18 Burst results for "Julian Schnabel"

"julian schnabel" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

We'll See You In Hell

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

"I thought he was tremendous. I think he absolutely deserves the nomination. I do not think Sasha baron Cohen could have done as well. He wouldn't have heart. That's for sure Sasha baron Cohen. I think would have traipsed into the territory you're talking about it with vice Fellag, it would have been an impression. Yeah. He would've figured out sort of character traits and mimic them, very well. But Rammie Malik the emotion. Was there the struggle of guy being gay and not being able to be? Openly gay because of his background and the time he was living in and his confusion and everything it was all there. He nailed this fucking part without Remmy Malik that would have been a bad movie. I agree. I mean, he held together a two and a half hour bio pic, really well. And you always sort of were able to believe you're watching one of the most charismatic people of all time. That's no small feat is a really good performance Willem Defoe in at eternity is gate. What not only have? I not seen it. I don't know anyone who's seen that movie with the fuck is that I believe he's playing Picasso. So that's a movie that I will never see. Although Julian Schnabel directed it who did. What's the one where the guy like paints with his mouth? That was a good diving bell and the butterfly that was a good movie, actually. And Juliette snob was a good director. But folks, I got no interest in another bio pic of a painter. I'll tell you that much watch up a CASA with the fo-. He's probably real crazy about the movies, so boring. It's like watching paint dry full. Next up is Bradley Cooper. And as Andrew dice clay said, hey, you know, maybe next year, you'll get some directing thing. Does she it's all about the acting? That's what you're known for be happy. Bradley Cooper is good in this movie. He is that picture makes me sick that the picture is why I'll never truly respect Bradley Cooper. I'm looking at a picture of him like biting, his fist like like blanche to Baugh are blanche Devereaux excuse me on the golden girls and staring off into space. The thinker isn't any like a pensive actor, and it's really gross. Fuck off hearing him and lady Gaga talk about acting and their connection and everything is pretty sickening. The truth is for a direct Oriel debut. It's a really well directed movie, I heard it was saved and editing. But regardless what's on the screen is great. And he's really good in it at some points..

Sasha baron Cohen Bradley Cooper Rammie Malik Willem Defoe Julian Schnabel Andrew dice clay blanche Devereaux Juliette snob Oriel Fellag Gaga director Baugh
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Film Vault

"So research, I think what Julian Schnabel was trying to do was to like this is this is set in the last year or two of life. I've been goes life. And I think Julia was trying to get you in that guy's head space. I don't feel like I know him at all like I spent two hours with this dude is meant to our staring out of it. I don't feel any better was was much recorded history on this guy died penniless, and like no one really knew had no fame or anything. That's not true. He was who's the woman painter. He wasn't a super. He wasn't considered a great painter of his time at the time. But he was he was known. Thought that he was kinda like get discovered till I dot he didn't have celebrated until Delhi die. But he was he was known. He was like a commission do paintings and stuff and he's showing around down. Yeah. He was he was a workman at the time. Anyway, this is what people think of when imagine a boring stuffy Oscar this this is it's slog. It's a slog. It is hard to get through. It got really bad reviews. Too. Many wordless tracking shots of wandering through foliage. This is like Van Gogh like trying to reconnect with the beauty of nature. It's almost thin blue line ish. There's a lot of like just just to see him wandering anymore. Good. I understand that. Fine. Compelling. I mean, you know, he's he's always willing to false. He was up for best supporting last year to for Florida price. Right. And I like a lot better than that movie. His best role ever allies platoon. Nineteen eighty six. Good call. I never saw the loss of Christ. I can't say naked and hanging on a cross felt like a long meandering exercise round the film. It's just hard to get it. Sorry. If if you guys are completeness for the Oscars, and you're trying check this one day, it'd be guys. Couple of weeks ago and finally painting off here here. I'm not sure I meant to look this up. Dammit, Logan, if you can spare second can you look burning and see burning streaming anywhere. Whether it's for rent, or this is the the Korean film that came out earlier last year. I was surprised to see that it was up for best foreign language film. Really? This was listener axes favourite film. I talked to burning this movie is Jong Soo Jong Soo. He's a young Korean lad when I say young probably mid twentieth. Right. Kind of he's kind of aimless doesn't really have a whole lot going on his life. You can tell your with him constantly throughout this to be tuning burns your with them constantly. So you really get you get a feeling that you know, this kid and he's unsure of himself. And he he he's not of means he works on his parents farm, and you know, you can tell the things aren't going to well for Jong Soo. He early in the film, he bumps into a girl who used to live in the same neighborhood is heated and she asks him she's very attractive to like they have like these cheerleaders almost outside of these mall little malls with and their cheerleading about giveaways for like cell phone companies, and she's one of them and he walks by kind of falls him inches. I go you don't remember me? Do I grew up in your your neighborhood? Will you watch my cat? I'm going to Africa. They they get a instant relationship. And now all of a sudden he's in our apartment and he's watching her cat. And he's got this thing for you really feels for she goes to Africa she's gone for a while. He was kind of just a month and around and then she comes back, and he calls me say we pick me up at the airport. She's you know, she's using this guy. One of those guys. He's like, oh, yeah. Sure. I'll come get you, and he goes together. And she's there with another dude, he's come back from Africa with very very swamp. Well to do very confident guy we later learned and drives a poor. And now, it's the three of them. And they're hanging out. I should tell you. This is very serious dramatic. There are moments where you chuckle and you laugh, but it's it's not like goofy. By any means. Now, all three of them are hanging out and Johnson doesn't really know us plays..

Jong Soo Jong Soo Logan Julian Schnabel Africa Van Gogh Julia Oscars Oscar Johnson Florida two hours one day
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Film Vault

"But the the story itself and particularly star. She was fantastic. And she carries his whole movie like you want her on every single screen on every single frame. She's a mandala Steenberg Sem Stemberg, Amanda Stemberg. She was she was really easy to fall along with the story. I really liked the hey, you give I I'm just annoyed that it didn't quite. And the execution was awful. The execution was off. It didn't have to be sorry to hear that don't have to run out and see it now. But I would recommend it to be that two hours fifty minutes. Went by Peru. Quick sounds like most criticize it. No. I didn't. I said everything that I liked about it. And then I talked about the shortcomings really speaking of not being able to recommend movies, and it's a long week long week punctuated by long films long films. There are movies that seem like homework. Like homework as soon as you start watching top five. Velika deputy you see all the Oscar movies this year. I know you always do that on the way you always make it seem like a new thing. At turned his gate. You turn it. He's gay. I was so Mademoiselle because I walked out of one movie. I can't remember what it was. And as I was leaving going that was a waste of fucking time. I saw that Addie turning these game was playing right across the hall. And that's what I should've fucking scene. And you haven't seen yet. I have not. Movie about Vincent Van Gogh starring on will vote for an Oscar for best actor he was very good with this anything basket because it's the same direction as I saw diving bell the butterfly which I love I love that movie. That doesn't have a lot of crossover with basket. Okay. Well, this had a little bit across over but nowhere near as interesting or compelling journeys gate is in theater some theaters now, I saw the theaters director by as you mentioned Julian Schnabel director of the diving bell the butterfly Basquiat. And he's an artist I former beyond what a quick pause. Let's save those for because we don't have anything to top off the patriot upset that. All right. Well, I mean, we gotta listener mail, and we hope they're patriots. They don't hear Roby opening your listener mail on patriotic. Thank you for biggest scribe, starring Willem Dafoe, Rupert friend, Oscar Isaac and Mads Mikkelsen all in this film that Mads the first time I check my walk Hannity minutes in the first time. That's too early. Read it with this low enders slow is getting the head of Vincent Van Gogh. You wanna be innocent? No, many weren't actually here's the thing. So I think I think okay..

Steenberg Sem Stemberg Vincent Van Gogh Amanda Stemberg Oscar Mads Mikkelsen Oscar Isaac Willem Dafoe director Julian Schnabel Peru Addie Roby Hannity fifty minutes two hours
Film Review of 'At Eternity's Gate': Willem Dafoe Is Vincent Van Gogh

/Film Daily

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Film Review of 'At Eternity's Gate': Willem Dafoe Is Vincent Van Gogh

"HT? What have you been watching? I only saw one movie in the theater this weekend. And that was at attorneys gate, which is the film chronicling the final years of Vincent Van Gogh played by Willem Defoe. I hadn't heard a lot about this movie then praised for limb Defoe's performance, and from what I've seen like trailers or images, it looks kind of muted because it's shot in mostly natural lighting. But and I was wondering whether that would be able to capture sort of like, the brilliant artistry of incident Van Gogh and how he like display's color and everything, and I'm also like a little biased because I absolutely love the doctor who at the soda about Vincent Van Gogh. And I think that's one of the best depictions of the artists, but at attorneys gate is I the best the depiction of the artists in his tortured existence as well as the way that he uniquely views the world. So the natural lighting was it's actually a really beautiful way of depicting. His particularly singular way of viewing the world because it's it's somehow becomes this rich symphony of colors by using the sunlight as a as another form of color. I can't really describe it. But it's just beautifully shot. The descended cinematography is amazing and director Julian Schnabel just doesn't think it Schnabel Schnabel as a brilliant job of just kind of looking all these different types of colors, and shades of just like blades of grass, and yes, Willem Dafoe is astonishing in this movie, especially because this film a lot of it takes place in intense close ups of his face, and he is just all crackles, and and deep deep wells emotion. And I hope that he might get some awards buzz for this film, especially after he got rudely snubbed for the Florida project still. Very bitter about but he's really into gin. And I highly recommend this film, especially if you like Vincent Van Gogh, or if you just want to see a film that really realizes an artist in a beautiful way.

Vincent Van Gogh Willem Defoe Schnabel Schnabel Florida Director
"julian schnabel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hits a target. No one else can hit genius hits the target. No one else can see that's a quote from German philosopher, Arthur Schopenhauer, and it's pretty much the perfect description of Vincent Van Gogh. So I'm going to take you back in time for a second. It's the late eighteen hundreds Vincent Van Gogh is out roaming, the French countryside, creating wild vivid paintings, and these have vibrant, blues spectacular yellows, and he's just slapping on the paint. So thick it's like it stands out from the canvas now in his own time. No one really understood his work and his life. Was you could describe it as miserable. He spent a lot of time on his own. He spent a lot of time cold and lonely and barely scraping by. And nobody really thought this man is going to become one of the most celebrated artists of all time. Julian Schnabel is not the first filmmaker to play out this tragedy on the big screen. But he does bring some really. A new perspective to the story because Julian Schnabel's, not just a filmmaker. He's also a world renowned painter is going to tell you that he was never really interested in just making another film about Van Gogh for him. This was about capturing what it's like to be Van Gogh. And so he's made this patient meticulous. Slow paced film before we get into all of that. I had to settle something. Which is how do you pronounce this name? His name is Vince sin. If you wanna be. Dutch about it. I'm from New York. I say Vincent Van Gogh bringing it a little bit into his story. What's kind of interesting as we're going to really go into the story that you've presented. But if I look at this artist, and I look at you and your body of work in a lot of ways your life as an artist couldn't be more different from van Goghs. You're well respected. You were successful at a young age. You have a family all of those things they really alluded then go, and yet watching your film. I get a sense that you have this deep attachment there. And I'm wondering where that that affinity for him. And for his story where that connection comes from. First of all. I think there's a huge chasm between art and society or art and life. So the fact that I would be able to live off of my paintings where people would know who I was. I don't know if people really. No. What I'm doing? So this idea of an artist being famous. What is it? That is the essence of what we're really talking about. It's the work. Somebody does I mean Van Gogh made paintings and in making the paintings that was his. Practice. It was his joy. It was his commitment. That was his way of mediating the world whether people responded to it or not is not really the issue. And so maybe I'm supposed to be famous. But I would say that people don't really know what my work is. And usually of obviously when you make a movie people see somebody acting out life and things happening to them. And they can understand that. 'cause it's similar to seeing themselves. Go through. Some situations. Where paintings not like that? When you look at a painting. There's nobody explaining something to you don't even have to know, you don't necessarily have to understand it for it to be affecting you. So it's a very different kind of practice than say making a movie or it's not a discursive practice. So there's a huge distance between of the audience and the author. Let's look at that decision to make a film. There have been dozens of telling a van Goghs story in in films and television shows I'm wondering why you decided to come at this story as well. I guess I didn't feel like any of them of made you feel any closer to him. In fact, most of the times it serves to make things more confusing. It's interesting that that's the way you're saying it because definitely it's a very intimate portrayal. We are with him at all times the sound is intimate. The shots are intimate. There's also a sense of almost setting the record straight about about his story. Did you feel that? There was something that you wanted to say that hadn't been said, absolutely. Oh, and I think it was important to tell the story of from his point of view. And so it's not about him. It's more about being him. And it's not just about being him. But maybe it's about anybody that was ever gonna make anything. And so what are the concerns of an artist? What are the things that? They're. And in his case of. He was so immersed in nature that it was. An element that helped illustrate what his ecstasy and his. Communion and his inspiration laws that communion with nature is present in the film right from those opening shots where he's on the field and he gets down in the mud. He actually sprinkles the mud on his face and his closed eyes. And it's one of the few moments where he seems to actually be in some kind of of some kind of peace or feel some sense of joy. Absolutely. He was in the right place at the right time. That is not somebody. That's not successful. It depends. What your value system is? I don't think that artists make art to make money think artists wanna make art and what happens later is something else. And so it's not the awards of the rewards that you get it's the it's the voyage. It's the making of the thing. I wanna I wanna take everybody a little bit on that voyage by playing a clip. This is Van Gogh speaking with a priest at the asylum where he's being treated. Sometimes. Feel.

Vincent Van Gogh van Goghs Julian Schnabel Arthur Schopenhauer Vince sin New York Communion
"julian schnabel" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on Kickass News

"I of course, I like his later work. And now I have a huge relationship to the shows because I practiced pair of shoes. I was gonna say is there one that you like painting. That was probably the scariest part because there was a real tangible sense of success or failure. While I had Jillian helping me and he was coaching me through it. It was difficult because we were basically painting it in real time. Yeah. And so the camera, you know, we didn't want to cut out of it. Because the the the painting ceased to be interesting earth Saint ceased to function, but I think it sort of does function, and and one thing that's beautiful in the film. Even though we it was filmed it was painted in real time. We do cut away from it. But still even with cutting away not to cover it not being painted, you know in real time. But more for rhythm. You still get the sense how a series of marks can earn an and how colors and talk. Talk to each other. And and make something is not a representation, but really captures the essence of something. Now when you were painting the shoes and other moments when you're painting in the film, did you find that you were trying to please Julian Schnabel the director or Julian Schnabel, the artists more both. I must admit I was he was very generous with me, and I didn't want to disappoint him. And he became you know, no, it was very important because he was my guide. And I he was my teacher. So it's like when you're dedicated to a teacher you want to do. Well, so I must admit that's that was difficult because I know he would like to be doing the painting. But he he's got a frame and direct. So I'm his creature. I'm his thing. I'm the thing that is him. And is me, and he sends it out in the world. He's creating that's where it was crazy about this movie. It was so collaborative between the deep pay between. The actors and totally you hear this often people, basically, it's kind of just been positive about the experience. But in this case, you know, when actress talk about oh, how what a great collaboration that was. This was a real collaboration Julian has very strong vision was very clear about what he was doing. But he has also an ability to invite you into collaborate with him and make room for you to find your personal stake. And then once you make that personal stake that gets transformed into a kind of collective stake net is all driven by the rhythm. And the the the the birth of the movie, and that's that's a wonderful thing to be part of then I've had it to some degree with other directors people that allow me because of a certain level of trust in a certain level of on generosity. They. Vite you to collaborate. That's I like that most I don't like. Sometimes I can just function as an actor. But I like to function as an actor that's a creature of the director, but even more so with this movie, I guess because you're seeing things through the artists size. So there's a relationship between you and the art director in the cinematographer in also at the wanna say you were doing some of the steady Cam work yourself. Well, I have the Cavs look really when practically he wanted made to contribute. Yeah. He wanted made to do the framing wanted to give me that power. He wanted to give me that stack. So that was it sounds like just, you know, let's exciting. It wasn't big responsibility to it was but I felt comfortable also because. Ben wa dalom was very close with me on this shoot because we weren't shooting conventional locked off from coverage. Yeah. We didn't get a master. And then go tighter and tighter. And tighter tighter. It the way it was shot was very fluid now there are some very composed sequences when you think about the movie it's really a series of landscapes and portrait's. I mean, that's how it's framed. Yeah. So there's he's fluid nature shots. And then there's these very formal conversations that were really quite close, and we're really dealing with talking heads sometimes heads talking directly to the camera. So that was nice because in the structure of the movie Julian really was reflecting. What did Van Gogh paint primarily landscapes and portrait's, and there was a scale to it that correspondent to his work?.

Julian Schnabel director Jillian Cavs Van Gogh
"julian schnabel" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on Kickass News

"I I'm Ben Mathis. Welcome to kick ass news. Having made over a hundred films in his legendary career Willem Defoe is internationally respected for bringing versatility boldness in daring to some of the most iconic films of our time, including Oscar-nominated roles and platoon shadow of the vampire and the Florida project as well as Mississippi burning the last temptation of Christ born on the fourth of July clear and present danger. The English Patient Spiderman the grand Budapest hotel and last year's murder on the Orient Express. Now, he gives what critics are calling the performance of his career as Vincent Van Gogh in added turn ities gate, which opens in theaters Friday. November sixteenth he received the trophy for best actor this year's Venice film festival for the movie. And I'd say the odds are better than good that you'll be seeing a lot of him this coming award season today. Willem Dafoe comes on the podcast is share how his beginnings. In experimental theater inform. His acting what draws him to independent films time and time again, and what it's like to make his one hundred movie he talks about how his latest film challenges the image of Van Gogh as an unappreciated mad genius and rethinks the constructs of the traditional bio pic. He reveals what it was like to immerse himself in van Goghs world and find inspiration in the very same scenery. That inspired one of the greatest artists of all time. He discusses the pressure of having to recreate iconic works of art with the cameras rolling. And how artists in director Julian Schnabel taught him if you want to paint like Vincent Van Gogh you have to learn to paint the light, plus the proper pronunciation of Van Gogh or is it van guy the time he tried to summon the ghost of Houdini and the beauty of embracing the mystery in life coming up with actor Willem Dafoe in just a moment..

Vincent Van Gogh Willem Defoe van Goghs Ben Mathis Julian Schnabel Budapest Orient Express Venice murder director Mississippi Florida
"julian schnabel" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"And I'm here with our digital director, Mike HOGAN, Hello kitty, and our chief critic, Richard Lawson. Hello. So guys we're getting into the thick of November. There's a lot going on up there. And yet still somehow we're talking about the best popular Oscar, which really shows you how all over the place. Oscar talk seems to be these days. We're gonna start talking a little bit about the potential revival of that idea by the academy. President this week Richard is in the middle of reviewing editors gate, Julian Schnabel films. We'll talk about that briefly green book, which we talked about since Toronto is out limited this week. We're going to kind of use that as an excuse to talk about the best supporting actor and actress campaigns former Herschel alley in that movie in other people and then out this week finally is widows, which we all saw Toronto. And I've been really excited to see it again since and two other people, I know to see it. So we'll talk about that movie. And then share the interview that Mike did with the film's director Steve McQueen, which is very exciting. But first, let's let's talk about Black Panther. Again. It's been almost a year. Since we started talking about by Catherine this podcast. And yet, it's it's not really going away the president of the academy. John Bailey did a a panel discussion in Los Angeles this week and variety reported on it, and it's kind of paraphrase what he actually said. So don't try to misquote them. But he basically suggested that if something like Black Panther gets nominated alongside the likes of Roma or Cold War, which he described as two very uncompromising black and white art films. He said it will be interesting to see how that plays out. It might give us a strong perspective on how to move forward. And to me the only way to read that is him saying, basically, if Black Panther gets a best picture nomination than we won't have to do the popular Oscar do you guys read it that way too? Yeah. I mean, I think that what he was trying to do. And I think pretty cogently was explained the reason for the popular Oscar, I mean, he said, he basically was like, you know, the the smaller artistic movies like shaped water moonlight. They're not widely distributed so audience don't have a chance to see them. And so, you know, that's less. A problem of how we. View the quality of movies and more just about availability. And that to me makes more sense. So I guess he's what he's saying is like if this voting body can see to it to nominate a big popular film on its merits this year like Black Panther. Then maybe these things are kind of blending together. And we won't have to create something new, although I will say I'm looking at looking at the numbers the shape of water was in over two thousand theaters at the beginning of February last year, which is right around the time like right at the nominations came out. So it's not as widely distributed as safe Black Panther. But that might be something of a straw, man. That, you know, maybe they're they're out there, but just people aren't clamoring to go see them. I think sorry shape of water was the example, set by the variety article. Maybe not by little since. Oh, I should clarify that. But but yeah, no still like it's a gamble horror movies still. I mean, so it was tiny that isn't Pacific rim. Yeah. I mean, it does feel like you're trying to do the Super Bowl of movies. And then you are bringing in teams that no one's ever heard of instead. Of the teams that everyone has a rooting interest in. That's the problem that they face in terms of ratings in terms of ABC, not being happy. They've got this long term contract, you know, and they had really really bad ratings last year. And so they have to figure out something that they can do. And I also do think that there's a little bit of this sort of defensive nece to in the era of Oscar so white and all the rest of it where they wanna give more opportunities for film like that to get rewarded so that they're not in a situation where because the membership may have made a kind of eccentric decision..

Oscar John Bailey Mike HOGAN Richard Lawson director President Julian Schnabel Toronto Herschel alley Steve McQueen Los Angeles ABC Catherine Pacific rim
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Frame

"From the Mon broadcast center at KP. See this is the frame, I'm John horn. And thanks for joining us during our fall. Membership drive today on the show we have a conversation with actor will Afo. He's now starring in a new movie called at attorneys gape to folk plays Vincent Van Gogh toward the end of his life. The movie is directed and co written by the artist and filmmaker Julian Schnabel, and it's not all that interested in Van Gogh's mental health instead at attorneys gate is focused on Van Gogh's painting. How the Dutch artists all light and color and texture. It's also about Van Gogh's friendship with a French painter Paul Gauguin who's played in the film by Oscar Isaac when Willem Dafoe join me in the studio at KPCC early this week, I asked as I always do at the start of an interview if his mobile phone was turned off. I don't carry him for you. Congratulations radical. That's good. You can spend more time talking reading scene. Seen as opposed to looking looking at people. Yeah. Sounds like good training for playing a painter. Yes. I wanna ask you about Willem. Welcome to the show. I should welcome. Thanks. Sure. I wanna ask you about the shooting of this film. Because in watching it, I imagined there are a lot of early mornings and late evenings. Because the way that this. Film captures light is extrordinary. And I wonder what that was like on a given day because the light in this film is without equal. Right. I think that's well observed and light is important one of the first things I had to learn how to paint for this just practically and also as a key to the character. And the first thing I learned was concept of painting, the light, and then from in terms of the DP, and and Julian composing things nature was, you know, a big character in this..

Vincent Van Gogh Willem Dafoe Julian Schnabel Mon John horn Paul Gauguin Oscar Isaac KPCC
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Yeah. I doubt it very nice. And anyway, so we've gotta pass shooting in the room where the Delacour paintings, and you see Garrick halt the rafters in there also. But in the next room is the marriage it kinda by Varanasi, which is the painting that Napoleon stole from the Cini foundation Venice, anyway, we were able to just walk in there. So William guests to walk up to the painting and in the real life, supposedly Van Gogh wrote. Because he didn't think he liked Varanasi. And he was painting potatoes eater. The potato eaters around that time, which was kind of a gray Brown and black painting. But when he saw the marriage at Khanna, he wrote the colors in my painting. Don't come from reality. They come from my palate. Well, the your was in your house recently. And I gotta tell you. I wanted to I wanted to I wanted to take it out of there. The portrait of Willem. And then there's a there's a there's a portrait of Willem. And then there's a portrait another portrait of Willem. Tell me. I would've I would've taken anyone is going to go for some money. I know, but then what isn't gonna go for some money. One was a prop. And I was going to ask if it's a prompt and give it to me. I will I already gave it to William do you gave it to will Andy I did. So what who gets that who gets who gets the money? I hope I get some someday. Anyway, here he goes. Nah. Okay. So what happened is Van Gogh? I'm one of the things we found out and making the movies how we worked, and I don't know if anybody knows us in the room, probably raise your hand, if you know, do you know that the flower paintings, the paintings of sunflowers, he didn't paint all of them from life. There. Fifteen sunflowers in a painting and their fifteen sunflowers in another painting. In some another one there might be twelve sunflower. So what I'm saying is he would make paintings of his own paintings say you couldn't go out that day or whatever he wanted to paint. He would make paintings. So he was kind of like Andy Warhol in that sense because he was sort of the first post modern painter. So that being said if William was going to be Van Gogh I needed to make the painting that he painted himself. Look like willing sees in the movie, so I painted Willem as Van Gogh. And that's what's on the wall and the asylum after I got home, I painted a painting of the painting. So I made a plate painting of the painting of Willem as is going to steal. And that's what he saw the student who said this is going to be your last movie. And I don't believe you. And I hope to not know why why am I really change? Well, you know, I have to really change gears to do that. I mean, everybody here. Probably I mean, if that's what you do you do that that way of mediating the world, I do that by painting. And I really didn't want to do this. But I think it was my mother that was. Had an impulse to educate people or maybe she did that to me. I don't know what it was. But I felt like he was. Mistreated during his life. I think he's been Meese mistreated historically with all of these silly myths, and I think he's missed been mistreated in films that we've seen by directors that we all respect who don't know anything about. I mean, Robert Altman's a great director. He didn't know God damn thing about. I was gonna say Willem Dafoe about Vincent Van Gogh. And I mean, it was beautiful thing. Sean, I always loved the thing about the brothers in them. But the first thing that happens in that movie talks about a painting being sold for thirty six million dollars or whatever who gives us. I mean, that's not what it's about. And so I mean. I mean, MAURICE Piazza's movie. I don't know if anybody likes that movie. But it was a busy in my opinion. I French people like it. But I mean, it could have been about anybody..

Van Gogh Willem Dafoe William Varanasi Cini foundation Venice Delacour Garrick Napoleon Andy Warhol MAURICE Piazza Khanna Robert Altman Andy I Meese Sean director thirty six million dollars
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"I mean, we had seen those eighteen minutes long him walking in nature. There were a large moments of the film where there's no talking, and then there's some where there's a lot of talking. And so we thought and I think that she saw the movie visually head portrait's horizontality landscape, and I guess also. So we started to. Respond to these seven hour days and also to literally to the physical arduousness of the landscape, and for example. So you started the film without an editor knowing so did, you know, she's going to edit prior to on the journey know what happened. No, not at all what happened was Juliet wealth lane who edited the diving bell and the butterfly was supposed to do this. But she was working on Jacko DR Smoot movie and wasn't going to be free till April. And I love Juliet and trust her and thought, we'd wait, and we got done shooting on December ten, but the thing is that don't you hate that? When that happens. When you're doesn't happen to me all the time because movies all the time. But but you hate that. I hate it when it happens. So. Louise. Learn the avid program in two days because she basically does all of these bills these buildings and all does all the spatial work sketch up and different things in has. Curated different exhibitions. And in fact, there's an exhibition at the museo door state where she built the walls. And so I think thinking spatially has a lot to do an editing and also. Inventing things. I don't think there was one set that we did we didn't change everything around. So someone asked her the other day, did you we editing on on the set? She wasn't editing but recorded everything new all the skeletons were buried in undescended tenth of we just started editing movie, and it was on the laptop. So we went edited in Mexico airplane wherever and by the time, April rolled around. We were so far how long does that? So you got a December tenth to April tenth what does that December? Mark was a four or five months. That's good. We were so far gone that when Juliet of looked at the material and some money, well, we paid her anyway instead of breathing on her neck, we'll let her work on it for a while. But she was going to take out everything that characterize it as what it was. And you've got all fight for whatever. That thing is. I mean, there are a lot of battles to fight when you make movies, but there's. We really preserved what we thought was the film. And so we just were inseparable and basically. Went through that whole process. And she used the editor..

Juliet editor Louise DR Smoot Mexico Mark eighteen minutes five months seven hour two days
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And anyway, and so an a very literal way you kind of see what he wants. And then here's a woman standing on the road. But it's not really connected in such a. Literal, way and. I think that there is a big chasm. There's a chasm between art and society. There's a chasm between artists and society, and there's certainly a chasm between or I mean, somebody might be very good at one thing and not so good at other things. I mean, he was very good at painting very bad at relating to people. They did of. There was a petition to keep him from coming back to ARL, man. That's a fact, and so, but we invented situations that would serve the story. I mean, he didn't paint the roots in eighteen eighty eight those kids didn't bother him. I mean, that's not exactly what happened. But it was a good way to get him into the hotel set up the sing. So then his brother could call write a letter to Gauguin to get him to come down there. I mean, I wrote the letter to go GAM, but there worked correspondents that were close to that. And then. Getting Gauguin down there. You could have you can see how how important friendship was. And also somebody that he could communicate with. That's so cool. I mean to. I thought about my friendship with you. When I watched the film to you know, how supportive you've been and how you are a supporter of the arts. You know, you support artists and. Yeah. That's what I thought about that with him and your style, man. I really dig your style. I love how I love the music, and I love your your lack of your lack of sound. We're in. We're in motion. We're hearing things. Oh, we don't hear anything. Didn't you hit me with some music is almost like a cool jazz album? And who did whose Taylor who who did the music Tatyana, Liz off sky thinks this is the. I think I I soundtrack that she ever made her first instrument is the violin. And. The first couple of cords in that I made up, and then she and Paul Cantillon did the rest, but all of the piano music, she played by herself. And then louisan I as we edited the film or saw the film really heard that in his head. Now, the in you, you say louisan you edited the film. How does how does that does that? The editor of the film. Editor of the film. Okay. All right. What happened was it was unintentional of you hire had you edited before Louise, she's an architect. Okay. So how did that work? Gene. You can you. Explain it or are. Okay. Well, John Claude carrier, and I started to write the script. And at a certain moment. I mean, something happened. We were we went to we saw Van Gogh Arto exhibition at the museum Dorsey, and when I was looking at the paintings, I was explaining what I thought how Van Gogh painted them to John Clottey felt like go Van Gogh was talking to him. I didn't know that till a couple months ago. Anyway, I was explaining things about the painting. And then I thought okay, the fifth say fifteen paintings in the room, you have an experience with each one of these things at the end, you have an accumulative feeling about everything you saw. So I thought if the structure of the movie is that and we have fifteen vignettes, and it doesn't have to be nil 'lustration of what's in the painting. But a story that could be a parallel life to whatever that separate image was. So we started thinking or talking about things for example discussions about Christ. Shakespeare, vietnam. At a certain moment of. I was seeing a movie I guess being somebody that may actually makes things three dimensional things. With seeing the movie at a different way than John Claude. He's eighty seven I'm sixty six she's thirty three she's from Sweden. I'm from Brooklyn. He's from Columbia, and we all had a feeling about Van Gogh and saw it in a different way. So at a certain moment of Louise started to organize the vignettes into a place where this narrative was coming that was closer to how I was seeing the film. And then when we went down to ARL, if you see the script, you'll see it says that we've been kind of re wrote it, but it was say he walks in nature..

Van Gogh Liz Gauguin Louise ARL John Claude editor Shakespeare GAM John Claude carrier Brooklyn Taylor Columbia museum Dorsey Tatyana Sweden vietnam Paul Cantillon John Clottey
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Your language with your family at home and in this case? The convention was advan go and his brother, we're gonna speak English. And then I guess you could see how beautifully Oscar Isaac speaks French. But he doesn't really speak French that beautifully of. He did a pretty good job. But French people would have heard that it wasn't that good. Louis Gorell came over to the house, and we recorded Louise voice on iphone, and he did Oscar's voice. And we were able to. Arrange acuity and do the tenor of his voice to where it sounded like Oscar's voice and Louis Carell did in mazing job. He also read Orioles letter and was go Gant's voice in the end. And I'm glad that they let them use the movie place. So you could see the yellow come up because I think that's kind of the really the end of the movie, but we didn't want to have too many endings. So we had to wait a little while to give you the yellow. I loved the I really was surprised in love the tenderness between the brothers came came out of nowhere. A shot of Willem in the bed looking up at his brother not wanting to leave. I felt. It's interesting when you think that an image could speak volumes because what they're saying. Isn't that interesting? But the fact that these two guys are lying in a bed in a suit and his his his brother holds them like that. I thought Rupert was really the repository of all of his grief and all of this love, and and at a certain moment, he said to me, I think maybe just my character. I need to have more agency where I could speak about my brother. I said. If I said if you just do what I ask you to do. I think it'll be fun. And he sure did I mean he was really able to be still and the he had so much affection in him towards Willem. And he was so there was some pretty chaotic moments in some of these scenes, and Rupert was able to be very stoic and still and still still still still the that's that's how I felt too about. Who's that beasts that was in the in the? Mental. Oh, Neal's our droop. He's a beast. He's brilliant. You know, when he said basically told him that he couldn't that. What was this garbage? Was it? What was what was he doing? I mean, he was acting as as what he was wasn't acting. He's not acting. He's just crazy as a bug. Here's a great actor though. But he's not I don't think he was acting. In fact, I wanted him to say because some people don't understand what he's saying. Sometimes maybe some people did or didn't. But didn't feel like we needed to put subtitles under what he was saying. Because of I didn't want anybody to read anything when they were looking at his face, except what was on his face so Neal's. He played in the diving bell and the butterfly also. And he's what was what was he was a guy who had been locked in a basement on had been kidnapped and came to see John Doe, and John Doe is sitting there paralyzed. And he says God why why didn't I call this guy when he got out of being? In after he was kidnapped. And so he was instead of it being a positive thing. He was just mortified that. He is sit there and look at this guy. He never called. Anyway, I wanna kneels to do to play in the scene, and at a certain moment, I said to him you think you could just tell me the words sergeant again. And he said, you know, I am like a leaf that's blowing around in the wind. And I don't know that I could get to that place again and really deliver that line that you're asking me to deliver. And so I said, okay. And then he said it anyway, but we never changed it. And I think that the movie was made like that. I think that Willem was like a leaf blowing around in the wind, and we were like a leaf blowing around in the wind. And there was a lot of wind, and weather and the weather and the landscape. Protagonist in the film. We shot the movie in the asylum, where did you shoot the film for? Was thirty eight days or something like that? But we had two weeks where we was not scheduled and we went down to all..

Neal Willem Oscar Isaac Rupert Louis Gorell Louis Carell Louise Gant thirty eight days two weeks
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"So obviously, we all know that editing is writing and. Ben wa Willem Louise, and I all became the same person at some moment and. What was your question? I'm sorry Lee. Where'd you shoot it? Okay. So we were we were in all. And that all in the south of France. And that's where Van Gogh lived from eighteen eighty eight until he moved to over sir walls where he died, and so this was took place more or less than the last two years of his life. Gauguin came down visit him as brother. Paid for Gauguin to go down there. And. Keep them company, but Gauguin wanted to do it and one thing that was, but when we arrived, for example, there was no weet in. The south of France. So we sent Ben wad. Scotland asked him to shoot his feet. Okay. So how much is your budget for this? Budget was ten million dollars. And we probably had to spend two million dollars on lawyer's fees for some ridiculous can reason. I mean, it really was hobbled together in a way, and and at a certain moment. Also, we lost three hundred and fifty thousand dollars from one of the investors. They said, well, can you shoot seven hour days? Yeah. I can. And in fact, every day at about five thirty it was magic our in our will end. So Louise, and I would actually. Keep inventing scenes to shoot. And so many of the things that are in the movie were done spontaneously and Willem was up for it. And so was Oscar so good. He's so good. He's so good in the film. Let me do you. Do you like you shot? Now a couple of movies the country. What's different between those crews and these crews here. Your American supposedly. I mean, my father's from Czechoslovakia. My mother was born in New York, but she's from Romania, and I would say. Well, but I would say about say be honest. Well, I would say I mean, I've felt like a person who's person without a flag really somewhere in mid Atlantic. And after I made the diving bell and the butterfly was within tell you, right. I was with Sean Penn who made a movie about. Go with the Emile Hirsch. Into the one to the wild. And I was sitting there watching Shawn's moving. He's really an American director. I was a real American movie, and I looked at the diving bell and the butterfly and I thought well, that's a French movie. And it was a moment where Jerome said do one in me to make the movie in English. And I well, I can't do that. Don't you think it'd be weird for? French people to be speaking English and people reading French subtitles of a movie about a guy who's runs a magazine in Paris. So no, I don't think it'd be weird at all. I said, well, I can't make that really. And so we made that movie in French, and but this movie. I think we're in a post linguistic kind of moment and. What is often Tissot and? Okay. Those kids it would have been very inauthentic to me for those kids to speak English. And also for the people that were in the bar in the Tambo around to be speaking English. But when you're a foreign are you speak.

Willem Louise Gauguin Oscar France Van Gogh Ben wad director Emile Hirsch Lee Sean Penn Jerome Czechoslovakia New York Scotland Atlantic Paris Romania fifty thousand dollars ten million dollars two million dollars
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Everybody. We have matching a patent leather shoes. Tell them why. There was the gala of route the. Lucknow? So and he kept he kept his AT took his tux off in the car here. Ooh, how you. Ju-? The last time we were here together you interview in you interviewed me for the Butler. I think we did that in New York wasn't hunting. So but say movie, Saint people just different state. All right. Thank you. Nice to see everybody. Thank you for coming out. So Julian Schnabel's, my hero. And he's one of the reasons why I do what I do. And I guess I'm going to just start with. I why why this film? Why? Well, I didn't wanna make a movie about Van Gogh because everybody thinks they know everything about him. So it seemed absurd to do it. But. I don't know a whole lot about other things. But I know quite a bit about painting. And that's what I am on the painter. And I think there's a an inevitability about his work and. I think he's still waiting for his audience, but they keep coming anyway. So I think that maybe it was a reason why didn't want to do it in the first place. But are later I think the fact that most people think they have a relationship with the painter. Why? Mus good to try to answer that I think ultimately, I got a chance to say things about painting that I wanted to say and about being an artist in just about making anything it wasn't necessarily about painting. But maybe that was a way to talk about what it's like to be alive. When I when I. I walked away with the feeling of like. Wow, critics, you know, 'cause they dogged him, you know, and. As an artist. You know, you get dot you open yourself up to complete vulnerability. And I what it left me. I ended up leaving this film with the feeling of what defines art who who who is who defines that a critic from the New York Times. Who defines what defines art? And I was just wondering if you had anything to share on that. Listening is that why you did the phone. I think that art is a practice that nobody asked you to make. I don't think people do it for the money. I don't or for the fame when you're young you want agreement from other people, maybe one agreement from other people just for being alive, and you don't really know how to get it. So you do different things to get people's attention. But ultimately, the more you work. I think when Vincent says. To Dr Gachet. I thought that an artist was supposed to teach something about. Life. And then I I stopped thinking that now I just think about my relationship with your turn ity. And. I think the more you do it the more you realize that the process of doing it is really. But the thing is and. The notion that Van Gogh wasn't successful. Is a bit is absurd. I would say since. First of all he. If and I guess there's that moment where Wilma sitting in that vegetable field any pours dirt on his face, and he starts smiling. And I would say that to me it looks like that guy was exactly in the right place at the right time and. I don't know how many people actually feel like that in a lifetime. And the work that he made were was his. His was his companion was his confident, and it was his he had the dialogue with himself. It's a luxury when you can have a dialogue with other people. And I think that that's what he loved so much about Gauguin that he had respect for him. And I love that. I love that you showed that I felt like when I was watching the movie I was watching. Watching Van Gogh paint is how you sort of. Is how you directed. It. I shot who shot it Ben wa Delo shot the movie. I think he did a great job and guess this bunch of directors in this room, and I can say to you that he never said wants to me. I can't do it. And that's extrordinary. And there was no he asked for a lot this one. Well, we devised ways of doing things Louise Coburg is in the audience. She wrote the script was John Claude carryanne, I n and also edited the film. I did it with her. But she did it how you wanna stand up stand up. Louise..

Van Gogh Louise Coburg Butler Lucknow Ju New York Times Julian Schnabel Dr Gachet New York Gauguin Vincent John Claude carryanne Wilma
"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"What if I could be important would if I could be remembered? What if I could be amazing. In that, of course, the negative side of that is, you know, maybe if I set myself on fire, people notice me in my experience. Sadly, both these wells, the tree house and setting yourself for they both work. They both produce a wonderful arm and you'd love it to not be true to, you know, yeah, the new we are all going to die. Yeah. I mean, one way or the other, you know, he's thinking watching us thought, yeah, the real killing themselves, but either way they're going to die the way they're going to die. So I mean, that's today, did the screening today. And this woman said to me was like, I could tell she was in screenwriting class or something. So why would you tell us that he gets killed right in the beginning? So let me tell you something you're going to die too. I'm not going to blow anything. You know what I mean? It's just a sick, but wouldn't it create tension if you didn't know. I'm like, I'm sure it would, but I feel tense. And we all know we're gonna die. That's not the point. The point is how we're going to die. But also there's something kind of great about the fact that you tell us right up front. I thought he's going to die. And I mean one of the greatest titles of any book ever written his chronicle of a death foretold. So I mean, read the book. And you know he's gonna die. But you know, I mean, I had weird flashes during the film. I thought about Julian Schnabel. I thought I went to the screening of diving bell and the butterfly and at the fouled and enormous movie theater and Frank Marshall produced the movie and and. Julian comes down and he had made one requested it. They he would do this movie would if they did the premiere screening at the Bill, that was what he wanted. And as he said, he lit up a cigarette and he started smoking and I, you know, the whole audience, sorta. He smoke it in a movie theater and and we all clutch pearls for a second. And we kind of realized then, 'cause I did too..

Frank Marshall Julian Schnabel
"julian schnabel" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"And I'm here back from vacation a rejoining, our chief critic, Richard Lawson pillow, joining us once again, our Hollywood editor Hillary abuses Hilo. Joining us back in studio for the first time in a while. Our Hollywood writer Johanna Desta. Hello, a third. Hello? Hello? Hello. I like more singing on the show with the more the better well, as if you keep inviting me, it's gonna. All musical episode. Once more with feeling style, it's what the people have been clamoring for. We have two new releases. Well, one one upcoming in one newish to talk about this week when attacked by eighth grade and crazy rich Asians. But first we wanted to get into yet more festival news. It is August and things are very slow. But although the news about the fall festivals is coming out and the New York Film festival announced its lineup, it's kind of a one of the old and very prestigious festivals, and for New Yorkers it's always a great chance to catch up with Phil's from Ken and sometimes from Toronto in Venice, and what are the noteworthy things I thought about this year is that there are other than the Julian Schnabel movie, which hasn't been announced anywhere else. Everything is being in another festival. Do we feel like this is a big deal or is the kind of okay for the film festival to take this position? I think it's a big deal. I mean, I looked it up went when they announced the opening night film, which is the favor of the Yugoslav anthem movie, which will be at Venice before that I looked it up and it's been a long time. It's been since two thousand nine that the opening night film at the New York Film festival wasn't a world. Premier, you think you've had gone girl and British spy. Spies premiered there and social network. I remember from weird their social network. There was wonder wheel last years. Yeah. So. Hillary, please keep your voice down, but it's just interesting because this was a, this was a festival season. Now that element we kind of figured out what is going to be the all the festivals that there was a lot debut because Sundance was quiet, can was quiet end to to see that New York Film festival didn't get sort of significant piece of that is strange, and I wonder what's going on behind the scenes. Yeah, it's hard to really float a theory because he's conversations are all happening behind closed doors and it's not like they have bad films. They've got a lot of stuff that we've been excited about like the favorite. You mentioned the Afonso Koran movie Roma the Coens with valid BUSTER Scruggs buried Jenkins if you'll streak at talk, which we'll talk about in a little bit..

New York Hillary New York Film Venice Hollywood Coens Johanna Desta Hilo Richard Lawson Julian Schnabel writer editor Sundance BUSTER Scruggs Spies Toronto Phil Jenkins
"julian schnabel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"julian schnabel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Secure hussein and joshua redman are performing it as the jazz centre sunday at three and seven pm at this point in the show novelist salman rushdie came to the stage michael is interviewed rushdie many times over the past 30 years for his books including the satanic verses and the booker prizewinning midnight's children michael talked with rushdie about his new novel the golden house which spans the election of barack obama to the rise of the havoc reconfigure called the joker you just keep turning novels out one after the other will love you hit a what else would i do act well if over the next few an offer that you the one thing i really thought about is it some years ago i was unable to accept an invitation because i was on book tour to take part had wolf was then called untitled will federal busker movie and their idea was defied the three most improbable people they could think of to be dressed up as moscow drivers the helmet was just one shot it was like sloat walking towards the camera slow motion you know top garden take my breath away buzek of the three people they wanted were julian schnabel lou reed at me and we all water to do it but the scheduling good work out to the drop their sort of shave bolger has lost i feel you know you can keep your novels well you do love popular culture comes across again in one of the things about this book is finally allowed me to talk about movies looker is the duration of this level is this young man who's a just i figured it was just out of and more you film schooling and trying to begin to be a filmmaker he was to make a movie of the golden the family who else served there's this bizarre probably very mysterious indian family this old patriarchate his three adult songs relocate to new york they change their names the conceal their pasts they don't wanna talk about where they came from and they're obviously hiding something pretty serious and this young man thinks that could be something i could do a movie about so he kind of invade goals himself into their lives in order to find out about them but the great figures that having a filmmaker as y narrator allowed me to use by a lifetime of filmed i agree head script.

hussein salman rushdie michael barack obama lou reed bolger new york joshua redman moscow julian schnabel 30 years