22 Burst results for "Julian Fellowes"

'Downton Abbey' Cast Returns for Sequel Opening in December

AP News Radio

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

'Downton Abbey' Cast Returns for Sequel Opening in December

"A second film based on the series Downton abbey is in the works marches are a lot of what the latest connection is already begun on the movie Downton abbey to which will feature the original principal cast is scheduled to be released December twenty second creator Julian Fellowes has written the screenplay the first film was released in twenty nineteen three years after the series ended it made one hundred ninety four million dollars on a budget of less than twenty million dollars

Downton Abbey Julian Fellowes
'Downton Abbey' creator turns to the beautiful game

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

'Downton Abbey' creator turns to the beautiful game

"Five with global soccer shut down these days fans desperate for a fix of the beautiful game may find it from a rather unlikely source the creator of the stately Downton abbey Julian Fellowes has created and co written a new Netflix series called the English game it's a six part look at the origins of a one time British gentleman's game that has become the most popular sport on the planet the series focuses on the first full time professional players but this being a fellow's project has plenty of drama off the pitch as well including the rise of the working class that's a series that begins

Soccer Julian Fellowes Netflix
‘Downton Abbey’ Crowned No. 1 at Box Office With $31 Million Opening

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

‘Downton Abbey’ Crowned No. 1 at Box Office With $31 Million Opening

"Big screen encore of Downton abbey the mega hit British TV series created by Julian Fellowes the film opened with an estimated thirty one million dollars in ticket sales over the weekend over series the royal period drama has collected forty one million to

Julian Fellowes Downton Abbey Thirty One Million Dollars
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:12 min | 1 year ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Knew there was nobody nobody in the family had ever done that. Before my brothers I had two brothers were twins and they they both became architects but six years old but they could do these fantastic drawings and so that was that was a mystery. I think to my parents too because they had no idea that that was around in the family anywhere. We've maybe it never was but and so they wrote the way for me. If you know what I mean I've no idea where I got the idea from to do what I do but I think they ended alison. My my brother's kind of opened a lot of doors for me onto the world yeah made. It seem to be a very very interesting place or were you an entertaining kid to your friends. Did you make them laugh. I don't remember doing that particularly. I went to a school where they were the they they did did plays and things I was. I was never in those really but had very good English teacher who said to me that she thought I ought to do. it. She I know she saw something. Thank goodness because I think if it hadn't been encouraged I by somebody that serious. I'm not sure what would have happened to me. Do you watch your homes homes and your and your television performances. Why would only about them stunt part of the pressure so you're never you're never quite satisfied. One let me think why in name of God did I do that. I'm cringing listening to back seduce things now. I do it all differently now. We're all enjoying it and you're crunching. I do everything different that no I wouldn't. You can't go back and do that. When I told people I was going to interview Maggie Smith I just can't I can't tell you the number of people who said Oh my heavens. You're so lucky I just love her. and I think you know you've particularly had an expanded audience with Downton Abbey and the Harry Potter films but you know you such terrific career and you've achieved so much and so many people just love you and I'm wondering what that kind of mass adoration. It feels like to use it gratifying scary is it can even comprehend well. It only happened to me since Downton Abbey so I blame the hoofing on television. It's it's odd and I've said this before but I find it very difficult to to do anything on my own now because people recognize we this is never happened to me before because I haven't really done television before but but I suppose if you're in people's rooms over the time I don't know I was thinking that the other night with people like the Caprio uh-huh and the big stars in Cape launches and you just how do they exist. It's so difficult and I think now it's very intrusive zip because of these cell phones with cameras right. Why have you people want to take a picture of your take a picture uh-huh them with you and it's I know so. How do you do anything on your own. How do you react when someone well you know. John Cleese told me he just tells people don't do pictures. I'm sorry I do say that. It depends on it depends who who it is. If it's a very young person the trial of course you would but it it is incredibly intrusive. I usually say do you like having your picture taken it could maybe they do. I don't know and if it's not too intrusive you live in a fifteenth century farm houses that right. It's the moment it looks as though it's never been a tool because it's being I'm having to really have a go rewiring into things because it is indeed very old electric lights but yes. I think you ton every lies on with rubber. She's if you any sense. Do you want to take one question question about Harry Potter or would you rather be released which I will drive the pay release and you've been a to her okay well. No I don't know about what's that about Harry. what was it like to play that role to act in those films. WanNa tell you I just adore DINU. The Dan Radcliffe who I had what before Harry auctions spent a long time telling telling all the producers they had to see him because I thought aww said terrific and it's it's been sad thinking about it because of of Alan Rickman and yes he was such a terrific actor and that was such a terrific character he played and it was a joy. HP With Him we used to love together because we ran out of reaction shots. They were always when everything had been done and the children were finished they would turn the camera around and we'd have to various reaction shots of amazement sadness and things and we I used to say we got to about number two hundred and something we'd run out of knowing what to do when the cameras came around enough but he was he was joy joy Maggie Smith. It's been a pleasure. Thank you so much thank you. Maggie Smith recorded in two thousand sixteen gene she plays the Dowager Countess in Downton Abbey the movie which opens in theaters today coming up Justin Chang reviews the new film Ad Astra starring Brad Pitt Pitt this is fresh air support for NPR and the following message come from comcast through Internet essentials comcast has connected more than eight million people from low income households to high speed Internet most for the first time more at comcast corporation. Dot Com slash Internet essentials support also comes from whyy presenting the podcast eleanor amplified and adventure series kids love and will make those summer road trips a little easier on everyone one here reporter Eleanor outwit crafty villains and solve mysteries as she travels the globe to get the big story available where you get podcasts or a whyy whyy dot org great inner calm in one harrowing early action scene a high altitude explosion sends him falling to earth and his pulse barely accelerates as he deploys his parachute ruins more comfortable floating in the vast sterile emptiness of outer space and he is is on solid ground where he has to deal with the messy -ness of feelings and relationships he recently split from his wife who was fed up with his workaholic them and emotional detachment richemont ruin inherited both those qualities from his father. Clifford McBride a legendary astronaut who vanished twenty nine years ago on a deep space mission in search search of intelligent life but one day Roy is called in by two top generals who have some startling news for him about the source of the electrical storms known has the surge major. What can you tell us about the project I manned expedition to the outer solar. The systems are some twenty nine years ago and the commander was was my father sir. The ship disappeared approximately sixteen years into the mission. Data is ever recovered. Deep Space Missions were halted after Roy we of something that might come as quite a shock to you. We believe your father still alive. Near Neptune the fathers mm-hmm Alexa believe some Roy. The search seems to be the result of some kind of antimatter reaction now. The Lima project was powered by that material and your father was charging. We're talking about a potentially unstoppable chain-reaction here. The uncontrolled release of antimatter could ultimately threaten the stability of our entire sources. All life could be destroyed. mm-hmm. Roy's mission is to travel to a military base on Mars to transmit a secure message to Clifford and persuade him to stop the surge urge but I you'll have to head to the moon which has morphed into a grungy capitalist dystopia a giant shopping mall surrounded by a wasteland crawling with pirates grits. There's a gripping chase sequence in which some of those mercenaries pursue Roy in rickety vehicles across the lunar surface later. There's a frightening scene aboard a spaceship to Mars where Roy makes a shocking discovery a reminder that humanity's desire to conquer new frontiers can have disastrous consequences these little jolts helped break up a long episodic narrative that shuffles genres it will starting out as a futuristic noir before shifting into an action movie a paranoid thriller and finally a cosmic male weepy ad Astra can feel both overwritten and under imagined I wish there were we're less of Roy's incessant voice over monologue and more of a sense of how this mind-bending often downright Kooky vision of the future came to be the story becomes.

Roy Maggie Smith Harry Potter Downton Abbey Clifford McBride comcast alison John Cleese whyy Lima HP Dan Radcliffe Alexa Caprio Alan Rickman eleanor Harry. Cape
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Real story and when people say that would never have happened of course it did happen happen. Justice love affairs between seven thousand members of the family happened disapproved but they still happen and this particular story. Harry is based on the door of an L. who ran off with the groom. Actually it wasn't the Chauve was the groom and I didn't think it was a great distinction in that and they had to put up with it. I oh I think it was very difficult. And of course they rather encourage the couple to live in Dublin because it sort of easier if they're out of sight but you know families then families now when your children marry someone you would not have chosen for them. There is a moment where you have to decide. Am I going to quarrel with my son or my daughter and literally no longer have them in my life or am I going to find a way to get on with this person and I think most of us hope hope for the second and that's really what the grand themes have to do. What what kind of research did you do for Downton Abbey. I mean you obviously had a a lot from your from your own experience in discussions with your relatives. What kind of research did you do. You know one just kind of reads. A lot got a books around it. I mean the the truth is i. I've always been interested in the whole setup of the old world you know when I was young long. It had only just for many people come to an end you know. I was a little boy in the fifties and that was when a lot of people were talking in the Towel Holland selling the house and so I would see MT seven rooms and Mt Cupboards in the basement lined in Green Bay's or whatever if I can remember all that quite well so a certain extent I just would be imbibed it from the air but I also have read quite fight a lot about it. I mean one of the great advantages of the Internet. If you want to use a piece of slang or you want to use a song or you just type pin thing you go into the etymology dictionary gives you the year of first usage and so on or I printed usage but on on the whole I do sort of I mean sounds rather pretentious actually but but I do sort of know how this way of life worked at this this point and I take advantage of that really you said you saw houses with empty servants quarters because essentially that way of life had just disappeared. Yes I mean you know you go into the stable and there were no horses and then you go into the old kitchens huge old kitchens and there'd be sort of signs for the village fate and and you know old parameters and broken bicycles and things and they would have created some horrible slopped locked kitchen in some anti room upstairs and you know all of that was was very fresh. I mean one of the great changes now. Actually is that these houses one set of survived have essentially been reinvented by their owners who are normally the children or grandchildren of the ones who threw in the towel and they come twit differently this generation doesn't you know long for the days you were footmen behind every because they weren't there youth was spent after after let it come to an end so they just looked differently and they have different ways of running to now help in the house comes in from the village instead of coming from Dobbs as everyone calls each other by their Christian everything else it just runs on different wheels and I like that I like the fact that these houses have in a sense been reinvented kid and it's very attractive. Downton Abbey begins in nineteen twelve when there are all these social trends that that are causing the the the old order to begin to unravel did did your observation of kind of the disappearance of that way of life make you want to really explore the end of of of that period and the dissolution of the aristocracy. I just remember one one time. When I was quite young I was I forget now. Seventy is on and I was staying in a house and I got lost and I went through the wrong door and I was standing at the top of the staircase that led down into the kitchens and everything and and there was a tremendous row going on between a sounded like four five six people shouting and yelling and this now and I suddenly they had such a powerful sense of the lives that were being lipped by the people who work there and not you know only the family who lived Theban the people who worked there were also you know enjoying life will of hating each other loving each other or whatever and I suppose knows you could say that in that Moment Gosford Park and Downton Abbey were at least conceived whether or not they had yet been born and at some point I would explore that fairly simple emotional recognition that everyone's life is one hundred percent importance to them and who they are and you know I've been sort of innocence exploring it ever since Julian fellowes created Downton Abbey the masterpiece he series and also wrote the screenplay for Downton Abbey the movie which opens in theaters today after a break we'll hear more from fellows and from Maggie Smith known for her hilarious one liners as the Dowager Countess of Downton Abbey also Justin Chang reviews the new film Ad Astra starring Brad Pitt. I'm Davis made this is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from state farm who agents know that your car and home are more than just big purchases. They're a a big part of your life. You put the time into making them your own so now it's time to protect them with your own personal state farm agent not only do they truly really get you but they'll be there for you when you need them and with over nineteen thousand agents in neighborhoods across the US there could be one just around the corner more at state eight farm dot com or one eight hundred state farm state farm here to help life go right Downton Abbey the movie opens in theaters today with much of the cast of the masterpiece series that ran for six seasons soon bill. Here's some of my two thousand sixteen interview with Maggie Smith who plays the Dowager Countess in the series and the movie but first. Let's listen to what Julian fellowes. The creator of the series and screenwriter of the film had to say about that role. I spoke to fellows in two thousand thirteen eighteen. The Maggie Smith character in in doubt Abby is just such a delight T. Tell us who she is how she fits into that so the family well she she really as. I said she's really based on. My eldest. Great aren't who was quite tough character but she was no tougher on anyone else since she was on herself in fact in real life she had quite tragic life. Her husband died of wounds at the end of the first World War in her only child filed drowned on active service in the second so she had a lot to babble thing that she was toughened funny and some of the phrases that Matt you know what's a weekend and and stuff like that come from remembering Gosford Park. One one question Maggie asked me. She said I didn't understand about the Momma. I and I said Oh well that was this particular aren't because lady treatment goes fit is also sorta based on it and I said this particular and always thought that if a house ran out of its own jams jellies than it was it was not being well run than it was a sign of its weakness. Oh she said I've got it. I've got it and she does that line. So wonderfully fluency looks into the Jam Pot and says bought mom laid. I call that vide- feeble and and I what I love about Maggie's that she has this extraordinary skill to bring many different aspects of a character into her delineation but they never seem contradictory victory that she never turns into a different person a lesser actor. Would you know find it difficult to be kind and cruel simultaneously apoe superficial here at quite deep here but she manages to synthesize all these elements into a believable woman we should hear one of these moments and this is from the first season where she and lady Grantham played again by Elizabeth McGovern are sitting and discussing the difficult matter of finding a suitable husband for lady Mary the oldest of the Crawley daughters how about smoke house parties. She's been asked to one next month.

Downton Abbey Maggie Smith Julian fellowes Harry Dublin US Towel Holland lady Grantham Davis Moment Gosford Park Elizabeth McGovern Green Bay Gosford Park Crawley Dobbs Brad Pitt Justin Chang Abby
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Fresh Air

"On television and Justin Chang reviews the new film Ad Astra starring Brad Pitt Downton Abbey the feature film based on the masterpiece series that ran on PBS for six seasons seasons opens today in theaters much of the cast returns in the movie for a plot set in motion by the visit of King George V to Downton in this scene conflicts inflicts emerge as servants at Denton or talking about preparations from the royals with the Kings page who's part of the royals advanced team so my mates and I will not not be involved in the preparations you mean during this day you'll be the Butler and excuse me I am not Butler. I'm the kings page of the Baxter us so our staff has nothing to do. I'm sure they can be useful but how can they eat and get dressed at Rabi Castle. If the chef and the on the mayoral here we have two of each the principal valid in the principal dresser will arrive in advance of their Majesties who bring an Equerry lady-in-waiting to detectives to show the other chef goes from Rabi to Harwood four footmen with him and the other four come here do all understand me today will listen to an interview I recorded with Maggie Smith who regularly stole scenes in the Downton Abbey series as as the Dowager Countess and returned to the role in the movie but I will hear from Julian fellowes the screenwriter of the film and the creator of the series fellows. This is an actor as well as a writer and much of his writing has dealt with class distinctions and how they affect human relationships he grew up the son of a diplomat with an aristocratic background ground and he has a title himself Lord Fellowes of West Stafford his screenplay for the two thousand and one Robert Altman Film Gosford Park won an Oscar. I spoke to Julian Fellowes in twenty thirteen. Julian fellowes Lord fellowes welcome to fresh air and it's nice to be here you know a lot of your writing both for television and film and your novel involves distinctions of Social Class no that you grew up the son of a diplomat with an aristocratic heritage. I believed Steve. Did you have servants growing up. Now I mean I think my background is much more ordinary than the newspapers of made it I mean you know we we we have people who came in and did some cleaning but I mean who. D- plenty of other people have that I think in a way why became quite aware of classes a kind kind of live defining issue is because my parents came from different backgrounds. My father's was grander than my mother's and and so my mother had to sort of put up with the disapproval of my fathers relations and I suppose from that grew a kind of interest in in a way the unfairness of class the fact that it is so arbitrary and its selection and you know so so nothing to do with merit and yet it shapes alive and and creates entitlement and all sorts of other factors that that Oh you know have a long-term effect on us one of the things that makes Downton Great and Gosford Park which is a movie I really love is the intimate look at the servants the life downstairs. Where did you become so acquainted with their lives and customs and rules? You know I was lucky. In one way I mean I was Oh kind of one hundred and fifty years old and so when I was young I still had great aunts and that kind of thing who had lived to a degree that life before the first World War I mean my eldest great aunt who is really the model for Violet Grantham was born in eighteen eighty you know and she was presented in eighteen ninety eight and married before the first war and all of that and I knew Bevaqua she died when I was twenty one so I was able to hear a lot of this stuff I and where I was tremendously lucky is. I was interested when I was young one of the problems we you know when you don't get interested in things until uh-huh much older is a lot of people are dead and because I was interested as a teenager there were still many members of the family who could talk about what life had been before the first and second wars and union. I was very glad to hear it well. Let's talk about Downton. Abbey and I wanted to play a clip from season one. this is a moment at a table in the kitchen downstairs where the servants are all having tea and we hear one of them's. O'Brien who's played by Sharon Finneran disparaging urging Matthew Crawley. He's a cousin of the master of the House who's arrived on the scene and may inherit Downton the whole place will hear shuffling of furniture whereas the servants spring to their feet because lady Grantham who's played by Elizabeth McGovern suddenly showed up in the kitchen and has overheard Miss O'Brien her own lady's maid talking Talking Down Matthew Crawley. She rebukes Miss O'Brien and this leads to an interesting exchange after that among the servants. Let's listen. I'm sorry I have stemmed. It's interesting something episodes and if anyone thinks I'm going to pull my phone can kurt it to this. Mr Nobody from Nowhere Brad Discussing Mr Cruelly yes melody is at your place to do so I've got my opinions melody and the body. Can I help you leadership. This is the button limousine from an evening co-defendant lying on the gravel but I was shocked at the talk. I heard as I came in. Mr Crawley is his lordships cousin and heir. You will therefore please according to the respect. He's entitled title to but you don't like him yourself. Milady never wanted him to go sailing perilously close to the window Brian. If we're to be friends you will not speaking that way again about the Crawley's or any member of Lord Grantham family. Now I'm going to rest wake me at the dressing gown.

Julian Fellowes Matthew Crawley Miss O'Brien Downton Abbey Gosford Park Violet Grantham Rabi Castle royals Lord Grantham family Butler principal Brad Pitt Maggie Smith Justin Chang Rabi Majesties Mr Nobody Denton Robert Altman King George
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone and welcome to on. Here's what's coming up the the biggest protest yet as children around the world. Take this school strike to discreet author. Jonathan Safran four tells us what we can do then too much trauma that people going through that they shouldn't have to go through the richest country in the spiritual guru author and Democratic Presidential Wild Cod Marianne and Williamson talks us through the issues that matter to her plus. You'll Majesty's welcome to Downton Abbey a blast from the past as Downton Abbey hits. The big screen writer and Producer Julian fellowes tells me why we're all happily riveted by the upstairs downstairs blockbuster. Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane Amanpour in.

Downton Abbey Producer Julian fellowes Jonathan Safran Christiane Amanpour Williamson writer
Imelda Staunton on the New 'Downton Abbey' Film

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:36 min | 2 years ago

Imelda Staunton on the New 'Downton Abbey' Film

"Today today after making a name for herself on the West End Stage Imelda Staunton shot to international fame when she started in the Mike Leigh Drama Vera Drake in two thousand and four it earned her an academy award nomination for Best Actress. Imelda Staunton is also the winner of three Olivier Awards for best actress in a musical for her roles in into the woods sweeney any told and Gypsy in two thousand and sixteen. She's back on screens this weekend. Joining the cast of the feature film version of Downton Abbey she spoke to Monaco's has been Ryland for me joining it now because I'm not in the series and although my husband who plays Carson isn't the series or do feel. I've lived but I think that's that's very interesting to think. NCA- about. Should we want things to stay the same and yet I also think within the story that Julian fellowes has given the female characters. You know I've could a very interesting story line because I come into it but women questioning there. Should I be living in this big house with servants. What what what's happening with the world and yet the audience crave costs and someone steady. They want things to be steady and safe because we are going to hell in a handcart hot. Let's face it to cling onto something that has got tradition. If you like and that's why I dare say we're all obsessed with the royal family or just something that is stable because it's all over the place and I think it stability that people want and yet we have to sort of we have to move within that the big question of course is which tradition should we hold onto and which ones should we move on from and we all collectively need to make this decision and in a microcosm sort of way that's the the dilemma faced with many of the characters you'll your character wants to make a decision without giving anything away that would be quite untraditional it would be against the idea of what what people do you and there are other characters such as Maggie Smith who looks at this and says no things shoot remain how they've always been and it's it sort of feels like a wider dilemma that we just don't know which ones we should hold onto to know but in film terms that's tension and that's what you need to make a drama. There's no point of us will sit making a film that everything's fine or everything's terrible you have to the tension is like the tension between Maggie Smith Skirt and Penelope Wilton character which yes you think about it. She doesn't belong to the House and so her role throughout the series was almost almost and I'm a I'm quoting her now but she was the window from the audience into Downton again will is that right and she could question on behalf of us. You know what was going on on and I think you have to be malleable with all these traditions and you have to move all family of how to move with the Times with you will in Kate and and how it has to move on and I think Downton has embraced that the film you know the fans just desperate for the film and I think they'll be delighted with it but I think they'll be delighted with it because although it's a chocolate box and it's a fantasy they're serious points in the film and I think you know for what it is. I think people go uh no. I think that's that's quite true if the made the cooks assistant questions. Why are we having to do all this the king and Queen or why are we having to you know just just questioning just putting things out there. I think it will make people listen to more than just oh what we have tea and dinner served. Well absolutely it's. It's such a cozy film but also you know we were talking about traditions and in a way the film is about nostalgia isn't it. I found myself coming out of a wondering whether it really is a love letter. Tunis eligible naught because there are so many elements of the film that while very much of the time that he's being depicted here. It's also making it clear that time is moving on culture is moving on whether these people choose to understand it or not the the king and Queen that come to visit wouldn't have any idea about this secret secret gay club. That's happening without anyone's knowledge behind these on March doors you know there is an element of a coach is moving on even if these people are living all all alone in a happy little place in their own little bubble at the end of the film it did make me one east this and affectionate love letter to nostalgia all has more of a reminder that all things will eventually end even Downton Abbey the series the film perhaps the structure itself yeah. I think it's both I think it's it you can give and take away and I feel that you know Downton. Abbey was Sunday night fair and it's not political to cope with a big P. It's as you said it's cozy television and it's feel good and that's that's what this is. We must pretend as any different than the there were few little ingredients. It's in their little bit risky. You know and that's within its remit. I think it hits all those marks and yes you know anything about the old days. It's no style Jake and and Britain does that quite well. I Suppose Julian fellowes you know with Gosford Park for goodness sake all those years ago he knows how to do that. So you see you can push the boundaries so fall with film right Downton Abbey and I think he's done it and I think he's served the regular characters. I'm aware on the periphery of at the end of the regular characters are who the fans want to see and this is a film that has been made because of the demand of the popular you know how many people one hundred twenty million people watching it so he's given them what they want. I think Imelda Staunton they're one of many stars of the new feature film version of Downton Abbey Speaking to Ben Ryland Downton Abbey is out in cinemas

Downton Abbey Imelda Staunton Downton Ben Ryland Downton Abbey Julian Fellowes Maggie Smith Olivier Awards Abbey Mike Leigh NCA Tunis Ryland Carson Vera Drake Monaco Penelope Wilton Jake Britain Kate
"julian fellowes" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"It was very loose about a country house involving a murder that was it. And I knew I could do it. I thought I know this stuff, but what I did do is because it was men, and I I thought probably he had to be talked into this. And he was very American. I mean, they're Khanna and one of the most legendary American directors of all of all his Paul Thomas Anderson with that's why he makes movie he was going to way from his territory. Yeah. And an eye. Do this. And I thought what I want is. When he gets the first drop to the script. He's going to open it thinking who here goes nothing. And then he's going to read it and the MO he reads Moi's gonna see it's an open movie. So I rushed out, and I found every movie I could have videos, I spent three days watching and that multi arc narrative, which I later went on with for danton. But you know, you have some big Arsenault right over the picture. Some those sold in three see look, California split or natty Bill all of his movies have this. And I wanted him to see that exact same structure was being played out at a shooting weekend in Gloucestershire. And so he read the script, and he told me off to it's actually 'cause I then I sent it in. And I got this invitation to fly out got a phone you to work on the script with him for a few days. And that was the first moment of the whole. Process that I thought it might happen. I did you allow excitement did you allow yourself to become excited because it doesn't seem like you try to tamp expectation down a bit. Well, that I that was the first time, and he later told me that until he'd read the script he never believed it would have. So I love this moment. I really love it so much being my wife, and I both writers and having these Hollywood careers where it's up and down over and over again. So I just I I love this moment that you and your wife decided to fly your club class talk about it. Can you just talk about it a bit? For me. Because now you're in the house of lords and your Julian fellows, and you've you're you're landed in every way imaginable, and it's important. I think to understand that before Gaza park for which you won the Academy Award. You weren't sure you could afford to fly yourself to America in a way that would allow you to work. So can tell the story. Well, couldn't afford it. Really? And we got the see I lived in California for a couple of years earlier on night act to the bit. I enjoyed it. Actually, I people city didn't. But I loved it. I had a great time. But when I left I the next time, I come back to California someone else's paying for my tickets powerful. And I kept that I didn't break. But now, I was being fed back. But of course, I was being back third. Yes. All the way in the back coach. Yeah. And which is fine. Yes. And so we had the normally fine. But from England to California is an cry. It's ten hour flight, and they'd promised you the hotel, right? And they said you tell you have a day off you won't be working until Thursday, usual. An MS said, no, I think we should pay club for you to fly out shadow care coming back coming back. You can hold onto the undercarriage. But going out because if they want you to work straight away, you must have slept on the fly. If you're the back, you won't have slept. It all so we did. But it was a big thing for us. Yes. To put up that money that it was an investment. What happened when you landed? I landed they said we're going straight to the studio now all men rugs. Wait. Yes. And you wanna drive yourself? We rented car here. So I I mean that in itself hope the other side of the thing, and I got to drive there. We have to sit I have to be absolutely on the button straightaway. And because I had slept for about four hours on the flight..

California Paul Thomas Anderson Moi Khanna danton murder Arsenault Gaza park Hollywood America Academy Award Gloucestershire England Julian four hours three days ten hour
"julian fellowes" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Was in a series, and I was in then I was in a long running series on television for five years on British television. Right. And then I was right. And that was an overlap now. That's interesting. And I imagine that you were then I know they don't pay a fortune. But imagine you were kind of comfortable living a decent life. Yes. It could be worse. You know? A nice house in Knightsbridge. Everything was fine. That's what I'm saying. So how did you marry to baby then often when people are in that spot, the they sort of acceptable? This is this is great. What do you think? It was that kept you turning was it as you were writing these things you wanted to solve this puzzle. Was it that you liked what you felt like when you were writing. Like what what happened that made you decide I'm going to this lonely work. I think to one is my wife who by then had been married to me for about ten years now about thirty. But tend in those days had always thought I was going to end up a writer why she thought this. I don't know mine too amazing. And so that was always in my head. I didn't quite know what she thought that. But the other was very quickly. And right. I mean acting I was the minister who said you have three days, Mr. Boehm, but I wasn't missed bone. Right. And and. I was trying to get a job on casualty. I was working on a Sunday night series called monarch of the Glen. When I started writing I was working for I was suddenly working for Scorsese. I was doing so, you know, all of this. But that was later wasn't an you said you've written a few scripts that didn't what kept you going when you would write a script, and even you because you have this great ear an eye for it were like that one can be. But this one's good that one could be better where you getting something out of it in the doing, I guess did it feel more alive to you or the same as I did have periods. I remember thinking who am I trying to kid is ever going to this is useful to hear because all of us feel that way? And someone is accomplished as you feeling that way gives comfort. I think I remembered lying back in the bath Watson just saying is ever going to happen. And yes, it's going to happen. And it's going to happen soon. And who? That's great. And then I was rung up by ballot ban. I think about a month later that stuff's just I mean, that's my favorite my favorite things decided I have to press on somehow because that's still hasn't gotten made. Right. That never scripted Balabagn showed Almon that never has not gotten made. Even though it changed your age my life. That's say young righteous. Actually, you don't know what role a script may play in your life when they're writing it. They think this is a wonderful script. It'll get made it'll change my life. But the truth is most produces a looking for rights to work on an idea they already have. And so you don't have to dig in. If that script gets you the job to write the script. They're looking full. It's done its work. It has served its turn in your lies long as asking you this stating, but I would guess as long as when you get that assignment you understand how to make that work. Well, or do you think just take the job there? You. Sometimes you state job. Let's not get out selves. But I think the major step you need to be a bit lucky. I mean, I was very lucky with goes to you. I was interested in that period. I when I was young I had known my great aunts one of whom was about ten years younger than Mary Crawley. Older the merry Croly. And she had been married before the first wash lived. I knew it was twenty one. Right. So you understood it an firsthand, and I understood all that. And I was intr- how there's houses worked what this used to be the something this used to be where they in the lamps this use I'd grown up on us to be and an I knew that stuff. And when this commission arrive to write a film..

Knightsbridge Mr. Boehm Mary Crawley Scorsese writer Watson Balabagn Almon ten years five years three days
"julian fellowes" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on AP News

"Circuit court had been scheduled for friday to determine whether bird rides can continue renting electric scooters in that city but the hearings been rescheduled the cases being moved to federal court at the request of bird rides papa john's is pulling its founders image from its marketing after reports he used a racial slur the pizza company has featured john schnatter as the face of the company and logos tv ads and packaging his face was off at least some materials by late morning friday though the company said the details that exact timing for everything were still being worked out the pizza chain said there are no plans to change its name schneider is still on the board and is the company's largest shareholder meaning he remains a key presence but the fallout from his comments has made it to the university of louisville the school said it'll remove the papa john's name from its football stadium and that it'll rename the john h natter center for free enterprise at its business college three years after going off the air doubt is coming back as a movie focused features says it will begin production this summer on doubt and film that'll remet the crawley family on the big screen series creator julian fellowes wrote the screenplay and will produce the end has been long rumored over six seasons downton abbey became a global hit airing at least one hundred fifty countries ended set a record for non us television shows with sixty nine emmy nominations brian percival who directed the series pilot will direct the film and the primary cast members are all such a return it will likely be released sometime next year hi i'm ralph rousseau ap college football writer and host of the ap top twenty five college football podcast available on apple podcasts and podcast one while there be sure to subscribe rating review that's the ap top twenty five college football podcast russian.

the pizza company john schnatter schneider john h natter center julian fellowes us writer university of louisville emmy brian percival ralph rousseau football apple three years
Kavanagh, Jerry and Washington Downton Abbey discussed on Face the Nation

Face the Nation

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Kavanagh, Jerry and Washington Downton Abbey discussed on Face the Nation

"Democrats are trying to figure out their best strategy is they try to derail brett cavanaugh supreme court nomination democrats have so far seized on kavanagh's likely impact in two areas abortion and healthcare as they prepare to fight his nomination they're also hoping that something in the mountain of documents from his past gives them something they can use but in the narrowly divided senate unity is critical and that calculus is complicated by red state democrats looking to be reelected in november jerry bowed lender washington downton abbey will be happy to hear the award winning tv series will be made into a movie julian fellowes who created the show is written the screenplay and will produce the movie jeff bezos rocket company plans to charge passengers as much as three hundred thousand dollars for its first trips into space next year potential customers in the aerospace industry have been eager.

Kavanagh Jerry Washington Downton Abbey Brett Cavanaugh Senate Jeff Bezos Three Hundred Thousand Dollars
"julian fellowes" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on AP News

"I'm tim maguire with an ap newsmen at a dozen russian military intelligence officers have been indicted on hacking charges as part of robert muller's investigation into russian meddling in the two thousand sixteen election deputy attorney general rod rosenstein allegation in this indictment that any american citizen committed a crime there's no allegation that the conspiracy changed vote count or affected any election result rosenstein says the hackers broke into the computer networks of the democratic national committee and hillary clinton's campaign and then made public the information stolen from those networks you diamonds come just days before president trump is to meet with russian president putin university of louisville has taken papa john's name off its football stadium in response to the pizza company founder john schnatter's racial slur his name has gone from the university school of business and now major league baseball has dropped special deals the pizza chain had with individ teams i'm tim maguire three years after going off the air doubt naby is coming back as a movie focused features says it will begin production this summer on downton film that arena at the crawley family on the big screen series creator julian fellowes wrote the screenplay and will produce the has been long rumored over six seasons downton abbey became a global hit airing in at least one hundred fifty countries and instead of record for non us television shows with sixty nine emmy nominations brian percival who directed the series pilot will direct the film and the primary cast members are all such return it will likely be released sometime next year papa john's is pulling its founders image from its marketing after reports he used a racial slur the pizza company has featured john schnatter as the face of the company and logos tv ads and packaging his face was off at least some materials by late morning friday though the company said the details that exact timing for everything we're still being worked out the pizza chain said there are no plans to change its name schneider is still on the board and is the company's largest shareholder meaning he remains the key presence but the fallout from his comments has made it to the university of louisville the school said it will remove the papa john's name from its football stadium and that it'll rename the john h natter center for free enterprise at its business college oklahoma's medicaid program is the nation's first to be approved for a drug pricing experiment that supporters say could save taxpayer dollars and provide patients with the most effective medications the federal centers for medicare and medicaid services in june approved a plan called value based purchasing in which.

john h natter center university of louisville brian percival emmy university school of business founder putin university of louisville president rod rosenstein deputy attorney general medicare oklahoma tim maguire schneider the pizza company us julian fellowes crawley family
"julian fellowes" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on AP News

"Three years after going off the air downton abbey coming back as a movie focused features says it will begin production this summer on doubt and film that'll remet the crawley family on the big screen series creator julian fellowes wrote the screenplay will produce the end up tation has been long rumored over six seasons downton abbey became a global hit airing at least one hundred fifty countries ended set a record for non us television shows with sixty nine emmy nominations brian percival who directed the series pilot will direct the film and the primary cast members are all set to return it will likely be released sometime next year actor comedian tyler perry is warning fans not to get scammed in a facebook video perry says he's given cars and houses to employees and friends but he's not giving away anything on facebook he says his team shuts down as many as thirty fake promotions a day he warned people not to give out their personal information in response to the fake offers perry also directed a strong comment at whoever was making the post saying stop it devil papa john's is pulling its founders image from its marketing after reports he used a racial slur the pizza company has featured john schnatter as the face of the company and logos tv ads and packaging his face was off at least to some materials by late morning friday though the company said the details that exact timing for everything we're still being worked out the pizza chain said there are no plans to change its name schneider is still on the board and is the company's largest shareholder meaning he remains a key presence but the fallout from his comments has made it to the university of louisville the school said it'll remove the papa john's name from its football stadium and that it'll rename the john h natter center for free enterprise at its business college hi i'm making crane.

julian fellowes us tyler perry papa john the pizza company john schnatter schneider john h natter center emmy brian percival facebook university of louisville Three years
"julian fellowes" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"In the dj program jennifer victoria and i focusing on julian fellowes who created downton abbey he believes the crown deserves all the success it's enjoyed but there's part of the series that he didn't love he appeared in a podcast that katie couric dozen talk turned to the crown which is very popular service series that's on net flicks the dramatization of the british for families lives fellows praised the crown he's headquarters was very well done it was beautifully acted beautifully written for me i'm not completely comfortable with the dramatizing people who still jams has in lives of people who are still alive and still living their lives because anything is possible to be unfair and in the second season i didn't think it was fair to prince philip to the duke of edinburgh based on very little his life wasn't what was presented i get currently wasn't accurate second season of the crown focuses on the late nineteen fifties in the early nineteen sixties depicts both political upheaval and a strain on the marriage of the queen and her husband as to whether he believes the show to creative license with real events he says it's a tricky area i think a lot of it was based on obviously very good research but some of it was not coming was extrapolation from a rumor somebody's rather prejudiced account and it was presented as fact so did the queen and prince philip have a tough time in their marriage that's news to me but yeah interesting it's interesting that he says this because my mom watched season two of the crown and said that they got all the stuff with jackie o wrong and that they were just seem very sensational is to make it to make her look bad like the dumb american you didn't know protocols and stuff and it was just my mom really loves the series and said that the stuff in the second season it was like it was different writers or something it was very maybe they were trying to get splashy or something but it's funny that my mom had the same kind of feeling that he did yeah that's the one lithgow plays churchill in the crown right in season one he did yeah dead now right or he's retired by season two yeah all right music time florida georgia line this is big news jennifer dog euro festival they're having their inaugural f t l fasted indianapolis motor speedway september the eighth leading a lineup that includes nellie cole swindell ray lynn julian jacqueline jillian gillian jacqueline jackson yeah recognize any of these names nellie come on yeah nelly so stoked that f g l has taken him on for every show and they're you know i don't know if you guys remember but last summer i went to see nelly open for florida georgia line and they were fantastic i thought they did such a great job so it's kind of high energy they have the show they have the song together because nellie helps them do the remix of cruise which is like their biggest hit ever that was their breakthrough hit so yeah to bring them all together it's going to be way fun yeah coincides with the annual brickyard four hundred which is a nascar series race held at the indianapolis motor speedway continues along standing relationship between the race and the label it produces florida georgia line and other florida georgia line news jennifer they shared a video for their current single simple on friday simple is the lead single from their fourth studio album which has not yet been assigned a release date so big time news from florida georgia line at twenty eight after the hour sam.

jennifer victoria julian fellowes downton abbey
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

"The show that marriages even one which gives it a grownup storyline to go with the things that have come from the film and from the books school of wrote was different because schooner bro walson to book school wrote was an original script for a movie brilliant script and marvelous film about again the film was very much a jack black vehicle and we needed to make it a abroad thing and also i wanted us to get to know the children more than you do in the film so that it would know the children's parents you would know the predicament they're all battling against and all the rest of it and we would see you know a hundred things you can do wrong when you're bringing up a child you know which any parent is familiar with unusually guilty off i am and so that was a whole new dimension but it was again really to give it rolled appeal so that any age you know really i think from you know children can go to school of rock with their grandparents and their enough jokes and and enough things that will touch them they will have a good evening my kids are five and nine and we've now seen it i think five times in between new york and london now oh no i know every to every song really hate yeah hate for your tied you'll be really pleased they love me and i love it too i think it's great and the kids i mean one of the interesting thing was we we were amazed by how many children we found who could play these instruments and i mean and i say we it was all oversleep andrew lawrence were looking for them but we thought we would have to delay the opening in london because we wouldn't be able to find them actually we could have had another three costs you know and we had to put the audience clearly in the picture that the children were playing because we thought otherwise we're gonna think someone's playing the braille instrument in these don't have sound that's one of the most fun parts i think children are so talented on your your second second tops stuff and i mean incredible that's why andrew always says you know they are playing live i love that don't gel thank you very much for coming in we're gonna i'm going to have later i i'm worried she might take my job so i need to get out of here but we're gonna have you come in later jill to talk about how much you love the podcast before we go to modern times i i want to go back in time a bit and ask you how you feel about the crown because i i am almost as obsessed with the crown as i was doubt nappy and he thought he liked to but the crowd is a wonderful piece of work and a brilliant brilliant writing from peter morgan i know it's not about i wouldn't say that because i think it was very very well done it was beautifully acted beautifully written for me i'm not completely comfortable with dramatizing people who are still alive and still living their lives and an because i think it's possible to be unfair and in the second series i didn't think it was fair to prince philip the duke of edinburgh at based on very little now i will be punished for that because you know it's a great success in it deserves to be but i i don't know when people are still alive living their lives doing a good job and popular and loved do they deserve it and and in that sense i i'm not sure they do give sense that are do you believe that a lot of artistic license was taken in the story lines in terms of how these individuals have been portrayed in the series you'll guess he made to a tricky area here goodie i i think that a lot of it was based on of asleep very good research but some of it was not and some of it was extrapolation from a ruma oh someone's rather prejudice the cubs and then it was presented as fact and i i'm not show that joust let's move to content i'm a big fan of peter morgan i repeat that i think he's the best writer on television at the moment and you know is deservedly successful as far as i'm concerned certainly has a massive budget were you jealous of that i mean i.

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

"Was very it was season of what can contact his wonderful wonderful now but financial and bates tom courtney a very very rich crop but i was been more right for the generation per full the sort of role i could've in in the west end you know with actresses in white folks coming down the red cop and that wasn't the industry that i'd come into and i did find it very hard to break through that prejudice i mean i was once lectured by cost director at the national saying your kind we feel your kind of acta is happier in the west end now was when the director had asked for me and i thought well you know if the director also from and i don't get the job job i better try something different and so i went to california in fact in the end it was a californian in the person of robert altman who gave me my big writing break that's right i think i got you know he reached out of a different industry and gave me my break so i'm not sure it's completely change but it is now lusa than it used to be but anyway that was the reason i went to california and i had a very good time it was moments in my life really when i was up for a change my mother had just died of to reload on illness off to longtime with cancer and that was part of the reason i left the country i just thought well let's have a new start let's have a new beginning and do something different and i was in los angeles for about two and a half years but the problem was i kept getting work in england so i was always got flying back firing back vying back and flying back and in the end i thought i've got a better career in england i just have to get used to that and i remember what decided me resign wind up for a film called baby the secret of the lost legend this was the only unsuccessful dinosaur film anyway i tried to get an audition i read this part you in some breakdown and i thought this is dead right for me and i tried to get an audition in los angeles and they wouldn't see me and i then flew back to london for something else and my agent rang me and said it will while you're here i've got an audition for him called baby the secret of the low sledge and i i went up for it and i got the pot and i asked the direct but why wouldn't you see me in los angeles he said well we felt all the really good english actors we'd find in london so i though well i don't know what i'm doing la and that was when i came back but i enjoyed an actually when i got to hollywood i was doing television and little parts in tv movies and things i thought no this is what interests me i because i go to rehearsal for play i learned my lines i sit i play it it would either ron wouldn't run and that would be fine and i never got involved in the whole process but with phil i'd be sitting there and i think why is he taking that off the microphone weizhi putting that furry sock on it why is the lighting guy fiddling with the light now that it's a smaller tightest shot an i thought this is where i belong well clearly you did because when you were fifty two i guess you were asked to write the screenplay for gosford park by robert altman and i think you wrote it in six weeks time at least that's what i read or came back with a lot of pages maybe seventy five pages after six weeks and you presented them and bob balabagn who it was in the movie who we know a little bit from new york said it was just brilliant and here you were not super successful actor and you've got this new lease on by then i had running a very successful series sorry which china that into lauded with the making of goes for park and i took the oscar and i want it onto the set of monarch glenn and if you look very carefully there is a scene where molly is in the library at glen bogle an i come in to see her and the the lamp on the desk is a lamp shade an golden pair of legs coming out of the.

tom courtney six weeks
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

"Thought that would be fun to explore the american heiress but later when she lived the life in england and she had that thing which you see among all our friends where your children are different nationality from yourself and they have different prejudices and different assumptions and how do people deal with that which interests me anyway and so in that sense cora grantham was born at and then you know i don't know if you write for television but when you've started to imagine characters you have actually accepted the job even if you don't know it and so that's how it began and the relationship between cora and mary is so delicious because mary almost thinks of her own mother as unworthy of her class well that really came from a very grand english friend mind who spun in a great family and married into a great family and so that fabulous woman but she had had an american mother and i always noticed that when she spoke of her mother that was associated faint era of tolerance you know that she was a good woman at heart and must be forgiven a foley and and i show that came from having an american mother and as i watched it i found it so amusing that i thought when i was putting the series together that would be fun to mine there has been some criticism of course and it basically is that by showing the upper class as a sensually benevolent and kind and exhibiting sort of nostalgia for that period when people knew their place you were yourself sending a political message there's there's a labor leader in britain named francis o'grady who said unfortunately britain is becoming like downton abbey in the sense that the living standards of the vast majority are sacrificed to protect the high living of the well to do and in saying so he was he was criticizing downton really that was in the context of that so what what is your kind of response to a number of people who said that it wasn't perceived as equal the two classes will they weren t quill at that time i mean in terms of their intentions and character that you were essentially portraying the upper class as more sympathetically than the servants down soy just think that's true tool i like the servants more than often people's favorite characters and something like the romance of honor in bates was absolutely a seriously dramatized as the romance matthew and mary i i think that is false once i think is not false is that it wasn't an equal society and there is a limit to how much you can throw a kind of pink cloud over the past you you have to represent their values the contemporary values reasonably honestly i mean when totally with dealing with thomas's sexuality for instance we couldn't immediately have every sympathetic character saying this is great the house in nineteen twelve that wouldn't be their response and so what i strove for was to have some people who didn't mind like robots grantham oh mrs hughes kostin who was rather offended by the whole thing and so on so it would be reasonably balanced but i you know i think you abound to do that if you'll representing a period in history but i don't think it was a benevolent view i mean these i heard one guy on television in america say the terrible injustice of the show was that julian fellowes had portrayed the upper classes as likeable well you know that's just known since i mean in any group of people some people ally qabala some people are not some of them are good looking some not some of them are clever some of them are stupid and that's true of any class of any nationality of any religion of any social grouping you can find and the idea that one class is unlikable is reasonable as saying one people has rhythm one people is good with money it's all nonsense as and and so i would absolutely reject that one of the most moving i think many there are many moving moments in the series but they often occur when the two classes meet and in this scene that we're about to hear is when mary's husband matthew dies in a car crash as we mentioned and her butler carson consoles her let's listen.

england
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

"Being here i don't think you should say miss the judy lord i the say load fellows all julian fellowes okay try think would be more appropriate for the shaky life reshape that i need somebody like you around all the time so julian fellowes welcome to our podcast we are absolutely thrilled to have you thrilled to be here and we have so much to talk about because i'm obsessed with so many things that you do first off i miss lady mary and matthew crawley and edith and lord and lady grantham and anna and bates and carson do you of course i mean they they became so central to my life i'm in this went on for seven or eight years because it ran for six years and so they were by the end woven into the roof of my thinking you know and of course i mean i'm not mad they didn't become real you know but but but they acquire a kind of spurious reality to you and you want them to be happy and you want things to work out you know so it's i mean i i don't regret ending the show i think it's run its course and i think with all of these things well with everything in life you know you're you're aware of coming to the end of a chapter that you have enjoyed very much but it's time to move on and i think we got to that point the may be a film of course and what we're hearing i was i was worried it would go the way of sex and the city three which is often compared i'm sure i never criticize any else's work it is difficult to make bad film as it is to make a good one out i hope there is a film because i think it'd be a nice sort of bone bouche way of finishing and then everyone goes off and has the rest of their career can i ask a stupid question what is bombed bouche oats when you're finishing a feed and everything you put all the delicious bits together in one mouthful and finish it and then the players mt and is it a noun or a verb it's a noun and adjective bun good mouthful oh interesting sort of the opposite of a a moose bouche will i'm us girl is here we go a throat tick la which is how you begin the feed not an amazon bouche when i suppose people could use who's bush bit the normal phrase in france is misgar interesting i'm cave learn something well we have to getting back to fountain and i'm sure we're going to learn many other things from you julianne why in the world did matthew get killed off well darling matthew that you are going to i thought you were calling me darling everyone you know the first question i get asked is wide at math you have to die and the truth is dan stevens who is a lovely chat very very nice man and was wonderful this matthew about he felts that it was time for him to move on you see in england you can only get actors for three years before you have to renegotiate in america you tend to get in for five but here it's three an after the first three years you'll never get them for more than two so all the time your renegotiate it and matthew had been offered a dan had been offered a film and he'd been offered a play on broadway and deadly dunk and he decided it was time to move on my problem was that right from the beginning jessica brown findlay has said i'm doing three years and then that's it well when a seven character says that they get another job there's no problem of they go you know brand goes off to work for lady flintshire five goodbye but when a family member is never going to be seen again it's the grim reaper and so we did various bits of research and we discovered that eclampsia was still a big killer in the twenty s was only really in the thirties that they started to get on top of it as a condition and really in the twenties the only treatment was to have an early caesarean and even that was by no means always successful but once you had started to fit have fits than you were going to die and what i also discovered was that there was in many many many instances this false ending where you seemed all right the baby was born everything was fine and.

three years eight years six years
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Katie Couric

"Well brian this is it the last stop on our london tour and who better to close it out than the right honorable lord fellowes of west stafford say what katy don't be so day class say normally are i'm talking about julian fellowes the creator of one of my and i know your all time favorite tv shows downton abbey did ity doodoo doodoodoo that one that was your most during rendition yet you know my wife actually uses that as her ringtone so i hear fifteen times that's so funny and julian really is the man behind the show the only man he didn't have a writing stafford out and he penned every episode himself with a little help from his wife emma his preferred second reader brian now you and i are admittedly both very big fans and in fact my wife and i once hosted a premiere party at our home for down of course you did now i didn't have a party but i was equally obsessed and if you don't believe me i actually retreat breathed some of my live tweets from that era one was carson fetch me some brandy i'm retiring i must get some rest to face tomorrow by the way lady mary getting on my nerves hashtag doubt in pbs or please let there be good things in store for edith it's not going to find her a husband hashtag i need to get a life but i was really really into downton abbey so k one thing that really surprised me learn about julianne for all of his successes is these actually the quintessential late bloomer things really started to go his way when he wrote the screenplay for gosford park and won an oscar at fifty two so brian there so free oh yeah this is true and very encouraging as well okay we talked with julien about downton a lot and what it is about social class in the uk that fascinates him so much we also of course covered the royal wedding julian stint as a young actor in la and we even had our first ever live listener cameo that's right a shoutout to listener jill apple who asked lord julian kick ask question about his writing for the stage i'm really happy the chill got to join us and observe are making magic i wonder if she's less impressed or more impress now of ably the former meanwhile to kick things off i couldn't help myself and on behalf of of all you listeners who loved down to the abbey i had the spend the first several minutes gushing lear very thrilled to have you mr julian fellowes thank you very much for.

uk mr julian lord julian la royal wedding julian carson julian london jill apple stafford julien oscar gosford park julianne downton abbey brian emma
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Okay if you're just tuning in you're listening to q on cbc radio and pri public radio international speaking with lesley nicol currently play miss hannigan in any of the musical most of you listening wait no her as mrs patmore downton abbey did you have any idea how how big this show was going to know noto nobody julian fellowes who wrote every single word of it says if he if he knew if he knew it was going to be that kind of success he he would willingly right a string of them but he knows quite why did what it did globally in we'll ask the same question asked before when did you realize that this was bigger than just a television show it was a slow burn i suppose the first thing i remember happening that was kind of cute and but it kept happening was this is right the beginning of the first season we men would come running up to you and this isn't a british thing is you know what a bit reserved so that was unusual form lines we definitely do that always confident about going up to people in congratulating them yeah would run up and say my husband likes it on that was consistent on with them when when it came to america the funniest thing i heard was somebody said well my my brotherinlaw i mean he lives in seattle on the only what she's the super bowl and drinks beer and he won't have anybody come to the house on sunday night because he's addicted to downton abbey so that was the first kind of witness and then hugh bonneville who played lord grantham came to america quite early on and he came back and he said not going to believe what's going on the infusing hasim is astonishing and he went to the white house and some gathering the white house with elizabeth mcgovern and hillary clinton elbowed people out of the way across to tell him that the clintons would all sit there as a family in the pj's on sunday night and watch tonight bay.

lesley nicol hannigan downton abbey seattle hugh bonneville lord grantham america white house elizabeth mcgovern hillary clinton clintons mrs patmore noto
"julian fellowes" Discussed on Graham Norton

Graham Norton

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"julian fellowes" Discussed on Graham Norton

"Which i just don't know really initially round you to attribute such wisdom to me i'm coming back a lot of actors who in the running characters and getting all twentyfive of them whatever it was together because they're allstar style the roles you made allstars you made them stores well they made themselves styles mona mongolia you what are you to help and the costume department obviously but you helped beautifully out i think you help people by allowing them to show what they've got i don't think one should ever be confused you gave the what they've got because you didn't and as was you can't wait too long for this from can you i mean if if the longest a yuko topic is i think we'll because that they'll be so much older you out of this the downton exhibition going around the world just got back from singapore yesterday what you look well on it i was cutting the ribbon opening the down next sedition in this huge hotel on the bay was he need actually they donate brilliant they because you have some of the rooms rebuilt the kitchens to precautions pantry only stop rebuild the dining room of highclere other things had done with sort of ripping projection save sit in the room and it's the drawing room and then he suddenly isn't it sipple's bedroom and she's dying on your crying and all stop and then they've got about fifty of the costumes so fantastic operation and that's going on around the world so you know swat surreal actually that that is an odd thing that are an idea what you had years i want you are sitting on the eighth thirty one thinking what should we invent a certainly or opening an exhibition in singapore it is it's a kind of seven lease ride weld on you and congratulations on that aggression on the wind and the willows the musical which is now at the london palladium and it will be there until the ninth timber later this year at julian fellowes what a pleasure to be you thank you very much coming.

singapore london palladium julian fellowes swat