was his weapon extended the around. What the players that? Once that happened My first in sync was. We're being shot at and so I, I was I had an ar fifteen thousand issued to the Drug Enforcement Unit I pointed my weapon in his direction and fired Several rounds I don't know how many. But several. And I noticed in my peripheral of. Chris Dennis and Frank Dale. Were were falling down My Mind in my mind I thought that Kristen is was shot in. He going down. He went directly. Backwards but he was I could see. He was firing his weapon at a my. Also. Once, they hit the floor The firing stopped I stopped. I saw Julian. I guess you'd says he, he, he dropped the gun at his fee, took a couple steps backwards and kind of fell back into the hallway. at that point I knew he'd been hit often any blood or anything, but I knew he'd been stroke We still thought that was hit. I checked on briefly He said he was okay. I saw Franklin Dale He'd also fall into the ground He had gotten up. and we both you know I I, said Hey. We've got to move forward. We don't know the rest of the house is clear. Frank gotTA. Move forward frank moved forward covering the bad guy or Mr Ben once we got him, frank stood over the handgun it was now does fee and Julia was laid laid out on his back. He was awake and alert and screaming. Some of the officers were wearing body cameras. But it appears they didn't turn them on until after Julian bitten had been shot. With shower. When you watch the body camera footage, you can see Julian on the floor, obviously in terrible pain. The handcuff him. He calls the officers serve. They call him Bud. At one point, he says please don't hurt me anymore. The put a tourniquet on his leg and then you see paramedics takeover. Julian baton was taken to grand. Strand Medical Center where doctors performed multiple surgeries. He was put into a medically induced coma for six weeks. When he woke up. Feel his legs I remember waking up a few different times and CMO hospital at my best hat, and was like okay and kind of dozing off on now with the when I first started getting a memory back to would happen. It was a sheriff officer next to my bid telling me that has shootout with police. And mayhem is arguing because I'm like dude I'm black I don't know I'm not sure that the police tell me what really happened. And then they told me what day it was a panicked because I didn't know. Like, I, lost a month and a half. You. Know the last time I know. It was April I was waking up is is Joan So what happened? To that space and that six weeks. Tossed my friends, they've got a phone. Thorough that live the bulk I heard about it. And what did you hear? I heard. It will shooed out that he got a shootout or something with polices when I initially. This is Julian friend Reggie Mitchell. He says that when he heard that Julia was in the hospital, he went to see him right. and was told he wasn't allowed in the room I got. No reports? For the news where they say did. He shot at cops or something like that. I just knew that being sound right, so my first thing was. College Johnny. Now. That was my first move. Johnny McCoy's lawyer and Reggie Mitchell's old friend. They both grew up in Myrtle beach. They played football together. As soon as I heard that. Soon as I heard that he shot police on new, there wasn't right. Media called. He calls me one day and he says look man. One of my buddies, this guy who I record music with. He's in the hospital. He's in a coma. said what what what happens when the police shot him. And I said it Myrtle Beach, said Yeah. The police shot him and. I said well. What a what did they say he did? He said I don't know I don't know what they say he did. I know they're saying that. He shot them first and then I asked Reggie one question. What did they accuse him having in the House and he said all I know is Julian only messes with weed. And I trusted Reggie right then I. said well. There's no way that this guy had a shootout with the cops over we'd. So I knew that it was gonNA. Be Hell! Try to get the truth out in this case, but because it was marijuana. I knew I knew this young man was not shooting the police over marijuana. When you McCoy went to Julian buttons over for the first time. He was told he couldn't see Julian because. They said he was a restricted patient. Julian baton was technically in police custody in his hospital bed. Johnny McCoy says it took some negotiation, but he eventually allowed to go in and see Julian. That's when he learned the extent of Julian's injuries. He had his gall bladder removed. His spleen removed of. He's paralyzed from the waist down. He add a large part of his small intestine removes. he had. I can't even count the amount of surgeries. This young man has had because his stomach is where he took the bulk of the bullets. Or. That's where the bulk of the surgery happened. He also had a nasty bullet wound in his leg. That's why his legs I mean to this day there. He's working on it, but there's very little there, but yeah, it was the trade tube. The trae to I'd never I'd never interacted with anybody with tracheotomy tube and it was, and he was crying and emotional. It was really it was really something. When I talked to Johnny, my main concern was am I going to jail for the rest of my life because I didn't do what they did, and that was the whole thing and it was like. I don't know how to disprove. The police I mean. It's my word against theirs I. Mean I don't? Really stand the chance. The officers who shot Julian Baton had submitted sign statements stating that they'd fired their weapons after Julian shot at them first. But when investigators collected the Gun Julian had been holding and tested it. They found that it had never been fired. It was fully loaded. This confirmed with Julian had said from the beginning. That he had not shot at the police. The commander of the Drug Enforcement Unit was William Knowles. He was later asked under oath whether any of the officers who participated in the rate of Julian Buttons. Apartment had been disciplined. Replied that they had knocked because quote, they didn't do anything wrong. He was asked. Did. They do anything wrong. When they submitted signed statements that were false. Commander William Knowles replied. I don't know that they submitted sign statements. That were false. I know that that was their perception and that's what they believed. There's a difference in my opinion between ally and someone that perceive something differently. It was lies all the way up to all the way up the top nobody. Above the people who shot me. Sit anything wrong with that. We'll be right back. Support for criminal comes from simplisafe. Simplisafe is an award winning home security system. The believes simple is safer. It's easy to order online. You can set it up yourself in under an hour, and your home is protected. Twenty, four seven with emergency dispatch for break-ins, fire, and more it protects every room door and window with monitoring that includes video doorbells, smart locks and motion sensors, plus there's no contracts or hidden fees. All start just fifty cents a day. Had To simplisafe dot com slash criminal and get free shipping and a sixty day money back guarantee that simplisafe dot com slash criminal. Thanks to better help online counseling for their support, better help, counselors or licensed professionals who specialize in many areas, including relationship, conflict, anxiety, depression, loss, trauma, and more. Better help as an affordable option and our listeners get ten percent off your first month, but the discount code criminal. Join over million people taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional. In fact, so many people have been using better. Help their recruiting additional counselors. All fifty states get started today at better dot com slash criminal. That's better H E L P dot com slash criminal, talked with therapist, online and get. The officers from the Fifteenth Circuit Drug Enforcement. Unit had made two claims from the beginning. One that they had shot Julian bitten after he fired at them first. Tests later showed. The Julian's gun had never been fired. They also claimed that. When they arrived to his apartment, they knocked and announce themselves before entering. Police sometimes obtain so-called no warrants. But in this case, the officers had a standard warrant which required them to knock on Julian store announced themselves as police officers. In Give Julian reasonable amount of time to answer the door before entering. The Drug Enforcement Unit officers said on multiple occasions and typed in statements. That they had knocked and announce themselves as police officers when they arrived it Julian. Buttons apartment. Julian Benton said he never heard a knock. His next door neighbor Santos. Garcia who would watch the whole thing said he was a hundred percent sure the police had not knocked. Here's Julian's attorney Johnnie. McCoy so when you file criminal discovery. They have to give you. So about three months after I filed by Cremona Discovery, the officer who was handling the battering. Ram, shows up at my office and he's got this sort of like dvr box in his hand with no cords, nothing just a dvr box. He's came in I. Just wanted to bring this over to you. This is from Julian Taus, probably nothing and gives it to me. I knew right then and there I had to call my buddy. WHO KNEW ANYTHING ABOUT ELECTRONICS? We ordered the correct chords for it. We had by brand new ones. We plugged in and. When we got to the part. where? On on April fifteenth of Two Thousand Fifteen at approximately I think it was three o'clock in the afternoon, and we in the picture became clear, and we saw these officers pull up on Juliet's front lawn. There was proof they were lying. I knew they were lying the whole time, but now I knew that there was. There was no way for the get around it that we had Like we, we got him we got him. That's when that's one stuff. Start Changing Investment desimone star. Stop looking for me was like okay. We finally got something that disproves their lives. They they they. SAID THEY GONNA, announce before they can't. They said he'd knock before they came in. They said they announced before they came in. And then they said are fire them, and then pointed the gun at them. which are four was lies? To disprove one at a time. And we went ahead and follow. In the surveillance video from Julian Security Camera, you can see a white SUV. pull up right in front of the building. You see Julian buttons next door. Neighbor Santos Garcia standing outside with his moped right for the house. Then all of a sudden you see. There's white. SUV poll up right. Through the grass. Right up into this guy's face. WHO's working on the head? There's no insignia on the white car. There's no there's no police insignia. You can't tell that it's a police car than five or so men who are. Not Dressed in police, uniforms of police insignia on that's identifiable. Some of have masks on some of them. Baseball caps on that are backwards. Some had jeans on. Some have long sleeved shirts on. Some you know is totally scattered. You can't tell who these guys are. Some of them have a are fifteen. Well. Most of them have ar fifteen, th of one of battering Ram, they all exit this vehicle three of them with fifteen run up on the porch, one of opens the screen door, and the guy with the battering ram on a on a dead. Burn it. Comes up the stairs and hammers the door down boom. Julian's next door. Neighbor Santos Garcia. Told investigators quote. If the men would have just knocked on Julian's door and announced themselves as police. I believe Julian would have walked out peacefully. Did Not have to happen the way it happened. In almost all of South Carolina officer involved shootings are investigated by the South Carolina Law. Enforcement Division also known as sled. sled conducted the investigation into Julian's case, and their findings were reviewed by an independent prosecutor named Kevin Bracket. downst- in July of two thousand fifteen. that. None of the three officers who shot Julian. Button would face criminal charges. He said quote. The officers were justified in their use of force. They were acting in the room defense. Julian Button did face criminal charges for possession of marijuana and possession with intent to distribute. Ended up having to plead guilty to the possession of marijuana charge to marijuana with intent distribute where he sold to that young lady. He he had pled guilty that he owned up to it, but these officers never even got questioned about their lies nothing. The judge suspended Julian Sentence essentially giving him credit for the time. He was in police custody in the hospital. Julian, Benton. The lawsuit against the city of Myrtle beach, and the officers and supervisors involved with the raid. His lawyers Johnny McCoy joined by civil. Rights Attorneys Burton Craig and Brad Bannon depose the Drug Enforcement Unit officers at length under oath. At one point during a deposition officer Chad guests testified. It's not the law to knock and announce you know it's just not. It's the officer's discretion. Commander William Knowles was asked. What's the purpose of the knock announced in wheat constitutional requirement? He replied. I didn't write it. How would I know what the purpose of it is I know that it's requirement, so we do it. I don't know what the purpose of it is. One of the officers involved in the rate of Julie's apartment officer mark. McIntyre resigned shortly after. He went on the record, stating that during his time with the drug. Enforcement Unit from October two thousand fourteen through April two thousand fifteen. Quote. Agents almost always forcibly entered without. Renouncing or simultaneously with announcing the attorney Brad Bannon says officer. McIntyre was in essence a whistleblower. Some of the defendants settled for two point seven five million dollars in March of two thousand eighteen. Others including officer, David, blue and the city of Myrtle beach did not. Officer blue appealed on qualified immunity. The case was reviewed by the United. States Court of Appeals for the four circuit. The judges were critical of the way the police had treated Julian baton. As Judge Barbara Keenan said they just came in to unload on the sky. The four circuit rejected officer. Blues qualified immunity claim and sent the case back to the lower, court. And, just before jury selection officials for the city of Myrtle beach settled the case for eight point five million dollars. Combined with the earlier settlement amount, Julian was awarded, a total of eleven point two five million dollars. His medical bills have already exceeded three million. None of the officers received any disciplinary action. How are you doing now physically? I'm still Akron. I can take. Ten maybe twelve steps my walker. But predominantly wheelchair most party today, but I can't push it in and get it and get on my walker in an show out for about ten or twelve steps. So I'm getting stronger. It's just taking them longer than I thought I would, but my problem is. My right leg doesn't been at the knee and I have some Shushi aiding nerve pain. And it's kicking and right now what it's it? It seems like it never goes away. It has a mind of its own, and we can't figure out why. My right leg doesn't bend at the need, so I might have to have another surgery to have my. To get my nita start bending, but once that happens can maybe start walking a little faster. Gear, you in constant pain. Ninety percent of the day, yes. How do you? How do you manage it? A great sense of humor. A great humor. I try not to. I try my best not to let that get me down. I'm Never been a pessimistic person so I. Don't think I should start now He says the first thing he did. When he got settlement money was remodeled the shower and his house to make it bigger, so as wheelchair could fit I'm in love war all over. That was the first thing. With the show. I got. I got my I got my shower I. Get my. My hope bathroom just a shower remodel so I can near, and I have wheelchair that sits in there that I get in that transfers. Who from my wheelchair then stays in the shower? So yes, that was the first thing about was a shower. What's your life like now? What what is what's life like for you now? Simple now that I don't go I. Don't go to work. have video games for the most part holiday. You like video games. Yes. Yes, what's your favorite game? right now would say collar duty. I've never played a video game. I've only played Mario Brothers from like nineteen eighty-seven. My whole life haven't played like snake on your phone. Oh you remember to own. The kids had the little snake. I actually yes. I played that and I. I guess I have played that I remember that Game Oh. My God I forgot about that game. Played that game, everybody played that game. Yeah, that was a decent game, but I would assume that it gives them passes time. What do you want people to know about what happened to you? That it was wrong. and. That I was too late to prevent. It from happening to somebody else because beyond the Taylor. Was the same thing except for she died and I didn't. And and I I mean I was actually guilty of a crime she didn't. She didn't even commit a crime. I mean. Police get away with everything and. Those back, the is to training. The the cops, the shot me weren't the same competition, Brianna, Taylor with the case happen. The same way is to training. It's what they're trained to do. So. When. They're of twelve officers arrested one guy for selling a bag of marijuana. Dislike that's that's. Wasting taxpayers money every day of the week. and. It shouldn't be something that people were getting shot over. In the in in any type of way. We contacted the south, Carolina Lockdown forcement division and many of the agencies involved in the drug, enforcement unit, including the Myrtle Beach, police department, or county, police department and the Georgetown County. Sheriff's office, but we haven't heard back. In May of this year. Julian Betton was invited to meet with Myrtle beach city officials. During that meeting, they apologized for the shooting. Julian says none of the officers ever apologized to him. No, no, no officers did. Would you like that? They didn't want to. They had a chance they they didn't want to. And and they don't want to. If they if they wanted if they wanted to. Then I would, it would be genuine, and they would have done it and being that they haven't done. It means they don't WanNa do it. It would be disingenuous because there not not. There's no, and there's no need for it. There's no need at for it. criminalist created by Lawrence Spore and me. NYDIA. Wilson is our senior producer. Susannah Alberson's our assistant producer. Audio Mix by rob buyers. Special thanks to Matt Major. Julian Alexander makes original illustrations for each episode of criminal. You can see them at this is criminal dot, com or on facebook and twitter at criminal show. Criminal is recorded in the studios of North Carolina Public Radio W. UNC, where proud member of radio topiary from PR x a collection of the best podcasts around. I'm phoebe judge. This is criminal. Radio. Support, your criminal comes from better help online counseling. Help counselors or licensed professionals who specialize in many areas including relationship, conflict, anxiety, depression, loss, trauma, and more. Better help is an affordable option and our listeners get ten percent off your first month with Discount Code Criminal. Join the over a million people taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional. In fact, so many people have been using better help, but they're recruiting additional counselors in all fifty states get started today at better help, dot com slash criminal. That's better, each yelp P dot com slash criminal talked with therapist online and get help.

Julian officer Julian Buttons Julian baton Myrtle beach Drug Enforcement Unit Santos Garcia marijuana Julian Ben Johnny McCoy Julian Mr Ben Julian Alexander Julian Betton Julian Benton Julian Taus Myrtle beach Julian Sentence Julian Button Commander William Knowles Chad
32Julian, the Apostate Who Aped the Church

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina

25:02 min | 5 months ago

32Julian, the Apostate Who Aped the Church

"Go as he. You know The folders and be summoned by on sundar oud. Welcome to the way of the father's a podcast sponsored by catholic culture dot org. I'm your host. Mike aquilina this episode will be unusual. Some time ago we considered the work of basil the great especially in terms of its influence on later christian social doctrine. Today i want to revisit basil's life in order to compare his social vision with that of his most powerful contemporary the emperor julian known to history as julian the apostate both basil and julian were gifted leaders. Both were bright brave and disciplined men. Both were steeped in tradition and both wanted to find new ways of expressing ancient traditions. They revered both place their lives at the service of a certain ideal of social order. Both in fact were raised in a christian tradition that stretched back more than three hundred years. Basil owned that tradition and tried to move forward. Julian despised it and tried to supplant it. Well the document known as the did a k. Is one of the most important early witnesses to that tradition outside. The new testament is probably the oldest christian text that has survived. Some parts of it are probably than the books of the new testament and some passages may predate christianity. The word did k. Means simply teaching the did k. claim to be the body of teaching the apostles had left regarding how to run a church how to fashion and sustain a christian society out of many individual christian lives so revered. Was this book in the early church that it was sometimes listed among the inspired books. The dedica- begins with these words. Two ways there are one of life and one of death and there is a great difference between the two ways. there are two ways each way. According to the data k. Involve certain actions and certain omissions and each of these actions or omissions contributes to the making of a certain kind of society. Keep that in mind as we turn again to basil and julian who split the two ways between them each took a particular road and each would say with robert frost that that made all the difference. There ways divisions their ideals were not morally equivalent. They were opposites indeed. Perhaps both men would agree that there are two ways were rivals in a great cosmic drama. Both julian and basil were students together in athens in three fifty five. Ad both were then in their twenties. Both had been raised in christian families. Let's take a look at their two ways. One by one will begin with basil in episode. Twenty nine we considered basil's life in some detail. We saw that. He was born into a large and loving christian family his ancestors included martyrs and even his parents had suffered a bit for the faith. Basil's father was a professor of rhetoric. Who home school does children. He died when basil was a teenager and basil continued his academic studies at prestigious schools. I in his native capita osha then for a year in the imperial capital constantinople and finally for six years at athens. It was there the three. Fifty's that basil and julian converged. This was the fourth centuries ivy league where the rich and powerful went to get their training in life. Both basil and julian studied under lebanese. The most famous rhetorician of their time labontes was an ardent proponent of the old religion the pagan religion but he did not let this stand in the way of his training of great christian men among his students were besides basil and julian john system and gregory of nausea. Gregory in fact became basil's closest friend. While they were at athens they were housemates and shared a common life. Philosophical study prayer and fasting basil return to capita osha to teach in three fifty five at that time. Basil had a spiritual awakening that led him to take up the contemporary of life in seclusion with a small group of family and friends. He lived as a monk on his family's estate the fruit of contemplation poured forth in his writing. His theological works in his letters drew attention for their area in and their style. His old classmate julian emperor tried to entice basil to life at court but basil refused. Basil was ordained a priest around three sixty two and made an auxiliary bishop sharply afterward. It was a time of doctrinal crisis in the church but also social crisis in three sixty eight. A series of natural calamities including hailstorms floods and earthquakes. brought famine. to the lands of capita. Basil was appalled when some merchants seize the opportunity to grow rich from the scarcity of food leaving the port starve. Basil's preaching shamed the wealthy and lead them to share what they had he lead by example as well as he sold his inheritance and gave the proceeds over to relief efforts. It was basil's management of these crises that established his reputation with the christian people when his bishop died three seventy basil was made the bishop of caesarea and he served in that capacity until his death in three seventy nine historian say that basil was the first to produce a sustained theological reflection on the church's social concerns and his ideas found institutional form as he built a vast campus known as the best salacious the locals called the new city and it included a soup kitchen poor houses and trade school a hostel for needy travellers personal care for the elderly and a hospice for the dying his staff of monks and nuns dispensed food and medical care but basil insisted that the duty to serve the poor was not just a peculiarity of monks and nuns. It applied to all christians. He accepted relief from the imperial government and he even argued for it but he was unwilling to trade it for influence. He was consistently keen to defend the rights of the church against encroachments by secular power. He refused julian's invitation to serve at court. He declined similar overtures from his provincial. Governors basil's classmate. Julian was similar to the great saint in many ways. They were both brilliant intellectuals with mighty ambitions there were both disciplined men who could defer pleasures and gratifications. For the sake of a chosen 'cause they both modeled fortitude for their followers. Julian's in the army and basil's in the church both men loom colossal in the history of their time. And that's impressive. Since basil did not live to see his fiftieth birthday. And julian reigned for less than three years. So we come to julian. Julian was born in three thirty one into a brutal family and a bloody business. His father was the emperor constantine's half brother one historian notes that julien's family spent a great deal of their days developing ingenious ways to kill each other. The motive was usually intrigue grabs for the throne or just the suspicion bread by such an atmosphere in three twenty six. Constantine ordered the execution of his own wife and eldest son. The three remaining sons succeeded their father in three thirty seven and rather quickly dispatched almost all their male relatives. Only two young boys were spared five year old julian and his teenage brother gallus. Julia was too young to be a threat and gallus to sickly. Though julian continue to live the privileged life of the imperial family. He kept the memory of that purge whose victims included his own father and he nursed the grudge years later. He would write with incredulity of his cousin. The emperor stand us. Our fathers were brothers sons of the same father and close relations as we were how this most humane emperor treated us. He put to death six of our cousins. My father who was his uncle another of our uncles on my father's side and my eldest brother all without trial. The imperial family was officially christian by this time and the irony was not lost on. Julian who was himself raised a christian constituents. The murderer professed the doctrine of jesus. Christ it doesn't take a psychiatrist to locate the origins of julian's anti christian. Dr julian learn to keep his thoughts to himself. Contentious was his patron and alienation from the emperor meant certain death so julian studied diligently with basil and gregory took philosophy and rhetoric at athens and secretly began his investigations of the old religion. The pagan mysteries he found a group that secretly practice the old rituals any join them though. He kept up his outward practice of christianity his mind and heart now belonged to the old gods appointed to leadership in the military. Julian rose rapidly with some stunning campaigns in the western provinces and barbarian lands. He gained a reputation for toughness. Unlike other generals he shared the hardships of his troops. He ate what they ate slept where they slept and he rewarded them handsomely. All this made for tenacious loyalty. Not surprisingly they eventually declared him emperor so in three sixty. Julian began to march toward byzantium to confront his cousin constanza soon. But the meeting never happened. Constanza s- died of natural causes. While julian was on the way then began the rain that gave julian his place in history. Julian did some great things. He did some things extremely well. Tax reform for example and military leadership. But no one remembers julian as a tax reform or even much as a general. He is remembered as the apostate. The man who renounced christianity in public and forcefully institutional way the christian church had enjoyed the favour of emperors for a half century but julian made clear that his reign would be different. He immediately made vast sums available to restore temples that had fallen into disrepair through a generation of christian rule and pagan decline. He promoted pagans to prominent positions in the capital and boosted the wages of the pagan priest. Hoods he tried at least in the beginning to include christians in his dawning era of toleration. As i said he invited basil to take a seat at the imperial court but the churches. Big names were wary. Basil refused the honor and julian became more hardened in his anti christian position. Pagan restoration became the keynote of his rule. He wrote a philosophical take. Down of the christian religion titled against the gala liens yet. Julian's paganism was not really the old religion. It was rather a mirror image of christianity. It was an anti church a reactionary project. Julian himself recognized christianity's influence on his ideas. You can take the emperor of the church. But you can't take the church out of the emperor. Julian's greatest recent biographer adrian. Murdoch wrote julian's attempt at creating a pagan doctrine. Betray his christian upbringing. By the very fact of his early education he was already as he would have put it polluted whereas the old religion had been a riot of god's colts and feasts julian strove in a very roman way to impose unity and uniformity on worldwide polytheism. And it was the religious equivalent of herding cats in julian scheme. The emperor himself served as a sort of pope over a hierarchy that mirrored the catholic structure of archbishops bishops and priests. He said a pagan philanthropies in imitation of catholic charities. He urged his clergy to lead lives of virtue and preach philosophy to the people. Julian himself had chosen to lead. Celebrate life after the death of his wife as adrian murdoch puts it. he wanted the pagans to out christian. The christians julian despised christianity and led the charge to repay denies the empire but he could not help but imitate catholicism if he wanted to succeed at establishing religion and implementing his social and cultural program in his letters. He grudgingly admitted admiration for christian charity. To one man he vented the impious galileo and support not only their poor but ours as well. Everyone can see that poor lack aid from us. His pagan coming out climax during an extended stay in syrian antioch. A city of a half million people situated on route to the battlegrounds where he would meet the persians while in antioch julian renewed the pagan practices. Though he was hardly satisfied with the priests performances. He showed himself to be as prissy and uptight. As any of history's most fanatical puritans in antioch a city known for its comedians and satirists. The majority christian population openly laughed at julian's efforts. this infuriated him of course and led to harsher restrictions on the christians he began by banning believers from teaching grammar rhetoric and philosophy. He made the requirements schoolteachers so stringently pagan that no christian could fulfil them banished from the public square. Christianity could be minimized as a cultural force yet. Julian had retained the appearance of religious freedom. Believers remained free to do and think whatever they wanted on sundays as long as they didn't let it seep into the wider society from nine to five on monday through saturday. According to a recent biographer. This was julian's masterstroke. Julian marginalized christianity to the point where it could potentially have vanished within a generation or two and without the need for physical coercion as julianne said of the christians. If they wanna learn literature they have luke and mark let them go back to their churches and expound on them. Julian wanted to remove christians from public discourse neutralize their public influence and drive them into a cultural ghetto and briefly briefly he succeeded. It was not to last however as and shook the dust of antioch from his feet. He marched his troops toward persia into their devastating defeat at the hands of the persian emperor. Shop poor the second on the battlefield at the persian frontier. Julian fell hard and with him. The eastern empire began to crumble. According to one account he was struck by a spear and suddenly saw matters clearly according to some reports his last words were you win. Galilee in juliet's death was a critical moment in the fall of the old empire. His biographer adrian. Murdoch concludes to all intents and purposes. We can say that paganism died as a credible political and social force in the last days of june. Three sixty three and in such ends christians found a new beginning. The historian robert royal gives us an excellent summary. Answer to the question of why. Julian failed the church. Fathers cited supernatural causes and the hand of providence but builds on nature and julian's old project died of abundant natural causes. Bear with me please. While i quote royal summary at length it's brilliant. Julian crafted one of the strongest early critiques of christian beliefs and made great efforts to stop christianity's growth as a social force in the empire yet julian conceded in a realistic appraisal of what he had to overcome that the christian churches were carrying out relief efforts among the poor pagan as well as christian that the pagans themselves were not julian and the whole classical world suffered two disadvantages in competing with the new faith. I there was no substantial set of principles within classical religion and philosophy to inspire such charitable works the stoic said come closest with their conception of the entire world as one city the cosmopoulos but by julian's day platon ism was the only real pagan philosophy still standing and even the old stoic principal was a far cry from the active and lively sense of the universal brotherhood and sisterhood within the kingdom of god that the christians called cari toss had such ideas been influential in pagan societies. They would not have faced a second problem. The absence of the social structures needed to implement large scale works of charity. The empire and its municipalities sometimes provided a public dole but love and empowerment of the common. People is something quite different from a state subsidy. No ancient city let alone. The whole empire had ever attempted that in the world of late. Antiquity christianity introduced not only new beliefs and ideas but new social practices that transformed ancient mediterranean life. Julian could not manufacture the sort of love that drove the christians during centuries of persecution to establish a network a system a society a culture of voluntary mutual care and support. What christians were willing to do for god. No one in his right mind would do for a program as boring as julian's it may be sweet and beautiful as the pagan said to die for one's country but few people seemed willing to turn over there tied for rome or volunteer for pagan soup. Kitchens they asked a sensible question. Isn't that what our taxes are for. And they went back to their games of horseshoes and checkers. Julian had great ambitions for reshaping society and when he failed he failed spectacularly yet. Julian has fascinated christians ever since. I sometimes wonder if julian was the model for the main character. In flannery o'connor's brilliant novel. Wise blood the characters name is hazel motes a war veteran scarred by his experiences he rejects the christianity of his upbringing and he lives in rebellion against the christian. God he wanders the south preaching what he calls. The church without christ will one of his would be followers. Is a scam artist. Who sees hazel new religion as an opportunity to make a lot of money so he appoints himself as hazel apostle but he doesn't understand hazel religious rebellion at all and he preaches what he calls the holy church of christ without christ the holy church of christ without christ. That's what julian wanted a worldwide gathering of do gooders imagining. There's no heaven. It's easy if you try. And no hell below us above us only sky the results for julian and for hazel motes would be tragic and the stuff of christian satire. The problem is that without christ. There is no holiness. Without christ there is no such unity as we find in the church. What's more there is no such thing as human dignity human equality and human freedom. There is no reliable foundation for universal brotherhood or the hope for world peace. All of these things came about as a result of the christian revolution in the pagan world. There was no talk of just war. There was no such thing as a hospital. No one was floating. The idea that a slave was equal to his master in pagan rome. It had been legal to rape or kill a slave. Christianity changed the way. The world looks at itself composes itself and thinks about life we may no longer recognize this or remember but we may learn the hard way that it is true we may acknowledge the failure of secularism and the idolatry of the state only when it has failed to feed us and he'll us and save us from our enemies to ways there are one of life in one of death and there is a great difference between the two ways. There is a vicious rumor about that. The early christians converted the world by promising everyone pie in the sky when we die by and by there is another rumor that the early christians converted pagans by making them fearful of hell. The truth is that the fathers of the church hardly mentioned heaven hell at all. Oh they believed in the last things but they knew that eternity broke into time right now whenever the church gathered for the mess they were more concerned with the ways you and i might make the world more heavenly where we live or make it more hellish two ways there are one of life one of death and there is a great difference between the two ways to roads divergent are would let us choose the way of basil even as our world tries to drag the way of julian. If you've enjoyed this podcast please consider making a contribution for the continuation of our series. The way of the fathers is listener. Funded so we're dependent on the generosity of people like you pay us a visit at catholic culture dot org we pray for our benefactors every day. They're gua- saw romney Road and on and on do and he way of the fathers is just one of the podcasts produced by catholic culture dot org to hear more from the church fathers in their own words. Checkout catholic culture audiobooks readings of catholic classics including the fathers and saint john. henry newman. you might also enjoy criteria to catholic film podcast. It's a film club. Devoted to works of high artistic caliber and catholic interest and for interviews on a wide range of topics and catholic arts and culture. Listen to the catholic culture podcast.

julian basil Julian Basil athens Mike aquilina capita osha julian john julian emperor Dr julian Julian rose constanza Constanza robert frost imperial court imperial government adrian murdoch caesarea gallus antioch
Salvation Step by Step

Coming Home Ministries with Julian Awad

28:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Salvation Step by Step

"Welcome to coming home with. Julian rediscussed salvation through jesus christ production of coming home ministries. Has anyone ever asked you. Y you're a christian or have you ever been asked or even thought your own mind. Do i have to be born again. Can i just be a good person. And god will see my heart. I've been asked this question a lot in my life and I've even spoken to some people that said that All you really need is to be a good person and god will see your heart and that's good enough so the question becomes then. Why must we be christian and really what does born again mean in. An is it necessary to be born again. What do i have to do in order to be born again or more importantly what do i have to give up. What happens if i do it. What will be their repercussions or what will happen to me. And if you're married or have kids what will happen to my family. These are questions that most people are thinking through as the holy spirit begins to tug on their heart and we'll discuss them a little bit tonight but first let's pray lord. God thank you for this opportunity today to talk about you and talk about what we really are being saved from and the importance of salvation really wide. You have salvation for us. Lord god we wanna thank you for this opportunity. And i pray that for everyone. That's listening lord that they would hear your voice. You would speak to them. They wouldn't hear me. Keep behind your cross lord in jesus name amen so if we want to dig in the first thing we have to understand is that all of us actually are sinners and in romans The book of romans chapter three verse twenty three. It says that all of us have sinned and come short of the glory of god. Everyone has sinned. Everyone is break. You know if you lie just once you're a liar just like if you murder just wants your murderer. And god's standard is perfection. He wouldn't be a great god if his standard wasn't perfection so he doesn't tolerate the infractions whether they're big or small because his standard is perfect. Just like a judge when you come in. You're caught on camera for committing a crime and you go through that process with a With the trial and they show it and they say this is you. There's you smiling There's you again with your friend and here's your friend. Who testified that he was there with you that you committed that crime we have you write down Lock stock and barrel that you committed this crime now. If the judge is a good judge the jury is a good jury. You'll be found guilty and the really the only thing that you can do is throw yourself on the mercy of the court now. Some people try to Corrupt the judge or bribe the judge. They might even say You know i won't ever do it again. And the judge. If it's a good judge will say and you shouldn't you shouldn't do it again but a good judge will also make sure that you are tried and found guilty. You'll be given a penalty for what you did. And that's really important is to understand the concept that we've all sinned. We've all tied vol hated our brother or sister. We've all taken something Whether mitt to it or not no matter what. The value was a lot of people like to say when i was a kid. I did that. But they don't wanna admit to the fact that they downloaded something off the internet without paying for it like music or Just even using god's name in vain which is strange because most people would never consider using their mother's name in vain or even another god's name in vain in exchange for four letter v word but when we begin to really sit down and realize it we have jealousy in our hearts and were not perfect. And you might say yeah. Nobody's perfect. That's the point nobody's perfect and so we need somebody. We need something to atone for the fact that we're not perfect got is romans. Chapter five eight through nine says that god commanded his love towards us in that while we were yet sinners christ died for us much more than being now justified by his blood we shall be saved from wrath through him. The interesting thing here is that there's In the beginning it shows that god has love towards us so much so that even while we were in our sin even while we were sinners even while we were in some translations you might end up seeing this idea of an enemy of god war. We were still in a process of saying. I don't need god. That christ died first anyways and importantly and when you see down the end that we have been justified by his blood you see that it says that we were saved from what from raff through him. So the interesting thing here. That i i. I've missed it for years. Is that were saved from the wrath of god because like any good judge any good judge he is going to make sure that the criminal the person committing sin gets what they deserve and his his wrath against sin that were saved from a lot of people. Want to take that and say it's his wrath against us and while that is true. It's really the sin that separating us from him his standards perfection because he's a holy unrighteous gun. God knew that we needed help. He knew that we needed his intervention. And so jesus died for us. He became the sacrifice. He's the one who stood up and said let me do the time in the middle of the courtroom. He asked to take our place he died for us and it's by his punishment that we are saved. You know sin really angers god. He hates to see the little girl who was taken advantage of. He hates the see the elderly who were taken advantage of hates to see the person with hatred in their heart and jealousy. Who's treating and speaking to another person in such a demeaning way. He hates to see the war. Criminals that are abusing killing maiming and destroying people in war-torn areas. He hates to see the disease. In our bodies. That's a result of sin coming into this world. He's upset by the people that are stealing from others and taking advantage of others. His heart is broken by even the rape and the murder. That happens out there. Enrollment six twenty three. It says for the wages of sin is death. Remember that word wages but the gift of god is eternal life through christ our lord member wages is something that you earn took. Says that our sin earns us steph. We all have an appointment with death and salvation is a gift for those who want it. Salvation is a gift for those that want it through. Jesus and eternal life it salvation from that wrath against the sin that we have committed to against salvation from that wrath of god that sin that we committed. but it's also eternal life that we get to have with god luke. Nineteen verse tennis for. The son of man is come to seek and save that which is lost. I want to hammer home. The idea that so many people feel that they're fine just the way the way they are even when he talked to those that are freshly out of jail when you talk to those that have recently committed a crime or done something wrong. They'll all say they're fine. God knows their heart. When i find so interesting is that we all are lost. And jesus came to save us in john chapter three verse three jesus answered and said unto him because he was speaking to nicodemus at the time says fairly rarely i say unto the except a man be born again. He cannot see the kingdom of god. Jesus makes it explicitly clear that you must be born again to see the kingdom of god and of course nicodemus was curious as to. What does that mean to be born again and even asked jesus. Does that mean. I have to go back inside of my mother's womb and be born again a second time and jesus began to explain to him says marvel not that i said the must be born again. Don't be confused or shock is what he's saying. Explicitly goes through the process and explains it says once by water and once by spirit that the spirit of god is what you need to be born into god. Wash u clean and give you his spirit and you'll have a new life a new mind and a new heart you'll be born again and where does it all start. It starts with understanding. Yet you're in need of salvation. It starts understanding that you are a sinner. It starts an understanding that you are separated from god and you will not be able to be close to god once you die with a hundred and fifty thousand people dying every day could happen to you no matter what your age are. You could be in a car. Accident could have a health problem. There could be an any kind of accent around the half heart attack. Stroke even covet. John chapter three sixteen through eighteen. Says for god so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son that who so ever believe in him should not perish but have everlasting life. For god's sent not his son into the world to condemn the world but that the world through him might be saved he that believe on him is not condemned but he that believe if not is condemned already remember that because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten son of god. Eighteen important. i'll read it again. He that believe with him is not condemned but he that believe if not is condemned already because he is not believed on the name of the only begotten son of god. So god loves you. He wants to save you from punishment. He wants to save you from eternal separation from him and so he created a way for you to be saved and avoid hell and eternal punishment to avoid eternal separation from him. Which if he's light and he's love and he is peace. Those are things that you want in your life and you want those things forever. As opposed to being in darkness and in chaos surrounded by hatred to have no peace. John chapter five verse twenty four rarely rarely i say unto you he that. Here's my word and believes on him. That sent me hath everlasting life and shall not come into condemnation but his passed from death unto life. These are jesus's words not mine. He saying that if you hear his word and you believe on jesus christ and you believe in the father has sent him and believe the words of jesus says you have the opportunity to repent from your sins which means to turn around and walk the other way to be forgiven and to walk into life that you've never experienced before something brand new your light. The the light that you will see will be the first time you've ever seen in the piece that you experience will be the first time that you've ever experienced in the blinders will be removed from your eyes and from your ears and as a holy spirit and in envelopes you. You'll begin to see things the way the gone season and you'll be in to hear his voice. The word of god will suddenly become something way more meaningful to you so today. You've heard the gospel. All you have to do is believe if you believe in jesus as your savior you will pass from death to life. You have to place your trust in jesus and not in yourself. You see we're tempted. We're tempted to try to save ourselves through good works if you remember in the beginning. Why can't i just be a good person. If i just do. Good things or help others. That will be good enough. But if you try that in a court of law your i know you have gone me on camera. Yes i shot the guard. I know one died. I shot somebody else. Who is in the bank. I stole all the money. But i'm a good person and after i left there i helped an old lady cross the street. I donated a bunch of the money to good charities. I've done good things. It just doesn't wipe out the sin and it's not the standard of a holy imperfect god so just like you would parachute when you're about to jump out of a plane. We have to put our trust in. Jesus if you don't have a parachute hit the ground going one hundred twenty miles an hour or so only takes about twelve seconds or to go fifteen hundred feet and fall in those twelve seconds. You wish you had a parachute on but if you put on your faith and trust in jesus for your salvation just like you're putting on that parachute when you jump from an airplane or in this case when we die we will have the confidence the trust and the faith that we placed in him of where we're going to go. I'm trying today to explain to you that we're all the same journey. Were all on a plane. That's going to crash all of us. We're all gonna hit the ground at some point we're all gonna pass. It happens every single day to a relatives to our friends or friends relatives. Sometimes even we end up having accidents that are near death experiences. And what i'm trying to say is take this parachute. I'm trying to help you by scaring you a little bit hanging you out over the door and say look. The plane is going down. The ground is coming up. I have a pair of shoot for you. Just please consider it you know. Some people often are concern. Because they feel like by surrendering their life to god and saying that or choosing jesus as their lord and savior will somehow reduce their experience with life and that they won't end up having a great life and that they'll have to give up so many enjoyable things what they really want is they want to be able to take the parachute and they want that parachute to make the rest of the ride on that plane more enjoyable. But it doesn't that's not the point of the parachute the point of the parachute isn't to make your carnal life better but the minute that we have the holy spirit living inside of us we get something much better than an improvement in our carnal life. And i want to get into that in a minute. John chapter fourteen for six as jesus unto him. I am the way the truth and the life. No man cometh unto the father but by me there is no other way. But jesus jesus is truth and life acts chapter four verse. Twelve says neither is their salvation in any other for there is none other name under heaven given among men whereby we must be saved so there is no other profit no other god no other way that you can be saved. All other religions will push you into being a good person to be saved reincarnation. You just follow all the rules. Give the alms to the poor pray. Certain amount of times. Say this duvet as long as you've done. Those things committed to those actions completed these tasks and been more than fifty percent good. You'll be saved all other religions. Say that. But it's clear in the bible that jesus says that he is the way the truth and the life and that there is no other way and that we must be saved mont not by our own good works fusion's chapter verse eight nine says it's four by grace that year saved through faith and not of yourselves. It is gift of god not of works lest any man should boast he. I did this and i did that. I'm saved no. It's by grace and grace's unearned favor unmerited favor. It's something that god gives to you and shows you that you did not deserve and it's not by your works or how good you are. God will not be bribed. He will not be bribed by your actions by your good works by your good deeds. But it's by his grace and through faith. It is a gift that you receive romans. Ten verse nine and ten says that if thou shalt confess with a mouth jesus is lord and you believe in your heart that got has raised him from the dead you shall be saved for its with heart the man believes unto righteousness as would the mouth. That confession is made unto salvation. God looks at your heart. You have to confess it with your mouth and god will your heart if you believe and place your trust in. Jesus believe that he was resurrected. Believe in the power that god has to bring a new life a new life into jesus's body and into your life romans tenth thirteenth for whoever shall call upon the name of the lord shall be saved if you call out to jesus lord. Please save me help me. I need to repent of my sins. I wanna go the other way. He will save you. Second corinthians chapter six verse two says for he say i have heard the in the time accepted. And in the day of salvation i have secured which means help or give aid to the behold now is the except the time behold. Now is the day of salvation. It's important for you to remember that you could die at any time. But more importantly every day that goes by without you completely surrendering your life to god. And maybe you're somebody who gave their heart to jesus but never understood that it was about sin and your life is still a mediocre life full of sin full of compromise without a true relationship with jesus. Maybe you had what you think was a conversion but nothing really changed in your life. I'm telling you right now. Don't wait call out to god. You are not promised tomorrow. But today's the day no matter what the cost is. Don't take god's gift for granted it's important. This is the most important decision of your life and every single day. Jesus is better than the last year. Two three four without him the piece that you depending the confidence and the assurance of a life beyond this life the ability to hear god and watch him change you from the inside out. You know you don't have to feel anything. Special gone honors sincere heart. I have to do is take that step of faith. You say i'm gonna put on that parachute believe in your heart and confess with your mouth. Hebrews chapter ten twenty two says. Let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith. So here i will give you something to say. If you don't know exactly what to say. But tonight. I want you to call out to god dear god in heaven and what you just to say your name. I and i'll say julian ask you to come into my heart rate now to forgive me from all of my sense by the shedding of the blood of your dear son. Jesus christ with all of my faith. That i have. I now take you as lord and savior of my soul forever. Thank you for coming into my life. And making me a newborn child of god a christian in jesus name i pray a men so what happens now now that you are in christ. Second corinthians chapter five or seventeen says therefore if any man be in christ he is a new creature. Old things are passed away behold all things have become new. Share your testimony with others get baptized join the church. That is bilingual. Focused and christ-centered don't just join a building with a group of believers kit a bible physical bible and read your bible daily. Get to know. God spend time talking with god and pray as often as possible all throughout the day and the little things and in the big things and let god. He'll you up find a a group of brothers or sisters that meet and encourage each other and look for opportunities to bear fruit. Look for good. Works that god is opening before you follow. Jesus commandments and look for ways to help others asked the holy spirit to help you be obedient and overcome temptation and ask god for deliverance from any addictions that you've had in your previous life. He is faithful and finally worship. God and be thankful anytime an every time you can even in the tough times. Lord god we thank you for this opportunity tonight and i pray for anyone to this. That needed it. Lord that you will work a mighty were miracle in their life in jesus name amen still with you love me. Share it with those held. Show me your the one had beside you. There's no Straw even are now all that. Uh this has been a production of coming home. Ministries for more information go to coming home. Ministries dot net.

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Julian Assange's unlikely, powerful friends

The Signal

16:04 min | 1 year ago

Julian Assange's unlikely, powerful friends

"This is an ABC podcast based pain an extraordinary twist in the Julian assange saga with the wikileak's he likes found a seeking political asylum in Ecuador. He's taking refuge in Ecuador. London embassy with President Obama to do do the right thing. The United States must renounce its child against wikileaks. Police have arrested the founder of the wikileaks website. Hi to Julian assange and removed heavily Ecuadorian Embassy. London focused on route to central London police station. He's lived at the embassy since twenty while in the time since Julian assange has been either in prison or prison like conditions. Australia has had five prime ministers. There have been seven in seasons of game of thrones and see has risen at least two centimeters and if the US gets its way he'll be spending a lot more time behind bars anything up to one hundred and seventy five years unless a small group of Australian. MP's has anything to do with it. I'm Anne Shaw P and I'm Stephen Stockwell Oakwell and today on the signal the peach and the plan to get wikileaks founder. Julian assange back to Australia Cole I think equate on ready to guard So what I'm GonNa do just to begin with these get you to give full name your title Greg Bounds. A barrister and I'm an adviser to the Australian assange campaign so we're pretty much as long as Julian assange has been in the crosshairs of the US. Greg bonds has been making the case. Fay's release Eh lightly. That's taken a very specific form. It has been trying to corral Australian. MP's from all sides into taking up the cause and he's had some success. I just suffered enough in San Jose's family. It's time to end this geopolitical madness. He's not an American and he wasn't in the US when he spoke. Okay simply he must be allowed to return to Australia. That's Andrew Wilkie he's Co chairing potty working group which has been set up to help free assange on who apparently lost seven years has deteriorated. Pretty badly people who haven't been following along. Where's Julian assange right now? He's here's an maximum security division of Belmarsh prison. No much prison high security prison in London in terms if you WANNA quivalent. It's like Golden SIP. amax Obama in prison in Victoria. This is where you hold very high security prison and one of the conditions. He's being kept in very difficult conditions. He spent some time in prison hospitalise and a lot of timing effective solitary confinement mental and physical health and have declined markedly early of course such poppy to seven years in the Ecuadorian Embassy. But a prison these no place for news on well if you go into prison on will You're unlikely to get better. And so he's extremely difficult conditions. And what we're finding I'm finding in my discussions with people is that that's the my concern Shani's health and his poor health and whether or not New starting gunman ought to be doing something about that. Yeah so we had this appearance in court and and he didn't say well at all according to people who saw him there in the court. Can you give us a sense. Of how the concerns for his health I think it's on the record. The racially doesn't want some to Dine Gile. And I think you know you can't rule out the possibility. Yeah so a cynic would hear that. That concern raised that he may not survive in time to for his appearance seen in February that he might die in prison and maybe assume that it was tactical goal. How seriously do you take that concern or I'll take it very seriously and I should say I have some background because I've worked with prisoners of many as cheer our prisons legal service in Tasmania? I've seen the deterioration in prison is and I My view is that prison is generally If people make that statement about they loved one that he's done in a very genuine y and I've gotten enough that This is a you know. There is a genuine threat to his well being and permanent damage being done to him by the current conditions. And as I you cannot rule laugh at the possibility as far the scene of the prison system. So this concern about a scientist health spot glossman repeating person for a preliminary hearing at a London magistrates and according to several people who were there including the current editor of wikileaks. Kristen roughness assange looked confused. Struggling to recall his name and his age he lost a lot of white and just generally we looked to be in poor health somewhat stable. But you can. You can see that. He's let all this time. In isolation is taking his total he has lost weight he can't sync. This is what's happened and this is a condition man fighting for his life so that's the state apply for Julian assange waits for his extradition hearing in February and back in Australia. You have greg bonds the whole parliament trying desperately to explain that to strengthen politicians and build up this working party. It's gaining support. Andrew Wilkie and George Christianson have established a support group I had Along with Jennifer Robinson one of the key legal same way briefed that committee. You've got people from the library. potty people from the Grains Rebecca. Schalke Independent Rex Patrick Endo stealing grip from the central lines And of course Barnaby Joyce the ID that person Ustralia is to be extradited. Today's to the United States because of the belief that I have committed a crime. There is an incredibly dangerous precedent. It is like this model style Motley crue. We have people like this advance enjoyed Clinton's than getting the same room. What does that tell you what it tells me is this is a humanitarian issue and You know George Christianson. Hey understand the humanity of the situation as does Adam band issues which crossed party lines and this is clearly one and there certainly You know you would find to be very many impey's who would take the view that what is happening currently is acceptable. Yeah so you've been on the front line line of that you've been a driving force behind this. What's that process like? Like what do you do a you just sort of bowling around the halls of parliament. Pitching this to people. How visit God wants to work in? Parliament has twenty years ago Chief-of-staff to Joan Five News Finance Minister and people used to come and see me and now I'm one of those people knew rhymes around the Cardo has gone to Sapio It's an odd place parliament. Ask because that's what you do literally wonder around corridors and you have opportunistic meetings with people in Carlos and that's that's essentially essentially what's happening and look. We've got a very small team that's that's working all particular. MP's around into Morose Pine in book straight the other day in Melbourne as you doing a strategy. The Foreign Minister in Book Straight. And I've known for a long long time and I just said look up to come come and talk about assange and she didn't say very much but which was fine but but again you know you just seize your opportunity and look you know also working for example Kevin Rod coming at you Bob Xm showing some interesting no matter as well so it's a broad array of current and former rampage taking interest in issue when you're walking around the house and you bowling up these days. What's your pitch them? Make the pitch to two engine. I right now. Yeah pretend way we have actual power and pitcher to US media. Look the pitches essentially this that you've got a strident citizen who is facing an effective death penalty for the publication of material which was published by a number of newspapers around the world including here in Australia. This is aggressive arranged by the United States. His health is really really poor. His parents are extremely concerned about him. The Australian government. It needs to do something about it. Put aside personality put aside what do you think of the strategy of wikileaks strategy of of leaking documents etc.. Put that to one side. Focus focus on the humanity of the case in focus on the injustice of the case And I do this. All the time is a lawyer with juries in trials. It's the same thing and I put aside what you think about McLaughlin GonNa Issues And look again You know to be fair to Mazda imposed that a look. I'm I'm happy to. I've got my own views about acids and I've got mine views about wikileaks. And what they do. But I understand way all coming from and the issues here Certainly discreet issues. which need to be examined? You say you're getting a pretty warm reception when you make that elevator pitch to people but it is so far you know fairly You know it's some modest list of 'em pays have been willing to put their names to this publicly. How many I guess hard noise you getting Already had one had no but but mainly because because some people some employees I remember this from my politics. Lilac to work behind the scenes. They'll say you look. I'm I don't want to join the group or don't want to be public on this but I'm happy to talk to my colleagues. You'd have to think that the fact that this has to do with the major the major Australian ally. The United States is informing forming. A lot of those responses are just preferred to work behind the scenes on this fun. Look at my you know you'd have to say if we if Julian assange China now you'd probably find the vast majority of MP's being very vocal because it's become fashionable. You haven't managed to get any leaves on board yet. How the problem is that Look I I think these things are often a matter. Sheriff Tom I mean this is a pretty new group that Andrew in Georgia established so early days and generally. My Experience Ranch has been win. Momentum builds around an issue people will join. And we've seen that for example on the issue of Assam Sake is over the age and liberals would affect effect on that issue but then of the ease she did say some liberals crossed the floor and defect and people at Russell Broadbent still doing it in the parliament by. I'm particularly troubled by that. Okay so that's the politicians but if greg really wants to get Julian million assange home. He needs the public to if you go back to successful campaigns once these things being talked about an impact officers or impact MPG GONNA functions in the issue gets raised or they getting a lot of Mile Labatt as you. That's wimpey's design. This issue is now how long the shop focus in recent times. The Rod intervention his father's Interviews Mother's very active on social the media so we are seeing an increasing awareness within the community. Generally Julian can no longer speak for himself. And so so We his family and friends must speak for him. Loss of my son journalist. Julian assange an immediate critical danger. I thank you for being here and they think your mother's plea to ask your help inside his. Yeah I mean a big pot of two parliamentarians is don't worry about you. Know if you don't like him anymore if odd and what stands in its stead is is this argument about your hobbies Corpus. And you know our responsibility to a citizen. And they're quite high-minded occupants that perhaps easy to make to a politician Asian with a law degree then they ought to make on the front page of save the Deli. Tell Daily Telegraph. You know how do you make that peach a little bit more palatable. Do you think voters capable of getting getting on board with that kind of reasoning. I think there's a general view an all political stops a distance and I think it's pretty hot. You guys might have a similar view. A lot of Australian Ryan stink that if an Australian citizen gets into trouble either says there's an obligation on the part of the government to help them. That seems to be general view and in fact there is a continuous Louis. There is no legal obligation really a moral obligation so you start from that premise. Much distractions of familiar with someone. WHO's been in trouble overseas whether it be Chapelle Corby we'll be which is a totally different case but it could be Chapelle Gobi? It could be giants Ricketts. Anyone and so much people get their heads around the fact that particularly when I hear Julian's dad or when I you know read his mom on social media Christine I say Yeah Look Tuck. This is this is. He's got a mom and dad's family You know something should be done. So it's that again humanizing of the issue which is really important. Wouldn't and as you human being. He's a he's a father he's got parents And he's in big trouble and I think a lot of Australians can relate to that for all the aforementioned raisins the trump administration the fact of the US Australian alliance. There isn't necessarily the public groundswell of support that you would look for four in a case like this and no one that's far from the government will put their name to these calls. That Mr Assange We'll get the Simon support that any other strategy would. In these circumstances he's not be given any special treatment or he'll get the same treatment as everybody else will get the same support as everyone else. It does seem to have all hallmarks of a lost cause right or not. I wouldn't say that I had I mean And the reason I say that is because There are people within the government to I. I know Take I- sympathetic view. There are also The the Working Group of Andrew Wilkie working with enjoyed Christianson is only had its first meetings. So it's embryonic and you've seen in the last few days the former Foreign Minister Bubka. You've say now former prime minister Kevin Rudd so James Richardson who went through a similar experience. These campaigns you've got to have patients that can take a long time as you talked to anyone who's done those death penalty campaigns in Indonesia. They can take a long time in fact. We're probably feeling more optimistic. Now than we have been in relation to Julian skies for some talk. One thing that has happened is that the Straton consular assistance has re commenced and there is work. Strata can do in order to ensure itself off gave for example by being taken to a hospital at Saad of the prison. If thousand metres can be dealt with quickly then his health you know certainly let me can stabilize but you know you've got to sign a long term. The real issue me. She got a person here. WHO's facing hundred and seventy five years and effective death penalty? And you've you've got to say. Is that really faded. Any Australian citizen considering what's alleged against him that's Today's episode If you are liking to signal may be considered leaving his a review. If you're listening on an APP that allows you to do that. It helps other people find us and we'll I'll be back tomorrow. We'll catch you then. So Yeah you've been listening to an A._B._C.. podcast discover more great A._B._C.. podcasts live radio and exclusives on the A._B._C. Listen Up.

Julian assange United States Australia assange Andrew Wilkie London wikileaks Julian Ecuadorian Embassy President Obama Julian assange China Ecuador George Christianson greg Julian skies Greg bonds ABC founder wikileaks
Mix Up in the Mediterranean (Feat. Alonso Duralde / The Wrap & Linoleum Knife Podcast)

Deck The Hallmark

47:08 min | 4 months ago

Mix Up in the Mediterranean (Feat. Alonso Duralde / The Wrap & Linoleum Knife Podcast)

"This is a bramble. Jam podcast guy. I love hallmark ever after movies. Hey i like hallmark love ever afternoon and after movies. It's alonzo and i like love ever after movies when they get real gay omar podcasts or happy to. If you haven't gotten enough alonzo recently. We brought them back to go two days in a row. You're the real deal. I think is what i'm trying to say. You're the real deal. I i was. I was unsure until this point to an hour deal if you mean that. I'm a real bargain. Yes that's right. I don't hey don't sell yourself short now. You don't pay anything but you're rider is true. My two rose candles. You get to control the climate in this room so how we signed off on that but you do how i met on the facebook group about people say how. I looked like i was freezing. But he wasn't. I wasn't i just you know. I like to bundle sometime. I'm a big layer boy or before they call they call me layer layer. Larry layer layer. Don't ask what hot Guys how are you happy to stay. Used and i haven't seen you since thursday you doing. Okay hey man to and so. He was on the friday show was he was. That's why i can't kiss strain on friday and go. I'm not even gonna look at you and but you know we've we've made immense. We have made amends have made a And danny doing well yeah. I can't complain how everybody quickly About that new juice juice. The juice dude. I don't think we can say anything yet. No not yet not yet. Not till it's for certain. Okay okay all right. Stay tuned for that new juice. Everybody we're talking about mixed up in the mediterranean today. And i'm very i'm very can be really good. I'm very excited about this one. Lots of hubbub about it for for lots of different reasons Which we'll get to all of those different reasons But before we do that no mix up here. Jam plus is to believe what they're calling the bargain of the year or the year. You can get on the facebook group and determine for yourself if brand looks like he's freezing or if he's just a layer larry. Yeah yeah can do that. Plus sign up And even if you just do the the bottom tier you're gonna get all these bonuses you get the bonus gavel in the bonus base and all sorts of good stuff nowadays Remember dot com. And i caught up in the next week or so. If you're an all access member you're gonna get lunch with the boys exhaust lunch. Everyone's everyone's excited talk that. That is what i'm hearing. What are we catering for everybody. O'reilly's that's why when parnu interesting. yeah they they. They have a lot of good stuff. I'll get off outta town. Yeah i was gonna say that's when we were going to be able to juice. I thought i for some reason. I think we got our. We did our wires across time. our guys are so mix up in the mediterranean originally aired on february twentieth. Twenty twenty one. Twenty twenty one. And hey josh is a chef at a diner. Alaska who has bigger dreams to be a chef with the big boys but also wants to stay true to his roots. Meg is an event planner. Who is planning this culinary contests. Don't call it a cooking thing. It's a culinary contest competition Julian josh's twin brother is a chef with the big city. Boys sue is going to compete in this competition in malta. And he calls up. Josh and says hey i need a third person. Would you like to come along. You're always always staying there in alaska. Why don't you come along for one of these ships. And he's like fine. I will come along. Which is a good thing. Because julian hurts his back picking up his bag right before he goes down to register for the event and so josh's like no problem. Give me your idea. I'll go down there. Assign a i'll sign up for you. It's going to be like a we. We used to solve all the time. Tomkins fiasco you know the kind and so he goes down to sign up his brother as him. But as you know you get. What i'm saying. And he bumps into meg and they they've bombed a couple times at this point and he's really taken aback by her but he's at the point now where he has to act like he is his brother and his brother has a husband and so he can't seem interested in her and he can't give her any like any reason to think that he is not julia so he registers but he He signs his name as j Last name and So she can just kind of you know because he doesn't want to ally he's a liar So he just does that and that's the name of the restaurant as well. He's very on brand. So you registered. He he goes and he wants to. He wants to prove that he can. He can do this. This is a moment for him where he can kind of show off his his his chops and so he tells julian julian let me. Do this like okay. You can do it. So josh as julian keeps finding himself hanging out with meg and he really likes her. And she's like if you weren't who you are we'd be perfect together. She opens up about how she was in love with. The guy was a liar. Which you know. Welcome back Really unfortunate because he is also the first round happens. Josh does Great joy gets mad for chopping veggies. Not how julian would. Which is very julian thing to say julian But josh still manages to move on they keep hanging out and they cooked cheeseburgers together and they have a wonderful night together and the next competition comes along. Someone messed with workstation turned off all the power all the veggies. God all the good stuff. God he has to To make something so he goes to the kitchen nearby forget some food and he puts together a nice cheeseburger in honor up and he moves onto the finals. Enjoying comes down after winning with that cheeseburger. And he's like it's my turn. I'm back. I'm going to do this. I'm going to do the finals. They argue and one of the competitors over. Here's this and it's like oh no you didn't. He finally agrees to let To to to not to not let julian go. He's going to do the whole competition. But this competitor goes to the top guys like. Hey i know. The truth and josh goes to talk to meg and he feels like he's about to tell the truth but megaphone call from the top dogs and they're like we gotta go. We gotta go now and talk. And they tell josh. Hey we know the truth. Julian sarah's well. You guys are disqualified and meg the only reason why you're not fired because you're the only person who knows how to run this event. And so so. Congratulations but josh julian. Take your knives and leave. And they're they're very upset about this but he's especially upset because mek thinks that he's a liar and it's like i don't even wanna talk to you get out of here not interested but he does go to find her later on and she says. Hey loophole The contract doesn't say julian's name you signed it as j. You didn't sign his name. He signed jay. Which is technically you and so you can do this if you want to and but also just stay away from me. 'cause you're a liar. I don't want to be friends with you anymore so julian josh go. They fights and they fight for their their right to party and they say hey. We're in this competition. The contract is a poor contract. He shouldn't have been so bad at your job. Let me do my cooking. And they say well. I guess you are going to do that. And josh even gets jewelry to be a sous chef and so they get to work together they put together. This wonderful magical Dish from back home. It ends up winning the competition. Josh goes up to magazines like. Hey i won the competition. Do you wanna get together. And she's like no still higher but he's like. Hey i know there's something between us and you once told me back then that You two months if you can't get over someone in two months and You know it. It's meant to be something like that. and so he's like. I want my two months. Cool is josh. Josh goes back to new york and he starts to work with his brother. They get the getting the restaurant together to do a new grand reopening with a new menu including a cheeseburger. Could you believe. I can make walks the door for the grand opening. And everybody's like oh. Wow this is amazing. So they leave so that Josh mccann kissy kiss. They talk about how much they like each other and talk about how excited they are about the restaurant and now my friends was mixed up. Mediterranean at is exactly right. That's exactly right. Yes we're We're going to break this episode this episode by this episode of me mean this week in this down. We'll take a quick break. We'll come back. We'll get to our hotcakes and the sorts Came to everybody thoughts about this movie. Martin short and the sorts of hot takes the slower so good. It is a shame what happened to them because they stay worked through their differences when they broke up as the end of that. Russian house dj. Saying i hate that. We'll be right back here on see. They're good looking so good We're talking about mixing them in the mediterranean today here on the hallmark very excited to break this data and to do that. We have the hot take. We each share exactly how he felt about this movie. And we don't hold back no holding back here boyce. Can we all agree. No holding bar. And i'm gonna i'm gonna start with paying. The pain hasn't held bars. And i believe fourteen years was fourteen Last time i held a bar. I said nope nope. And so you've been holding holding true to that pledge and i'm going to see how you do today. What do you think about mix up in the mediterranean. He'll just hold onto your horse because no bars will be held yet again brand. This movie is pretty solid overall. A first of all really love how the actors just got long in this movie i. I really think they had a lot of fun. I had fun watching them. I thought there was some great dynamic. There really enjoyed that the plots different. You know i it. It has a fun kind of zany. Fueled to it that we don't normally get there's some hijinks involved. I liked it. It's good to have some hijinks from here and there beautiful scenery from firm here. And i said what i said and i say every every bit of it you should hijinks coming from everywhere everywhere he left and right up down. Everywhere up jinx. But here's the deal for some reason. I don't know why this movie still felt like a little bit of something was missing for me to do that. I didn't quite get the feels in this movie. Like i had fun with it bound. No if it gave me sort of emotional field. I didn't really feel that as much with this movie. I enjoyed it. I thought it was a solid movie. Overall it's in my opinion by far the best one we've had in february Not as good as taking a shot at low taking a shot at love is is a masterpiece player luke macfarlane compared on that skill. Almost every movie is gonna fall on. Its own terms. This movie is great and to hold up to a classic like taking a shot at love. Yeah you understand. I appreciate that you've come around. Took me some time to see. Sure yup alana. What do you think. I'm mostly with panda on this one. I'm reminded as panda said. I want to say on the snow bride episode. Where sometimes a hallmark movie gets. Good enough that falls into the category of like bad romantic said that. No that yeah. I said that while we were watching the movie before the he said he took it for me. I can promise you that okay. I'll let you guys work that out of your own time but anyway this felt like good enough to be a bad romantic comedy under other circumstances but by homer you know means top of the heap Definitely the best location movie. I think i've seen from them. Because usually you know when a jet off to some exotic locale you get a couple of scenes and in front of some real touristy thing and then the rest of it is shot on some like back alley of somewhere this one like just the shoreline and the market place and like it really i it. It it makes malta. Just look probably at. Its best since robert altman's popeye ii agree with panda. Also in that. It's chemistry wise. The love story doesn't quite land like it's definitely you get. It's written well enough. Where i i got the relationship as far as them having things in common i liked the things like the two months and they plant stuff along the way to sort of make. The story works in a lot of ways. I was impressed with that. And you know the gay stuff. I thought was fine You know he was your usual kind of. We're back to the hallmark side hug. You know like the because it's a married couple so you know they don't get to have like an arctic. They're just like they're they're lovely together and that's it But yeah this was fine. I fun Yeah i i think i'm a little bit higher than you guys are. I loved it. I think it's my favorite of the year so far. I just thought it was really fun and i thought Was jeremy jordan. Is that his name. Yes love i thought he was fantastic. And i really good job of separating the characters the best that you can. I thought that they both both of the twins had their own flavor that he brought to both of those characters. That was really good. And i thought jessica did a good job in this movie i liked. I liked them when they were together on screen. It worked for me I yeah. I i get the not like i. I wasn't rooting for them. Hard like i would maybe some other characters when he said. I want my two months like i felt like you said a little aggressively but i kind of like. You're on the clock. I'll see a new york So yeah i mean. Overall i really really love best of the year so far but maybe this is better than the stalwart taking a shot at love. I i would say yes i. It's really just a he's he doesn't he's not. I don't get it. I think performances in this movie really are what take it over. The edge thought it was really good performances. All around big fan for brain yeah. I don't like this movie And i would also say that the entire movie hinges on a bracelet that virtually makes no sense whatsoever and malta just as a melting pot of indeterminate. Accents i guess but having said those two things. It's my favorite leading mail performance of the year. I laughed more in this movie than i think i have. Maybe purpose on purpose of course at actual laughed and the subtle nuances of jeremy jordan. What he's doing into performance I hate that. They made his brother julian kind of the worst person. Like he's kind of awful like terrible for the majority of the movie and seems to just all of a sudden have great character growth at the very end. it seems like it just was. There's a lot of questions But i love the scenery and i laughed and it's the best performance so if you take those three things account it's the best one of the year it is. It's it's the best one that they've done so far this year in the two in new year new movies or love ever after herbs. So i'll give it that she like it. No a dead. I would never watch this movie again under any circumstances but it has more to recommend than any other movie any circumstances you know what i mean. Under normal circumstances that don't involve me getting paid a lot of money. okay Watch this you. Get to hang out with ben affleck for the day. No who cares you. That's the dummy head off hard past. Sorry get to play golf with me go. I get to play golf whenever i want. And you're always invited. I'll actually come this time. But that's basically like getting paid. Lots of money. I mean. Let's be honest like getting to play golf with you. That is kidding the lottery just to watch him recorded more than normal circumstances. The same you watch. The crandall doesn't come around anymore. Ooh what about janis he. He's still here though. You have one alonzo going to have the dunkin without the ben affleck. I don't even know athletic deal back. Oh what about like math. Even gonna or someone someone fun. How no man. I sat sap also these are things that are a value that you can't put them on like that's not an option so anything it is an option and this hypothetical it's a contest or sweepstakes i'm talking about on a normal day under any matthew. He's get one more shot one more shot. I'll finally come around. Alright alright. Alright dicit tweeted that out. He didn't even know. Do you know matthew. Mcconaughey i do. That's why mcelwain pat unbelievable suffer all the fields. This show we're talking about what in this movie gave us feels payment now. Lot of feels when they brought out that burger. That's the best looking homework burger. I've seen a for the judge for the judge has a clutch looking burger. I would actually. I'm gonna say something bolt boy. That's the best looking food that has ever appeared on a hallmark movie that we've watched so we're don't just not including beverages because the hot chocolate. Not that's fantastic. That's the best food. Good job they. John dot good jobless and it's going to be on the dvd from the homework says they've done a good job. Listen in love ever. After the season they've done good job with food. They've done the tacos for the last week win caveman food. That much like it looks decent but like this that burden of the burrito gray. But we didn't get to see it like we saw the burger. The bird like an add bacon and cheese. Oh my gosh. Wonderful alonzo fields location fields for sure again. I i think that there's They made an effort to sort of incorporate where they were shooting. And didn't you know kind of spend all the money in transporting everybody there. Because you know you've got one actor playing two roles that's a that's a savings right there You know and i think i just There were moments in this where i of stopped without. Wow this is really quite well written so You know. Even even if i wasn't getting like the the big flaming chemistry between these two. I just sort of admire along the way you know how will put together. This thing was and i agree. It is the best of two thousand twenty one so far Some i feel are just jeremy jordan. Doing doing the both parts. Because if you remember way back in two thousand eighteen when we watch for christmas are big critique of she. Cb's b.'s. performance was that both of those characters started out as two unique roles but then once they swap they just became at. Oh my god. It was the same character for both. And i felt like jeremy for the most the largest racial this movie like you knew who what who was doing what like you know both characters and i felt like he didn't really good job. The gave me like hey. They did it. They did a good. This time feels far. Be it from me or anyone here to speak poorly. Ccb we would not do that program heavens now it almost makes you think that she doesn't have the range to play two characters that are twins in a movie. Almost i don't want to. But i think there's a chance that maybe she wants. You wanna see a jeremy jordan. Ccb act off. I think that it would be over before it started. And i think well. Here's the thing jerry when you play twins so in the case of this one. Jeremy jordan has to figure out who joshua's yes figure out who julian is and then. He is called upon to play josh pretending to be julian and julian pretending to be josh. Try and ccb doesn't do any. Not even joe sheet. No she she lost you at the two characters but he doesn't eat like even the pretending he does a good job of both of them like does my holy julian playing josh. He doesn't have the same awkward mannerisms as playing julian. They he did them. Both uniquely a watching josh play julian. The first time is my fields. Because i laughed a ton when he goes down to sign up and et or whoever is like julian and he does this like weird like half wink and gun thing and then kind of realizes that he's julian and he's like no and he keeps walking this really hard. That's funny that's a funny bit. And this guy is acting his tail off. And he's doing a great job by feels were some of the comedic instances and then when julian josh and tries to lower it reminded me of a daniel levy in in happiest season when he comes as the say like it. Was this same kind of like trying to adjust the tone of his voice. It was wonderful. I thought they both. The jeremy jordan steals the show in this movie. He's so wonderful. The best performance. We've had in a long time and in all honesty. I know it's early but you can put a little decades alert stamp on this season. If you're going to give me a better male performance in this this year. I'll be shocked. This is this is this is gotta go. Gotta get nation has thank you. Thanks wonder beats the threat on the beat. I thought you said daniel listing. And i was excited to see where you're going with it and then now i now i know no. They knew listening though he's great Let's take one more quick break. We'll come back and we'll talk about the wait. What's and the what the hallmarks for this flick and titled makes up in the mediterranean on the podcast. Also titled alonzo for the bad during the man. Keep forgetting it's friendly tv me work overtime this. We're talking about mixed mediterranean. And we're talking about the way what's show where we talk about. What in this movie made us go. Wait what panda what she got buddy. The where in his julian's back gives out. He's gone for the suitcase and for the life of me. I don't know what happens like i'm trying to. I don't think you can recreate that. He's the physics behind his fall. Are facet you start. getting older. Like upper thirties forties fifties. You know what. I'm talking about the your your back. We'll just tweak for no reason whatsoever. And i but i it doesn't. He literally bent down to do something he's done. Virtually thousands but keeps on court. And i don't understand physics don't work it doesn't make any sense so i'm trying to get a feel for this. I understand that the entire competition is based off of your skills. Generally speaking has a chef but the very first round they don't taste they don't say they don't taste them. What was happening right now. It seems to be that this is a progressive challenge because the first round they don't taste the food and then they announced the winners that night the second round they do taste. The food announced the winners that night. The third round. They just announced the winner right away. That's what they do. It doesn't make any sense at all. I don't know why they would need to wait an entire evening. Can you imagine making a dish and then sitting around in malta. All day wondering if it was good enough i just don't i don't understand what judges deliberating jury like what we do. It's ridiculous. thank you taste. God god i the food off. Should we eat it apple the dude who deals in legal black trump. I just want. Questions i maybe. He's a what the hallmark but he's he's fascinating to me. I don't understand why he seems very shady for somebody dealing in a legal substance. I don't understand And then the final thing is. Why did meg get blamed. I mean she gets the full blame for the brothers. Doing the flip which ruth has nothing to do with literally. Nothing like they trick. Everybody and yet. She's getting so much shaped on her. I don't understand that. Like i would be mad if i would be clearly upset. They should have been probably kicked out of the competition. But like why's mega thrown under the bus. I don't understand that No that's fair that's fair. I don't know but she deserves it. German lady had it out for her the whole and stop. Stop too much by alonso. Wait what's a few. I will say as much as i enjoyed your jordan performance and down to the. he's differentiating. The twins twins even by the way they stand He is he's he's got a deep broadway background you know. I'm sure he knows a lot of gay dudes. There are some scenes early on where he's really go into heavy with the hand which honey calm down and he did thankfully so. That was just over there right. Is this what we're gonna do here okay. the scene where meg's dad comes to Jay northrop and and he runs out of the kitchen. And it's just like so gruffly about like. Oh please a restaurant euro tells. I'm like if you're a big new york chef no even if you are desperate to get his guys hotels you're gonna still be arrogant about it and you would never grovel that much and you certainly wouldn't be rude to the guy's daughter in front of on all that it was like nope nope nope nope. Nope you know. Yeah all the stuff with the contract loophole. The fact the judges don't punish them for having cheated but gotten away with it and still let them win. That seem crazy and then again. Meg's dad at the very end. Who has been just the worst this whole movie like a complete awful bad dad suddenly comes around. That is all like you know. Ray j you like. I'm not buying that at all. So those were my biggies. But that's these are minor compared to most of these books and the guy buys a castle and he's suddenly like. Oh i care how it is when you buy a castle really puts things really does a couple. One is our home our. How dumb do you think we are to to try this move. You show us a close up of each of these competitors and we see them. They're five and in the first hour. Hallmark has nerve to say there's ten and we're cutting it to five. No you didn't know ten. We only saw five. Showed us off a hallmark. Yep do you think we're done. We're just like our. I must have missed it. No no no just say. There's what's so hard about that. I missed that she said we had to. We have ten competitor. I was running the numbers. And i thought maybe this was the confusing thing when they said we brought in ten. I thought it was. They were counting the chef and chef. But the reason it doesn't work is because they said we're we're splitting you into into groups of two. Yes two five. Yeah because there's only five workstations. Only five workstation announce the finalist. It's all the people who aside from one joker but i think he was in the group. I was very. Why couldn't they just do them all she. She starts to really pitch working for the restaurants to josh as jillian and her big i got big is flowers and candles on the tables idea. She i couldn't fall asleep last night. Because i was thinking. What have you put normal restaurants on the table. I found it very funny that they win at the very end of this competition. Julian walks off. Josh locks up. Meg and so. The poor people are stuck interviewing the losers in the background. House he settles to the to the alaskan fellas and listen. I i know i am not one to judge anybody on hair but i will say this. You had for two months union. You knew it was coming up. It was either gonna be the day. It was gonna be the moment the two months were up tomorrow and you went with that hair. My buddy mike guy that he blew. Wizar- i no one would've played meg if she walks in and goes when she walks right out that it was by man. Bat with working ryan philipe from two thousand. Three's upset at that haircut like it is. It is just wild lawn. More sideways lyles was happening there. It's a hate crime against straight people. I forgot one huge one by the way which is after all the subterfuge the these guys have managed to do the whole time. Then julian decides the heck is big competition with josh out in front of the hotel in front of eight yen and got an everybody Gee i guess this is going to be three now. Yeah good dan. So i have so many i he is in his diner in alaska and he has food are tickets. He's supposed to be making for people patrons in his diner. And instead he's working on a baked alaska. It's it's it's not even on the menu. Mummy and is just pouring over this desert and there are customers waiting for their food and i for the life of me. Don't know how we get past that. You can't be good at your job. That's what you're going to do. And then some servers somebody calls back. This is the order that callback. Three cheeseburgers in a grilled cheese. And no fancy stuff like like black truffle. Like wh what is he going to do like sneak in like eric coates. Bear on the side of the like. Is this like what is he doing. Dumbest thing i've ever heard while there is one. There's one alaska thing that the ccb movie not the twin win but the santa one gets right that this one doesn't which is that it takes getting food to alaska is a challenge like everything has to get flown in. They don't have a ton of fresh produce. Like there was a whole article i read about. How the the big thing there is. They they take a cake box cake mix and like mix it with sprite because it's hard to get up there and so that rest at diner has like lettuce and like so i'm like where in alaska that nowhere is where it is Can we talk about the competition for a second. They put every contestant pretty much house arrest to compete in this thing. You have to wear a bracelet. You can't take off. And i was to make sure i get the quote correct if it breaks your disqualified if your bracelet breaks your disqualified from the entire events i this is not a cooking things. Work ladylike look. We had these twins when year so not messing around anymore. We're not doing it. Also each chef has to provide their own ingredients guys the only way to really determine who made the dish. The best is to have the same ingredients across the board. Like you're not tasting like to like all these cooking shows. It's very important that the kitchen everything's regulated for everyone. That's the same i it. You're not tasting. Who's the better chef. You're tasting who's the better ingredient picker at that point to some extent. It's a shopping competition. Yeah it's Supermarket sweep guys grocery. Whatever it's called. Yeah she's a supermarket sweep not only did the guy a good one. No it is a real show. I know it is not only did. The grocery game serta's the black market black truffle. Guy was also very weird but the guy. Clyde peters or whatever's chester. Whatever his name is. He's talking with jeremy jordan jessica lowndes and he's like that's him right there and if he sees anybody watching him he gets spooked and he leaves. They're talking fifteen feet away from him. Pointing authors that guy. You see him right there. The big fat one over there on the bench. He gets spooked. If you're talking about him so dumb. I understand that at all black truffle ronald the call them black trouble. Ron don't say too loud they. They make a cheeseburger together in the evening but they need the down and he's he does affect sure he does a full ghost bit there. But i gotta be honest if you are kneading dough for a cheeseburger bun. You're a long way from that cheeseburger. You have some time to kill. In fact i would suggest eating the cheeseburger tomorrow night's Because you're not getting to the next few hours easy. It's just not happening using instant east instinct east to need out themselves breakfast. Burger king is. Yeah it's a breakfast bar on that bad boy. The burgers that they serve at around are the most delicious thing i've ever seen. One of the buns has a giant full black truffle in the side of the bun and that is not how that would work at all. Wanted to make sure we knew this line. I'm philosophically and just you know went into my my cart self to just try to unpack this bad boy. She gets off the phone and she goes. I'm really sorry that was. Et and he was babbling on saying your not being who you say you are. I don't know. I don't know she didn't say he he says you're not who you say you are. You're not being who you say. He is being who he says he is. If i'm not mistaken like he's trying to be the person he says he is. I just don't quite understand that. And then lastly it's a pretty. Big loophole did not have someone's name in the contract. Can i just say like straight up the fact that his name julian northrup appears nowhere in the entire contract. It's a pretty big gaffe on the part of this competition. That's been around for over fifty years to not have the name. They're kind of a big deal. Signed your own signed with the neck so you can stay in the was signed for the what the whole markets departure show where we uh. We'll talk about any questions that we still have that we would love some answers to and i need to know more about eighteen This guy every single time. he appears i get. He's a bad guy but he is. He's doing a full. Peter sellars inspector associated about it but i also like not exactly he's next level like he says the meanacing that people while smiling and that fascinates me and terrifies me at the same time. Like i haven't seen you in a long time. And i'm just going to go for the jugular every single time and i know what it was refreshing. Can i say that refreshing in his honesty a little mean. I wouldn't probably be friends with him. But i want to see more of him. He's great. I want to know more about that guy. Amen dan you said he's the only thing he's ever done. No no no no chester the guy that the old chester has one. Imdb credit and it's mix up in the one wanting which is crazy so good lonza. Yeah i bet is right. We need more of the debate energy in these hallmark movies. Because everyone's too nice. Even though. I know panic things that That shouldn't take the blame for for screwing up this competition. I mean she's someone in someone's head has to roll and between that and the parable candles and flowers idea what's her empire. From all indications she is not good at her job. Her empire should be called. I didn't build this because she literally only has a job because of her dad and her other suggestions and other ideas are bad so yeah her. Her need to avoid nepotism is honorable. But it's like what else you got My biggest one does it. Comes back to the The truffle guy. I just i wish we could have known how it transpired because my guy took them to point at the truffle. That's right and says you need to get lost in the loss in the market. And then and then i'll approach him. I don't know it was very it was. I want to know how he got truffles. I think maybe he's the guy and he's trying to throw people off the off. The sent us good because it makes no sense to point out a random guy and then tell them to get lost. And i'll handle because that makes the truffles on. Why does it matter if they come and see the guy if they're not going to be the ones that ask as a matter last through a second location and less trying to throw them off the sense that he's the truffle man you chester's tra- chester's heiser only love it. It's great i have two one is i can't believe a restaurant called. Chester's by the failed in malta. But since it did. I wanna know how what. What were you thinking bad businessmen. Why don't we call. Why don't we call it. I dunno chester's by the sea in malta is going to be cheetos themed and they're disappointed. And then i'll have the mac and cheese regular i. I want to know about the parents of the twin boys when they were naming their kids. Josh julian i just want to know how they got there. Those name seem to be from two different worlds and for them to name twin boys. Those two names just did just that up to me. It's very simple. You want one kid to be straightened wanted today. You name the straight. When josh and the julian and it just takes over from best to lob that one to heal on best somebody needed to say to read it just just seemed very kind of ridiculous that we needed these two names so you and your head can make sure you know which one is gay. That was the only reason homework did it. And that's a physicist. Because if he's julian not only is he gay. He's going to be the candidate who drops random. French words sentences no pair. He studied at the court on what they if they wanted to. Really do it right. Julian should've been the straight guy that would have been knew. That's what i call a mix mixed team got us a mix up middle middle. America's living room is he's straight one in the bible. T would go by joshua. Because that's the that's the thing. I don't know a lot of mike. But i know a lot of michael's even if the cutting off the power of the workstation seems familiar it's because they pull that same move in the first princess which movie I can't remember. I remember that from not watching it though head. He's he's crafty offer later on her monday. We congratulate wow. Wow wow i'm proud of you. You're we tomorrow very exciting interview That i think you're gonna you're gonna i think it's gonna really your heart your heart and we'll be back on thursday tug at your heartstrings. You said call your heart. Yeah we're staying the same thing. Yeah sure about heart Speaking of hearts when calls the heart on thursday episode eights man. We'll see this is the best show just the best show we'll see if that episode has Legs to walk on and on friday. We'll leave that. Episode has legs to walk on it. Were oh my gosh and on friday. We're talking about trading. Christmas macomer stabby. Mccomb leave out. Debbie's dave for the love of god steady macomer. It's in the contracts and the contract bomb before we leave the double decker of the week. It's my decker doubleheader. Who do we have today. Andrea clawson class in clawson. classroom clawson. We're going to close as close. Yeah you've done the deep dive panda You're you walked in with a little spring in your step. Visit a good one. It's probably the best. I've heard of since last week and under listen she's crushing. The food industry Day by day and with high concept art mixed in with the concept food mid concept mid concept. You get it okay. I'm glad you understand name of her new restaurant. This isn't her first. Merry go round this. Is this big. It's called crept up your creeped up on me. You crepe up on me yet. your crept up on. Doesn't sound okay. you're gonna like it. And it's a heightened. Go seek while eating crepes. What's crepe is it like creeped. Yeah you crept crept craft up on r. e. p. t. but up on me. Yeah so you eat crepes. Which seems like a difficult with a hoarder. Then you think to sneak up on someone while you're eating a crepe. How silently can you do it. You don't know now. What do you do when you finished your crepe. Do you always have to have crepe on play. gotta get another crepe another crate. Why would behoove you to not eat the crepe. Well you got to. You got eat while a while is it. A is it a timing. People are people watching the tommy. It's kind of like laser tag okay with creek and no lasers or tech i. I know exactly what you're say that it's like laser tag. Okay so really quickly. Though so you have. Let's say five minutes To creep up on as many people as you. Yep now who are you hiding are you. Seeking you're you're you're the one seeking because you've got that adds another friend you just don't have to eat crepe now. Let me take this their andrea. What if you were seeking the crepes. Yeah then you sell off more crepes. That way you think so hiding and look and it's a lot harder than all these people that have to hide at the same dad. No no i like that idea. Take that her. And she thought of ninety percent of the way through and then we just need to get it over the gold. And that's fair. That's what happens with entrepreneurs. Sometimes dan lark art art entrepreneurs archer preneurs exactly right yup tomorrow We can't wait for. Its hope you'll join us and tell then maybe the i wish you a merry christmas. Six homework is a bramble jam. Podcasts produced by brain presented by friendly. Tv our lovely set is decorated by plum home decor. You can check them out of plumb on main dot com for more information on brain madrid. Podcasts google podcasts dot com and the here every bramble jam podcast app free with the brain. The gym plus dot com.

julian jeremy jordan josh meg mediterranean Josh julian josh malta alonzo Larry layer Julian josh alaska julian julian Julian sarah josh julian Josh mccann Meg luke macfarlane ben affleck dicit
Julian Assange's last stand

The Signal

20:21 min | 1 year ago

Julian Assange's last stand

"This is an ABC podcast after years of legal maneuvering the. Us is finally making its case in court to drag. Julian assange to American soil where he could face up to one hundred and seventy five years in prison. I'm Angelov WOK. Yeah I'm Stephen Stockwell down the signal. The wikileaks founders last ditch efforts to stay out of the. Us sorry the US has been after. Julian assange for a very long time ever since two thousand ten really when wikileaks started dumping classified material implicating. Us forces in various kinds of wrongdoing in the Iraq and Afghanistan the White House lasting the release of over ninety thousand US military records on the war in Afghanistan. This is the largest leak well. This isn't a wiki leak. This is a wiki Torah. Us military's secret. Afghanistan warlords provide the most revealing picture of the conflict so far wikileaks website released. Nearly four hundred thousand secret files on the Iraq war. Today it was the largest leak of intelligence leak in History Hillary Clinton Secretary of state in the diplomatic firestorm with wikileaks revealing a directive from Clinton for US diplomats at the United Nations to spy on their counterparts and they might finally be about to get their hands on him depending on what happens in an extradition hearing which starts tonight in the meantime massages wedding out in London's Mush prison where to Australian politicians paid him a visit last Tuesday. We'll is a pretty recode. I think the Scots would say It was very cold showers around. You know that was dame. It was a very. It was very typically London winters die. The buildings went gripe they seemed gray and I it was all very golomb and An Sheila SPLICE I. I couldn't imagine what it's like driving up there as a prisoner. Who's about to go into detention they so independent? Mp Entry Rookie. He's one of a handful of Australian politicians who are pushing to have assange released. He went to Belmarsh with George. Christianson LIBERAL-NATIONAL MP from North Queensland the itself Very big and very imposing Of SEEN IN VAIN INTO PRISONS IN A strike but this one was particularly foreboding An odd hood said that it's actually easier to break out a bill Marston to break in particular Julian assange at the weather and the dampness An all the warnings I've been given out All the security checks. It's frankly it's it's. It's not scary. But it's very wanting just to get from the car park Through the little building Leah. Trump tweet belongs. Put a lock in through all that security chicks X. Rice and that's a good half an hour or so of security just to get through. When you first have Roy I take fingerprint and I put some sort of stamp on the Becky Ham. But you can't see and I must have to put my thumb. Sorry my finger in a fingerprint reader. At least half a dozen times There was the X. Rise. There was a frisk There was a point we had to stand on a daughter and I and I suppose a drug dog fifty over took about half navigating but eventually I did along with mark companion travelling companion Philo Impeachable Christensen. Once he got through that process. Where do you end up in curiously? You end up in a very large room quite a cavernous room with rows all six seats where quoted large number of prisoners. I'm going on. And how many probably a couple of dozen prisoners all meet with visitors simultaneously but as a result of semi people in the one room. It's all my son. Noisy. You can't hear it. Almost by design might be uncomfortable with the noise and the complete lack of privacy and Julie. Well we arrived about twenty minutes after the start of the visiting time thinking. Oh in Julian's been waiting for us for I just but there's not Julian all the other prisoners are in there All the other visitors are in there and Georgian are just sitting on Allen towards the corner of these cavernous room and we had to white at least twenty minutes maybe a little bit more for Julian escorted in and I'm an. I'm told by the legal team that that is quite commonplace that Julian is treated very differently to the other prisoners. And it's quite normal full. Business have to white for him to be escorted in lost and for him consequently to have much less time with visitors. When did you first see him? I think Georgia's looking in a slightly different direction. Mean he saw him. I any modesty something. Go here or here as well. He comes Julian so swing around and for the first time I get to see. Julian assange who had a hick and he'd had to Shave. He looked what will groomed and clean cut. Nothing like the How we saw him in the photo is when he was hustled out of the Ecuadorian Embassy. It was obviously delighted to see if he was absolutely stoked and he gave us a good thin handshake. Then we sat down and got to work. What did you talk about well? The first thing was defined yet he he state of Hilton Mugabe. And the conditions of incarceration says. There was a lot of talk about how he was traveling feeling after wall. I mean we started to talk more about the issue And the case and the merits of his of his team's arguments zone perhaps Jillian feel about the extradition hearing about to stop all. He's obviously Amanda under enormous pressure. Low he he. He's obviously confident of that. He's a waste on the right thing you know. I think he's confident that They've got a great good case to make he smart enough and chided enough to know that it's not that simple knows his as an intensely political and It's impossible to guess how he will fare. You're right now. He's not a Rod Now I'm not A. I'm not a doctor or psychologist. I couldn't do a medical assistant and at capacity interview. He seemed to be holding up pretty well but every now and then you just get a glimpse into him. There'd be times when he'd be talking quite lucidly seeming to be traveling well and they just stop any clauses is a lowery's hated hated his hands and he'd be solid for the wall as he's trying to sort of get strength back. How did that meeting end where we we're all? Well Georgia constantly looking at the clock. Thinking running at a time it ended very very abruptly too abruptly We stood up and Julian Guy Jewish Christians. How many shook my head brushed. It was very actually caught a a very personal moment and then Georgia. I walked across joined his cue to to get fingerprints. Tyco will read again and and let out and and I looked across and Julia was still sitting in his chair and gave me the the clinch. Feast that you'll stay strongly. He'll keep voting so this fight is about to come to ahead. The extradition hearing runs all this week before it goes into racists until May and there have been some last minute twists. Yes what we now know. Is that assange was pitched a deal back in two thousand seventeen offering to drop the. Us extradition case is also being confirmation over the weekend that his meetings with his lawyers were being secretly illegally recorded. So we called Matt. Bevin to find out what that means for the extradition case he's the host of Russia if you're listening and a reporter on our breakfast. What we know is that a this is coming from both sides of this conversation. So a Republican congressman. Who is now not in office anymore? But while he was still in office went to the Ecuadorian Embassy and meet with assange and his lawyers and had a chat about various things and during the course of the conversation. He said that if assange can prove that it was not Russia and that it was someone else who middled in the two thousand sixteen presidential election then Donald Trump would pardon him so the specific Russian interference. That asandra being asked away was the hack on the Democrats in two thousand sixteen the DNC hack was basically group. The mall report says involved Russian military. Hackers breaking into the National Committee's email and documents server which apparently wasn't all that difficult for them because security was roughly equivalent to the security. You'd have at a second hand furniture shop over the email system. It seems to have been very easy for them to get in there. They stole stuff over a period of several months and then leaked to wikileaks. Gave it to. Julian assange for him to disseminate There was also a separate fishing attack. Biologically an email was sent to Clinton's campaign manager. John Podesta which said hey change your password by clicking this button and through more incompetence they did do that and they got access to all of John Podesta's emails and the guy goes to wikileaks as well for him to disseminate the argument. That people who don't think it was Russia make is that it wasn't them it was that disgruntled DNC staffer a democratic basically decided that he didn't like the way things are going the that he would steal the documents and send it to. Julian assange for him to disseminate. So that was the deal or the supposed deal off and in seventeen that assange needed to come out and say it wasn't the Russians. It was an inside job and both sides agree on the substance of the deal that was signed lawyer Jennifer Robinson and the former Republican Senator Dinero Rebecca but where it gets complicated is the question of whether the US government had anything to do with it. Rohrabacher says that trump didn't send me and the various various news stories. That have come out over the last nearly three years that since this happened. Indicates that he's probably right about that. He's probably telling the truth and the reason for that his story in two thousand eighteen that said that robot kept trying to organize a meeting with Donald Trump to talk about Julian assange and the theme. What has chief of Staff John? Kelly basically was blocking the door standing in the doorway going. No no no. You can't come. You know no. We'd rather you didn't go in and talk to the president so it's very possible that data rebecca was You know Acting ride acting road. Not What is the White House said about this allegation yes so then? What has said that? We didn't talk to Roebuck. He was a Acting on his own accord we don't know who he is. I know he is basically that. He wasn't acting upon our behalf and to be honest While the White House says many many things that are not true This is possibly not one of them. So let's just say for argument's sake just for a moment that the deal was a real off I it was. It was made in good faith schorr. Insofar as that term applies why would assange not have accepted this? Well there's two possible reasons. What one or the other will seem more likely to your depending on whether you think that. Russia intervened in the election if you think that Russia was the one that intervened in the election than the reason that assange couldn't take the deal is because he doesn't have any proof he can't prove it didn't happen because it did so that's one option the other option is if Roy Meller and the FBI and everyone who was investigated. These are wrong and in fact it was a disgruntled. Dmc staffer. Then assange probably couldn't take the deal either because that would be giving up his source. Okay so this deal may not have been faked that Julian assange didn't or couldn't take any way is out in the open and the timing right before the extradition hearing is very deliberate to prove that the prosecution of Julian Assange is purely a political thing if donald trump the president of the United States was willing to let assange go drop all charges against him an issue him a pardon if he did something for trump. Did something that you know. That trump wanted him to do then. That is a pretty strong argument that this is just a political prosecution and that it becomes convinced that it's purely politics and that there's no you know the US government or not actually that serious about the crimes that they allege Selena Simmons to have committed than they might be less likely to allow him to be extradited because they could see him more as a political prisoner rather than as an actual national security breaching criminal and on top of that we found out yesterday. Julian assange is meetings with lawyers illegally. Record it yes. This is a story that has been bubbling along for a while. Really about the security firm. Uc global so Spanish. Investigators have been looking into allegations that that company which had the contract for security in TV in the Ecuadorian embassy was passing on recordings from inside the embassy to the parties and they uncovered some fairly a concerning. Let's say things about this company that potentially the company was recording information about Julian assange recording his conversations potentially in addition to their usual cameras that you would install in any embassy. They were also installing. Secret microphones reportedly was hidden in a fire. Extinguisher in room assange often held meetings him. Initially the report was that they were trying to sell it online to the highest bidder. But there's also speculation. I haven't seen solid proof yet but that could just be because it's not quite out yet that the information may have been handed over to the CIA at some point I either deliberately or the CIA took it. Somehow we're certain that they secretly recalled the meetings. This is there's video available in the SEC website. Y What isn't established beyond reasonable. Doubt is what happened to that information beyond it a funding its way into the hands of the AC. The it's not quite clear with the CIA. Evidently handle that information. Maybe they did. Maybe they didn't but at the moment we're sort of talking about all was accessed these from American Ip addresses and that sort of thing which is concerning but not necessarily not quite smoking gun just yet okay and does this. News have any bearing on the extradition hearing that is about to take place. Ooh maybe maybe not. I mean if the US have been able to hear all of Sanjay's legal strategies before him then they may unfairly be able to prepare counterarguments however really be up to the court to decide how to deal with this if it can be shown that the US government has obtained the secret recordings. I mean you can imagine that assange is legal team will want to exploit both of the I guess new developments that we've already spoken about but more generally what's their strategy for fighting this extradition. What's the argument? The ARGUMENT IS TWOFOLD. One is that this is a political prosecution. Sange is a journalist who is being prosecuted because he did something that the. Us government didn't like that's one and the other is that will argue that the UK shouldn't release assigned to the US because the US going to trade him in a cruel and unusual way and therefore they shouldn't let him go there. Those are the two main arguments that they've been setting themselves up for a basically ever since and was arrested. So is there any clue as to how this is going to shake down or? Is it just anyone's guess? At this point it is anyone's guess but the one sort of wild card here was kind of exposed over the last couple of weeks when to Australian. Mp's including Andrew Wilkie went over and so having conversation with British Politicians Journey Corbin the soon to be ex British opposition leader. Boris Johnson and said. Look you know we need to consider whether this is a fair deal that assigned is getting is the is the US UK extradition arrangement. A reasonable one doesn't need to be reviewed and the interesting thing was that Boris Johnson didn't Swat this away and go. No no no of course. We're entirely onboard. Everything he's doing he said well. Maybe it is. Maybe there is a problem with this. Maybe there is some sort of issue with the way that we exchanged prisoners with the United States. And that was a big surprise. And the thing is that you know entirely unrelated to Julian ASSANGE CASE. There is a whole separate extradition. Fight going on with between the US and the UK and that is over this basically a diplomatic person with diplomatic immunity. Killed a young motorcyclist in a hit and run in northern England and then the person diplomatic immunity fled the country and the UK. Really wants to get this woman back but the Americans are going on on. No diplomatic immunity. She's she's here now. So maybe you could just leave that alone and ignore that. Don't do that. Don't don't force it. Come back over here. Which means that suddenly the UK wants something from the US. And I have something the US wants so you never know whether that might actually play into this. This may be a bit of a wildcard into this proceeding. That's the signal. If you do want to get in touch with meals stocky both on twitter. We also have an email the signal at ABC dot net. And we'll be back with you tomorrow so you've been you've been listening to an ABC podcast. Discover more great apes. Podcasts live radio and exclusives on the ABC Listen Up.

Julian assange Us Donald Trump Ecuadorian Embassy Georgia wikileaks Russia ABC London Hillary Clinton UK Afghanistan Iraq DNC Roy Meller Stephen Stockwell wikileaks ABC Senator Dinero Rebecca
How DeFi is Disrupting the Financial Space with Julian Hosp

Entrepreneur on FIRE

20:27 min | Last month

How DeFi is Disrupting the Financial Space with Julian Hosp

"Shake the room. Fire nation j. l. d. here in welcome to entrepreneurs on fire brought to you by hub spots. Today we'll be focusing on. How defy is disrupting the financial space to drop these value bombs. I brought dr julian hosp on the mike. He is one of the largest crypto influencers in the german speaking world in a medical doctor ex-professional professional athletes. He's the ceo and founder of cake and chairman of defy chain foundation. His vision is to bring blockchain awareness to a billion people by twenty twenty five and today fire nation. We'll talk about what is decentralized finance. How is it different from the traditional understanding of centralization what the advantages are what is blockchain and so much more when we get back from thinking. Our sponsors online training is skyrocketing across every industry thousands of entrepreneurs just like us are using to create market and sell online courses launch. Your own online course and share your knowledge with the world today get started at think dot com slash e f. That's t. h. I n. k. F. dot com slash e. o. f. Hiring can feel trying to find a needle in a haystack. But when you post jobs on ziprecruiter their matching technology finds these qualified candidates for you and invite them to apply so while other companies. Give you too many options. Ziprecruiter finds you the needle in the haystack. And right now you can try zip recruiter for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash fire. Dr julian say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with pleasure to be on. I believe timing is everything and i think. Many people don't give proper timing enough credit. Timing is everything. Proper timing enough credit. And i can tell you a little bit on our conversation today if i had just had a little better timing when it came to bitcoin. Slash other crypto currency. My life might be looking a little different as well. So i'm all about timing. And i imagined today. Fire nation during the intro. We're talking about. How defy is disrupting the financial space. Cilicia dive right in julian. What the heck is decentralized finance. Break that down for us. It's actually something that's quite straightforward if it's expanding simply Functions or seven things that finance. Oh banks normally do which is create value transfer value exchange value. Token is value lend value identifying value predicting valued future so seven fundamental things normally banks do and decentralized ad which means there's not a central party anymore that is in charge but it's actually the entire community that's in charge of those functions. That's so fire nation. That's why abroad gillian here. Because this is kind of an interesting topic as a timely topic for multiple reasons which are going to be getting more detailed into. But this is the world that we're moving into. We're not saying there's not going to be a centralized finance going forward for the next hundred years but there's definitely going to be a strong decentralized growth in the financial space. Let's talk about how it is different jillian from the traditional understanding of centralization so i think the concept that most people are familiar with is actually that of creating decentralized value and transferring that value and that's because bitcoin has been starting over ten years ago in two thousand nine so it does actually does i to function that's and bitcoin. It's extremely disruptive s. Probably most people seeing the news. Large companies like tesla putting it on their balance sheets. Because they believe in. This future now agree with you. Don't think defy. These finance is going to be everything. But i think it's going to be an important part and Yeah with that. You're not just have a lot of extensions. you're gonna see suddenly so called. Decentralized exchanges where things digital thing can be exchanged without a central custodian. And that's very disruptive. Decentralized lending is going to be very disruptive for access to this financial space and so especially for those that have followed everything we would game. Stop and the robin hood stories right now. The so called decentralized tokiwa station where stocks bonds and commodities suddenly get decentralized at that very highly regulated part gets decentralized we're moving towards well total financial freedom and that sometimes a quite scary i think also for the regular now for those people that may not be that familiar with the game. Stop and the situation is going on there. Maybe just a little confused about it. Can you dive a little bit into that and how that actually plays a role in the conversation. We're having right now. Yeah the main story. Was that a lot of the smaller. Investors retail investors. What is called kind of gathered up especially on reddit which is an online forum and they were kind of fed up with large funds and large institutions. Trying to push down certain companies which is called short-selling so you betting on these companies going down and these people just gang up you know what if it's a lot of us and we put all this money together we can actually really push back. And that's actually what happened. Especially on companies like nokia and blackberry companies where objectively saying do not worth much but this retail bunch of group really pushed against and so you would sit there and say okay all fine and it was a back and forth and one hand it looked like the big boys institutions were winning and then it looked like the red investors were winning. But then that's where it gets extremely disruptive it really looked like retail read at the average show the small investor winning and suddenly you robin hood and many other platforms pulls the puck and didn't let those small investors keep investing but actually force them out of the investments and so that meant the other side was inevitably winning. And so there. Was this major outcry where well as long as the big boys a winning you kind of play on their side and soon as we would start winning you pull the plug. A debt was because robin hood or those banks platforms are centralized there. Is this central party. That has the power so that was humongous. Move towards defy especially since. This happened over the past couple of weeks. There was a lot of people tweeting and commenting on that. And there's even a hearing in the senate on it because it was. It was very questionable. If what they did was market manipulation or not defy would completely remove the power from those platforms and with the power actually put about to the community in debt. Something obviously donald passionate about. Yeah there's a lot of crazy like conspiracy theories that are being thrown around and you know this is a very interesting and crazy time right now that we're dealing with. I mean the robin hood. Ceos literally getting death threats and living in a hotel right now because people are so pissed off because of what happens. You know of course. They're claiming that like hey they're not in collusion at all with the wall street hedge funds were forced to do it because they couldn't cover these bets that were happening. You know from this red form. This actually called wall street. Bats fire nation wall street. Best and i guess has now over eight million and growing is probably well over that now users of people that are in their taking all these crazy quote unquote wall street. Bats trying to go all in yolo. You only live once and doing all these different things. Just bet on the house. Or i should say bats leg casino because that's kind of what their their attitude is right now and there's some really fascinating information out there but to kind of pull a back to what we're talking about julian. What are the specific advantages of decentralized finance. I mean we've been talking about what that could be the last situation. You know with what happened with game. Stop but what are some of the other advantages in decentralize finance. That could really make just this world a better fairer place. I would love to talk about the adventures but also the disadvantages. I think both are really important because not everything. Just has an upside right. There's always a flipside get vantage definitely. Are that there is no one that you have to trust so you are in control. The communities in control does no trusted counterparty. And that's very disruptive by itself because it also means said if you make a mistake it's up to you. There's there's no customer support. So that's obviously a downside. You are charged but that means you are charged. That can be very scary. The other thing because no one is in charge. Everything is completely transparent which is extremely powerful because especially in financial space you you hear about this transparency and you hear about a lot of these kind of things happening behind the scenes that the average person doesn't have access to in some the. The playing field is leveled. Goes of this full transparency. And obviously that's powerful. And then the last aspect is this open access A blockchain or decentralized system doesn't discriminate. It doesn't discriminate against age. Doesn't discriminate against gender against race. Everyone is one hundred percent equal and so obviously. That's what a lot of people appreciate an and that's what especially the past months past years. There has been a push towards that and you can see this in the upcoming of defiant and the importance of defy beyond what bitcoin is providing to those additional services. So fire nation. I hope that you're really understanding. What some of the advantages are. I hope you're seeing what some of the disadvantages are. Is there anything you want to add julian to either the advantages or disadvantages or do you feel like you've covered them. Fully advantages are clear. It's open it's democratized. Everything is equal. Everyone has access to it but the problem of this is it's very very inefficient. It's extremely slow because everyone needs to be on the same level. Sometimes it can be extremely expensive to do that Inefficiency a always comes with all these diversifications many times and especially as an entrepreneur. focuses everything lights of bundled into one small. Being can light them on fire anything. Yeah and does not doing that. light and the same thing here. So there are ups and downsides that is why especially when you mentioned that defy not gonna be the only thing going forward you one hundred percent correct but i love to see defy as the gatekeeper. All this this the check that make sure that the centralized finance system doesn't go haywire. Doesn't go totally overboard. So there's this counterbalance and i think. That's what defies so excellent. About so fire nation we've talked a lot about decentralisation of finance the advantages the disadvantages how difference you know. It is from traditional understanding of centralization. The world that we lived in for so long we have a lot more going to be discussing such as blockchain. We're gonna be talking about the fundamental understanding that. We're all going to be having over the next five to ten years when it comes to blockchain and centralized and decentralized finance if we want to have our finger on the pulse and so much more when we get back from thanking our sponsors. If you're a business owner who's hiring you probably face a lot of challenges when it comes to finding the right person for your role like not having enough applicants with the right skills or experience. That's why hiring can feel like trying to find a needle in a haystack shirt. You can post your job to some job board but then all you can do is hope. The right person comes along. Which is why you should try zip recruiter for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash fire. When you post jobs on ziprecruiter. It gets down to over one hundred. Top job sites with one click then. Ziprecruiter is matching technology. Finds people with the right skills and experience for your job and actually invites them to apply. In fact ziprecruiter is so effective. That four out of five employers who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day. It's no wonder over two point. Three million businesses have come to ziprecruiter for their hiring needs. So while other companies overwhelm you with way too. Many options ziprecruiter finds you. What you're looking for the needle in the haystack. And right now you can try ziprecruiter for free just visit zip recruiter dot com slash fire once again. Remember go to this unique place zip. Recruiter dot com slash fire ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire as the covid nineteen pandemic has changed how we do business and how we make money. Entrepreneurs are moving to online courses more than ever you can quickly pivot and create an impact course for your business within kick the best platform to create market and sell an online course within you get total control over the structure price in content of your online courses. Plus you don't have to be tech savvy get started. We know from personal experience. We've been hosting our courses on since two thousand and seventeen our students rave about how easy it is to follow our content things to think readily available themes and templates in a world where spending hours online can exhausting. We know that we are delivering an experience for our students that is both user friendly and engaging allowing them to succeed in reach their goals. So whether you're a guitar teacher or an executive business coach think if it can help you expose your business to millions of people. Worldwide joined the thousands of entrepreneurs creating and selling their own online courses. Monetize your skills today at think dot com slash e f. That's t h. I and k i. F dot com slash e f to julian. We're back and this word blockchain around a lot. And i don't really feel like people have a great grasp as to what exactly is blockchain. Can you just for once and for all share with us. What is blockchain. So imagine we would. Everything's digital quite easy to understand right now with all the covert situation going on everyone being remote. So there's nothing physical everything is digital and let's say we would try to keep check on money that we other and we are not using additional dollars which is using our own money here. You'll fire coins for example and but we don't want anyone to be in charge because then that person could create those coins out of out of nothing so no one should be in charge but everyone being charged. So how would we go about that. And the way we do it as we would put. Let's regular exit and we put it into blocks and we say you know what every ten minutes we on us by. Call really quick and we talk to each other. How much did you send to everyone else. And so we hop on this call minutes obviously very inefficient as a human being but as a computer would be super fast and we discussed this and as you know what i send a couple of you'll quench you. Julianne an ice. And a couple of kate and kate maybe gave you some and so we just record that in that block and afterwards we synchronize that block among each other until at least the majority and that's always a key thing immaturity at least fifty one percent. Say you don't yes. That's what happened in the last time block and now would this is a cryptographic thing. This going to be a final little key. And that key connects or chains. The one time block to the next one and we need to include that key in the next block and the reason is important is because now when we fill out the next block it's automatically chained to the block before if we were to change anything this block the other blocks would become invalid and everyone could verify that if we keep doing this. What's going to happen is we're gonna have blocks of information chained together that is i'm a changeable unless and that's the key part unless you change at least the maturity so fifty one percent of all the participants and so the power here is of course if it's just the three of us it's not that exciting but if you have hundreds of thousands of people it suddenly becomes this point where trying to manipulate. The blockchain database in a malicious way is actually way more expensive than an economic gain. That you would get out of it because there's so many people involved that you would have to change to manipulate and wouldn't work out anymore and sort of power of blockchain generalist that you could store any information for example. I got into blockchain. Seven years ago. Because i'm a medical doctor. I wanted to store medical data in there. And i just realized it was extremely difficult to do that. And that's how. I ended up in the financial space in cryptocurrencies. Where it's very easy. So if someone asks what does it blockchain. it's nothing else than a database. Where information is stored in blocks that get chained together with a majority of the community agrees on their bites unchangeable fire nation. Unchangeable just listen to what jillian is talking about. When it comes to blockchain in general. And how i really want to take this conversation. Julian is why like wise blockchain specifically going to be a fundamental part of our day to day in the next five to ten years. I mean this is not a longtime from now like this is the near term future like this is literally in twenty twenty five twenty twenty seven. Twenty thirty is going to be part of our day to day. Why is that the case. I mean just like decentralized finance is an application of blockchain said uses blockchain. It uses the same advantages and disadvantages. And so these adventures apply to anything. Anything that uses a blockchain is slow. it's inefficient. it's expensive but there's no central party that can overrule someone else. Everyone can join the community. There's no discrimination. It's completely transparent. Exactly what's happening so you can trust what's happening and a we live in a world undeniably where we always look for more equality. We look for easy access. We we want to have equality and we. We look obviously for the transparency. Because we believe not. Sure how. How fair and transparent. Everything's going on to in order to build that trust and that's why again blockchain is not going to solve everything over the next ten years but it's it can solve a few problems and think solving those problems can make society a better place. So how do you want to end our conversation today. Wrap it up with the key takeaway. You wanna make sure fire. Nation really gets from everything that we've been talking about then share a way that we can connect with you specifically to learn more about this conversation this topic. And then we'll say goodbye. Blockchain defy decentralisation is not solving everything. But it's going to provide options and it's going to provide options in an area many times where people without the system do not have any options. They are forced into one option. That means no option. And that's why it's so powerful to learn about that. And that's why i'm so passionate about that. Yeah if. I'm mostly active on twitter if you wanna follow me on there my hanley's at julian hosp. I talk a lot about defy about my companies my investments in bitcoin. Cdn tire Cryptocurrency world's obviously would love to get in touch. So let's get real specific. What is the best way for fire nation to get in touch with you to learn more from you about this topic. Follow me on. Twitter handle is at julian hosp j. u. l. i. a. n. h. o. s. p. julian hosp on twitter and fire nation. You know this you're the average of the five people you spend the most time with an you've been hanging out with j. h. and j. l. d. today so keep up that heat and head over to fire dot com type. Julian in the search bar has shown us will pop up with everything that we've been talking about today. Best show notes in the biz in julian. Thank you for sharing your truth. Your knowledge your value with fire nation today for that we salute you and will catch you on the flip side. Hey fire nation. Today's value bomb content was brought to you by julian in. I've created a treasure trove of free courses for you at teach you how to podcast for a mastermind creek. Funnels that convert in more. All you need to do is visit. You'll fire dot com slash resources to start learning today. I'll catch you there or catch you. On the flip side. Online training is skyrocketing across every industry and thousands of entrepreneurs just like us are using to create market and sell online courses launch. Your own online course and share your knowledge with the world today get started at think dot com slash e o f. That's t h. I n k i. F icy dot com slash e. o. f. Hiring can feel like trying to find a needle in a haystack. But when you post a job. On recruiting their matching technology finds these qualified candidates for you and invite them to apply so while other companies give you too many options. Ziprecruiter finds you the needle in the haystack. And right now you can try zip recruiter for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash fire.

robin hood dr julian hosp defy chain foundation Dr julian julian Cilicia jillian gillian tesla reddit yolo bitcoin nokia donald julian hosp senate kate blockchain
Percy Lavon Julian born - April 11, 1899

This Day in History Class

07:48 min | 1 year ago

Percy Lavon Julian born - April 11, 1899

"Here's the thing saving money with. Geico is almost better than playing pickup basketball. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly bricks threes. And who completely hack you? And then put his hands up and say no foul no foul with GEICO. It's easy to switch and save on car insurance. No need to fake. An ANKLE SPRAIN. Because you're absolutely exhausted. So switch and save with GYCO. It's almost better than sports. Hi I'm Laura Vendor Kim. I'm the of the before breakfast. Podcast and the author of several time management books. I'm also the host of IHEART media's newest podcast the new corner office in this show we share strategies for thriving in the new world of work one where the location and ours are more flexible than in the past. Listen over that First Cup of coffee and I promise you learn something useful. Listen to the new corner office. Every weekday on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. This Day in history class is a production of I heart. Radio Hello Again. I'm eaves and you're listening to this day in history class. A show that jobs a little bit of history knowledge every day. Today is April Eleventh Twenty twenty. The Day was April Eleventh. Eighteen ninety nine chemist Percy Levonne Julian. It was born. Julian is remembered for synthesizing drugs and chemicals used to treat people with Glaucoma and arthritis. His work also led to the mass production of testosterone and progesterone as well as the development of firefighting foam called. Aero phone. Julian was born in Montgomery Alabama. He was the oldest of six children. His father was a railway clerk and his mother was a teacher. Jillions father was strict and had high expectations of his children. All of whom went onto earn university degrees. Julian went to the state normal school graduating at the top of his class. In nineteen sixteen he then enrolled at depauw university in Greencastle Indiana in nineteen twenty. He graduated as Valedictorian with a degree. In Chemistry Jillian wanted to go to graduate school but his advisors suggested that he get a job teaching at a black school in the south where he would not need a doctorate. His father also wanted him to become a physician since he feared that Julian would have difficulties finding work in the chemistry field because of his race but Julia wanted to stay in his field so he took a job teaching chemistry at Fisk University. A Black College in Nashville Tennessee. After teaching there for two years he was awarded a fellowship in Chemistry to study at Harvard University. He got his master's degree in organic chemistry from Harvard in Nineteen twenty-three though he had good grades. Harvard did not offer him the opportunity to serve as a teaching assistant since southern white students might not accept him as a teacher so he stayed at Harvard for the next several years. Taking on various research fellowships in small jobs to make money in nineteen twenty six. He took a teaching position at West Virginia State College. But by the next year he moved on to head the chemistry department at Howard University in Washington. Dc Wallet Howard. Julian found a renewed interest in producing synthetic materials. That could help patients dealing with illnesses. He got a grant from the general education. Board to study with the chemist Ernst spate at the University of Vienna in Austria. Julian like Speight was interested in the ways that nature turned simple organic compounds into complex substances. He worked when finding a synthetic material that could replace soybeans which were then being used to manufacture drugs like Pfizer. Stig mean visor. Stig mean was used to treat glaucoma. Juliet got his doctorate from the University of Vienna. In nineteen thirty one. At that point he returned to Howard. University then went to Depaul University as a research fellow teacher of organic chemistry in Nineteen. Thirty five he married his life in a Roselle and they later had two children together that same year. Julian Dr Yosef pickle. An associate of his from Vienna succeeded in developing a synthetic chemical similar to natural FIS astigmatism. Depaz Dean recommended that Julian be appointed as head of the chemistry department. But the faculty did not approve this calling his appointment in advisable despite this glidden company a manufacturer of paint varnish and chemicals offered him a position as director of research and chief chemist he took it and worked there until nineteen fifty three at Glen his work with soybean proteins contributed to the creation of firefighting solution called Aero Foam. His work with soybeans also led to the synthesis of the sex hormones progesterone and testosterone which led to an increase in the world's supply of them and reduce the cost of hormone treatments while at glidden doing also synthesized cortisone from soybeans stairwells or solid. Alcohol's cortisone helps treat rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. Natural Cortisone was extremely expensive to produce as it required the extraction of animal bile but Julian synthesized cortisone may treatment more accessible to patients. After leaving. Glidden he started his own company Julian Laboratories in Chicago in Mexico City. He soon began making drugs synthesized from wild Mexican yams over the years. Julian got more than one hundred. Thirty chemical patents in the last years of his life. He also dedicated a lot of his time. To the civil rights movement. He continued to work in the lab until his debt. In nineteen seventy five. I'm aged up coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. And if you haven't gotten your fill of history after today's episode you can find us on social media at t. H Z podcast. And if you have any questions or comments you can send us via email at this day at iheartmedia dot com. Thanks again for listening to the show and we'll see you tomorrow for more podcast. Iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows my name is Shapiro. Will for the past four years. I've been trying to figure out how my twenty two year old son Courtney wind up with a bullet in his back outside of Chicago police station. There's what you hear on the news. That Courtney got shot then drove himself to the station. Were officers did everything they could to help him. And then there's the troop. Listen to somebody on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Any guesses how a delicious peach dessert is related to a deadly epidemic. What row pigeon poop played in one of astronomy biggest discoveries less way? Did you know that x rays were used as entertainment at Kid's birthday party assumed that you've got botanical espionage to thank the GIN and tonic and the treatment for malaria casual? I'm Greg I'm Marianne Brown new poku surprisingly brilliant. We've been collecting some of the most shocking inspiring and downright bizarre stories from science history from medical misadventures histories missing geniuses. You'll find it in surprisingly brilliant from seeker so come listen to surprisingly brilliant on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts. Wherever you get your podcasts.

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Your Calendar Is A Ledger Of The Time You've Traded Away #1217

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:18 min | 3 months ago

Your Calendar Is A Ledger Of The Time You've Traded Away #1217

"Your calendar is i- ledger of the time. You trade it away. If you think about your calendar as a place where you can just schedule your meetings. Then according to julian shapiro. You've got it all wrong. He suggests that in fact you should be thinking about your calendar or your diary as a ledger. As an account of the time that you've chosen to trade away you've chosen to devote that time to that meeting rather than do something else and that something else could have actually bring them more effective more efficient use of your time and could have created more value for you or your organization so the next time you look at scheduling a meeting. Ask yourself if this was a ledger. If this was an account of the value in the usage of my time is this a good entry to put on that ledger. Am i going to be happy to look at that ledger. If i do an audit at the end of the and say yes that was a good use of my time if it's not maybe it's time to balance the legion. What do you think. Do let me know your thoughts in the comments below. That is it for today. I do thank you for your time. And i will be back again tomorrow so yeah.

julian shapiro
The Showings of Julian of Norwich

Stuff You Missed in History Class

40:02 min | 2 years ago

The Showings of Julian of Norwich

"This episode is brought to you by apartments dot com. Have you ever thought about the fact that we're you choose to live directly impacts, the you you become well, apartments dot com is here to help you find that future perfect place. They're the number one rental search site. And with good reason, they're the most listings, which means you have the most apartments townhomes condos and houses to choose from and apartments dot com has custom search tools too. So you can find exactly what you're looking for to become the best version of yourself. Visit apartments dot com to find your perfect place, apartments dot com. Change your apartment change the world. Welcome to stuff you missed in history. Class a production of I heart radio. How stuff works? Hello. And welcome to the Bod cast. I'm Tracy b Wilson. And I'm Holly fry we are going to talk about a medieval mystic today, which is the topic. We seem to roll around to about once every three years or so. I they're usually topics that you have selected Mike I feel like it's it's one of those things that your brain just is like I made a little mysticism. Sometimes I do it's also I took a class in college. I studied literature in college. And I took a class that was all about medieval women writers, and it was about women writing in medieval Europe, and then also women writing in, hey on Japan, which was happening at the same time. And a lot of the women who were writing in medieval Europe were were mystics in in one way. So that's part of it. I really loved that class that I loved so many of the women writers that I learned about in it, even though at this point. It's starting. It's starting from scratch with research. Like, I don't remember any of the details from class from. Oh, yeah. Years ago. That's a yeah. My brain can't retain it in any sort of clarity for that one. Yeah. This this time we are talking about Julian of Norwich, and we've talked about other mystics before like, I just said there were as Marjorie camp and Hildegard of bingen. We haven't really talked about mysticism in general or how that fits into the context of medieval European history. And specifically Christianity in medieval Europe. So we are going to cover that context today. In addition to talking about Julian and mysticism is not unique to Christianity or to Europe or to the medieval period, it's been part of religions around the world for most of human history and secular mysticism exists as well. But when it comes to Christian mysticism in Europe things really started flourishing in the late thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. These centuries were dangerous and chaotic and we are really going to only scratch the surface in this recap in thirteen nine pope Clement, the fifth moved the papal capital from Rome to avenue all in France. He was escaping political pressures in Rome, and then also did this to appease king. Philip the fourth of France over the next seven decades, the papacy became increasingly French rather than being more Italian as it had been before. Then in thirteen seventy seven pope, Gregory, the eleventh, moved the seat of the papacy back to Rome, but his successor urban the sixth was difficult to work with and but it heads with the cardinals. So the cardinals elected their own pope Clement the seventh who returned to Evansville in this set off a series of rival popes and anti-popes in what became known as the Great Schism or western schism which lasted until fourteen seventeen. The Catholic church was immensely powerful. And religion touched virtually every facet of people's lives. So all of this upheaval damage, the church's, reputation and spawned all kinds of chaos and uncertainty. We talked about it a little bit more in the episodes about the defenestration of Prague which involve throwing people out of windows in thirteen thirty seven so to rewind a little bit ongoing conflicts between England and France evolved into the hundred years war and that continued off and on until fourteen fifty three. So the hundred years war was an a lot of places overlapping all of this chaos and the Catholic church. The war was connected to disputes over territory and to the line of succession of king. Charles the fourth of France, he died without an heir and then England tried to take control of the French throne. This war was marked by active battles as well. As linked to sieges, and it's the war where Joan of arc who was a French mystic in her own right came into prominence in addition to war and religious upheaval. There was the great European famine which lasted from thirteen fifteen to thirteen twenty two followed by the black death which peaked at thirteen forty seven. It is impossible to calculate exactly how many people died as a result of either of these. But the most common estimates are that the famine killed about five percent of the population. While the black death killed as much as one third that is a widely cited number, but it's also extrapolated from a few specific cities records members of the clergy were disproportionately affected by the black death since their religious work involved, caring for the sick and the dying and England specifically experienced its own problems. In addition to all of this, including massive flooding and thirteen fourteen that helps set off that famine and the peasant uprising of thirteen eighty one which is also called watt Tyler's rebellion. This rebellion started in East Anglia, which is where Julian of Norwich lived, and it started as a response to some unpopular laws have been passed that year. These included a poll tax and the statute of laborers that second statute set a cap on workers wages because of a labor shortage that followed the black death. Of course, there were plenty of other things going on as well in the face of all this chaos and war and death. Many people in Europe felt like the world was corrupt an out of control and that God had turned his back on mankind. Religious thought and writing were often cynical and focused on the fear of hell and damnation and the church also started cracking down on heresy. We also note that there were definitely people of other religions besides Catholicism in Europe at this time. But Catholicism was the overwhelming dominating force in the places that we're talking about mysticism was a response to all of this. And it was essentially the opposite of that trend toward fear and damnation it can be tricky to pin down and exact definition of. What is and isn't mysticism? Oh in the medieval era, Christian mystics were all over the place in terms of their backgrounds and life experiences. They included members of the clergy and the laity some were wealthy and others. Reporter some were highly educated and others couldn't read or write. So each individual mystic might not embody every single hallmark of mysticism, but they still all fit under that overall umbrella as a general rule Europe's Christian mystics approached God and religion through love instead of fear. They were devoted to the humanity of Jesus Christ and to having a personal relationship with him. They often described some kind of intense transformative experience in which they were awakened to a sense of the all inspiring love of God, and Jesus many had visions or revelations in which they viscerally experienced God's presence and felt personally connected to the day. Idi many of them wrote about or dictated those experiences in the vernacular rather than in. Formal Latin even if they had formal training inland, even though mystics tended to approach religion through love. It wasn't necessarily a cozy hug fest mystics tended to be outsiders. And they often lived very solitary lives mistakes also tended to live in really restrictive ways, the life of a mystic tended to be filled with penitence an absence and a sense of purification as examples in previous episodes. We talked about Marjorie Kemp wearing a hair shirt as a form of penance and Hildegard of bingen interpreting serious illnesses as punishment from God for failing to do what he had asked her enka rights and hermits took this life of restriction abstinence in solitude to an extreme both chose to live in a solitary way with their lives devoted to introspection penitence in spiritual purification hermits, typically lived in remote undeveloped areas, but had the freedom to move from one Hermitage to another. Anchor aids stayed in one place in closed in a small cell attached to a church or other religious site. There were two hundred fourteen documented anchor rights and hermits and England in the fourteenth century, they were thought of as outsiders, but they could also be sources of counsel and guidance for the communities around them, they might act as teachers or just sort of spiritual counselors and some of those who had been ordained as priests might also act as confessors Paul of Thebes is usually described as the first Christian hermit. He fled religious persecution in Egypt in about the year. Two fifty and lived in a cave in the wilderness. It's not clear who the first anchor eight was but the practice was being formalized by the twelfth century, the formal steps to becoming an anchor eight included a religious service with mass and prayers for the dead because after being enclosed the anchor was considered dead to the rest of the world. An Inca writes in closure was called an anchor hold. The recommended size for an anchor hold was twelve feet or about three point six meters square. But they really ranged from small nukes that you could barely turn around in too much more spacious accommodations that might even have multiple rooms or accommodate guests anchor. It's typically had at least one servant and some anchor holds were large enough for the servant to live with the anchor right while still having the freedom to come and go, and this might sound like a luxury, but it was really an assessing since you couldn't leave the cell. You were dependent on someone else to do everything from emptying the chamber pot to procuring food to replenishing your supply of menstrual rags that typical layout of an anchor hold usually had three windows one of them faced into the sanctuary of that adjoining building that the anchor hold was built into. So the anchor right could observe religious services and receive communion and speak to a confessor. Another was used to deliver things like food and other supplies and. To allow the anchor Rights Act as a teacher or a confessor a lot of anchor rights. Also, did some kind of work like sewing or copying, and that work would be passed back and forth through the second window. The third window was for light. And it had a translucent covering over it, and sometimes it's covering had two layers with those basically a cutout with an OPEC layer that created a shape of a cross in the light some anchor. I had a little freedom of movement the window into the sanctuary might be more like a door allowing them to enter the church at night. And sometimes it was the anchor rights responsibility to keep the candles lit at night or to sound the alarm if something went wrong at the church, the second window might open out into a parlor or other area where the anchor could sit and talk to members the religious or secular community in some anchor holds had small garden plots attached, which the Inca right tended apart from this though, an anchor right who left their anchor hold was subject to arrest. A potentially damn name. Nation being an anchor was one of the few religious roles that was open to women female anger rights were often called anchor S's and more women than men choose to pursue this particular life. There were also women who were called valances who lived a very similar life. But did so in their own homes. A lot of them were widows, although male Inca rights tended to have been priests female, Inca rights and vows were often lay people being an anchor. It was also one of the few ways that a person could pursue such a devotedly religious life without having money joining a convent or monastery typically required some kind of dowry and in some places. This was the case for anchor rights as well. But some Anchorage were supported by the church in the local community, including through the giving of alms and bequests in people's will Julian of Norwich was an Inca. Right. And we will talk about her after a sponsor break. This episode is brought to you by Lisa. Lisa knows how important rest is to a better life. Lisa is the foundation of a healthier happier. You all Lisa products have been thoughtfully designed to go beyond creating a comfortable bed and the transform your bedroom into a sanctuary. You want to spend time in Lisa's. Most advanced luxury hybrid mattress is made with premium foam and springs for enhanced pressure relief with edge to edge support. The superior is thoughtfully designed with the best of both worlds. I recently received a superior mattress. And I have to say my backfield's a lot better than it has been a very long time. And I got some of the deepest sleep of my life, which is something I do not get because I tend to be thrashed. She, but oh that was a good. I slept the slip the sleep of angels. So don't miss how you can live healthier live happier by resting deeper. Order today and get fifteen percent off your purchase. For a limited time at Lisa dot com slash history and use promo code history. That's L E essay dot. Dot com slash history, promo code history. And keep in mind that you also get a one hundred nine risk-free trial, plus free shipping and returns. The woman we know as Julian of Norwich was born in Norwich East Anglia England and thirteen forty two I recognize natives to that place pronounce it slightly differently and away. I can't quite replicate because it ends more. Like, a j Norwich was the second largest city in medieval England after London it had several schools, multiple monastic communities and cathedral that dated back at least to eleven three this region prepared students for study at Oxford or Cambridge and for the priesthood Norwich had at least fifty Paris churches. Four of them within half a mile of Saint Julian's church, which is where Julian was enclosed. And because the Catholic church had such a large presence in the city Norwich. Also had a large community of artisans who worked on church commissions. These included architects glass workers stone workers painters sculptors and others Norwich. Was also a trading hub with a thriving merchant and craft community. In other words, it was a prominent bustling and culturally rich city, we don't know much at all about Julian's life like literally almost nothing, but we can draw some conclusions about her growing up in Norwich. She might not have had a formal education. But she did grow up in a place that valued education, which probably influenced her understanding of an approach to the world. And even if she didn't have much formal religious instruction this thriving religious community in Norwich would have trickled into things like the sermons that she heard during regular church attendance. She really might have been hearing a wider variety of more complex and nuanced religious thought than she would have been if she had grown up in a more remote area with the same parish, priest her whole life. We also know that Julia lived through all of that upheaval that we talked about before the break. The black death reached Norwich at the start of thirteen forty nine when Julian. Was seven killing about a third of its population and half of its priests. Although the black death ended in thirteen fifty three plague return to Norwich twice more before Julian became an anchor is I thirteen sixty one and then in thirteen sixty nine and we don't know whether Julian married or had children, but her religious writing includes themes of motherhood and mothering that we're going to talk about more in a little bit. And it's possible that if she did have children that they may have died in one of these plagues or from some other cause Julian wrote that in her girlhood, she prayed for three things one was that. She wanted to understand the passion of Christ to she wanted to experience a physical illness. That was so serious that she had everyone in her life with thinks she was dying this illness would let her suffer along with Christ. And the severity of illness would let her be purged, and then come back to God with the life of worship a third thing that she prayed for was that she wanted. What she described as three wounds to be made deeper in her life in the words of grace work who edited jillions work in nineteen. Oh, one these wounds were quote contrition inside of sin compassion inside of sorrow and longing after God when she was in her own words, thirty and a half Julian became very ill. So sick that she and everyone around her did think that she was dying this illness lasted for seven days and on the fourth day. She was given last rites the seventh day of this. Illness was either may eighth or thirteenth thirteenth Seventy-three. This date discrepancy is because in surviving copies of the manuscript. They're two different sets of Roman. Numerals one says that this happened on may the V I and the other says that it happened on may the X. I her curate had brought a crucifix for her to look at in her last hours on the seventh day of her illness. At about four in the morning. Julian's mother thinking that she had died bent over to close her eyes. And in that moment, Julian started experiencing a series of fifteen religious, visions that went on until about nine AM the following night. When it was clear that she was not dying. She had a sixteenth vision that confirmed what she hits him before not long afterward Julian documented what she had seen either by writing it down. Or by dictating it to a menu insists she described herself as quote, a simple creature that could no no letter, which suggests that she dictated her account. But at the same time her later writing reveals, a complex understanding of various aspects of theology something that it would have been really difficult for her to attain without knowing how to read so it's possible that that quote, no, no letter meant that she didn't know Latin not that she couldn't read or write English or it's possible that she didn't know how to read when she first experienced these visions, but that she. Learned how to read leader. There's also a note at the end of one of the surviving manuscripts that that references a scribe who had written it down. But that was probably a scribe who copied the manuscript not like the scribe who was literally writing it with her at the time at some point after see experienced these visions Julian was enclosed as an anchor at the church of Saint Julien and Konigsberg in Norwich, according to Bloomfield's history of Norfolk which was written in the eighteenth century quote in the east part of the churchyard stood in Anchorage in which an anxious or Rick lose dwelt until the dissolution. When the house was demolished, though, the foundations may still be seen in thirteen ninety three lady Julian the anchors here was a strict recuse and had two servants to attend her in her old age. This woman was in these days, esteemed as one of the greatest holiness the history goes onto name four other anchorages who followed Juliet. At the church with the first one starting in fourteen seventy two the first contemporaneous reference. We have to her as an anchor right dates back to thirteen ninety four although she was probably enclosed well before that although Norwich had an extensive religious and spiritual community there were no recorded anchor aids in the city before Julian most sources conclude that she took the name Julian naming herself after the church where she was enclosed. Although it was typical for people who became monks and nuns to leave their given name behind and take the name of a Saint which still happens today. There weren't many other documented cases of people doing the same thing when they were enclosed as an anchor. Right. So Julian really may have been named Julian from birth. It was not an uncommon name for women at the time. It was essentially another spelling of Jillian or she might have become a nun at some point and take in the name of Saint Julien when she did that before she became an Inca. Right. That's really speculation there. There's not doc. That she had ever been done about twenty years after writing this first account of visions Julian wrote a much longer one about six times as long as that. I document she went into each vision in much more detail and into how she now understood them after twenty years of inward reflection and study, and she had finished this longer document by about thirteen Ninety-three beyond that we just don't have a lot of documentation, even in this accounted for visions. She doesn't talk about herself much at all. So what we have to piece together comes from other people's accounts. Margery Kempe who we talked about in a previous episode visited Julian in about fourteen thirteen and Marjorie referred to Julian as Dame, which was titled that was commonly used for nuns, some sources point to this as evidence that zillion did become a nun before she became an anchor. Right. But it does appear that Marjorie is the only person who refers to her this way. Most of the rest of the details. We have about Julian come. Some other people's wills people came to her throughout her time as an anchor eight for help and guidance and several of them remembered her in there will we know she had at least two servants during her lifetime because someone left each of them money Isabel offered who was the Countess of Suffolk left Julian twenty shillings in her will in fourteen sixteen along with making other bequests. This was the last person to specifically name Julian in their will. But some other people left bequests to an anchor is at Saint Julian's, not naming the the anchor is by name and that went on until fourteen twenty nine since Bloomfield's history of Norfolk says that the next anchor is after Julian came in fourteen seventy two it's possible that these unnamed anchors were Julian and that she was still living as late as fourteen twenty nine. And after the break, we're going to talk about all those visions that we've been referencing and their influence on Christianity. This episode is brought to you by Godzilla only. One can be king long live, the king Godzilla king of the monsters is the next chapter in Warner Brothers and legendary pictures cinematic monster vers in this epoch new story. Godzilla is pitted against some of the most popular and terrifying. Monsters in pop culture history when three ancient super species rise from the depths of earth and vying for supremacy members of the secretive government agency monarch fight against the odds as Godzilla clashes with mothra Rodin and godzillas ultimate nemesis. The three headed Ghidora will this be the most epic theater experience ever as the clock? Runs out. The ultimate question is do we fight to defeat these larger than life monsters or do we join Godzilla in hopes of saving our planet and the entire human race. Or will you just have a ton of fun. Starring Kyle Chandler Academy Award nominee VERA for meager and Millie Bobby Brown in her cinematic debut, Godzilla king of the monsters storms into theaters may thirty first. While to leeann herself called her vision showing usually with an E instead of an O in show. Her book is often published under the name revelations of divine love because the overarching theme of these visions. It's all about the love of God and loving God. It begins quote. This is a revelation of love that Jesus Christ our endless bliss made in sixteen showings, or revelations particular in a simple conversational style. She walks through her series of visions along the way, she documents her understanding of God's love for mankind and various elements of theology in her relating her first revelation. She writes, quote, I saw that he is unto us everything that is good and comfortable for us. He is our clothing that for love rapid clasp with us and all encloses us for tender love that he may never leave us being to us all thing. That is good as to mine. Understood. Standing her tone is very comforting and reassuring and stresses over and over that God loves all of his creations. She frames this as a comfort that she needed to receive from God. And now that she has she's sharing it with the rest of the world the visions began with Julian looking at a crucifix on what she believed was her deathbed and many of the earliest showings, are related to the crucifixion of Jesus. And specifically what was happening to him on the cross the visions themselves are not necessarily comforting many of them are focused on wounds suffering and pain Julian described in early showing of the blood coming out from under Jesus's crown of thorns as quick and lifelike and horrifying and dreadful sweet and lovely, but no matter how graphic the descriptions are of Jesus on the cross each one circles back to Julian gaining a deeper knowledge of the scope and breadth of divine love Julian's accounts of the earliest. Showings, mainly involve the vision itself, and her understanding of what the vision means sometimes God or Jesus speaks to her or asks her a question, which she answers and at first Caesar pretty straightforward so Jesus s art thou well pleased that I suffered for the and Julian answers Yay. Good lord. I thank the gay. Good Lord blessed. Maced thou be or God asks out see her referring to the Virgin Mary before showing Juliana vision of the Virgin Mary. But in later, visions, Julian becomes more active and starts asking direct questions about religious issues. The thirteenth. Revelation begins quote after this the Lord brought to my mind, the longing that I had to him a four, and I saw that nothing leaded me but sin, and so I looked generally upon us all and we thought is sin had not been we should all have been clean and like to our Lord as he made us. This is a sensually asking why God didn't just use his power. Or to prevent sin in the first place leaving mankind pure rather than at a state of suffering, basically, preventing all these problems Jesus answers Julian with the most famous line from her showings, quote, it behooved that there should be sin. But all Shelby. Well, and all shall be. Well, and all manner of thing shall be. Well, the thirteenth revelation continues on from this largely as a meditation on the idea of all shall will. In her, showings. Julian also writes about Jesus in a way that probably would have been considered heretical if it had gotten wider recognition while she was alive that has happened in more recent years as well while reflecting on her first fourteen visions Julian meditates on the idea of God. And Jesus as a mother, quote, the mother may give her child suck of her milk. But are precious mother Jesus he may feed us with himself and do with it full courteously and full tenderly with the blessed. Sacrament that is. Food of my life. And with all the sweet sacraments, he sustained us, full, Mercifully and graciously. She later goes on to say, quote this fair lovely word mother. It is so sweet. And so close in nature to itself that it may not barely be said of none but him and to her that is very mother of him and of all to the property of motherhood belong as natural love wisdom, and knowing and it is good for though, it'd be so that our body fourth bringing b but little low in simple in regard of our spiritual Firth bringing yet it is he that do with it in the creatures by whom that is done Julian's. Fifteenth. Revelation is one of closure. She writes about how the whole time. She was receiving these visions she hoped that she would quote be delivered of this world and of this life, but in this last revelation, she has shown how be removed from pain and want is a reward for patients in abiding by God's will. She later says, quote, an in this he brought to mind the property of glad giver, glad giver, take the but little heed of the thing that he give it, but all his desire and all his intent is to please him and solace him to whom he give it and if the receiver take the gift highly and, thankfully, then the courteous giver set at not all his cost and all his travail for joy and delight that he has pleased solace Tim that he loveth. And then after this guy leaves her with the thought, quote, what should have been agreed to suffer awhile sit. That is my will and my worship Julian had her sixteenth vision the following night as she was beginning to recover and her life was no longer endanger. She writes of this one as gaining insight into her own soul. But in it, she's also visited by Satan who she calls the fiend. She thinks to herself, quote, thou has now great business to keep the in the faith for the Dow shoots. Be taken of the enemy. What's down? Now from this time evermore be so busy to keep the from sin. This were a good and a sovereign occupation. Jillions book ends with several chapters of her personal understanding of all these visions and by her book. I mean, the longer version of all of this wraps up with her overall sense of the whole of them being quote. What's thou? Learn lords meaning in this thing. Learn it well love was his meaning who showed it the love. What showed he love wherefore showed it he four love hold the they're in and thou shalt learn and no more in the same. But thou shalt never know nor learn there in other thing without end, thus was I learned that love was our Lord's. Meaning we know that Julian viewed this whole experience as a gift from God that she then went on to share with others, and unlike many of the other books written by anchor rights and hermits during this time, she seems to have meant her work forever. Everyone not just for other solitary religious people. And this was remarkable Julian Roach, Shirley, confidently, an authoritative -ly about religion when that really wasn't considered to be women's domain. And she did it for ordinary people not only for her own religious circle. She also did not shy away from that could have led to her being condemned for heresy. Can there were other women anchor rights who were writing things that were sort of meant as guides for other people like themselves so stiff a guide of how to be an anchor right or theological questions for for other anchor rights, but she really seemed to want this to be a work for everyone. And we know that people were talking to and learning from Julian while she lived, but it doesn't appear that many people were really reading her work until much later. Some of this is because of attitudes in England in the decades after her death. So in fourteen one while she was still living. King Henry the. Fourth ordered for heretics to be burned. And that included anyone found with heretical books, which Julian's showings, could've been the oldest surviving copy of the short version of her account dates back to the fifteenth century. There are three handwritten manuscripts dating back to the seventeenth century. The first time it was printed was in sixteen seventy almost three hundred years after that first religious experience, and it probably came from a sixteen fifty manuscript the first people who wrote about reading Julian's work three Benedictine from England who had been exiled to France that happened in the seventeenth century the churches Saint Julien was largely destroyed on June twenty-seventh nineteen forty two when it was bombed during World War Two by then it was affiliated with the church of England rather than the Catholic church. The structure was rebuilt in the nineteen fifties. And at that time the site of the former anchor right cell was turned into a shrine to Julian although that shrine is probably larger than the actual anchor. Hold was. Had history played out differently Julian of Norwich and several of her contemporary English mystics might have been canonized, but the Protestant reformation began about one hundred years after her death in England split away. From the Catholic church today. She has an unofficial feast day in the Catholic calendar, it's on may thirteenth while the Anglican episcopal and Lutheran churches listed as may ace. She's become a symbol of comfort and hope in the century since she lived the order of Julian of Norwich was established within the episcopal church in nineteen eighty-five. That's Julia Norwich her life, so strange, especially to a modern. I. She was in this anchor hold for a lengthy amount of it as far as we know and at the same time like her writing is just so comforting just over and over and over, and it's like a God loves all of his creatures. And it's great. Sort of her whole underlying tone throughout all of it. Do you have a little bit of a listener mail. Yes. I do have some listener mail. This is from Aubrey Aubrey says, dear Tracy and Holly. I recently finished listening to the back catalogue episodes of stuff you missed in history class. And now, I'm sad that I have to wait impatiently for new episodes. Thank you for keeping me company through many, boring hours of work. I feel like we're friends, but not at a creepy way. I know we're really not friends. Love that sentence. I wanted to write you today because of something I just learned that I find really exciting. And fascinating, I think Holly particular might be interested last week visited a small museum in Saratoga county, New York and had the opportunity to chat with one of the museums. Researchers the museum includes local archives that I was looking for information on my historic home. I happened to mention some of the odd things I'd found while renovating such as a child sized possibly nineteenth century leather-shoe encased in horsehair plaster in a wall. I imagined that a frustrated plasterer with tiny feet had kicked the wall while it was dry, and then unable to free the shoe had plastered over it. But the researcher whose name is an had a different take was a concealed garment. She explained that concealing a garment and a wall or to ward off evil was a tradition brought to the US by the British. She said that often a child's outgrown she would be used if there were no younger siblings to inherit it not knowing any better, I remove the shoot. My wall last year and have now opened my home to invasion by you spirits, live and learn I thought this would be a fun episode suggestion or that you might enjoy reading about it. Here's a link to an article, I found thanks for being awesome. Aubrey thank you for this note, Aubrey this. This actually came in a while ago came in about six weeks ago, and it caused me confusion because I had this moment where I was like I remember talking about this on the show though, I felt like Holly. And I had this whole conversation about putting sheaves in walls and about which is getting stuck in the shoes because they can't go backwards. And I said which would have to fight me because she's not taking my shoe. And then I eventually realized there is a thing that happens every year here in in Boston and a couple of places besides Boston and called history camp that is sort of an unconscious where people basically volunteer their time to deliver papers, and it's a cool opportunity to go and learn bits of things about lots of different aspects of history. And there I saw a whole panel that was about concealed garments and walls, and which markings on walls and all of that stuff related to belief in the supernatural in colonial and afterward New England, and I sort of conflicted that whole experience with our podcast and made it into something we had talked about. No what we did talk about it. Because I have did we talked about it during a live show. Okay. You are not crazy. I mean, you may be but this isn't the proof. I'm not a medical professional when these things we have talked about it. And I think that made it onto the show because I actually recall another listener mail or someone commenting about me fighting a witch, but we have talked about it. Although it wasn't the subject of a show it came up during a live show. Okay. I really like I had this whole thing where I was searching our website, and I was searching by folder full of old episode scripts, and I was racking my brain like I remember talking about this. When was it? I'm glad to know now that that was a real conversation and not just a total fabrication of my mind. This thing unrelated to the show now all of you listeners have heard me work through. I own memory. Which I wish was still as sharp as it was when I was twenty. I mean, I I can't remember anything. So you'll get except I remember that conversation because I said, I would fight a witch for my shoe you did you did. So thank you Aubrey for help me rekindle that memory. Thank you, Holly. Also for helping me together, we'll figure it, but tweet us we can assemble, and we can we can we'll probably get helpful Email emails from people who either have heard this on the podcast or we're at the live show that we're talking about. It'll be like. Oh, yeah. Anyway, if you would like to write to us about this or any other podcast, we love to get Email. We do read them all we are not great at answering them. But we do read them all we are history podcasts that how stuff works dot com. We are also all over social media missed in history. That's where you'll find our Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram and Twitter, and you can come to our website which missed in history dot com. You can find show notes to all the episodes highly. And I haven't done today's show notes includes links to the entire text of Julian's book, and you can subscribe to our show on the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. Stuffy missed in history. Classes a production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more podcasts for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. This episode is brought to you by the Home Depot. The Home Depot at all comes together. But not just the flooring trim in pain. Now, there's more kinds of doing with decor. From the Home Depot. Shop thousands of furniture and decor pieces plus get free its lexical delivery with no hassle returns to your local store. You can save up to ten percent when you use promo code history te- HD at checkout. Shop homedepot dot com slash decor. Today, valid on select items only free delivery on select items forty five dollars or more. Visit homedepot dot com. For more information.

Julian Norwich England Catholic church Saint Julian Europe Marjorie Kemp Holly fry Julian of Norwich Julia Norwich Jesus Anchorage France Aubrey Aubrey Julian Roach Japan
Luck Is A Function Of Surface Area #1246

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:35 min | 2 months ago

Luck Is A Function Of Surface Area #1246

"Getting lock he's a function of surface. Area abe. i do like it when i come across the smart quotes that explained simple concepts. But it's such a way that it kind of makes you stop and think just that little bit deeper for that little second. I think this one from julian shapiro. Does that at least it does for me anyway. The idea that the wider your surface area the more people you come into contact with the more products and services. You try the more experience. You have the lucky you get because it means that you're going to have more opportunities you're going find more opportunities because of your experiences and your your contacts and your context for that matter you can see opportunities perhaps that county. Perhaps the you would have not seen before. And it's all simply a function of surface area doing more experiencing more living life. If you like so the next time you'll lamenting the fact that you don't seem to have as much lock anymore. Think about how you can expand your surface area. How can you get out and meet a few new people. Can you go out and try. A new theme is try. Few new things have some different experiences. Because what that does is expand your surface area and what that does is actually improve your chances of having some good luck because luck is a function of surface area. I like it. What are you reading or that is for today. I do thank you for your time. And i will be back again tomorrow.

julian shapiro
3pm Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

02:20 min | 6 months ago

3pm Newscast

"Emma i can't believe it. The elevators totally stopped. All these buttons are dark. None of them are working. There's little panel down there. I think it's got a phone in it. It's nearly one o'clock in the morning. We're the last people in the building. There's going to be there. I don't even have a dial tone. No one's picking up nothing. Can you hear that music. Let's just we need to get killed music before we do anything that's gonna that's gonna make me crazy if we're stuck in here. I think the speaker cables are probably that should do. It feels like we've just been cursed every single year. We try one of these things. It never works. I mean just think back to that. I won the the cabinet in the woods so many years ago that it was so beautiful and in like one by one everyone called and cancelled. It was just a disaster. Yeah yeah but we did have one. Remember julian koster call from neutral kotel playedas that song that saved the night. That's right. I remember it like it was yesterday. Gosh julian koster mr music. Tapes neutral milk hotel. I can't wait for him to bring his musical saw. He should be here any minute. We're getting close to the to the big party. Time delayed leave bob. How are you cook. You close you here. we are you all. i feel. I don't think i can make you guys you. Don't you sound concerned. Well one of my sons is a cold one of your singing saws. It's one of the youngest name. Yeah i know it's it's north. She's sorry what's what's the symptom of a of a saw with a cold.

julian koster Emma kotel playedas cabinet bob
Harry Halpin & John Shipton: What Julian Assange Represents to the Crypto Movement

Epicenter

59:19 min | 1 year ago

Harry Halpin & John Shipton: What Julian Assange Represents to the Crypto Movement

"This is epicenter episode. Three thirty nine with guests Harry Halpin and John Shipton arena took. Hi Welcome to epicenter mine up today my guests are Harry Halpin and John Shipton. Harry is the CEO of nimh technologies. They're building privacy infrastructure. That's decentralized permission list and incentivize allows developers to build privacy pulls irving applications that protect people's data but also the Meta data and John Shipton. Is Julian Assange as father? Now you might be wondering why John Shipton is going to cripple conferences while he regularly attends crypto conferences hacker conferences and alike to build a base of support for the Legal Defense Fund that is fighting the extradition of Julian assange to the US. So as you know Julian assange was in the Ecuadorian embassy for the last seven or eight years and about a year ago was arrested in London and is now in a maximum security prison facing extradition to the US and one of the organizations that is leading this funding campaign. Is the Kurds Foundation? They are also defending other people who have been accused of various computer crimes hacking leaking information people like Edward Snowden Chelsea Manning. Jeremy Hammond and Barrett Brown and opinions about assange are divided. I recognize that but I think there's one thing we can all agree on and that is if he is convicted of violating the espionage. Act as is the case brought against him by the US. This sets a really dangerous precedent for freedom of speech and freedom of the press. You know one of the things which brought wikileaks. A lot of attention is the fact that they exposed war crimes committed by the US in Iraq. I think we can all agree that a world in which journalists are under constant fear of prosecution for exposing this kind of information is undesirable. And you know it's also important to recognize that. Wikileaks and Crypto have the same roots the cipher punk movement. You know we talked about the interview. Julian was in the cyberpunk mailing lists early on and perhaps even had exchanges with Sa- Toshi and I think you know the Crypto community really needs to step up here and support you know these these fundamental rights of free speech because it could be project next. Harry mentions that at the end the conversation and says you know it could be your project if you're building something that. Us government for example deems to be a threat. Will you could be facing prosecution for violating the extra two and you could be facing extradition to us. No matter where you are in the world you know they have very broad reach as we've seen here so I think this is a really relevant conversation for people that are in Crypto and for the types of technologies that. We're trying to build so yeah. This is really fun. Conversation really unique very different from what we usually do. It was great to sit down with Harry John. And we're going to have Harry on at some point to talk about. Nim everything that they're building. He was speaking at reset everything on the privacy panel and I really aligned and a lot of things here so love to have him on the podcast as well before we go the conversation. I've got a favorite ask you whatever you're doing right now whenever you have a minute. I'd like you to leave us an apple. Podcast REVIEW APPLE. Podcasts reviews are the fuel that power. Seo Rankings for PODCASTS. So when we have a steady flow of reviews coming in when people searched for Crypto podcast or blockchain. Podcast ON APPLE PODCASTS. Well we'll show up. We'll show up higher in the rankings. Which means we can reach more people. We get to have more of an impact and we get to attract sponsors which helps us keep the show running and I just love to read them like I actually have a slack notification whenever we get a new review it shows of my slack and like always excited when I read these reviews because I know that someone spent the time to show their love for epicenter. So that's the favorite. I'm asking if you want you to go to epicenter dot rocks slash apple. That will take you straight to our page apple podcasts. Or if you have the APP already you can just go straight in there and it would really help out a lot and really appreciate it and as a gift if you want one. I'll give you a discount code for a free key. Her Wallet like I do. Just email me the best epicenter dot TV subject. Line key interested like hey I love you review get key. I'll send you a discount code. See thanks a lot in advance. And now here's a conversation with Harry Halpin and John Shipton. I'm here with Harry helping. Who's the CEO of Nimh Technologies? And Them I must admit I don't know that much about him yet but I'm looking forward to learning more about it so that we can do a proper long form conversation. But you know you're working on privacy preserving technologies. It's like a next generation tour which is the same technology that kind of gave birth to for example hidden services like wikileaks and also John Shipton. Who is joining? Sasha's father I'm here to conjure up Substantial help and enthusiasm for Julian's fight against extradition to the United States. I think there's a lot to talk about here in in this episode. I like to I get some background on. Why you're here at any theorem conference and I think it would make sense because Joey assange is obviously very well known. Everybody knows his name. Everybody knows at least sort of trajectory. But I think for context it would help to sort of understand what got him to where he is today. And what brought you here to this conference to give us a bit background on on the story. Just start from the the end. Jillian is a part of the crypto movement or community from from the beginning being very much involved in blockchain Christmas before last was Playing Successfully Crypto kitties so an has a strong enthusiasm for smart contracts further to that My involvement comes because Julian is locked up and can't speak for himself so I've wandered around trying to symbol support of a financial nature political nature and a communal nature so being too slow Berlin Spain France a few times Strasbourg Brussels and London building a coalition of support. Which I have the supporting community of Theorem can reach out to Julian and assist. And what is it about the community that why the community or is it one of many communities that you're sort of seeking support from or are you seeking support also from other non non crypto communities every community for to answer your question in particular via therion community has notion of public goods which spoke of today so it's a community of foundation also? It seems to be contemporary communal effort to establish a means of Communication a means of contract and a means of developing capital in a more communal And a better sprayed on the bay. So there's preventative measures to within the community. To prevent the accumulation of singularly large amounts of capital we call plutocracy and divert. The course of the Theorem. There's preventative measures within the community. And within the structure of a theory which makes it very very attractive to me and to Julian and other supporters. Yes I think one of the most important things to realize about Julianne and I consider myself as friend is that effectively jillions project for wikileaks was too large then how to a heavy intellectual basis. He has a paper. Just very rarely. Read called State and terrorist conspiracies. Where he's looking at the. Us government programs to map the social networks of political radicals put people that they considered undesirable. And he said actually the real problem is corrupt governments plutocracy the centralization of power and he said and they also form a network they have a powerful network that then asymmetrically hurts people who are weaker and not as well connected their elite network so in his paper says why couldn't we imagine a case. We're we the reason why this elite power has so much power is because they control the flow of information and they keep it secret between themselves. What for example trade deals are going on or war crimes and so Jillian theorized and this is before wikileaks is if we could somehow overload this network with excess formation and prevent them from being so much in control because they themselves were so could no longer maintain their own secrets than these corrupt powers would become paranoid about each other. We no longer capable of communicating in secret and at the end of the paper. Says I'll explain more in part two. And then he doesn't actually finish the paper but he creates wikileaks and I think the dosing the system. It's essentially the off of the global centralized elite and it's it's a very political act and at the same point. I think it's very bright. People often don't understand how intelligent that move was and he was trying to kind of flip the tables because for example many people would be paranoid talking to Julian. Talk Hang Out. Julian's father and a theorem conference paranoid about donating to wikileaks. Komodo is a little bit paranoid but the fact that matter is he said the real goal our goal should be to make those who are in power who are enforcing corrupt economic structures. They should be paranoid. And that was the goal to some extent wikileaks and we can make them paranoid not by doing propaganda but just showing the truth of their actions in the world through journalism and releasing sources that they would otherwise them in their crony corrupt journalists would never reveal otherwise. You mentioned SA- Toshi. That Sushi ever written about wikileaks. Did he ever talk about Souto? She was a little nervous. If you remember correctly what happened There was a payment processor of wikileaks was actually under financial blockade. Pay Pal these. Shut them off. You can no longer donate to wikileaks. And of course at the same time over in the Cypher. Punks mailing lists. How a bunch in Nakamoto? All these people were working on a decentralized censorship resistant cryptocurrency called Bitcoin and win the blockade took place. Bitcoin I think was the life blood of donations to wikileaks and Nakimora himself. I believe was supportive but if I remember the e mail correctly he was nervous because he was afraid that bitcoin became too well known to quickly. It's various enemies in the banking system and whatnot. The governments would try to shut it down nonetheless it was. I think maybe the first time. Bitcoin really got out of the cipher. Pon mailing lists into mainstream news. Okay interesting I wasn't aware of that. That sort of connection with Ikemoto Andy Leaks. They're all the same mailing list as well. I might add. So They I. Actually we should. Troll has direct communication. You never know so let. Let's talk a little bit. Let's bring back somewhat and talk about your son and for our listeners. Just let's explains the case that's being brought on against him. The United States brought a an exhibition case against the Julian from the United Kingdom to the United States and try him therefore seventeen cases of espionage. In one case of calm legal use of a computer that would accumulate to about one hundred and seventy five years. So now we're in the tenth year of the persecution of Julian assange. It started off a ten days in one's worth prison arbitrarily detained then Irene months in Norwich under house arrest arbitrarily detained seven and a half years and the Embassy of Ecuador as an aside early arbitrarily detained again and now the latest thing ten months in Belmarsh maximum security prison nine months of that Twenty two hours a day solitary confinement. So it's a an escalating intensity of persecution of Julian for simply publishing news Rulli. Just truthful news leaked by Chelsea Manning and other people are you in contact with them at the moment Yes I see Julian Thursday Saturday and Sunday. I was the last Saturday and Sunday. So you're you're able to see him. Yes that's the millions of the the maximum security prison salt confinement you the maximum security prison procedures. We all must go through. And we all must be rayed go through four Separating portals in the sniffer dogs and all cymbeline or room with a high fidelity sound and high definition cameras about thirty one every three majors we sit with about eighty other prisoners who have visitors and maximum maximum of three adults per prisoner. South pretty crowded noisy room. You can't because of the high definition cameras. You really can't have to hold your hands over your mouth so that the the you know dull and muffled the sound bitten stop lip reading that surveillance of. Julian has now there's pictures of Julian consulting audio and visual of Julie Jillian consulting with his lawyers. How the intensity of Surveillance Wenders Powers Having Listening Devices in the ladies toilet because one stage they use the ladies toilet as A private meeting room To discuss things with the lawyers. The intensity had an increasing trajectory which the United Nations repporteur on Torture Nil Mel. Nils Melzer describes as psychological torture and wrote a report to that extent. So that's the situation and presently so I wanted to ask you a you. You described the charges that are brought against your son. Also the years of confinement. Do you think that what he did was right? And you absolutely you know it just to give you just one example of the many many many hundreds the cables Released the Iraq war had within it a cable which describes the murder of an entire family seven people altogether children and parents and grandparents seven of them murdered in their house. That cable caused the rewriting of the status of Forces Agreement between the United States. Well let's actually the cancellation of the status of Forces Agreement between the United States and Iraq and consequently in United States forces remove themselves from Iraq. I only to come back under the auspices of fighting against Isis and al Qaeda. So that's one the second thing. Is that the charges against Julian of espionage around the release of these Chelsea Manning's lakes and oppression of journalism and limitation of comment. It's so intense that there's about one hundred lawyers working on Julian's case about one hundred thousand people like me worldwide working to ensure the Julian's free there's of I imagine I don't know this for sure. But the counting it up about ten million dollars over three years this impression this oppression and intimidation of publishes publications and journalists main that no other publisher in the West or publication in the West or journalists in the West will take upon itself this enormous burden of worldwide oppression a global problem of enormous size. That no longer. Will anybody being a portion? This is important for the Theorem community. If the United States decides in that doesn't like a theorem it can issue and extradition order against the leaders of a theory and kidnap them. Judicially kidnapping has done so with The Hawaii Mangan's zoo from Canada in the United States has done so with all been in Ecuador who's an? It wiz is also done so with. Mike Lynch is again another. It billionaire in the U. K. That they've issued the next edition order so in two parallel lines. It covers technology that the United States wants or wants repressed and comment that it doesn't want or once for press that the Free Association of us to talk easily amongst each other and discuss facts in order to come up with a solution to our daily lives or whether we support this government that government action is completely suppressed. So I'd like to add little story so I did my PhD artificial intelligence and as a consequence of that. This is you know ten years ago more. I can very worried about surveillance and so I went to this event called chaos computer congress. Which at that time was in Berlin in order to learn more about what was actually going academic conferences and publishing academic journals. I Really WanNa know what was going on on the ground with the hackers and Cyberpunk San consider them part of a larger community and at that conference. Julian was there with other wikileaks. Volunteers and gave this wonderful talk about wikileaks. And I was to be honest. Very impressed that being said when wikileaks volunteer approach me and he said Oh. We're looking for more volunteers. Do you want to join? I said no way he said. Oh I said I said everyone in wikileaks all the US is going to try to send you all to jail. And at the time I was actually having my own grand jury court case so I knew a lot about a lot about that time and then the wikileaks volunteer. He said but we're not dissidents. We make tools for dissidents and I said I don't think the F. B. I. Will be able to tell the difference and unfortunately it's true and what we saw over and over the course of years is that rather than focus on the substantial crimes which were revealed by wikileaks including the stockpiling of zero days which has since been weaponized dangerous released in the vault seven which I think is the most important of the wikileaks releases. The one which is really put. Julian's head on the on the chopping block. Because there's no way they see ya with let someone who released a bunch of information about their ability to hack other countries and dissidents phones in the public survive the what the the public good that Julian did for the world regardless of what you think about the details I think does not justify under any circumstance extradition torture in sets a terrible terrible precedent for any kind of journalism and also those Jerusalem technology wikileaks really was a combination and is a combination of TOR hidden services than non whistle blowers and sources which journalists should do but historically very bad at doing what they very sophisticated journalism operation and by by shifting. Destroy that you know. The extradition process of trying to destroy the future of not only journalism but any technology which they believe is a threat to the current reigning order and this will definitely include cryptocurrency technology if it actually becomes accessible anything which is decentralized self sovereign censorship resistance and enables transparency for the powerful and privacy for the week. These are the exact kinds of tools which will be under increased threat. If assange is extradited it's interesting. How in a lot of people's minds in the crypto space the threat of legal and regulatory threat comes. Mostly I think from things like financial crimes securities law. This sort of thing. I mean this is what most people come on our show to talk about for instance when it has anything to do with some of the regulatory threats to Crypto. And what you're seeing here. Is that the the real threat. the CRYPTO SPACE. So people that work in the space is the ability for for Crypto to become so this weapon against the state and in the end when it comes to financial crimes people they can go after so the teams that are building day like doing illegal. Ico's or this sort of thing but when it comes to information the potential repercussions of say wiki leaks or something like that is far far far more detrimental to to estate power than say like a couple of investors defrauded or something like that. Do you get a sense. That in the CRYPTO space people sort of grasp the gravity of of the very notion that the crypto can be used as a tool against depression and a tool to contraception or the the powers. That that you're talking about for myself like decentralized systems and the very attractive and give the capacity to independently act in your own interests and your family's interests and the interests of your friends in a combination that in combination increases their power and decreases the power of those who wish to utilize our energies for their own ends institutions. That wished to do that so I find it very very attractive. You might remember a just a couple of days ago. The Taliban and in Doha have signed a peace agreement with the secretary of State. Mike Pompeo the united representing the United States. And this is very big. This is a victory of the Taliban over invader of their country and the destruction of the country. It's about ten years ago that the Afghan war files were released an allowed us to penetrate and allowed that penetration to permeate through how societies as commentary opposed to the commentary. That governments wanted to hear from Wanted us to hear that is brought about the end of the Afghan war. So it's very slow to turn things round that gigantic nature you know. Ten years tremendous moment in the distribution of information across the Internet whereby all of us can participate simply just having a keyboard and knowing how to use a search engine. It's just simply fantastic. I WanNa ask you about the the the information landscape and how it's changed since wikileaks came into the world. I think you can probably talk to you from your perspective. The the positive aspects of leaks. But have you thought of some of the negative aspects of wikileaks? And how you know. We're through changes to the information landscape. What positive and negative things that that gigs brought onto the world. Oh we'll icon. Save myself any negative aspects but technologically. I do see that. The Red Queen's revenge exists and any advancing technology will have a repercussion. I don't know how intellect intellectual who want to get today but so I'm believe that Martin High Diggers analysis is correct. That technology has brought about a sort of Pathak Chrissy whereby we find natural things that we relate to each other through a pain. Fallen into disuse. So it's really hard to recognize what is him and what is deeply him and the most of my day is spent mediated contact. I use the telephone message services and and all of that everything is mediated. The only thing that is unmediated in in a very busy day is when you sit down and in the evening and have dinner with a friend. That's an unmediated but the phone still interrupts and demands that you have a mediated guest at dinner even though they're not there so the the red queen's revenge has to be literally must take into account and developed and continued developing means whereby relate to each other face to face and I'd like to to make a quick point which is towards the end of his life heidegger German philosopher. Who was a definitely at some point Nazi but had an interesting analysis of what happening in Contemporary World? He said the contemporary world is becoming fascist. But in a new way we're in so it's becoming a giant system of control managed by cybernetics by to some extent feedback between humans technology and the goal of sovereign is the maintain systems of what's called a steady state. Homeo- stasis not chaos. Not Moving too rapidly jumping up and down Black Swan style but a society which can be easily predicted and I honestly think that from my memories of Julian that he was more of what I what I think. He himself considered almost kind of nineteenth century. Enlightenment kind of person We. He believed in individual freedom individual agency in the individual capacity to reason and that you know the whole vision to some extent wikileaks was that data would be published and they would be Editing on it so like wikipedia and that from the crowd of individuals that collective intelligence would emerge. Who which would sort out the true from the false so that second part wikileaks. Unfortunately it was never as fully developed as I think. Julian wanted it to be due to all of the repression he encountered attempts to do more decentralized wikileaks. Haven't really solved any of these problems. But I think it's pretty clear that it is definitely possible. Releasing information can have negative side effects. It can hurt people that's probably true. I'm docks or I have a revenge porn. There's the government's just as they monopolize propaganda of with radios and televisions as we all know from World War Two and Al doing the same on the Internet not surprising but what I think is important. Remember about both what wikileaks did historically I think. The philosophy that motivated it was inherently a nonviolent philosophy that was working very hard to reduce if not end any possible Julian deathly redacted. Lots of files and worked very hard to redact files but it wasn't just about the reductions with the larger issues. Which that if you have war if you have secret governments that can arbitrarily chill or declare. Who can live? Who's a citizen? Who's not and this? Sort of? What a dominant call zone of legal in distinction which is exactly where Julius trap. Now if you have this kind of world it's very violent world and the only way towards a nonviolent world world weather. People exist in a cooperative. Decentralized peaceful fashion based on mutual exchange would be to basically build a sort of way out of this world through spreading knowledge and spreading information and spreading technologies which enhanced human freedom rather than enslave. It and I honestly think that that vision is even though there are all sorts of particular. Instances was wanting to argue about. I think that vision itself has the same. Vision that motivates particularly laws. I would say the Libertarian influence on Bitcoin and a theory but also the same vision that that is behind smart contracts and much of the same vision which is behind cryptocurrency. As a whole there is a sort of not particularly well articulated Political and say exceedingly nonviolent vision behind these technologies. I definitely agree that Bitcoin is in itself. Political theory is political. At least it has political motivations. That are as you said like. They're not they're not Quite explicit or will in email archives are in the results of the right in the world. Manifesto there's not there's not a manifest I mean perhaps there some manifesto there but I. I don't know that most of the people you know attending these conferences certainly not here really on a daily basis. Think of how politically motivated division of theory is or the vision of Bitcoin is. Do you think it's important for New York community to sort of uphold that vision or do you think that turns it into something that can be seen as detrimental by a by states by the media? Because oftentimes what happens? Is You know the media will pick this up and and try to vilify it. Oh yeah they'll say oh. Everyone's a bunch of scammers is just pennies thaw. She put your money and it will just disappear why you trust your local bank. Why don't you trust us that being said of course like there will be as if theory? 'em BITCOIN cryptocurrencies and not just cryptocurrencies. But the entire sort of Cypher. Peng vision of privacy for the week but transparency for the powerful as more technologies. Come into being which lets that be a possibility. There will without any doubt be more repression both physical and violent repression by the state apparatus and propaganda mental repression stories against this kind of technology. There's no doubt that that will become more and more virulent. As the traditional kind of state in banking infrastructure starts. I would say probably declining as we're seeing now and we'll probably only get worse that being said it's important to say that it's important work on these technologies regardless and stay true to their fundamental vision. And what at least in the vision resounds true within within oneself? But how do you do that though? I mean concretely. There are people here who who are aligned with the vision and build things for that vision but there are people here also building business and seeing opportunities and the vision for them is. You know it's there. Maybe they recognize it. Maybe they see. Maybe maybe not even aware of it. How do you reconcile those students? These things are not necessarily incompatible. If you do it correctly so one of the things that Julian said you know I had this point in my life where I could have gone working for Silicon Valley. I could have become a professor just kind of relaxed and taught working class kids how to code but instead Julius we'll look he's you know I would be happy to be professor and hang out and teach quantum physics Australia. He was very good at that he could have done that in another universe besides important to do so. That really changes the world. And I. That's what you know. That's why he did what he did. And that's also you know. I felt one of the reasons when we I was finishing up my own academic research. I decided that we should actually try to commercialize privacy enhancing technologies and other kind of Cypher. Punk technology mix net which hides. Who's talking to WHO DISGUISES METADATA? I felt that rather than just hang out and write papers about it. Try to get rich quick scheme more join. Silicon Valley it made since the really focused down and produce code because what the world needs more maybe than manifesto right now is it just needs working code. That can actually solve concrete problems and privacy is a huge problem transparency and journalists huge problem. And if you solve these problems it's actually I think better critique wikileaks one way I would say. It'd probably be better almost dude. As a business than a nonprofit the mount of repression must be very financially damaging to everyone involved and I can say you know tore off technologists. Were very important for ricky leaks. They were ironically enough built on A. Us Government Grants to fund privacy. So the agent in China and phone home of the CIA is known and put it can do a google search and ends up being really useful amazing stuff and general purpose of and that's wonderful and that's what gave birth a lot of the technologies we see today but that being said if you can create world changing technology which is financially sustainable business or nonprofit or is just ideally even better at Dow Code is law thing. That's I think you'll you'll have a better chance of surviving repression and a better chance of accomplishing your vision Just on wikileaks Wikileaks is a a Wiki? It's a collaborative effort to be clear about it. When they cables were being released progressively by wikileaks. There were ninety two to ninety six other publishers and publications involved in the analysis that is exactly a Wiki keep and they they. All of the efforts would be feathered together and The wikileaks would publish the cable. And the analysis that accompanied it so that you could refer back to the cables if you felt that then. Alice's required more thought or if you want to confirm the analysis a perfect system at is the vision similarly ethereal not for vision ethereal and its community in the foundations. the vision. And it's very very enticing in my view so maybe and bring it back smart contracts one of things about him but people like 'cause they can see the co Bitcoin for financial tracks as you can slee the transactions the you take so set and it's an old open source principle or better yet free software principle where when you publish software of any type you can see the code. You can change all the code you can. You can make it do what you want. You can exercise your freedom and I honestly think the vision of wikileaks as a cloud platform which Israel today as well and should be adopted by more and more journalistic organizations that if you're publishing a story where you should publish the data behind the story because often your interpretation may not be the correct one other people have other parts of that story in. Lake wikipedia collective as you can bring those stories together and get a more complete and true vision. The world and this belief in truth is something that I think people. His desire for truth is something that people need today. This is interesting concept. So how how would you structure that in a way because I mean most of the data that goes into writing stories they piece? On The New York Times Princeton all that reporting qualitative data. Quantitative data is not easily. You know you can't put it into a spreadsheet you maybe you can do sort of. You're you're the you're the expert. Maybe you can do some kind of natural language processing stuff on there to extract things like sentimental for or intention or this sort of thing but how does one structure that and how does one make that into a viable system that people who are meant to interpret this information can do accurately in ways that actually sort of convey the meaning of the data Behind story or a news reporter publication. I mean to be honest. We did consider various points. Running artificial intelligence techniques naturalized processing over the cables because there was this belief that was very strong by Julian that there were probably many stories in the cables which the journalists and human volunteers. There's just too much data. So why don't we can? We find things that people glossed over and certain stories would be really big in India or Holland and not even notice by the kind of American filter bubble or the British filter bubble. And there's a lot of room for innovation and that's why I don't think there's a clear and easy answer but that being said let's be very honest about about things. The mainstream media you know has been spreading lies which wikileaks and journalists working with them. Help correct about things like Iraq. War Weapons of mass destruction so. I know for example that my parents and where I'm from everyone near me voted for trump. And it's very interesting reason why they voted for trump and I think that they said well trump was the only candidate that came out against the Iraq war and that they had lost tremendous faith and mainstream journalism because the journal May Journalists had been publishing lies and that most people I know are actually very four the existence something like wikileaks because it could restore trust journalism if you had access to the sources and the data and even better yet if that was on a blockchain. The legacy media is in at offend disadvantage. First of all it can has limited resources limited reach. It only has a couple of arms whereas publications like wikileaks can inquire and many many different directions simultaneously. In that sense. Legacy made is primitive. The next sense is that with certain. It techniques you can constantly refer to another as you know. One fact has another effect on either side so you can refer and research and create statistics which will give you an insight into the spread and in allow you to well. A good example of this is the when Wiki leaks published the order list logistics lists for Afghanistan. You're able to see how many desks they were. So you could search a vast array of papers really quickly and see how many desks they were ordered. Or how many computers there? Then you could compare that to the statement. The politicians generals making that there were winding down when in fact though buying two thousand more discs and for four hundred computers and five hundred trucks and so on so the primitive aspect of legacy media cannot compete with a site with an organization like wikileaks which utilizes the fantastic power of the engineering. That lies behind the Internet. That's the most solid aspect of their conversation is the legacy media is technologically primitive and the organisms within those organizations that is the people Shaped by those organizations they have acquired a technologically primitive relationship with the unfought the pace of unfolding events whereas wikileaks and say for example if you combine wikileaks and ethereal not combine the two organizations but combined the insights of those organization. Wikileaks has spread many different arms access to instantaneous. Research can manipulate its petitions. Find out where the information is true. Publish all those statistics for others to review and then an organization sorry. The foundation of a ethereal can feel the minute to minute pulse of its take-up and the minute. Sorry the nanosecond pulse. I'm of the time bolts. Sorry I'm I'm of the legacy media us. I think it's ridiculous. I think I think I agree with you. On on the point that legacy media is is is very much lagging behind and but but on the other side of that if you take the opposite side of that social media platforms are highly technological and one must look not very far to see this sort of damage that that has done to spreading truthful information. And that's getting worse. I think by by all accounts. What role do you think platforms like? Wikileaks can play in leveling the playing field. I guess or providing more truthful information on social networks and I guess more importantly stopping the of of faulty information as we've seen in these last couple of years just to quickly on on facebook. No I have very much respect for people who make the effort to exchange information and in Cape Cape the level of interflow with their friends and relatives the corrupt use of facebook by its owners. And by the it's as giving access to government or people like cloud strike that is a matter of regulation two distinct ideas and we tend to mix. Well I do myself. In my mix the class of ideas the class of ideas of people exchanging information rapidly and quickly across facebook with their friends and others is right that it's corrupted by its owners and the government is a matter of administration and that can be fixed in my own country. Google collects all sorts of information lawyers. Advise me five rise. Three hundred thousand dollars. We can ensure that Google doesn't collected any longer but there's no support for that in government government currently makes bad company with gigantic organizations like Google. In the you though again to break it up right. I don't think it's going to happen. But the proper administration of giants social media companies and Google is the problem not L. Liking talking to each other. So let me let me say like the fundamental technology of crowdsource collective intelligence determined truth. Some notion of collective truth maybe not big T. capital truth but at least a lower case trees that we can all agree on and that can be diverse divergent as people do more research and change over time and be archived. This is not only valuable for journalism. This is valuable for the larger society. Our libraries public institutions where we maintain knowledge should be building this kind of technology right now in order to maintain relevance and become an important part society in the future. And I'm very nervous both around the centralization of communications which I think not because I think the platforms themselves are inherently bad but they are more easily back doored. No G mail handing-over wikileaks volunteers emails. I'm sure a lot more than hand over various platforms but also because one person's fake news is another person can be another person's truth and the question is who do we believe should have the power not only to inflict physical violence which is classically. What states do but who? Who has the power to control the flow of information and by centralizing communication both in newspapers but also in facebook and twitter? We created a censorship vehicle and that vehicle there's a fundamental bet with censorship. So it's possible. I think even likely that propaganda which I think is a better term than fake news has been spread through facebook and twitter. It's mostly enable to some extent by the demand for advertising dollars which I actually think a lot of this workaround tokenism going on the black community could help address that being said the WHO is the gatekeeper. Sorry it's not just advertising dollars it's also political interest interest. You know the the trump campaign and everything that happened around there was was mostly a result of misaligned political interest. And even this week they said you know a trump investor might over get rid of Jack Dorsey and put a trump supporter as CEO of twitter. Imagine what the repercussions would be there. But that being said The the vision that is small group of experts have a better grasp of truth than wider humanity. Is I think very dangerous. It's essentially a futile vision. A divine right of experts while I and I think Julian I think many people the currency space would think that there is such a thing that humans and all of our fragility in our problems can actually collectively determine truth. CaN'T ARGUE CAN HAVE. Discussions can sort information out and the problem of to some extent propaganda and fake news. Disinformation is really problem of people meeting more skills and better platforms platforms like wikileaks order. Basically understand the sources of data analyze data income to their own possibly collective conclusions about what is true. And what's not that's a much healthier and much. Less dangerous is something which is built to stop. Fake News will be built to stop political dissidents next and then will eventually be built to track and kill people. It's kind of how we see technologies progress. Historically I think we we could go on this topic for for another hour. But we've already been here for about an hour and I'm conscious of your time here so I'd like to ask you a few questions here and bring it back to your cause which is helping your son in his transition and so what do you think the effects of prosecution on. Jillian would be to free press. What would that change? Fundamentally the change would be fundamental there would be no free press. Legacy media is already unfree. There's only six corporation in the United States and each corporation runs on some sort of government warrant or other so the very little freedom that there is now in legacy media would disappear altogether in alternative. Marion asked stuff. It was such a thrill you know I'm an older man is such a thrill to be able to read actual fact about large events in the world because I'd grown up on a diet of newspapers where you sort of hemp to read between the lines or newspapers in my involvement in La dies in politics where you was a tool used to stick a knife in the back of your enemy. This wasn't always the case the Daily Mirror in John Pilger and the Vietnam War were tremendous is not always the case. That's what will happen to our capacity to make decisions are based on what we speak to each other about. We'll big gone altogether. We'll be just won't be there. There's a little more could add in his. I'm not an expert on trade agreements but There's a a supporter of Julian's Eba Jolly. Who's an ex judge? Here's an expert. On phaser arrangements that the oppression in that I described in technology with Mike Lynch all been and will wings zoo and the oppression of Julian and journalism and publication there are described also extends into the trade agreements the fees agreements whereby national perogatives for example. Pharmacy pharmaceutical benefits. In France or in my country will be suborned and of lower prerogative. Legally then the national prerogatives so corporations would be out to sue or would be ours to involve themselves in the description of the Pharmacopoeia and consequently begin to strip money out of society. And that this would not be able to be defended so it follows. Three avenues has a fourth avenue. If I could just run it quickly passed you that the fourth avenue of this oppression is assassination and murder under Obama. They were four hundred forty six Tuesday murders decided between Brennan and Obama. Four hundred forty six extrajudicial murders. We saw the other day The Iranian general tricked into a peace conference and murdered on his way. There assassinated. Men named Salamone so this three avenues to how the Haeggman wishes to discipline and get conformity from its vessels the oppression of comment the stealing of technology. And the murder of those that they can't apprec- in either other way. That's a slightly depressing. At least however to put it in a more positive way please is this. We are here at the Athenian Foundation having a mating of people who have invented a method of commerce that includes community last week because of the wikileaks releases the Afghan war files last week. The United States admitted defeat. Eight a defeat. We all knew was ten years old because of the release of the Afghan war files so the war in Afghanistan is over brought about by our knowledge of what was actually happening anyway. That's the positive side. Thank you very much so before we end it. Please let us know where that you're operating to to raise money for Jillian. Sorry warmer self out on that loss statement. The COURAGE FOUNDATION HAS Z CASH. Bitcoin and other sorts of donation portals. That would help This Julian and US fought this extradition order to victory. So do you based please? I would like to add. I mean I I did actually discuss this Once with Julie and I said well you know. A lot of people donated bitcoin to you. You know ten years ago. The fact of the matter is I think most of that was spent on his tremendous legal costs. You know two thousand thirteen to two thousand fourteen so I don't think the legal team has huge resources so any and and when I know when I was the last guest visit him before he tweeted about Catalonia and got his guest list turned off any he. You know one of the discussions. He was very depressed that he felt that people were due to the media's campaign against them and you know people are going to abandon wikileaks abandoned supporting him and I think it's really important. People do come together and I did argue. I'd like to see it be true. I said well don't worry. What the mainstream legacy media. John puts a great term. Thinks about you but I do think that the blockchain community is a natural home base of support for this court case. And it's important to have Saudi with this court case because it could be you and your project next. There is absolutely no doubt about it so this is really a kind of you know either. Do or die moment. I think for the kinds of technologies that people here want to create. And what is the most serious legal challenge against the broader crypto movement? I think that's a great point to To end on. I WanNa thank you guys for joining me today. Wish you the best luck in. This will be a very important. I think they earn. Thank you for joining us. On this week's episode we released new episodes every week. You can find a subscribe to the show on Itunes spotify youtube sound cloud or wherever you listen to podcasts. And you have Google home or Alexa device. You can tell it to listen to the latest episode of the epicenter podcasting epicenter dot TV slash subscribed for full list of places where you can watch and listen while you're there be sure to sign up for the newsletter so you get new episodes in your inbox as the released if you want to interact with us guest or the podcast listeners. You can follow us on twitter. Please leave us a review on. It helps people find the show and we're always happening. Thanks so much and we look forward to being back next week.

Julian wikileaks Us Julian Assange Julie Jillian Iraq Google Harry John Shipton Harry John murder Wikileaks CEO of nimh technologies Harry Halpin Sa- Toshi facebook wikileaks apple
Interview w/ Julian Shapiro (part 2)

Developer Tea

41:30 min | 2 years ago

Interview w/ Julian Shapiro (part 2)

"I pause and said all of these skills learning how to get the word out. Systematically, they apply equally to start up. In fact, they apply better to start up because you can do so in service of actually earning revenue, and you could put money in to pour fuel on that growth fire 'cause with velocity at the mercy of my purely my wits, and my resources and my social networking essentially because I'm up paying this coverage. And so it comes down to well how else can I use these skills? But most importantly, I fell in love with the process at realize this is the branch in my career that I'm now going to pause at and choose a direction, and I chose. Yes. Used these skills. I've developed and pursue growth marketing. We're continuing the interview with Julian Shapiro in today's episode. We're talking about growth for developers not just personal growth with brewing. Your personal projects growing projects that you believe in and Julian has done this. He's done it, successfully we're talking about how Julian accomplish this with his own projects and how he's doing it with other people as well. Thank you so much listening to developer t my name's Jonathan Cottrell and my goal in the show is to help driven developers. Like, you connect to your career purpose to you can do better work and have a positive influence on the people around you Julian has figured out what his purposes now, it's not something that ends you don't find it. And then stop looking for you don't find it and stop figuring things out. So Julian is continuing to grow. And we talk about ways that Julian's growing and learning on these episodes the last one in this one. So let's jump straight in the interview with Julian Shapiro. It's such an an exciting story. And I think a lot of developers aspire to, you know, the the opportunities that that you've had Julian and it's easy to to sit back and listen to this and think, wow, you know, Julian is he bats thousand right? He's he hasn't missed a beat here. But I'd love for you to take a moment before we go into this this area of expertise of yours in marketing. And specifically as a developer, which is particularly important to this show. You know, having the the cultural understanding of, you know, having worked on an engineering project moving into marketing, I think that's that's going to be a very interesting conversation. I wanna get into that. But I love you to share. Maybe a moment that you felt was a dark moment for you. Or a a huge failure. Maybe a moment of uncertainty. Take us back to that moment. And explain kind of. How you were feeling. And in a what happened to put you there? So there was a startup I worked on few years ago before velocity. That was grueling. Absolutely grueling just wake up till I go to bed Monday to Sunday. And I I was committed because there is a little bit investor money, and they were my friends. I don't want them down. And everyone thought so highly of the idea so is this little concoction of ego on the line and reputation on the line and also believe strongly idea. So as head Sean about it, and it completely and utterly bombed in the most disasters of ways like it was gaining some traction was mildly successful everything went wrong at once. And I thought to myself I'm twenty three twenty four and this is the. Fourth may be fifth idea. I've been chewing on since I was like sixteen that I took very seriously that just failed as a startup, and I think part of what's. Was such a clear signal in getting good growth marketing, while working on growing velocity was the realization that the missing greedy that entire time was the growth experience. I was building a startup in a vacuum a divorce in reality of if you don't grow. If you don't have the methodology for growing, you don't know any tactics to grow you are default dead. As Paul Graham would say, so I realized pretty clearly during the law city that I now had the skills to go and build something and drastically de risk at this time around and that was very impounding. There's actually interesting conundrum where after doing growth marketing, professionally in the form of my agency bell curve for you know, twenty five companies over many it's been so far last couple years. I've been getting very good at it and increasing my confidence. And now I have so much transparency into what works and what doesn't that? It's this analysis paralysis where I'm like, I could I know how to make this this this and this all succeed to varying degrees. What's the expected value, and what has the highest upside? And I it's just I don't know what to do. And so part of the fun over the last few months has been working. With my team to isolate the best ideas. And now this growth agency, which first and foremost was created to help companies grow. Meaning we we become their resident VP of growth and run all their ads AB test all their stuff fix all the leaks in their so called funnel, which we can get into. And we we started with that. And now, we're slowly pivoting into other things one of which is training people. How to do that themselves and the others building our own stuff. So this whole journey of Jisr repeated startup failures never get anywhere with them is about to come full circle because we are out to start on a couple of ideas that we feel are highly de risked because we know what is likely to succeed or fail when acquiring customers. Profitably very interesting. And so I assume that we're going to have to wait to hear about those about those ideas. Yeah. A little bit one is out. So far, which is really fun to do to work on because it's way more emotionally rewarding than running ads for startup, which is like I mentioned a moment ago training people to be as good as we are at growth, we we took six months. So emerged my mind. My love for writing Jillian dot com and my knowledge of growth bell curve dot com, and we built a full training boot camp, and that's been so rewarding to empower people to do all the stuff we've done that took me for years. And now they can learn the three and a half weeks a figuring of the rubrics for compressing that knowledge. So that's one of these so-called products in the sense that is a separate business from our ads agency. Yeah. Well for people who may be skeptical of something like an online course, how can you? You know, tell me what is it that that make something? Like that work. Well, you mentioned the idea of compressing that knowledge. You know, what what kind of things in would. I be able to you know, how am I how my jumping over the four year gap that you spent an instead, how am I getting that that knowledge quicker is that is that you went through a process of of error, and and you try to bunch of things that didn't work and then finally arrived at the things that did work or is it something else? It's a very fair question. So it's succeeding training. People growth marketing to our level is a product of two things. One is the quality of the training and two is how abstracted the training materials are not high level, but abstracted meaning it's still very low level tactical. They'll tell you exactly what to do. But as obstructed to the degree that can be applied universally. So we're not giving you like the step by step instructions to make an ad on Facebook, which we do actually. But that's not all were doing. So you. Could repeat those same successful Facebook ad creation across any of these so-called ads house. So the quality of the teaching knows the most important thing, which is essentially mentorship and deliberate feedback. So so putting aside migrated Z entirely? I just believe strongly in these principles regardless for teaching learning anything. And so, you know, there's a reason why pair programming is effective both emotionally and the actual efficacy and the efficiency of training someone to learn ruby, for example, and you can take some of those same tenants and apply them to training someone on growth, which is they write their own homepage. They rewrite it, and then we go onto we go onto a slack stream. Share look at what they've done give the real time feedback edited with them. Explain our internal voice, that's justifying these edits, and we do the same process for at creation for going through ones on boarding flow. All these different concepts for growth, and so the the deliberate nature of that feedback. Is you get that it's given to you. And then we say great try this again. But this time do it for another project. And so we don't want to beat beat a dead horse. Here. We want you to keep replying this knowledge, and we'll keep verifying whether you're incremented, and so it's live slack screen. Shares one on one training mixed with heavy resources and was interesting about it is for it to be more considerate. You should be working on projects that are things you materially need to be working on. And so you don't wanna work again in a vacuum. So if someone joins this program, or if you're learning how to pair program ruby in both cases, you should build something you actually want for yourself. So people coming through. Our course are going to build a land landing page and ads for the product or company actually sells today, and then people some learning rubies, try to build that cool thing they always wanted to exist for themselves. So. It's the psychology of the training, and then having in depth, but abstracted materials that I think can really elevate a training. Yeah. And I think it's important to note here. The what you're talking about with having these these ideas that can apply across multiple systems is is this principles training. Right. And it's not just about, you know, here is the procedure to create an ad if that's what made people successful than everyone who has access to YouTube would be successful. Right. As facebook. At doesn't have a, you know, a special route for you to follow to become a successful advertiser. That's not really what this is about. It's about learning. How growth happens how people's minds work the timing? And why right. It's it's deeper. It's deeper understanding. I guess I should be really explicit here that Julian is is not sponsoring the show in any way. This is not meant to be in an advertisement for for this course. But you know, anytime that I that I come across a course, I always am trying to understand. Okay. What is it? That's being taught here is this a procedure. That's going to expire, you know in a year or two, right? And there's some value to those courses don't get me wrong times procedures very important. But the most valuable things that you can do in your career are almost always going to be based on principles understanding principles understanding mental models systems ways of thinking. And then the procedure is how you apply those things if you only learn the procedure, then you're kind of doing it the backwards way. Right. And unfortunately that knowledge is not going to be able to stick. That's exactly right. And that's also how were able to build a business model often that so just generally speaking for us to be able to work with clients, we have to have an eighty twenty approach to nearly everything because when you're running growth for, you know, fifteen companies at a time and each company has multiple channels which all define now. So channels is usually in reference to a an ad network where you can acquire users Trump's so Google search or Facebook as and so on and so when each of those fifteen has seven channels in operation and half dozen landing page A B tests running. There's just so much to manage. And that's where to your point Jonathan abstracted, principals, not just from the low level tactical perspective. But also now from the high level of how do you manage your time? What is the framework for knowing which growth projects to work on? And so part of growth is really project management or product management and understanding the prioritization of features and the cost goes into each because sometimes we'll get really excited idea. And it'll be answered ourselves and say, honestly, we could just spend a tenth of that on making Snapchat ads work a bit better because they already do work. So why are we trying to spin up Pinterest ads out of the blue when we don't have any sort of precedent for it? Yeah. That's that's such an interesting approach for for for many reasons. I think for any developer who is considering learning about growth, you know. I think it's important to start with this. Understanding that this isn't about doing something that that is an add on. It's not it's not just an extra task. It's an entire discipline that people do for their entire careers. Right. This. This is not just a, you know, a small skill set there. There are a lot of things to to really struggle with and and dive into and you can you can actually develop a true mastery level of of a career in this subject. So I'd love to know Julian coming as a developer into this marketing world and Lifton owed some of the things that you were able to bring over some of the mental models as a as an engineer that you were able to bring into your the the work with marketing that you do. Yes. So the the most the most clear parallel would be the engine. Fearing approach to product features and the and the engineering approach to growth or the the prioritization of of of projects in growth in both cases, you're trying to figure out what is the most repeatable abstracted and heist leveraged implementation. That's also the most erased so there's a lot of models there. Let me tie that something more concrete, which is I now take growth first mindset to what I'm working on. So and this equally applies to our entire conversation on open source, and let's start with velocity. But what I mean, by growth, first mindset, so. If I were trying to repeat my steps again. I would look for something that I think first and foremost has the potential to grow. Now, you went you might make the argument, but shouldn't you start with what you're passionate about? Maybe if you're lucky the two things will intersect. That's what you really want. And that does happen. If you start with what you're passionate about the probably blinded to what's actually realistic to grow because it's a lot. It takes a lot more more concerted effort to identify those opportunities than it takes oftentimes moments for you to be like, oh, yeah. There's this thing I'm super passionate about already. And so you don't really do much. You don't do a real canvassing of yourself emotionally, go. But there's this thing I really want to do and you're in the mood, and you really want to get done. That's not a good litmus test for whether you should work on something. Because if you project the AFC year or year outward, and let's let's project that far outward, let's consider the case of two different people one person shows their passion project where there. Tender to ten on how much they love that project. And the other person is a six and a half seven and a half a ten on how passionate they are about their project, but the seven and a half person was growth, first mindset and the other one didn't even look growth or considerate. Most likely the person who didn't look at growth will go through a slog because the vast majority of startups fail and are miserable roller coaster and then sometimes not sufficiently their ups and downs. But for very many people for being honest with each other is pure downs. The whole startup ride sucks for a given startup people. Don't like to say that. But it's absolutely the truth. And so the if you take a snapshot a snapshot, then one year later for both never mind. Their likelihood of success is putting that aside even though that's my primary point the way they're going to feel emotionally. Is going to be very different in my in my scenario, the person who actually pursued this thing that is growth. I and is actually demonstrating traction. Meaning people are using it. People are happy with it. Giving feedback your iterating on the product. Even if you weren't that passionate about that pass for yourself what actually sustains momentum in the long term a year, plus is the reward cycle, and there's no reward cycle when you're feeling through a slog. But there is a reward cycle when people are using a loving your product and eventually in the long term the way, the the curves workout is passions, much less relevant and other award cycles way more relevant, and that is what sustains your interest. And so that that that I feel very strongly about and then eventually you could find passion and intrigue in other aspects of building a business, but if it's failing there's not a lot of upside to find and so that's the grow. First mindset, and why one should normally pursue it. And that's just from the open source perspective. But the the the rewards Andy. The risks are much more tangible when you're perceived pursuing it in the context of business, right where you have investor money perhaps in the line or your own your own funding, and you could possibly make a lot of money and change allies of your entire team. And so there's even more pressure to take growth minded, or growth mindset when building a business, and what I've realized building bell curve and looking back on all the successes is I can pattern match what is likely to succeed going forward. And I d risk what I what will likely fail because I have so much inside data. So not not as a pitch for Bellcore of Naza pitcher, belco training. Just as an interesting realization, I have myself personally is I've been in the weeds so deep with so many founders I've. Been the tactician on the frontlines. Tweaking the Facebook ads tweaking the AB Tess that I have a very clear rubric for what is likely to work, and I come back out from there and say, okay, I know what most likely works for acquiring paid customers. Now, what does those best strategies most strongly correlate with in terms of business models and in terms of what I'm selling to people. So is an ecommerce or is it SAS? And if it's an e commerce business on my selling socks toothbrushes I can keep backing out because they have all this data, and I can say, okay. Well, toothbrushes at a twenty dollars price point being sold to women in middle America on Instagram in particular on IOS devices is probably an easy way to make a million dollars a year. Very interesting. And and how do you know? How would you come to that conclusion? I realized that the answer is well, and you have to have a lot of experience. Right. But how would how would you come to that conclusion? And maybe the better way of asking this question for the format of the pike S's. Let's say I meet you on a on a two hour, or let's say maybe ten minute a plane ride and ask you Juliana really wants to know, I wanna get better in this ten minute plane ride. Can you tell me what should I be thinking about what should I be paying attention to? What are some things that? I'm not doing that. I'm not paying attention to that. I should be. You have a maybe a list of two or three things that you would respond with in that scenario. Yeah. I would say tensor that questions specifically, I would say make sure the market is big enough. Make sure that the people in that market are willing to pay you enough for what you're selling. And make sure what you're selling is wanted badly enough that people are actually willing to forego for cash, and if you can find something that satisfies those require Syria, then you at least have a contender with your contender idea. You then need the experience I have which I distill for free on joint dot com or would hold guide on growth marketing, and one of the pages is called ad channels in other one's called ads and also the intro page. So there's three pages in there that gives you a lot of this context. And so you have your contender. And now you paired with the context meaning for each of these ads channels, I mentioned earlier Pinterest Twitter core, so many a what do they most commonly succeed with what type of business? What is the contender that they most often produced success for and really what we're talking about is what is the audience that is that is located on Corre engages with core. Ads and after fifteen a core ad actually goes through and buy something from you. And so if you if you match the what's being sold to the right audience to the right at channel that is sort of trifecta that that's the pattern that I'm speaking of when I say on pattern matching to derail things. That's what I'm doing. And I have enough data points to have enough confidence. To know the likelihood of one thing being more likely to succeed than the other. And I share a lot of this on Jillian dot com. And so it would make a lot of sense for somebody like me running up high cast, the people who are listening to this podcast. They they are exchanging a value with me, it's it's not dollars. But it is absolutely attention. And then we have sponsors. This is the behind the scenes really complicated business model we have going on here. But we have sponsors that that sponsor the show based on the interests that we attract right? And so it would make a lot of sense for somebody like me to go. En- read about you know, how can I hadn't matched to find ways to to grow the show, and I can do that on in your Guida. So. That's right end. So how would you get that data? How would you have enough data to pattern match off of right? That's the real question because I haven't grown a podcast. That's what you're doing. And my guy doesn't talk about podcasts explicitly. So as a more obstructed approach to this problem recognize what it is you're building. So you're building a podcast now recognize who are you selling this to you're selling it to developers? Let's say it's firing developers or senior developers. Okay. Maybe you wanna make a distinction there. And the can keep going down who is this audience where they exist. Once you have the audience, right? Then you can figure out who is like me. So what other podcasts for one to target the same audience? And now you can start identifying the other pieces of data the other data points that you can go and do develop customer development on or you can just call it market researcher and call biz Dev. And so what you're doing because you don't have growth agency. Right. You are going to go and proactively talked to people who are already doing what it is. You're doing successfully and you're going to pick their brains. You're gonna say, hey, real quick where the top two things working for you even write that down. You're then going to had her match across all those years identified the commonalities, and then you out have some sort of prioritization list for what you should be doing yourself to say get more listeners, and or a get more sponsors. And so that applies to any business any idea you do not wanna live in a vacuum. Where you said, oh, I'm limited by the blog post. I could find through Google. Yeah. To actually know how it is. I can grow myself. That's crazy. If I wanted to repeat the success that I've seen for Belqas clients. I would not spend a minute googling and looking for blog posts, I would go right to the people who were responsible for success at similar companies that are non competitors to my clients or at competitors. But since left the competitor, right and all go and pick their brain and say, well, what works for you. And that is what actually that is the answer. I give very often to clients asking questions that are outside the scope of our services like a how how should I do XYZ, and I'll be blunt I'll say I don't have the answer is not s not what I work on. But go to Lincoln go through your network and ask people, please ask people. So don't just start from some point. And this applies to. Low level grow tactics on a website or anywhere. So for example, if you're trying to spin up a landing page for open source projects don't do it in a vacuum. Go look at twenty other landing pages for other open source projects, which you have some reason to believe are successful of that that may not in its in and of itself be enough signal that these pages any good, but it's a start to proxy, and you can identify the commonalities and go from there. And so you don't need to have worked with clients. Like, I have you just need the the the resourcefulness and the hustle to actually go and do some competitive analysis, and quite frankly, those the two words isn't tire rambling speech comes down? And the reason I'm taking along to sort of accentuate this is because nobody does it is competitive analysis. Busy de most boring way to successfully de risk anything. You're working. Yeah. And to do it in a way that is that is not just about differentiation. Right. I think there's. There's a little bit of a of a falsehood that we try to believe about ourselves about our products that we are one hundred percent unique. And while there is probably something hopefully, something that is unique about your product or your offering how you differentiate yourself, right? It's almost definitely true that you have a lot more in common with somebody else than you think you do. There are other shows that cover very similar things to develop prety, right? It would be foolish for me to sit here and say well now, we're the only ones who do what we do. Right. We may be the only ones who do all of the things that we do. But we are not the only ones who have a short podcast in targeted towards engineers, for example. Right. That's that would be ludicrous. And so the reality is if we can go in this is kind of like, a an accelerated form of evolution in evolution or a, you know, formal evolution maybe not. But in. In in, you know, survival of the fittest the the best win out and therefore when they breed. They breed more like themselves, and therefore the best continue to get better with this strategy of looking at who is successful. And you're centrally mutating to be more like the successful ones. And so you're you're you're without having to die. You are evolving. And it's a it's a one of the amazing things that humans are able to do as we are aware. We are able to change our environments where able to change the things that we do not just as a result of, you know, something that we've inherited. But also because we look around us, and we can emulate the things that we see that are successful. The distinction you're making between differentiation and competitive analysis is various Stewart one. So it comes down to the expression, you have to know the rules before you can break them. And you have to know what? Similarly, you have to know what is the minimum installation of this idea for it to be good. That is the first thing you want to look for when canvassing competitors. If you having a podcast, it should sound decent. You should our late yourself. Clearly, you should have interesting topic selection, and so forth figure out what is the minimum viable product of the senior doing and then worry about differentiating because no one's gonna use you if you're bad to begin with unless you're just a very very novel like in a in a very novelty way focusing on differentiation, maybe that works, but that's pretty much the definition of a fat. So. The distinction. You make is a very wise. I think it's also like you may get lucky, and you've probably heard stories about people who say, you know, the the most important thing is that your unique, and they are successful somehow. Right. It's not necessarily because they did it the right way. It's because oftentimes this this is the survivorship bias, right? You didn't hear about all the people who tried their unique idea out that weren't successful because they aren't around anymore. They're not doing the thing that they were doing anymore because they they weren't able to sustain it just based on some unique feature. So if especially if you if you make your unique feature something that isn't sustainable, or that goes below that MVP quality of for example, if you you know, if you were to go and make your selling feature that you're this the cheapest whatever thing on the market and you're undercutting everybody in. That's the way that you're getting any of your business in the first place. That's not sustainable. You're not going to be able to stick around with that differentiator. So it's extremely important that you think about differentiation as kind of an an additional kind of the final piece of the puzzle rather than, you know, this is this is the I don't know where that myth came from. It's it's a commonly passed around myth in business of marketing a differentiation is key. But it's absolutely a color apart of what your businesses, but it can kill your business as well. That's right. And there's so many examples of startups that were almost identical to the ones that came before them. But they were the ones that took off so many examples, and why is that because they grew better. They probably had a better methodology for growth in may have just been lucky, but the through line for most of them as they had a better growth methodology. A Facebook is is maybe the best and biggest example of a growth, I internal mindset after they built a Facebook. And it started hiring their first round of exacts. They put together a. Team that made every decision based on growth, and it paid off. Yeah. I love the I love that idea, by the way, the perhaps one of the best takeaways from today's episode if you're writing notes or whatever while you're listening to this episode, the idea that you start everything with growth in mind that you I assume you've and prioritize your tasks with with this idea that what are the things that are going to yield the best growth out of this list. And because you're in that situation now where you have everything on your list yield some kind of growth, you're even saying I would which of these is going to yield the most growth of all of the growth things that I have home I listed do. Yeah. And and again, I think it's worth calling out that we're not talking necessarily about growth for growth sake. We're talking about growth for the purpose of implementing a healthy reward sites. So that you can actually sustain your interest in that thing or you can experience the byproducts of its. Jess like, I deduce velocity. And to go back a couple talking points. You're you're you're wondering how did this miss of differentiation? I come about almost like we we can label it, the differentiation first mindset, right versus the gophers mindset. And here's just you know, I'm just throwing this out there. I've I've thought about this very deeply. But it might be a reflection of the American individualism sort of e everyone is snowflake thing where the individuality is Harold as virtue and being different is heralded as virtue in the US. And maybe that carried over to this new generation startup founders who feel like everything to do has to be not just world changing. But also Unia some expression of individual individualism. Yeah. You know, how you should be unique. You should be uniquely good grow. That's the most effective way to be. Yeah. That's that is extremely important reality to face that sometimes. You know, the things that we face our egos and talk about the on the show. All the time are eagles will absolutely get in the way of making good decisions of even making decisions that are in our best interest things that we really care about. Sometimes our egos will prevent us for making decisions that are healthy forests. That are good for us. And we can often fall victim to this idealism. That is at odds with our ultimate goals and good example of that is a lot of people sort of refrain among B enterprise, founders that are young and seeing seeing a lot of growth is they'll say, I never the a lot of them are founded by developers and a lot of them will say I never thought I'd be starting a startup that sells to these old boring enterprise. Right. And but it is wildly successful. And wildly interesting. And while. Reward. Yeah. Like, you know, much fun this up guys or having in the envoy guys are having there's two examples dropbox three examples of young founders in the bay area who founded something that they never thought they get into sorry, not sing opt. I mean, century and so. User signed there's to huge enterprises, and they are much healthier and much higher of businesses than than many of their than the average non to be on the price counterpart. That's that's very important that our perceptions of what a wonderful life. Looks like are projections of what you know this plays out as how we end up impacting the world or the things the specifics of what we do. You know, it's probably a good idea to remain flexible in the specifics, and the things that you want to be inflexible on are those more principle oriented things, perhaps your values. Right. The specifics of how those things play out the more flexible, you are the more likely you're going to see those things can fulfilled. Right. Those self expectations or desires or long-term like we were discussing earlier in the show is a term. You know, forecasts of things that you care about. If you remain flexible in the specifics of how that happens, then that vision can kind of you know, manifest itself a little bit easier. I think yeah. That's well said Jillian I'd love to ask you two questions real quick to wrap this show up. First of all, though, I wanna thank you so much for taking the time. I knew the people who are listening to the show we're going to be grateful for the candor that you are presenting with and the the kind of awareness that you know, when you come into a group of developers. They've heard everything about marketing that they want to hear oftentimes. Right. I it seems like developers can be at odds with marketing as a as a discipline. But both fully this episode. And I know it has for me has changed some of the perspective that developers made by default have. And I wanna thank you for doing that here on the show. I am my pleasure. I just hope it was useful. I kind of felt like just rambling ho-. Yeah. Hope hopefully, there was something. Let me ask you these two questions, and I can assure you that I found value out of this. I know that the the people listening to the show will as well. But the first question that I want to ask you to wrap the show up is what do you wish more people would ask you about? I wish more people would ask me to validate the growth potential of their startup idea because I can save them so much time. Now, it doesn't mean I'm going to be right. And I don't know everything I haven't worked with every type of business, but I have enough of a rubric to say you're getting yourself into the heart is user acquisition strategy possibly could or not and more. Because I can't literally answer everybody's questions. Although I do if you send them my way absolutely would love to. But if it gets too too high volume what I do that point people to Jillian dot com. 'cause I've I've written a lot about this actually on the first page of my growth marketing guide, you can get a good quick feel for whether you're in the right direction. Excellent. Excellent. So send send at Julian on Twitter a bunch of tweets with your started by. And he'll. For over. I'll give awesome. All right. And in the second question that I want to ask you is. If you had thirty seconds of advice to give to developers at all stages in their careers young developers or season developers. What would you tell them? Let's see. That's a good question without having premeditated. This was coming to my mind is beware. The trap of inertia. So I spent most of this podcast talkie, but the benefits of inertia that flow state that is in part a result of the reward cycle. But conversely, it can be a trap and is all the time for myself included. So there's no merit in putting your head down in hustling super hard without ever taking a breath. And pausing to ask yourself, am I actually in the right direction, and my is my nursery pointed in the right direction or has something new change in my life. Is there new interest new inputs new realities new economic situations where after rethink things I'm choosing to work on and my priorities of things. And so that is sorely under. Under executed task. I think that actually what Ilan must basically advocates is a wonderful interview on whip. But why talks about his process rethinking of the world in this way? Where you have to repeatedly check where the outside world is ask are you still in the right direction with always considering the context? Yeah. That is that is extremely important. And it's important that we do this for selves. It's important that we do this for employers in. Oh, there's some wisdom in this idea that, you know, this is the same trap that gets us into situations where we're over optimizing where we're refractory code endlessly. And then that Kodo gets thrown away because it was on a temporary project, and then we put a bunch of energy into this thing that ends up being disposed of or otherwise devalued, very important and excellent advice. Thank you so much Julian for your time today. Yeah. Thank you so much for having me Jonathan I appreciate it. Thank you for listening to today's episode of developer t and a huge. Thank you to Julian Shapiro for joining me on the episode head over to Julian dot com and sign up for updates when Julian writing releases these guides, they're completely free and they're incredibly useful head over to Julian dot com. Thank you so much for listening. If you heard anything useful anything valuable in today's episode, then it's probably pretty good bet for you to subscribe them, whatever podcasting app you use because we do episodes like this one on a regular basis. Three episodes of week and subscribing is the best way to make sure you don't miss out on future, valuable episodes. Thank you so much for listening and until next time enjoy your teeth.

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Remembering What We Remember

You Need a Budget

03:02 min | 6 months ago

Remembering What We Remember

"Hello my name is jesse. Mecum this podcast number. Four hundred fifty nine for one m where we teach. You rose to help you. Stop living paycheck to paycheck. Get outta debt and save more money. Merry christmas everyone. I hope you have a very safe very enjoyable very merry christmas this week as i've been thinking about christmas of course julian. I tried as best. We could be ready well before the festivities actually pick up pace We were we. Were all right. We did okay. We did better than yours in the past and we were hoping that that would give us a little bit of time to reflect on I don't know actually slow the pace a little bit and not have things be quite so frantic. We have a lot of little kids and bigger kids now to make christmas. Merry four and while that is a whole lot of fun it adds some stress that we were trying to avoid this year. As i was thinking about money and christmas and how i could tap into budgeting today for the fourth fifth. I dunno sixth christmas. We've had this podcast. I couldn't help. But think about how little i remember of what i received as a kid and i was almost one and say that a lot of the things that we we need to remember what we remember about christmas and it is not about all the stuff and it is so much more about the feelings and the togetherness and the family time and so at this time of year where you might be frantically trying to wrap up some minute wrapping. I hope that you can remember what you remember as an adult now looking back and did you remember specific things and is that what made christmas mary. Was this one item that you just absolutely had to have or was it more about maybe Parents being able to slow down a little bit people being a little more forgiving a little a little kinder perhaps a little more able to be jovial and I don't know just that family together time so we spend a lot of time even here at wine app talking about. How do you save the money for christmas. How do you make sure that you can floated all and pay cash. And that's all good and grand great but at the end of the day. What really matters is your with family. You're spending time with family. And all the things that we tend to stress about tend to be massages as it were just they. They tend to be those things that don't really last lasts are the memories you make just spending time together and You can't really put a price tag on that until next time following apps for rules and you will win financially. You've never budgeted like this.

jesse julian
Episode 12: The Future of Retail with Julian Fisher

The Practical Futurist Podcast

28:49 min | 1 year ago

Episode 12: The Future of Retail with Julian Fisher

"Tickle advice from a range of global experts to help you stay ahead of the curve if we episode answers the question what's the future of we and welcome to the practical future is podcasts a by weekly show all about the near term future with basically got to adapt to the new market they've gotta pull back on the phenomenal amount of shops that they own people don't need as many need to have so many prime positions doors what could these companies have done differently and for the ones left what should I be doing now to prevent extinction well of course the the one of the main reasons for their and you media and in Nineteen Ninety four he launched the UK's first Internet exhibition since then his workers remain linked to the Internet and improving sales they're playing to a lot prices of major factor we all understand that but now it's becoming more to do with experiential actually having more to do to see too mrs so back then it was it was mostly information and it was people trying to connect through dial up to the Internet so not really purchasing that was just beginning to see the high street has got something which Internet doesn't and that's the ability for you to try something on there and purchase it and take it away with you so that advantage is the even Jess Jeff Bezos said that his company represents less than one percent which is quite extraordinary figure for world sells global sales but the longer you can be out of the city and still enjoy phenomenal opportunities phenomenal styles so it's a case of adapting licking looking at your market saying the payment and issues with compliance together with information solutions for a wide and diverse group a blue chip companies. Welcome Julian thank you now you told me earlier becky ninety four so twelve and the practical futurist podcast today's guest is Julian Fisher. CEO of retail platform jessop Julian has enjoyed a varied background in technology payments all at the UK's first incident exhibition a BBC Breakfast interview ask the question what is this thing called the worldwide web what was your answer back then tell something you're very passionate about and we've got to bring the elephant in the room out the elephant room of course Amazon they've been around for twenty years and my keynotes I ask people for show of hands who uses NFL on prime on now actually say who doesn't use Amazon prime and few hands go up so a question for you with Amazon side dominant Ken Highstreet Beside d- absolutely oh back then the the answer was information we didn't have many sites as we do today many of the millions of today providing retail products to buy and thought it was more information da well in fact in my presentations I play the dial up time it's actually hard to find and let the audience just go I remember that in fact looking to buy where they want to buy them and meeting those demands basically so one thing I saw in the UK happened that signs braise actually boggles and I think that was a really smart move because breakfast fill the the trade show but found it but I couldn't find a plan the high street with all the shops that are disappearing or have disappeared oh I've been online since nineteen eighty three dollars on bulletin boards as Darling Bulletin Boards back in Adelaide so I think we probably both incident veterans today we're GonNa be talking about the future of they now have an online business that that is quite lean in fact I heard the of the goes part talk and he ricans they're able to compete in some areas oil to experience inside is still we'll talk about it in a minute because that's probably why we can bring people back into the store we are seeing major change disappear house of Fraser deadman's even John Lewis closing down uh-huh was that they adopted too late everyone knows story of blockbuster this is one way up in Oregon as well we should head the now uh-huh mugs and stickers but the thing is what you go there to rent as a VHS type and I don't think many people can actually play it yeah and the problem with VHS tapes is that with Amazon do you think that was a good move for them and what other should be doing yes and absolutely we it was not considered by many to be a good move especially after the the time that you have to get the maintained so it must be nostalgia than anything else watch the latest movies on VHS. I did try and find the tape of my interview on the BBC time to buy into as the but yes it's been a very good move it has taken people a little while to get used to the idea of being able to go into Sainsbury's and effectively you go into what is a different brand in the same store but adapting change is something that people will get used to eventually so yes it was a good move and a small move now in department stores we would be used to the thing who concessions for those listening around the world this is like in suffrage is where you have the Selfridge's have the floor spice but you have the Mike County have the handbag counter that a staff people from those companies and I almost rent the spice could we see a signs breeze because of the moment you walk in on August there's a simpsons what I heard the CSI was they thinking about adaptive reuse we don't need the full four hundred thousand square feet maybe we have a small presence for Sainsbury's but you have other other people in other tenants is is that the mix you think you'll see in these existing sort of big box stores yeah you are seeing that whether Sainsbury's will do that is another matter they typically well for them but the reason for that is much more to do with the fact that they were too large to over-sized without having a focused direction and keys cart can get your shoes cleaned and fixed but actually yes a lot of shops are actually looking at ways in which they can create more opportunities create more reason for people they were carrying a large amount of debt so as a company they could not get over the debt at the same time as being able to grow the business which of course if you're a young burgeoning we have owned all of the businesses that are so they've coffee shops coffee shops they do have concessions outside the store so timpson 's can coming to their store so concessions is definitely on the cards of course you got to remember that this was very much evidence yes yes uh-huh adverse at Christmas but unfortunately again the size of the store it was just too much weight to carry and of course when Mike Ashley kept on Panini starting out you don't usually have those problems so you are actually able to move really quickly to the ever changing demands of the consumer so deadly is a good example sir opportunities product selection elsewhere they launched a new logo I and they were something that people in the same way as John Lewis not so much but they would enjoy the quite well well they they did have a website the issues run deeper the actually people weren't particularly keen to buy from there were much better offers as to how well the market's doing so many of the reto magazines online magazines will report sales of John Lewis every week going up and going down so we can see thing which is something that they've always done and they do now there are very innovative creative company they focus much more delivering quality of service never know they have now they they didn't the beginning John Lewis have to be created probably but I think it was e- Bairo by dot com they bought into a business so they were experimenting sold but you wouldn't necessarily thing to John Lewis for the cheapest product but you would definitely go there for the for the quality the variety and people getting their ecommerce up and running at the time they said that they mind flagship store was doing four hundred million pounds a year and they wanted their online to do that and more I think probably it's fair to say the mood of the consumer in terms of how how much they are heading to the highstreet to buy in the source brings me to an interesting point looking at my own retail experience online platform does more than any single stool and they almost treat that as a as a standalone store to get people in there do you think John Lewis has done a good job of their online strategy on an Amazon so you ceiling are you seeing showrooming becoming a big deal showrooming has been around for quite some time now it's been made oversee easier for the consumer to to use the up to demand more changes within the within the business this focus their attention in the wrong ways so actually remember John Lewis who one of my clients and social media and dealing with full service so they have done extremely extremely well and and everyone in the retail and she do look to John Lewis now to to actually get a temperature gauges recently I wanted to buy a new four K. television so I went to Peter Jones which is near where I live I saw the television how it might look on the on the the wall size the the number of inputs and outputs now I appreciate this sounds easy to say that actually do but that's where overseas services like our own just this is exactly what we do we give the the retailer the ability to meet those demands in real time but for the consumer they're going to be doing this whether the retailer likes it or not and in fact when mobile phones when they're in the store and she identified the product for many years we've had our clients say it's been quite cheeky of customers actually are they've been looking for information since all show back in ninety four but but the looking for information to actually satisfy a need which is to buy a product or to get some more information on the product connect with that customer find out what it is they are looking for and if it is possible to meet them with the price and actually find a way to to connect with customer and say well actually we can give you this right now ten percent fifteen percent on if the retailer knows their margins well than they'll know where they can go to in terms of unique or it doesn't work in other environment again of okay this is what we do so we are advocating with retailers to to actually get rid of their pay desk okay if you imagine but they seem to have pioneered this it's mobile payments basically you go and find someone and I get the the thing out the apple experience I haven't seen replicated elsewhere God I've been to their website nor would I consider buying something through that website with to light to the fall within ECOMMERCE solution whereas the others John Lewis now there's adapted undoing Mrs Way I think in a camera shop the practice look if you want to look at the camera give me a four hundred dollar deposit and you get it back if you buy the camera but I don't want to have to get it out and show you knowing had gone you pay yes I know there's a few product sometimes there but really what we're doing is we're saying you use the technology like Jessop to actually provide the information to help you find the product on their mobile somewhere else isn't but actually the idea today is is that the consumer is looking for information game we lost manages and supervises and stuff you know do you do this to you showroom yes of course in an ID is well I mean I'm so the idea really for the High Sch- Rito is actually meet the demands and provide that infamous day there while there that an actually company but very important is that we continue to develop the relationship between the customer and the retailer that's what retail retail is all about is that connection with me awesome so we help the customer with our application bringing together to people this is really important is the human element so we are individual the worst performing stores are the ones where they've pulled back on staff they've got no one on the shop floor customers are having to find the products themselves then there's no one into to a by request by the customer they come to the customer they are able to continue the shopping experience helping the customer this is what apple has done they help the shit that has a a device with them don't go to a cash point or a till and they meet my needs now it's getting busier I know this is a tricky kind of hover if you want someone to help you in an apple store around to help so we're saying if you get rid of the pay desk and you put your staff on the shop floor and then you connect with them through the application so they could all the mation they can they can do what's called endless they can check to see if there's products available in other stores if I want to buy the product I can have it shipped to me the Oregon have delivered to the store or I can come back later that day these are the processes these other solutions that we're we're saying to the high street awesome man about the the the different options are they went home bought on Amazon probably actually for the same price that's what we call show rooming I know they've been in can you feel fulfilled my is you say you can use technology in the store client yes so so what we do is remember off we'll have the phone or a tablet they're responding you come into the store you're looking at products if you're interested you pick up a product you walk into an area where selling is stopped effectively in the desk is where you selling oh you will get it from an online supply is human nature couple of feather examples thinking again to my in retail experience back to John Lewis I was actually in there needed a tie for an event that nodded didn't have a tiger I'm guilty as the next person you'll go into a bit of research you'll go online to research if if the product is comfortably cheaper and you're not looking to buy right now store so I could find it and I didn't know why I did until I worked out that they are partners in the business literally and so if I stay there and by that they get a benefit it's just retail and entertainment most together it's about this requirement for the retail industry in highstreet particular to find more ways to sales go up and they actually spend more money because actually I'm being helped on being looked after and I can then see what other probes you have and who knows more with them you can actually complete the transaction immediately where they are so what we found is black by working with the customer with the technology availability right now and they could help you save your store quite literally I mentioned that your job is my whole apple things you want the apple experience well may end up not buying anything but you probably will because it's kind of like when you think about the the shopping center what is the shopping center we'll they're putting encourage people to come into the store to be entertained to get an experience experiential experiences they're calling it as well so you'll see this in places like private walk the new HIV shop is also happening in Birmingham called the vote same thing where they're actually trying to bring more entertainment into the experience now estima that's the number one priority so we're saying the same thing focus on the customer get the information to the customer Helton with they're looking to purchase state doc it's all about customer service and this is going back to what you've been saying about Amazon's Jeff Bezos has done incredible he's he's made the company focused on the you can try the product they're even you suggested you can take away the product have a play with it if it works and then bring it back if it doesn't so they're giving you oh venue full of different things the store is now replicating so then now saying you can come into our store you can get your haircut you can decide to a band on entertainment that putting on food that putting on places for you to sit to rest to park your car so they're making it an experience so you're coming to an an hole so you kinda thirteen years I remember I went to define something that my wife had given me to to find on a on a picture and the person drop without doing walked me across the giving you something even something for free you'll go back or your recommend to some of course yeah and of course during the time that your being helped you'll defenses the products in the shop then the staff not me I didn't know about your products the staff know about the products the technology that helps the staff connect all the information on a few times and I found that I liked and I want to know what the prospects because there's no prospect so the John Assistant literally pulled out his store I find this is what you can have the technology then you need to train people as you

Amazon UK Julian Fisher BBC Jess Jeff Bezos John Lewis CEO jessop Julian NFL Ken Highstreet Sainsbury Adelaide Oregon Darling Bulletin Boards Fraser deadman nineteen eighty three dollars four hundred million pounds four hundred dollar fifteen percent